US20100279238A1 - Gas burner - Google Patents

Gas burner Download PDF

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US20100279238A1
US20100279238A1 US12387449 US38744909A US2010279238A1 US 20100279238 A1 US20100279238 A1 US 20100279238A1 US 12387449 US12387449 US 12387449 US 38744909 A US38744909 A US 38744909A US 2010279238 A1 US2010279238 A1 US 2010279238A1
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Prior art keywords
burner
gas
series
secondary
holes
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Abandoned
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US12387449
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Uwe Harneit
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DESIGNGASPARTS Inc
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Uwe Harneit
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D14/00Burners for combustion of a gas, e.g. of a gas stored under pressure as a liquid
    • F23D14/02Premix gas burners, i.e. in which gaseous fuel is mixed with combustion air upstream of the combustion zone
    • F23D14/04Premix gas burners, i.e. in which gaseous fuel is mixed with combustion air upstream of the combustion zone induction type, e.g. Bunsen burner
    • F23D14/06Premix gas burners, i.e. in which gaseous fuel is mixed with combustion air upstream of the combustion zone induction type, e.g. Bunsen burner with radial outlets at the burner head
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D14/00Burners for combustion of a gas, e.g. of a gas stored under pressure as a liquid
    • F23D14/46Details, e.g. noise reduction means
    • F23D14/62Mixing devices; Mixing tubes
    • F23D14/64Mixing devices; Mixing tubes with injectors
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23LSUPPLYING AIR OR NON-COMBUSTIBLE LIQUIDS OR GASES TO COMBUSTION APPARATUS IN GENERAL ; VALVES OR DAMPERS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR CONTROLLING AIR SUPPLY OR DRAUGHT IN COMBUSTION APPARATUS; INDUCING DRAUGHT IN COMBUSTION APPARATUS; TOPS FOR CHIMNEYS OR VENTILATING SHAFTS; TERMINALS FOR FLUES
    • F23L1/00Passages or apertures for delivering primary air for combustion 
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23LSUPPLYING AIR OR NON-COMBUSTIBLE LIQUIDS OR GASES TO COMBUSTION APPARATUS IN GENERAL ; VALVES OR DAMPERS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR CONTROLLING AIR SUPPLY OR DRAUGHT IN COMBUSTION APPARATUS; INDUCING DRAUGHT IN COMBUSTION APPARATUS; TOPS FOR CHIMNEYS OR VENTILATING SHAFTS; TERMINALS FOR FLUES
    • F23L9/00Passages or apertures for delivering secondary air for completing combustion of fuel 
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D2900/00Special features of, or arrangements for burners using fluid fuels or solid fuels suspended in a carrier gas
    • F23D2900/14Special features of gas burners
    • F23D2900/14062Special features of gas burners for cooking ranges having multiple flame rings
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D2900/00Special features of, or arrangements for burners using fluid fuels or solid fuels suspended in a carrier gas
    • F23D2900/14Special features of gas burners
    • F23D2900/14063Special features of gas burners for cooking ranges having one flame ring fed by multiple venturis
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D2900/00Special features of, or arrangements for burners using fluid fuels or solid fuels suspended in a carrier gas
    • F23D2900/14Special features of gas burners
    • F23D2900/14064Burner heads of non circular shape

Abstract

What is shown is an improved gas burner assembly that is easily adapted to attach to a range top or cooktop, or the floor of the range and can draw air from either above the range top level by external vents or from below range top level through an open style mixing cup. The improved gas burner assembly uses a plurality of flame rings providing the user a wide variety of temperature settings starting from a low intensity simmer to high intensity cooking heat. A gas transfer channel provides a sustaining ignition source. The gas transfer channel has sustaining flame buttons interior to the burner body, and provides the initial ignition for the main flame rings. The gas transfer channel additionally has slots that provide additional sustaining flames for the main flame rings located on the exterior of the burner body. The improved gas burner assembly additionally uses a cover plate of transparent or translucent, heat proof material that allows the user to observe the interior of the burner to which flame rings have ignited. The cover plate also transfers heat from the internal flame rings to the cooking utensil imparting a more uniform transfer of heat to the cooking utensil.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates to the field of gas burners that are used in the home. Specifically, these burners are used on surface units in household gas cooking appliances.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Atmospheric gas burners commonly used as surface units in household gas cooking appliances generally come in different sizes. The actual physical size of the burner as well as its energy output, which is referred to as BTU's, (British thermal units) are two of many design elements that are used to size the gas burners. The various burner sizes are needed to cook the myriad number of food items that are cooked in different sizes and shapes of cooking containers to satisfy the countless taste requirements of the population.
  • Gas burners have typically a maximum energy output, which is specified in BTU's, and a minimum energy output, also specified in BTU's. To regulate this energy output the gas flow to each burner is controlled by its own individual gas valve, usually one gas valve controls the gas flow to one gas burner. Manipulation of the burner's gas valve controls whether the burner is operating at its maximum or minimum energy output as well as an infinite number of adjustments between these extreme energy flows.
  • Generally, the current state of the art of surface mounted gas burners permit a minimum flow adjustment that is at fifteen percent (15%) of the maximum flow adjustment. There are burners, however, that have a minimum adjustment less than fifteen percent (15%) of the maximum flow adjustment and there also are burners that have a minimum energy flow setting that is greater than fifteen percent of the maximum flow adjustment. Therefore, in order to perform a cooking operation that requires a small BTU energy flow, such as melting chocolate without boiling and burning the chocolate, another burner is required that has a small burner body and its own discrete gas valve. That will make the low BTU energy flow requirement possible when the burner's valve is adjusted to its minimum flow setting.
  • The current state of the art in atmospheric gas burners for surface units of household cooking appliances limits the maximum and the minimum energy flows of the burner by the physical size of the burner body. A large burner body will allow a high BTU energy flow at the maximum flow setting of the burner valve and, although this high energy flow may be a desired feature, the large burner body required for this high energy flow limits low BTU energy flow at the minimum flow setting to a setting that may be higher than the desired cooking results.
  • In general, the current state of the art of surface mounted gas burners permit a minimum flow adjustment that is at fifteen percent (15%) of the maximum flow adjustment. There are burners, however, that have a minimum adjustment less than fifteen percent (15%), and there also are burners that have a minimum energy flow setting that is greater than fifteen percent (15%). In order to perform a cooking operation that needs a small BTU energy flow (low flame), such as the melting of chocolate (without boiling and burning the chocolate), the use of another burner with a small burner body and it's own discrete gas valve that will allow a low BTU energy flow, when the burner's valve is adjusted to it's minimum flow setting, would be required.
  • But the limit in BTU energy flow range remains dependent on the physical size of the burner body. A large burner body will allow a large BTU energy flow at the burner valve's maximum flow setting but limit the low BTU energy flow setting to a higher flow than desired for a particular cooking requirement. A burner with a small body may be able to give the desired low BTU energy flow setting when its gas valve is adjusted to the minimum flow setting, but in turn, limit the large BTU energy flow to a smaller flow than desired for a particular cooking requirement.
  • The following presents a summary of the invention, in order to provide a fundamental understanding of some of the features of the invention. This summary is not a broad overview of the invention. It's purpose is to present some concepts of the invention in a simplified form as a prelude to the more detailed description that is presented later.
  • In accordance with an aspect of the present invention, a burner assembly is presented with two separate burner bodies, an inner burner body and an outer burner body, where the inner burner body is centrally located within the burner assembly and also centrally located within the outer burner body.
  • In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, the centrally located burner body of the burner assembly is much smaller than the outer burner body. This difference in size makes it possible to have a greater range in maximum and minimum BTU energy output.
  • In accordance with yet another aspect of the present invention, the inner and outer burner bodies form an assembly that includes a top side, a bottom side, and a burner cap having a top side and a bottom side. The bottom side of the cap is configured to join with the top side of the outer burner body.
  • In accordance with a further aspect of the invention, a cover may be installed on the top side of the burner cap and above the inner burner body. This cover may have a transparent or translucent insert that allows the visual observation of the flame on the inner burner body. This cover, when installed, will also more evenly distribute and disperse the heat from the inner burner when the inner burner is operating by itself.
  • In accordance with yet a further aspect of the invention, the burner assembly includes a mixing cup with orifice fittings to supply gas to the two burner bodies. The mixing cup is in fluid communication with a gas valve that allows the regulation of a gas supply to both the inner and outer burner bodies and therefore regulate the maximum and minimum BTU energy output of both burner bodies.
