US20100264709A1 - Back extension backrest - Google Patents

Back extension backrest Download PDF

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Publication number
US20100264709A1
US20100264709A1 US12/761,291 US76129110A US2010264709A1 US 20100264709 A1 US20100264709 A1 US 20100264709A1 US 76129110 A US76129110 A US 76129110A US 2010264709 A1 US2010264709 A1 US 2010264709A1
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US
United States
Prior art keywords
upper
backrest
member
lower member
upper member
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12/761,291
Inventor
Steven Pearse
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Steven Pearse
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US17003609P priority Critical
Application filed by Steven Pearse filed Critical Steven Pearse
Priority to US12/761,291 priority patent/US20100264709A1/en
Publication of US20100264709A1 publication Critical patent/US20100264709A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C7/00Parts, details, or accessories of chairs or stools
    • A47C7/36Support for the head or the back
    • A47C7/40Support for the head or the back for the back
    • A47C7/46Support for the head or the back for the back with special, e.g. adjustable, lumbar region support profile; "Ackerblom" profile chairs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C7/00Parts, details, or accessories of chairs or stools
    • A47C7/36Support for the head or the back
    • A47C7/40Support for the head or the back for the back
    • A47C7/405Support for the head or the back for the back with double backrests

Abstract

A backrest for use with a chair that has a seat and a base. The backrest includes a lower member having a proximal end and a distal end, and upper member attached to the chair at the proximal end. A spring-hinge mechanism pivotally connects the lower member in the vicinity of the distal end to the upper member. A lumbar support is attached to the upper member and the lower member and spans the spring-hinge mechanism. In use a user sitting on the seat may, by anterior flexing of the user's upper back cause the upper member to pivot relative to the lower member from an unflexed position to a flexed position.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application claims the benefit of and priority to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/170,036, filed Apr. 15, 2009, the contents of which are incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.
  • BACKGROUND
  • 1. Field
  • The present invention relates to backrests for chairs and more particularly to office-chair backrests intended to alleviate back problems associated with prolonged sitting in conventional office chairs.
  • 2. General Background
  • Back problems and associated back pain are widespread. One-half of all working Canadians admit to having back or neck pain symptoms each year. Back pain is the second most common reason for missed work and visits to the doctors' offices. Most cases of back pain are mechanical or non-organic, meaning they are not caused by underlying medical conditions, such as inflammatory arthritis, infection, fracture or cancer. Canadians spend billions each year on neck or back pain. Experts estimate that as much as 80% of the population will experience a back problem at some time in their lives.
  • The ubiquity of computerized workstations has caused an epidemic of neck, mid-back, and low-back pain, and headaches. The human body was not designed to sit all day. In adults, spinal discs in your spine have no blood supply; studies show that around 12-14 years of age, the blood supply to the discs atrophies. That means there is no direct circulation going through a disc. There is blood supply outside the discs in people of all ages. This blood supply must be forced into the disc to prevent disc damage and allow healing to occur. Since there is no direct blood supply into a disc, the only way to get nutrition and oxygen into a disc and waste products out is by imbibition, which is augmented by movement of the spine.
  • Research has indicated that the movement adequate to force blood flow in and waste products out must be performed twice daily to maintain healthy hydrated spinal discs, ligaments and tendons. It has been found that it takes up to 500 days to force blood flow in and waste products out in those patients who are sedentary and don't or can't do the correct types of motion necessary to cause the desired exchange.
  • As well, sitting for extended periods in the average office chair often results in a forward-slouching posture, as such chairs tend to motivate and guide poor posture with forward head posture and a collapsed or reversed lumbar curve. This position puts strain upon the lower back.
  • SUMMARY
  • In one aspect, the invention consists of a backrest for use with a chair having a seat and a base, the backrest including: a lower member having a proximal end and a distal end, and attached to the chair at the proximal end; an upper member; a spring-hinge mechanism pivotally connecting the lower member in the vicinity of the distal end to the upper member; a lumbar support attached to the upper member and the lower member and spanning the spring-hinge mechanism wherein, in use a user sitting on the seat may, by anterior flexing of the user's upper back cause the upper member to pivot relative to the lower member from an unflexed position to a flexed position.