  • Other objects, advantages, novel features and various ways in which the principles of the invention may be employed and the present invention is intended to include all such aspects and their equivalents will become apparent from the following detailed description of the invention when considered in conjunction with the drawings and appended claims accompanying the patent.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART
  • U.S. Pat. No. 7,040,890 B2 by Silvano Todoli May 9, 2006 describes a gas burner for domestic cooking appliances with a bowl-shaped body, a toothed crown with a plurality of flame ports and an upper cap. There is no mention of five flame rings, as in the current invention nor is there mention of a transparent, heat resistance portion of the burner cap, as in the current invention.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,991,454 B2 by Gore et al. Jan. 31, 2006 reveals a gas burner that simulates a wood burning fire, including a glowing ember effect. The current invention is designed for a conventional oven or range, not for a fireplace.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,951,455 B2 by Jacob Goldman Oct. 4, 2005 shows a system for utilizing a burner with pressurized gas and forced air to burn gas to provide heat for heating and drying purposes such as industrial kilns and drying furnaces. Again, the current invention is used with a gas oven or range found in a kitchen.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,939,126 B2 by Michael Boyes, Sep. 6, 2005 entitled “Gas Burner” describes a gas burner for use in a domestic heating appliance. Prior such devices were fabricated using welds, which fail over prolonged use. The current invention is not used for such domestic heating applications.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,830,045 B2 by Eddie Brock entitled “Gas Burner Module for a Cooking Appliance” shows a gas burner module having a base structure preferably formed from stamped steel upon which is secured at least one gas burner element and a gas orifice defining member in a predetermined alignment. The gas burner module is adapted to be mounted in an oven cavity. The current invention is designed for use on a range top and is substantially more complex than the Brock patent.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,780,009 B2 by Uwe Harneit entitled “Gas Burner Head Assembly” is an earlier patent designed by the inventor of the current patent. This invention has a burner head, a burner cap and a burner body, the burner head having 2 flame rings and one primary jet. The current invention has more than one flame ring, 2 primary jets and one secondary jet.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,764,303 B2 by Bernard Dane, et al. Jul. 20, 2004 entitled “Gas burner for a Cooker” reveals a gas burner for a cooker with a burner head having a frustoconical peripheral side wall and a multiplicity of slots forming flame orifices. This invention attempts to use the geometry of the frustoconical peripheral side to create two operating modes on the burner—a low setting, whereby the small flames remain contained beneath the cap and heat the cap to allow heat transfer to the cooking vessel, and a normal or high setting where the flames go around the cap and heat the cooking vessel directly. The current invention has several levels of settings due to the multiple flame rings not taught by this invention.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,736,631 by William Ferlin, et al. May 18, 2004 entitled “Sealed Gas Burner” teaches a sealed gas burner for a cooking range that has a venturi tube assembly which is attached directly to a range top of a cooking range. A burner cap releasably engages the burner cup and defines a plurality of burner ports. The burner ports can be cleaned by removing only the burner cap. This burner appears to only have one flame ring versus at least one main flame ring, and at least 2 secondary flame rings on the current invention. This invention is also permanently mounted to the range top, whereas the current invention can be removed.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,712,605 B2 by Paolo Moresco Mar. 30, 2004 entitled “Gas Burner for a Cooking Hob” shows a gas burner for a cooking hob that comprises a burner body with a plurality of openings for air; a flame dividing element which defines a gas injector, in conjunction with the burner body and air/gas mixing chamber, for injecting gas into the mixing chamber and a converging/diverging duct that defines a Venturi tube downstream of the gas injector for drawing air into the mixing chamber. The burner body, the flame-dividing element and the converging/diverging duct are in the form of a pressed sheet-metal casing. The current invention differs from this invention by consisting of a mixing cup, a burner body with at least one main flame ring, and at least 2 secondary flame rings and a burner cap, all of which are fabricated as separate components.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,679,699 B2 by Bernard Dane, et. al. Jan. 20, 2004 entitled “Gas burner for a Cooker” is similar to U.S. Pat. No. 6,764,303 B2 by Bernard Dane, et. al. Jul. 20, 2004 entitled “Gas burner for a Cooker” mentioned above by the same inventor. This invention also is limited to fewer settings than the current invention as mentioned supra.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,132,205 by Uwe Harneit by the same inventor as the current invention, describes a burner assembly with 3 flame rings and easy replacement of the gas jets without having to remove the unit from the appliance. The current invention is an improvement on this burner by including more flame rings and a see through window on top of the burner so a cook can see if the burner is active.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,067,978 by Erich J. Schlosser et al. May 30, 2000 entitled “Outdoor Cooking Apparatus with Improved Auxiliary Gas Burner” is an invention for a complete barbeque grill comprising a grilling housing and a gas burner mounted adjacent the grilling housing. The gas burner includes a burner body having a base chamber, a burner head having at least one air and fuel mixture exit port and venturii providing a passage between the burner head and the burner body for the air/fuel mixture. The current invention incorporates at least one main, and at least 2 secondary sets of holes for the flame rings. Also the current invention does not have a see through port on its burner cap as does the current invention.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The invention is better understood by studying the cited embodiment illustrated in the appended drawings. These drawings depict only typical embodiments of the invention and are not therefore to be considered to be limiting of its scope. The invention will be described and explained with additional specificity and detail through the use of the accompanying drawings:
  • Figure one shows an exploded view of the top flow burner assembly.
  • Figure two shows a side view of the top flow burner assembly.
  • Figure three shows a top view of the top flow burner assembly.
  • Figure four shows a first cross section of the top flow burner assembly.
  • Figure five shows a second cross section of the top flow burner assembly.
  • Figure six shows a perspective view of the internal structure of the mixing cup for the top flow burner assembly.
  • Figure seven shows an exploded view of the bottom flow burner assembly.
  • Figure eight shows a side view of the bottom flow burner assembly.
  • Figure nine shows a top view of the bottom flow burner assembly.
  • Figure ten shows a first cross section of the bottom flow burner assembly.
  • Figure eleven shows a second cross section of the bottom flow burner assembly.
  • Figure twelve shows a perspective view of the internal structure of the mixing cup for the bottom flow burner assembly.
  • Figure thirteen shows the flame ring intensity using varied step positions.
  • Figure fourteen A (14A) shows a detail view of the burner cap assembly, burner body interface, and flame rings of the outer burner showing the gas transfer conduit.
  • Figure fourteen B (14B) shows another detail view of the gas transfer conduit.
  • Figure fourteen C (14C) shows yet another detail view of the gas transfer conduit.
  • Figure fifteen A (15A) shows a bottom view of the burner body for a top flow burner in perspective.
  • Figure fifteen B (15B) shows a bottom view of the burner body for a bottom flow burner in perspective.
  • Figure sixteen shows a side view of the burner body.
  • Figure seventeen shows a top view of the burner body.
  • Figure eighteen shows a bottom perspective view of the secondary burner.
  • Figure nineteen shows a side view of the secondary burner.
  • Figure twenty A (20A) shows an exploded view of the burner cap assembly with a cover plate.
  • Figure twenty B (20B) shows an exploded view of the burner cap assembly with an insert.
  • Figure twenty C (20C) shows a perspective view of a simple burner cap.
  • Figure twenty D (20D) shows an exploded view of the burner cap assembly with a square insert.
  • Figure twenty E (20E) shows an exploded view of the burner cap assembly with a square insert and separate legs.
  • Figure twenty F (20F) shows an exploded view of burner cap assembly with a round insert.
  • Figure twenty-one A (21A) shows a cover plate with a circular cutout.
  • Figure twenty-one B (21B) shows a cover plate with a star shaped cutout.
  • Figure twenty-two shows a side view of the burner body for a reduced height burner.
  • Figure twenty-three shows a top perspective view of the burner body for a reduced height burner.
  • Figure twenty-four shows a top perspective view of another reduced height burner body.
  • Figure twenty-five shows a top perspective view of a burner body having six sides.
  • Figure twenty-six shows a top perspective view of a simple burner cap having six sides.
  • Figure twenty-seven shows a top perspective view of a burner cap assembly having six sides and an insert.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • FIG. 1 shows an exploded view of the top flow gas burner assembly or burner assembly (100). With respect to FIG. 1, a gas burner assembly (100) is shown. The gas burner assembly (100) consists of a mixing cup (1), a burner body (2), a burner cap assembly (3), and a secondary burner (33), and an ignition electrode (56). FIG. 2 shows that the mixing cup (1) is generally attached either to a transverse member of an appliance or the base and/or the top (5) of the appliance. The burner body (2) is shown resting on the mixing cup (1). The burner body (2) is placed offsettedly from the mixing cup (1) creating an open air passage or primary air slot (15). The primary air slot (15) allows air into a primary air inlet chamber (9). FIG. 1 shows that there are at least two primary air inlet chambers (9) that feed a main burner chamber (35) that feed a first, and second flame ring or slot (21,22) as shown in FIG. 4.
  • A cover plate (6) is mounted on top of the burner cap assembly (3). The number of flame rings that are necessary on an outer wall (181) of the main burner chamber (35) can be modified so as to provide the proper BTU capacity by revising the cross sectional area of a first slot or hole (21 a) for the main flame ring (21) as shown in FIG. 2. In all cases there must be at least one flame ring (21) or slot (21 a) that provides the high intensity BTU requirement. In FIG. 4 the burner body (2) is shown having a protruding edge (27) wherein the protruding edge (27) directs debris and spillover from cooking away from the mixing cup (1) and onto the appliance top (5).
  • Figure six and FIG. 4 shows two primary air inlet chambers (9), which are located in the outer portions of the mixing cup (1). In FIG. 4 the mixing cup (1) has a gas supply tube (16) defined in the bottom portion of the mixing cup (1). A gas supply line (17) is shown attached to one end of the gas supply tube (16) and provides flammable gas. The opposing end of the gas supply tube (16) is shown having as not being drilled through, but the opposing end of the gas supply tube (16) may also be adapted to accept a plug (19) (as shown in FIG. 2) to close off the gas supply tube (16). At least two main gas jets (11) are shown communicating with the gas supply tube (16) allowing the gas fuel to pass therethrough and into the primary inlet chamber (9).
  • Since common construction of the main gas jets (11) have the sizes of the orifices or primary gas flow openings (41) small in diameter, the velocity of the incoming fuel causes a low pressure zone, thereby suctioning the surrounding air and mixing it with the fuel.
  • In FIG. 4, positioned above each primary gas jet (11), is a primary gas mixing chamber (13). The primary gas mixing chamber (13) is offsettedly placed above the primary jet (11) creating a gap (38) thereby allowing the surrounding air to be mixed with the flammable gas therein. The primary gas mixing chamber (13) directs the fuel air mixture into a main burner chamber (35). The main burner chamber (35) may be of any geometric shape, but as disclosed in figures one through twenty-six (26) of the instant invention, circular. Figures twenty five (25) through twenty seven (27) shows the main burner chamber (35) and the burner assembly (100) may be of any shape desired.
  • In FIG. 1 the outer wall (181) of the main burner chamber (35) has at least a first series of holes or slots (21 a) creating at least a first flame ring (21). The drawings disclose a first and second series of holes or slots (21 a, 22 a) creating a first and second flame ring (21, 22) defined therethrough. The first series of holes or slots (21 a) are larger than the second series (22 a) of holes and may be slots as shown in the drawings the slots or first series of holes (21 a) being located on an upper portion (106) of the burner body (2). The first series of holes or slots (21 a) provide for a flame that produces a higher BTU range than of the second series of holes (22 a) alone.
  • In FIG. 1 the main burner chamber (35) has at least one third hole or slot (23 a) defined at the top (78) of an inner wall (34), which creates a sustaining flame button (23) as shown in FIG. 5. The third hole or slot (23 a) is of a small diameter so as to create a very small sustaining flame button (23). The third hole or slot (23 a) is located on the upper portion (78) of the burner body (2). The first and second series of holes (21 a, 22 a), and the third hole or slot (23 a) all communicate with the main burner chamber (35) and provide an ignitable gas-air mixture. The bottom of the burner cap (74) is shaped similarly to the upper portion (106) of the burner body (2) and covers the main burner chamber (35).
  • In FIGS. 1 and 7 the burner cap assembly (3) therefore has a centrally located opening (224) theredefined. The cover plate (6) may have a centrally located hole or opening (256) theredefined.
  • In FIG. 4 a secondary inlet chamber (10) is interposed between the primary inlet chambers (9). In FIG. 5 a secondary gas transfer tube (20) is defined in the mixing cup (1) and communicates with the secondary gas supply line (58) and the secondary inlet chamber (10). The secondary gas transfer tube (20) is adapted to receive a secondary gas line (58) which provides flammable gas thereby. The mixing cup (1) is shown with a central hole (26) wherein the central hole (26) communicates with the secondary gas transfer tube (20) and the secondary inlet chamber (10).
  • FIG. 5 shows a secondary jet (12) inserted into the central hole (26) of the secondary gas transfer tube (20). The present invention shows that the burner body (2) has a first and second air slot (28, 29) defined therein. However, the burner body (2) may have one or more air slots defined therein. In FIG. 1 the burner body (2) further has a central cavity (102) defined therein, where the central cavity (102) is surrounded by an inner wall (34) of the burner body (2). The central cavity (102) communicates with the surrounding atmosphere via at least one air slot (28). In FIG. 1, the drawings disclose that the central cavity (102) communicates with the surrounding atmosphere via the first and second air slots (28, 29). The secondary inlet chamber (10) draws air from the primary air slot (15) previously defined. As shown in FIG. 4, the secondary jet (12) is shown centrally positioned in the gas burner assembly (100).
  • Figure fourteen A (14A) displays the geometry of the required gas transfer channel (54). The gas transfer channel (54) allows the central cavity (102) of the burner body (2) to communicate with the exterior of the burner body (2), providing a flammable gas/air mixture to thusly provide a sustaining flame (24) for the first and second flame rings (21, 22). In the present invention the sustaining flame buttons (23) are located in close proximity to the gas transfer channel (54) and communicate with the main burner chamber (35). The location of the sustaining flame buttons (23) provide an ignition source for the gas/air mixture that is present within the gas transfer channel (54) and ignites the first flame ring (21). At least one sustaining flame hole or slot (24 a) is provided between the main burner chamber (35) and the gas transfer channel (54). The gas transfer channel (54) is thusly isolated from the main burner chamber (35) excepting the sustaining flame slot or hole (24 a) and a small gap (7) positioned between the bottom of the burner cap (74) and an upper wall of the transfer channel (54) which allows a small amount of communication between the main burner chamber (35) and the gas transfer channel (54) creating a sustaining flame (24) for the first flame ring (21).
  • FIG. 14B displays a different geometry of the required gas transfer channel (54). In this case, a gas transfer channel (54) passes through the air slot (261) defined herein and may not be separated from air slot (261) by a wall. The upper wall of the gas transfer channel (54) may also have one or more flame buttons (64) to provide an additional ignition source for the gas/air mixture. That exits through the gas transfer channel (54) and ignites the first flame ring (21).
  • The burner body (2) may have one or more of the required transfer channels (54). Figures eighteen and nineteen (18, 19) disclose the structure of a secondary burner (33). A secondary transfer tube (31) is attached to a spherically convex base (30) of the burner body (2) and terminates in an end cap (32). The end cap (32) has a diameter larger than that of the secondary transfer tube (31). At the interface of the end cap (32) and the secondary transfer tube (31), a small groove (52) is defined therein. Additionally, at the interface of the end cap (32) and the secondary transfer tube (31) a fifth series of holes (25 a) define a fifth flame ring (25). There is at least 1 hole (25 a) defined. The hole (25 a) communicates with the secondary transfer tube (31) and a secondary mixing chamber (14), and allows a fuel/air mixture to pass therethrough.
  • The secondary burner (33) additionally has a sixth series of holes (104) defined. The sixth series of holes (104) communicate with the gas transfer tube (31) and allow the fuel/air mixture to pass therethrough, adding to the fifth flame ring (25). The fuel/air mixture also is captured by the groove (52) creating a sustaining flame thereby. The secondary burner (33) is positioned over the secondary jet (12) and the secondary inlet chamber (10). With the end cap (32) having a diameter larger than the secondary transfer tube (31), the fifth series of holes (25 a), sixth series of holes (104), and the small groove (52) located in the secondary transfer tube (31) will not be clogged with debris.
  • FIGS. 1, 7, 18, and 19 show the secondary burner (33) has a ring (94) defined thereon, where the ring (94) fits within a corresponding hole (96) centrally defined within the burner body (2). The hole (96) is defined within a conical or spherically convex base (30). The conical or spherically convex base (30) allows liquid or solid debris to be carried from the secondary burner (33) through air slots (28, 29) to the appliance cook top (5) and not fall through into the oven/range. Fasteners (98) securely hold the secondary burner (33) onto the burner body (2).
  • FIGS. 1 and 7 show the main burner chamber (35) is covered by the burner cap (75). The burner cap (75) has a top side (88) and a bottom side (74) where the bottom side (74) has the same shape as the upper portion (106, 78) of the burner body (2). The bottom side (74) of the burner cap (75) provides a leak proof fit with the burner body (2) when mated with the upper portion of the burner body (106, 78). The burner cap (75) generally is made from a material dense enough to provide sufficient weight to the burner cap assembly (3) to prevent dislocation of the burner cap (75) from the burner body (2), and to prevent the pressure within the main burner chamber (35) from dislocating the burner cap (75).
  • FIGS. 1 and 4 show the bottom side (74) of the burner cap (75) has a downward protruding boss (76) that is adapted to fit inside an inner wall (34) of the main burner chamber (35) of the burner body (2) positionally locating the burner cap (75). A plurality of upward protruding bosses (80) on the top side (88) of the burner cap (75) creates a planar surface for the cover plate (6) to rest upon. The placement of the cover plate (6) on the bosses (80) creates a gap (81) between the cover plate (6) and the burner cap (75). Each boss (80) has a through hole (82) defined therethrough to allow each of a plurality of fasteners (84) to securely hold the cover plate (6) in place.
  • FIGS. 1, 20D, 20E, 20F, 21A and 21B show that the cover plate (6) may be shaped similarly or differently to the burner body (2). The cover plate (6) is made from a dense material, that may or may not have one or more differently shaped openings, or as disclosed a centrally positioned hole (256) defined therein. In FIG. 4 the cover plate (6) additionally has a channel (36) defined therein circumventing the opening (256) therein, which would allow a burner insert (4) to rest therein. The burner insert (4) may be made as a complete metallic structure, or as the preferred embodiment a transparent or translucent heat resistant structure. The burner insert (4) is shown mounted upon the cover plate (6) allowing visual observation of the flame of the secondary burner (33). The present invention discloses the plurality of upward protruding bosses (80) securing the burner insert (4) into the channel (36). An advantage of using the cover plate (6) is that no direct flame is used for cooking. The flame heats the cover plate (6) which then evenly heats the cookware preventing any severe hot spots on the cookware. The burner cap (75) has a top side (88).
  • As shown in FIG. 6 the mixing cup (1), depending upon the volume of gas flow may or may not be equipped with vertical flanges (40) that separate the primary and secondary air inlet chambers (9, 10), and prevent them from drawing air from each other. FIGS. 15A and 15B show the burner body (2) has vertical locators (42) where each vertical locator (42) has extensions (39) on their side edges that positionally locate the burner body (2) in the mixing cup (1). As seen in FIG. 4 the vertical locators (42) and their extensions (39) reach into the primary air inlet chamber (9) and prevent sideways tipping of the burner body (2) over the mixing cup (1). The vertical locators (42) and their extensions (39) provide the secure centering of the primary jets (11) and therefore the primary gas flow opening (41), to the primary gas mixing chamber (13) and respectively the secondary jet (12) and secondary gas flow opening (44), to a secondary mixing chamber (14).
  • In FIG. 5 an ignition electrode (56) is inserted through the mixing cup (1) and the burner body (2) and positioned in close proximity to the end cap (32) of the secondary burner (33). The ignition electrode (56) is inserted through the mixing cup (1) where an externally threaded slotted round nut (48) secures the ignition electrode (56) to the mixing cup (1). This allows the ignition electrode (56) to provide a spark to ignite the gas-air mixture exiting the secondary burner (33).
  • The ignition electrode (56) in FIG. 5 has shoulder (45) with which it is set in a first stepped hole (46) from the upper side of the mixing cup (1). As in FIG. 6, a second stepped hole (47) is located above the first stepped hole (46) with tapped threading. After the ignition electrode (56) is set in the first stepped hole (46), it is fastened with an externally threaded slotted round nut (48). An ignition wire (49) running in the interior of the ignition electrode (56) has a terminal (43) attached on one side and on the upper side has an ignition plate (50). Material for the ignition wire (49) and the ignition plate (50) are plasma welded together and the same material is used for both of them.
  • Ignition wires (49) in electrodes that are found in the industry today are partly fabricated from stainless steel. Stainless steel is known to be heat resistant to 1850° F. Another material commonly used for the ignition wires is ferritic FeCrAl alloy, which is known to be heat resistant to 2370° F. A well-known problem with stainless steel is that when stainless steel comes into contact with a salt solution, it begins to show signs of corrosion. Stainless steel is currently known to be used for the ignition plate (50) on “standard igniters.” The standard method of construction used in the industry is to either rivet or weld the ignition plate (50) and the ignition wire (49) together.
  • It is known in the engineering and scientific communities that stainless steel and FeCrAl alloys have different coefficients of expansion. Because of this, the cycling of heat and cold will eventually break the weld and allow corrosion to form between the ignition plate (50) and the ignition wires (49). By using only high value FeCrAl alloy both for ignition wire (49) and ignition plate (50) (with a melting point of over 2700° F., the ignition plate (50) and the ignition wire (49) are plasma welded together. This will prevent the current problem of the welds cracking due to different coefficients of expansion.
  • A method of equalizing the gas pressure and hereby equalizing the flame size circumferentially, is as follows and shown in FIG. 16. The outer wall (181) of the main burner chamber (35) has a seventh series of holes or slots (112) defined therein. The seventh series of slots or holes (112) have cross sectional areas that is less than that of the first series of slots or holes (21 a) defined in the burner body (2). The seventh series of holes or slots (112) is also located towards the upper portion (106) of the burner body (2). Interspaced between each of the seventh series of slots (112) and first series of slots (21 a) is an eighth series of slots or grooves (114), the eighth series of grooves (114) allowing a flammable gas-air mixture to exit the main burner chamber (35) and provide a continuous flame for the first flame ring (21) (not shown). Situated below the eighth series of grooves (114) may be a ninth series of holes (116). The ninth series of holes (116) provide additional flammable gas-air for the first flame ring (21) (not shown). This makes the first flame ring (21) circumferentially continuous.
  • It is general practice to define the positional location of the first and second series of holes or slots (21 a, 22 a,) in angular measures. This would also be true of the eighth series of grooves (114), the ninth series of holes (116), and the seventh series of holes or slots (112). For illustrative purposes, the invention depicts the first series of holes or slots (21 a) and the seventh series of slots (112) being separated by ten degrees (10°). The second series of holes (22 a) is also shown in ten degree (10°) separation, but second series of holes (22 a) is offset five degrees (5°) from the first series of slots (21 a). The eighth series of grooves (114) is shown offset by five degrees (5°) from the first series of holes (21 a).
  • In practice, the gas burner assembly (100) operates as follows and is shown in Figure thirteen (13). A user will turn the gas supply knob to a first position, allowing gas fuel to enter through the secondary gas transfer tube (20) and through the secondary jet (12) and the secondary inlet chamber (10) mixing with the air. The pressure from the gas line will allow the flammable gas-air mixture to flow through the secondary transfer tube (31) and then be ignited at the fifth series of holes (25 a) creating the fifth flame ring (25)—FIG. 13 step 1. This will create a very low BTU flame. As the user turns the gas supply knob further (typically counterclockwise), the control knob will first be at a maximum setting where the gas fuel will flow into the gas supply tube (16), then through the main gas jets (11). The pressured gas will mix with the air in the primary air inlet chamber (9) and then be transferred through the primary gas mixing chamber (13) into the main burner chamber (35). The emerging gas-air mixture for the third flame or sustaining flame button (23) comes from the main burner chamber (35) and is ignited by the fifth flame ring (25). The sustaining flame slot (24 a) allows communication between the main burner chamber (35) and the gas transfer channel (54). A flammable gas/air mixture exits through the sustaining flame slot (24 a) into the gas transfer channel (54) and is ignited by the sustaining flame button (23 a). The ignited gas/air mixture will flow through the gas transfer channel (54) and provide an ignition source for the first and second flame rings (21, 22) creating a high BTU flame—FIG. 13 step 2. While there is flammable gas within the main burner chamber (35) the sustaining flame buttons (23) will remain “lit”. The sustaining flame hole (24 a) provides a constant source of ignition for the first and second flame rings (21, 22). All primary air needed for the correct combustion of the gas mixture enters through the primary air slot (15). Continuing to rotate the control knob reduces the amount of gas until a minimum setting is achieved, on the first and second flame rings (21, 22)—FIG. 13 step 3. Further rotation of the control know will shut off gas flow to the main gas jets (11) extinguishing the first and second flame rings (21, 22) and leaving only the fifth flame ring (25) lit—FIG. 13 step 4. Further rotation of the control know to its end position will also reduce gas flow to the fifth flame ring (25) to its minimum flow—FIG. 13 step 5.
  • Another style of cook top allows air to flow to the burner from the inside of the cooking device. As shown in FIGS. 7 through 12, a mixing cup (1) is provided. As seen in FIG. 10, the mixing cup (1) comprises the following elements. A gas supply line (17) is shown attached to a gas supply tube (16). The gas supply tube (16) is shown as linear. The gas supply tube (16) has a first end (204) and a second end (206).
  • In FIGS. 7 and 12, the mixing cup (1) has at its top an attachment plate (212) where the attachment plate (212) has an outer perimeter (214) and an inner open cavity (216) defined therein. An upwards protruding boss (218) is shown surrounding the inner cavity (216) and is adapted to loosely fit within a pre-defined hole in a cook top (not shown). A central boss (222) is positioned on the gas supply tube (16) and has a transverse boss (225) that protrudes from the central boss (222) and has a secondary gas transfer tube (20) defined therein. The secondary gas transfer tube (20) has an inlet (228) that is adapted to receive a gas line (not shown).
  • In FIG. 10, at least two main gas jets (11) is placed in close proximity to the first end (204) and second end (206), where each main gas jet (11) communicates with the gas supply tube (16) in order to supply gaseous fuel to the mixing cup (1). FIG. 11 shows a secondary jet (12) placed on a top surface (236) of the transverse boss (224) communicating with the secondary gas transfer tube (20) thereby. In FIG. 10, the secondary jet (12) is shown enclosed with vertical flanges (238, 242). An ignition electrode mounting plate (51) is shown having a central hole (246) defined therein in FIG. 12.
  • In FIG. 8, the burner body (2) is shown resting on the mixing cup (1). Positioned above each main gas jet (11) is a primary gas mixing chamber (13). The primary gas mixing chamber (13) directs the fuel air mixture into a main burner chamber (35). As in FIG. 25, the main burner chamber (35) may be any geometric shape, but as disclosed in the drawings of the instant invention, circular. FIG. 8, depicts an outer wall (181) of the main burner chamber (35) has first series of slots or holes (21 a) creating a first flame ring (21) therethrough. The outer wall (181) of the main burner chamber (35) may additionally have a second series of slots or holes (22 a) defined therethrough creating a second flame ring (22). The first series of slots (21 a) are larger than the second series of slots (22 a) and may be defined as holes as shown in the drawings. The first series of holes or slots (21 a) provide for a flame that produces a higher BTU range than of the second series of holes (22 a) alone. The number of flame rings that are necessary on the outer wall (181) of the main burner chamber (35) can be modified so as to provide the proper BTU capacity by revising the cross sectional area of the slot or hole (21 a) for the main flame ring (21).
  • As shown if FIGS. 7, and 11, the main burner chamber (35) has at least one third hole or slot (23 a) defined on an inner wall (78), which creates a third flame button (23). The third hole or slot (23 a) is also located on the upper portion (78) of the burner body (2). The first, second and third, series of holes (21 a, 22 a, 23 a) all communicate with the main burner chamber (35) and provide a gas-air mixture to be ignited. The bottom (74) of the burner cap assembly (3) is shaped similarly to the upper portion (106) of the burner body (2) and covers the main burner chamber (35). The cover plate (6) therefore may have a centrally located hole (256) theredefined.
  • FIGS. 7 and 11 shows that the burner body (2) has a first and second air slot (28, 29) defined therein, however, the burner body (2) may have one or more air slots (28, 29) defined therein. The burner body (2) further has an annular central cavity (102) defined therein, where the annular central cavity (102) is surrounded by an inner wall (34) of the burner body (2). The annular central cavity (102) communicates with the surrounding atmosphere via the first and second air slots (28, 29). The secondary jet (12) is shown centrally positioned in mixing cup (1) of the gas burner assembly (100A).
  • Figure fourteen A (14A) displays the geometry of the required gas transfer channel (54). The gas transfer channel (54) allows the central cavity (102) of the burner body (2) to communicate with the exterior of the burner body (2), providing a flammable gas/air mixture to thusly provide a sustaining flame (24) for the first and second flame rings (21, 22) (not shown). In the present invention the sustaining flame buttons (23) are located in close proximity to the gas transfer channel (54), and communicate with the main burner chamber (35) (not shown). The location of the sustaining flame buttons (23) provide an ignition source for the gas/air mixture that is present within the gas transfer channel (54) and ignites the first flame ring (21) (not shown). At least one sustaining flame hole or slot (24 a) is provided between the main burner chamber (35) and the gas transfer channel (54). The gas transfer channel (54) is thusly isolated from the main burner chamber (35) excepting the sustaining flame slot(s) (24 a) which allows a small amount of communication between the main burner chamber (35) and the gas transfer channel (54) creating a sustaining flame (24) for the first flame ring (21).
  • FIGS. 18 and 19 show that the secondary burner (33) is structured as follows: a secondary transfer tube (31) is attached to a spherically convex base (30) (not shown), and terminates in an end cap (32). The end cap (32) has a diameter larger than that of the secondary transfer tube (31). At the interface of the end cap (32) and the secondary transfer tube (31), a small groove (52) is defined therein. Additionally, at the interface of the end cap (32) and the secondary transfer tube (31) a fifth series of holes (25 a) defines a fifth flame ring (25). There is at least 1 hole (25 a) defined. The holes (25 a) communicate with the secondary transfer tube (31), and allow a fuel/air mixture to pass therethrough.
  • The secondary burner (33) additionally has a sixth series of holes (104) defined. The sixth series of holes (104) communicate with the secondary gas transfer tube (31) and allow the fuel/air mixture to pass therethrough adding to the fifth flame ring (25). The fuel/air mixture also is captured by the groove (52) creating a sustaining flame thereby. The secondary burner (33) is positioned over the secondary jet (12) and therefore the secondary inlet chamber (222), as shown in FIG. 10.
  • Since the end cap (32) has a diameter larger than the secondary transfer tube (31), the fifth series of holes (25 a), sixth series of holes (104), and the small groove (52) located in the secondary transfer tube (31) will not be clogged with debris.
  • Continuing with FIGS. 7 and 19, the secondary burner (33) has an annular ring (94) defined thereon, where the annular ring (94) fits within a corresponding annular hole (96) centrally defined within the burner body (2). The annular hole (96) is defined within conical or spherically convex base (30). The conical or spherically convex base (30) defines a slope that allows liquid or solid debris to be carried from the secondary burner (33) to the appliance cook top (5) through air slots (28, 29) and not fall through into the oven/range. Fasteners (98) (FIG. 7) securely hold the secondary burner (33) onto the burner body (2).
  • FIGS. 7 and 10 show that the main burner chamber (35) is covered by the burner cap (75). The burner cap (75) has a top side (88) and a bottom side (74) where the bottom side (74) is shaped as the upper portion (106) of the burner body (2). The bottom side (74) of the burner cap (75) when joined with the upper portion (106) of the burner body (2) provides a leak proof fit for the gas-air mixture. The burner cap (75) generally is made from a material dense enough to provide sufficient weight to the burner cap assembly (3) to prevent dislocation of the burner cap (75) from the burner body (2), and to prevent the pressure within the,main burner chamber (35) from dislocating the burner cap (75).
  • The bottom side (74) of the burner cap (75) has a downward protruding boss (76) that is adapted to fit inside the inner wall (34) of the main burner chamber (35) of the burner body (2). A plurality of upward protruding bosses (80) on the top side (88) of the burner cap (75) creates a planar surface for a cover plate (6), as shown in FIG. 20D, to rest upon. The placement of the cover plate (6) on the bosses (80) creates a gap (81) between the cover plate (6) and the burner cap (75). Each boss (80) has a through hole (82) defined therethrough to allow each of a plurality of fasteners (84) to securely hold the cover plate (6) in place.
  • The cover plate (6) may be shaped similarly or differently to the burner body (2). The cover plate (6) is made from a dense material, that may have one or more differently shaped openings or holes (256) defined therein. The cover plate (6) additionally has a channel (36) defined therein circumscribing the opening(s) (256), which would allow a burner insert (4) to rest therein. The burner insert (4) may be made as a complete metallic structure, or as the preferred embodiment a transparent or translucent heat resistant structure. The burner insert (4) is shown mounted upon the cover plate (6) allowing visual observation of the flame of the secondary burner (33). FIG. 20D shows the plurality of upward protruding bosses (80) is shown securing the burner insert (4) into the channel (36). An advantage of using the cover plate (6) is that no direct flame is used for cooking. The flame heats the cover plate (6) which then evenly heats the cookware preventing any severe hot spots on the cookware. The burner cap (75) has a top side (88).
  • The burner body (2) additionally has vertical locators (42) where each vertical locator (42) has extensions (39) on their side edges that positionally locate the burner body (2) in the modified mixing cup (1). The vertical locators (42) and their extensions (39) are adapted to slide alongside the vertical flanges (238, 242) of the mixing cup (1), and prevent sideways tipping of the burner body (2) over the mixing cup (1). The mixing cup (1) is secured to the cooktop or range. The burner body (2) is placed upon the mixing cup (1) sealing the cooktop and preventing air, spilled food and debris from entering the interior of the cooktop or range. This forces the burner assembly (100A) to draw air from the interior of the cooktop or range.
  • The upwards protruding boss (218) has a first, and second slot, (248, 250) defined therein, where the first, and second slots (248, 250) are adapted to position the vertical locators (42) of the burner body (2) therein. The vertical locators (42) and their extensions (39) provide the secure centering of the primary jets (11) and therefore the primary gas flow opening (41), to the primary gas mixing chamber (13) and respectively the secondary jet (12) and secondary gas flow opening (44), to the secondary mixing chamber (14).
  • A method of equalizing the gas pressure and hereby equalizing the flame size circumferentially, is as follows and shown in FIGS. 16 and 17. The outer wall (181) of the main burner chamber (35) has a seventh series of holes or slots (112) defined therein. The seventh series of slots or holes (112) have cross sectional areas that is less than that of the first series of slots or holes (21 a) defined in the burner body (2). The seventh series of holes or slots (112) are also located towards the upper portion (106) of the burner body (2). Interspaced between each of the seventh series of holes or slots (112), and first series of slots (21 a) is an eighth series of slots or grooves (114), the eighth series of grooves (114) allows a flammable gas-air mixture to exit the main burner chamber (35) and provide a continuous flame for the first flame ring (21). Situated below the eighth series of grooves (114) may be a ninth series of holes (116). The ninth series of holes (116) provide additional flammable gas-air for the first flame ring (21). This makes the first flame ring (21) circumferentially continuous.
  • It is general practice to define the positional location of the first, and second, series of holes or slots (21 a, 22 a) in angular measures. This would also be true of the eighth series of grooves (114), the ninth series of holes (116), and the seventh series of holes or slots (112). For illustrative purposes, the invention depicts the first series of holes or slots (21 a) and the seventh series of holes or slots (112) being separated by ten degrees (10°). The second series of holes (22 a) is also shown in ten degree (10°) separation, but the second series of holes (22 a) is offset five degrees (5°) from the first series of holes or slots (21 a). The eighth series of grooves (114) is shown offset by five (5°) from the first series of holes or slots (21 a).
  • While the previous disclosures define a burner that maybe used in the majority of appliances, there are instances where the gas burner assembly must be adapted to fit in a more confined area. FIGS. 22, 23, 24, and 25 disclose a reduced height burner body (260).
  • As can be seen in FIGS. 22 and 23, the reduced height burner body (260) has an inner wall (78) and an outer wall (181). The inner wall (78) and the outer wall (181) define a main burner chamber (35) therebetween. The inner wall (78) defines a central cavity (102) in the reduced height burner body (260), or (265). At least one gas transfer channel (54) allows communication between the central cavity (102) and the exterior of the reduced height burner body (260). FIGS. 22 and 23 disclose that the central cavity (102) communicates with the surrounding atmosphere via the first air slot (262), or (261). As can be contrasted with the earlier figures, the air slots (262, 261) for this reduced height burner body (260), or (265), must be bifurcated by the gas transfer channel (54) in order to communicate with the surrounding atmosphere.
  • The outer wall (181) of the main burner chamber (35) has at least a first series of slots (21 a) creating at least a first flame ring (21). The drawings disclose a first and second series of holes or slots (21 a, 22 a) creating a first and second flame ring (21, 22) defined therethrough. The first series of slots (21 a) are larger than the second series (22 a) of holes. The slots or first series of holes (21 a) are located on an upper portion (106) of the reduced height burner body (260). The first series of holes or slots (21 a) provide for a flame that produces a higher BTU range than of the second series of holes (22 a) alone
  • The number of flame rings that are necessary on an outer wall (181) of the main burner chamber (35) can be modified so as to provide the proper BTU capacity by revising the cross sectional area of a first slot or hole (21 a) for the main flame ring (21). In all cases there must be at least one flame ring (21) that provides the high intensity BTU requirement. The burner body (260) is shown having a protruding edge (27) wherein the protruding edge (27) directs debris and spillover from cooking and onto the appliance top (5) (not shown). The main burner chamber (35) has at least one third hole or slot (23 a) defined on an inner wall (78), which creates a sustaining flame button (23). The third hole or slot (23 a) is of a small diameter so as to create a very small sustaining flame button (23). The third hole or slot (23 a) is also located on the, upper portion (78) of the reduced height burner body (260). The first and second series of holes or slots (21 a, 22 a), and the third hole or slot (23 a) all communicate with the main burner chamber (35) and provide an ignitable gas-air mixture.
  • In all other remaining aspects, the reduced height burner body (260) and (265) operates and is constructed similar to the burner body (2) disclosed previously.
  • Yet another reduced height burner body (265) can be seen in FIG. 24. The reduced height burner body (265) has an inner wall (78) and an outer wall (181). The inner wall (78) and the outer wall (181) define a main burner chamber (35) therebetween. The inner wall (78) defines a central cavity (102) in the reduced height burner body (265) at least one gas transfer channel (54) allows communication between the central cavity (102) and the exterior of the reduced height burner body (265). This gas transfer channel (54) is a component of at least one central air slot (261).
  • In all other remaining aspects, this reduced height burner body (265) operates and is constructed similar to the burner bodies (2, 260) previously disclosed.
  • FIGS. 25 through 27 show a polygonal shaped burner body (270). The drawings disclose a hexagonal shaped burner body, but it becomes obvious that the polygonal burner body may have any number of edges greater than three. FIG. 27 discloses the mating burner cap (75) or burner cap assembly (3) for the polygonal shaped burner body.
  • Although the foregoing includes a description of the best mode contemplated for carrying out the invention, various modifications are contemplated.
  • As various modifications could be made in the constructions herein described and illustrated without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the foregoing description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative rather than limiting.

Claims (32)

  1. 1. An improved gas burner, comprising:
    a. a mixing cup, said mixing cup has a means to provide gaseous fuel to at least two primary jets, said mixing cup further has means to provide gaseous fuel to a secondary jet;
    b. a burner body, said burner body has a main burner chamber, said main burner chamber has an inner wall and an outer wall, said outer wall has at least a first series of holes or slots defining a first flame ring therein, said inner wall has a third series of holes defined therethrough said third series of holes having at least one hole, said burner body has a means to provide gaseous fuel to said main burner chamber, said inner wall creates a central cavity thereby, said main burner chamber has a means to communicate with said primary jet, said burner body further having a means to equalize the pressure of the exiting flammable gas-air mixture in proximity to said means to provide gaseous fuel to said main burner chamber;
    c. said burner body further has a secondary burner centrally positioned within said central cavity, said secondary burner has an end cap positioned thereon, said secondary burner has a small groove defined therein, said small groove is positioned below said end cap, said secondary burner has a fifth series of holes defined therein, said fifth series of holes are positionally located within said small groove, said secondary burner is positioned above said secondary jet, said burner body has at least one secondary air slot defined therein, said air slots communicate with said central cavity and provide air to said third and fifth holes;
    d. a burner cap, said burner cap has a bottom side, said bottom side has a means to be positionally located onto said burner body, said burner cap further has a cover plate, said cover plate has a heat resistant portion, said cover plate is offsettedly positioned over said cap and provides visual access to a fifth and third flames, said fifth and third flames are ignited from said fifth and third holes respectively;
    e. an ignition electrode, said ignition electrode is offsettedly placed near said fifth series of holes in said secondary burner, said ignition electrode is adapted to ignite a gas-air mixture creating a fifth flame ring thereby, said gas-air mixture from said third series of holes is ignited from flames from the fifth flame ring, creating a sustaining flame button thereby, said main burner chamber has a series of transfer channels, said transfer channels provide communication between said main burner chamber and said secondary air slot; and
    f. said burner body further has a gas transfer channel defined therein, said gas transfer channel does not communicate with said main burner chamber, said gas transfer channel allows said central cavity in said burner body to communicate with the exterior of said burner, said gas transfer channel providing an ignited gas/air mixture to ignite said first series of holes creating said first flame ring, said third holes or slots provide gas/air mixture to provide a sustaining flame button thereby, the gas transfer channel has a fourth series of slots defined therein allowing some communication between said main burner chamber and said gas transfer channel creating a fourth sustaining ring thereby.
  2. 2. The improved gas burner described in claim 1 wherein said means to provide gaseous fuel to at least two primary jets comprises a gas supply tube, said gas supply tube is adapted to receive a gas supply line, said gas supply line provides flammable gas thereby.
  3. 3. The improved gas burner described in claim 1 wherein said means to provide gaseous fuel to said secondary jet comprises a secondary gas transfer tube, said secondary jet communicates with said secondary gas transfer tube allowing flammable gas to be transmitted thereby.
  4. 4. The improved gas burner described in claim 1 wherein said means to provide gaseous fuel to said main burner chamber and said means for said main burner chamber to communicate with said primary jet comprises a primary gas mixing chamber, said primary gas mixing chamber is attached to said burner body and is located above each of said primary jet, creating a gap thereby, said gap allows air to be drawn into said primary gas mixing chamber, said primary gas mixing chamber allows a flammable gas-air mixture to transmitted therethrough and into said main burner chamber.
  5. 5. The improved gas burner described in claim 1 wherein said means of said bottom side of said burner cap to be positionally located onto said burner body comprises a downward protruding boss, said downward protruding boss is adapted to fit inside an inner wall of said main burner chamber, said burner cap additionally has mass sufficient to prevent inadvertent dislocation from said burner body and provide a good fit to said burner body.
  6. 6. The improved gas burner described in claim 1 wherein said mixing cup is adapted to fit within a range top, said mixing cup is adapted to be fastened to the range top, said burner body is adapted to be positionally placed on said mixing cup, said burner body is offsettedly placed on said mixing cup creating a gap thereby, said gap allowing air to be drawn to said primary and said secondary inlet chambers.
  7. 7. The improved gas burner described in claim 1 wherein said top side of said burner cap has a plurality of upward protruding bosses, said upward protruding bosses creates a planar surface thereby, each of said upward protruding bosses has a through hole defined therein, each of said upward protruding bosses further has means to positionally secure said cover plate, placing said burner cap on said upward protruding bosses defines a gap between said top side of said burner cap and said cover plate.
  8. 8. The improved gas burner described in claim 7 wherein said means to positionally secure said cover plate is at least one fastener.
  9. 9. The improved gas burner described in claim 1 wherein said outer wall of said main burner chamber has defined therein a seventh series of holes or slots, said seventh series of slots have cross sectional areas that is less than that of said first series of slots or holes defined in said burner body, said, seventh series of holes or slots also being biased towards said upper portion of said burner body, said burner body further has interspaced between each of said seventh series of slots an eighth series of slots or grooves defined therein, said eighth series of grooves allowing a flammable gas-air mixture to exit said main burner chamber and thereby provide a continuous flame for said first flame ring, said burner body further has a ninth series of grooves defined therein, said ninth series of holes being situated below said eighth series of, said ninth series of holes provide additional flammable gas-air for said first flame ring making said first flame ring circumferentially continuous thereby.
  10. 10. The improved gas burner described in claim 1 wherein said heat resistant central portion of said burner cap cover is transparent, and said heat resistant central portion of said burner cap cover is secured by said upward protruding bosses located on said top side of said burner cap.
  11. 11. The improved gas burner described in claim 1 wherein said heat resistant central portion of said burner cap cover is translucent.
  12. 12. The improved gas burner described in claim 1 wherein said means to equalize the pressure of the exiting flammable gas-air mixture comprises said burner body having a ninth series of holes defined therein, said burner body further having a seventh series of slots defined therein, said seventh series of slots being positionally located on said upper portion of said burner body, said ninth series of holes being positionally located below said seventh series of slots said seventh series of slots having a smaller cross sectional area than said first series of slots, said ninth series of holes equalizing said cross sectional areas, said seventh series of slots and ninth series of holes allow the flammable gas-air mixture to exit said main burner chamber providing a continuous flame for said first flame ring thereby, said upper portion of said burner body additionally has a eighth series of holes defined therein, said eighth series of slots being positionally situated between said first series of grooves, said eighth series of slots providing additional flammable gas-air for said first flame ring making the first flame ring circumferentially continuous thereby.
  13. 13. An improved gas burner, comprising:
    a. a mixing cup, said mixing cup is adapted to be fastened to a range top, said mixing cup has an internal cavity defined therein, said internal cavity has vertical flanges, said vertical flanges partition said internal cavity creating at least two primary and one secondary inlet chambers thereby;
    b. each of said primary inlet chambers has a primary jet, said primary jet communicates with a primary gas supply tube, said gas supply tube is adapted to receive a gas supply line, allowing flammable gas to be transmitted to said primary jet thereby;
    c. said secondary inlet chamber has a secondary jet, said secondary jet communicates with a secondary gas transfer tube, said secondary gas transfer tube is adapted to receive flammable gas from a secondary gas supply line;
    d. said mixing cup has a hole defined therein, said hole is positionally placed near said secondary inlet chamber and is adapted to allow an ignition electrode to be placed therein, said hole is further adapted to allow a nut to secure said ignition electrode in said mixing cup;
    e. a burner body, said burner body has a main burner chamber, said main burner chamber has an inner wall and an outer wall, said outer wall has at least a first series of holes or slots defining a first flame ring defined therein, said first series of holes or slots are located on an upper portion of said burner body and said outer wall, said inner wall has a third series of holes defined therethrough said third series of holes having at least one hole, said third series of holes are located in proximity to a gas transfer tube, said burner body has a means to provide gaseous fuel to said main burner chamber, said inner wall creates a central cavity thereby, said main burner chamber has a means to communicate with said primary jet, said burner body further has a hole defined therein, said hole allowing a secondary burner to be centrally positioned therein, said burner body further having a means to equalize the pressure of the exiting flammable gas-air mixture in proximity to said means to provide gaseous fuel to said main burner chamber;
    f. said secondary burner has a secondary transfer tube, said secondary burner is positioned above said secondary jet, said secondary burner further has an end cap positioned thereon, said secondary burner has a small groove defined therein, said small groove is positioned below said end cap, said secondary burner further has a fifth series of holes defined therein, said fifth series of holes are positionally located within said small groove, the flammable gas-air mixture communicates with said fifth series of holes via said secondary transfer tube, said burner body has at least one secondary air slot defined therein, said secondary air slot communicates with said central cavity and provides air to said third and fifth holes, said transfer tube has a ring defined thereon, said ring is adapted to fit within said hole of said burner body;
    g. a burner cap, said burner cap has a bottom side, said bottom side has a means to be positionally located onto said burner body, said burner cap further has a cover plate, said cover plate has a heat resistant central portion, said cover plate is offsettedly positioned over said burner cap and provides visual access to a fifth and a sixth flame ring, said fifth and sixth flame rings are ignited from said fifth and sixth holes respectively; and
    h. an ignition electrode, said ignition electrode being offsettedly placed near said fifth series of holes in said secondary burner, said ignition electrode is adapted to ignite a gas-air mixture creating said fifth flame ring thereby, said gas-air mixture from said sixth series of holes are ignited from flames from said fifth flame ring, creating said sixth flame ring thereby.
  14. 14. The improved gas burner described in claim 13 wherein said means to provide gaseous fuel to said main burner chamber and said means for said main burner chamber to communicate with said primary jet comprises a primary gas mixing chamber, said primary gas mixing chamber is attached to said burner body and is located above each primary jet, creating a gap thereby, said gap allows air to be drawn into said primary gas mixing chamber, said primary gas mixing chamber allows a flammable gas-air mixture to transmitted therethrough and into said main burner chamber.
  15. 15. The improved gas burner described in claim 13 wherein said means of said bottom side of said burner cap to be positionally located onto said burner body comprises a downward protruding boss, said downward protruding boss is adapted to fit inside an inner wall of said main burner chamber, said burner cap additionally has mass sufficient to prevent inadvertent dislocation from said burner body and provides a good seal to said burner body.
  16. 16. The improved gas burner described in claim 13 wherein said top side of said burner cap has a plurality of upward protruding bosses, said upward protruding bosses creates a planar surface thereby, each of said upward protruding bosses has a through hole defined therein, each of said upward protruding bosses further has means to positionally secure said cover plate, placing said cover plate on said upward protruding bosses defines a gap between top side of said burner cap and said cover plate.
  17. 17. The improved gas burner described in claim 16 wherein said means to positionally secure said cover plate is at least one fastener.
  18. 18. The improved gas burner described in claim 13 wherein said burner body has vertical locators, each of said vertical locators has extensions to positionally locate said burner body to said mixing cup, each of said vertical locators and their extensions reach into said primary air inlet chambers and prevent sideways tipping of said burner body over said mixing cup thereby, said vertical locators and their extensions provide for secure centering of said primary jets and therefore said primary gas flow opening to said primary gas mixing chamber and respectively said secondary jet and said secondary gas flow opening to said secondary mixing chamber.
  19. 19. The improved gas burner described in claim 13 wherein said burner body is offsettedly placed from said mixing cup, creating an open air passage or primary air slot therebetween, said primary air slot allows air into said primary air inlet chamber.
  20. 20. The improved gas burner described in claim 13 wherein said heat resistant central portion of said cover plate of said burner cap is transparent.
  21. 21. The improved gas burner described in claim 13 wherein said heat resistant central portion of cover plate of said burner cap is translucent.
  22. 22. The improved gas burner described in claim 13 wherein said means to equalize the pressure of the exiting flammable gas-air mixture comprises said burner body having a ninth series of holes defined therein, said burner body further having a seventh series of slots defined therein, said seventh series of slots being positionally located on said upper portion of said burner body, said ninth series of holes being positionally located below said seventh series of slots said seventh series of slots having a smaller cross sectional area than said first series of slots, said ninth series of holes equalizing said cross sectional areas, said seventh series of slots and ninth series of holes allow the flammable gas-air mixture to exit said main burner chamber providing a continuous flame for said first flame ring thereby, said upper portion of said burner body additionally has a eighth series of holes defined therein, said eighth series of slots being positionally situated between said first series of grooves, said eighth series of slots providing additional flammable gas-air for said first flame ring making the first flame ring circumferentially continuous thereby.
  23. 23. An improved gas burner, comprising:
    a. a mixing cup, said mixing cup has a gas supply line, said gas supply line is adapted to receive a gas supply tube, said gas supply tube has a first end and a second end, a first support and a second support project upwards from said gas supply tube and attach to an attachment plate, said attachment plate has an outer perimeter and an inner open cavity defined thereby;
    b. an upwards protruding boss surrounds said inner open cavity, said upwards protruding boss is adapted to loosely fit within a pre-defined hole in a cook top, a central boss is positioned on said gas supply tube and has a transverse boss that protrudes from said central boss, said transverse boss has a central hole or secondary gas transfer tube defined therein;
    c. said secondary gas transfer tube has an inlet, said inlet is adapted to receive a gas line;
    d. a primary gas jet is positioned in close proximity to said first and second ends, where each primary gas jet communicates with said gas supply tube supplying gaseous fuel to a burner body, a secondary jet is placed on a top surface of said transverse boss, said secondary jet communicates with said secondary gas transfer tube thereby, said secondary jet is enclosed on three sides by a first, second and third wall;
    e. an ignition electrode mounting plate has a central hole defined therein, said ignition electrode mounting plate is attached to said attachment plate and said first, second and third wall;
    said burner body has a main burner chamber, said main burner chamber has an inner wall and an outer wall, said outer wall has at least a first series of holes or slots defined therein, said first series of holes or slots are located on an upper portion of said burner body and said outer wall, said inner wall has a third series of holes defined therethrough said third series of holes having at least one hole, said third series of holes are located on said upper portion of said burner body, said burner body has a means to provide gaseous fuel to said main burner chamber, said inner wall creates a central cavity thereby, said main burner chamber has a means to communicate with said primary jet, said burner body further has a hole defined therein, said hole allows a secondary burner to be centrally positioned therein, said burner body further having a means to equalize the pressure of the exiting flammable gas-air mixture in proximity to said means to provide gaseous fuel to said main burner chamber;
    g. said secondary burner has a secondary transfer tube, said secondary burner is positioned above said secondary jet, said secondary burner further has an end cap positioned thereon, said secondary burner has a small groove defined therein, said small groove is positioned below said end cap, said secondary burner further has a fifth series of holes defined therein, said fifth series of holes are positionally located within said small groove, the flammable gas-air mixture communicates with said fifth series of holes via said secondary transfer tube, said burner body has at least one secondary air slot defined therein, said secondary air slot communicates with said central cavity and provides air to said third and fifth series of holes, said transfer tube has a ring defined thereon, said ring is adapted to fit within said hole of said burner body;
    h. a burner cap, said burner cap has a bottom side, said bottom side has a means to be positionally located onto said burner body, said burner cap further has a cover plate, said cover plate has a heat resistant central portion, said cover plate is offsettedly positioned over said cover plate and provides visual access to a fifth and a sixth flame, said fifth and sixth flames are ignited from said fifth and sixth holes respectively; and
    i. an ignition electrode, said ignition electrode being offsettedly placed near said fifth series of holes in said secondary burner, said ignition electrode is adapted to ignite a gas-air mixture creating a fifth flame ring thereby, said gas-air mixture from said third series of holes are ignited from flames from the fifth flame ring, creating a third flame ring thereby, said main burner chamber has at least one transfer channel, said transfer channel provides communication between said main burner chamber and said secondary air slot, said secondary air slot further has a smooth radiused transition thereon, said smooth radiused transition provides an ignition flame for said flame rings located on said outer wall of said burner body, igniting said flame rings thereby.
  24. 24. The improved gas burner described in claim 23 wherein said means to provide gaseous fuel to said main burner chamber and said means for said main burner chamber to communicate with said primary jet comprises a primary gas mixing chamber, said primary gas mixing chamber is attached to said burner body and is located above each said primary jet, creating a gap thereby, said gap allows air to be drawn into said primary gas mixing chamber, said primary gas mixing chamber allows a flammable gas-air mixture to transmitted therethrough and into said main burner chamber.
  25. 25. The improved gas burner described in claim 23 wherein said means of said bottom side of said burner cap to be positionally located onto said burner body comprises a downward protruding boss, said downward protruding boss is adapted to fit inside an inner wall of said main burner chamber, said burner cap additionally has mass sufficient to prevent inadvertent dislocation from said burner body and provides a good seal to said burner body.
  26. 26. The improved gas burner described in claim 23 wherein said top side of said burner cap has a plurality of upward protruding bosses, said upward protruding bosses creates a planar surface thereby, each of said upward protruding bosses has a through hole defined therein, each of said upward protruding bosses further has means to positionally secure said cover plate, placing said cover plate on said upward protruding bosses defines a gap between top side of said burner cap and said cover plate.
  27. 27. The improved gas burner described in claim 26 wherein said means to positionally secure said cover plate is at least one fastener.
  28. 28. The improved gas burner described in claim 23 wherein said burner body has a plurality of vertical locators, each of said vertical locators has extensions to positionally locate said burner body to said mixing cup, each of said vertical locators and their extensions reach into said primary air inlet chambers and prevent sideways tipping of said burner body over said mixing cup thereby, said vertical locators and their extensions provide for secure centering of said primary jets and therefore said primary gas flow opening to said primary gas mixing chamber and respectively said secondary jet and said secondary gas flow opening to said secondary mixing chamber.
  29. 29. The improved gas burner described in claim 23 wherein said burner body is placed upon said mixing cup, and is adapted to prevent air from entering said mixing cup from above the range or cooktop.
  30. 30. The improved gas burner described in claim 23 wherein said heat resistant central portion of said cover plate of said burner cap is transparent.
  31. 31. The improved gas burner described in claim 23 wherein said heat resistant central portion of said cover plate of said burner cap is translucent.
  32. 32. The improved gas burner described in claim 23 wherein said means to equalize the pressure of the exiting flammable gas-air mixture comprises said burner body having a ninth series of holes defined therein, said burner body further having a seventh series of slots defined therein, said seventh series of slots being positionally located on said upper portion of said burner body, said ninth series of holes being positionally located below said seventh series of slots said seventh series of slots having a smaller cross sectional area than said first series of slots, said ninth series of holes equalizing said cross sectional areas, said seventh series of slots and ninth series of holes allow the flammable gas-air mixture to exit said main burner chamber providing a continuous flame for said first flame ring thereby, said upper portion of said burner body additionally has a eighth series of holes defined therein, said eighth series of slots being positionally situated between said first series of grooves, said eighth series of slots providing additional flammable gas-air for said first flame ring making the first flame ring circumferentially continuous thereby.
US12387449 2009-05-02 2009-05-02 Gas burner Abandoned US20100279238A1 (en)

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WO2016157006A1 (en) * 2015-03-31 2016-10-06 BSH Hausgeräte GmbH Gas burner and gas cooktop
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WO2016157006A1 (en) * 2015-03-31 2016-10-06 BSH Hausgeräte GmbH Gas burner and gas cooktop

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