  • The backrest has three main purposes: to correct the posture of the one who is sitting; to strengthen the internal muscles associated with spinal support; and to increase circulation up and down the entire spine. This is done by means of the rearward (or anterior) flexing of the upper body while sitting. The backrest flexes, or hinges, from a point midway up the lumbar curve. The backrest foam and fabric cover are not split, but they flex in order to accommodate the motion. The hinged portions of the backrest are spring-loaded, so that they return to the neutral or starting position.
  • In order to use the backrest, the sitter engages his or her spine with the backrest lumbar support, and flexes backwards several times.
  • Possible variations involve moving the hinging point higher or lower, making the spring resistance variable, providing a height-adjustable headrest, providing an adjustable tilt for the upper portion of the backrest.
  • DRAWINGS
  • The above-mentioned features and objects of the present disclosure will become more apparent with reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein like reference numerals denote like elements and in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a side elevation view of an embodiment of the invention shown unflexed.
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective cut away view of the backrest shown in FIG. 1, shown unflexed.
  • FIG. 3 is a perspective cut away view of the backrest shown in FIG. 2, shown flexed.
  • FIG. 4 is a side elevation view of the backrest shown in FIG. 2, shown unflexed.
  • FIG. 5 is a side elevation view of the backrest shown in FIG. 4, shown flexed.
  • FIG. 6 is a side elevation view of a variation on the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1 which includes an upper-back roller.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • FIGS. 1 through 5 show a backrest 10 embodiment of the present invention as a feature of an otherwise-conventional stylized office chair 12 having a seat 14 and base 16. FIG. 6 illustrates a variation of the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 5.
  • Referring to FIG. 1, the backrest 10 includes a lower member 18 and an upper member 20, attached one to the other by a spring-hinge mechanism 22. Spanning the lower member 18 and upper member 20, and projecting away from the spring-hinge mechanism 22 towards the front of the office chair 12 there is a padded lumbar support 24.
  • The spring-hinge mechanism 22 is configured to permit the lower member 18 and upper member 20 to pivot relative to each other between an upright, essentially aligned, unflexed position, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, and a flexed position, an example of which is shown in FIG. 5. The spring-hinge mechanism 22 is configured to resiliently bias the lower member 18 and upper member 20 into the unflexed position, such that a user of the office chair 12 experiences some resistance when moving from the unflexed position illustrated in FIG. 4 to the flexed position illustrated in FIG. 5 and the backrest 20 will not remain in the flexed position unless a suitable force is maintained. Preferably, the spring-hinge mechanism 22 is configured, or other features of the backrest 10 are configured, to limit the range of movement of the upper member 20 relative to the lower member 18, such that the pivot angle between the unflexed position illustrated in FIG. 4 and the normal maximum flexed position illustrated in FIG. 5 is about 30 degrees.
  • Referring to FIG. 4, the spring-hinge mechanism 22 may be configured, or other features of the backrest 10 may be configured to permit adjustment of the alignment of the lower member 18 and upper member 20 when in the unflexed position and to permit adjustment of the range of movement between the unflexed position and the normal maximum flexed position illustrated in FIG. 5.
  • The lumbar support 24 deforms to accommodate the pivoting of the lower member 18 and upper member 20 between the unflexed position illustrated in FIG. 4 and flexed position illustrated in FIG. 5. Preferably the lumbar support 14 has a suitable unsegmented surface configured to accommodate the pivoting of the lower member 18 and upper member 20, and the associated deformation of the lumbar support 24, without resorting to openings that might tend to undesirably interact with the users clothing when the backrest 10 is moved between the flexed and unflexed positions illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5.
  • In order to use the backrest 10, the user engages his or her back with the lumbar support 24, and by applying a force by means of a rearward (or anterior) flexing of his or her upper body, moves the backrest 10 from the unflexed position illustrated in FIG. 4 to the flexed position illustrated in FIG. 5. Used in this way, the backrest 10 assists to correct the posture of the one who is sitting, strengthen the internal muscles associated with spinal support and to increase circulation up and down the entire spine.
  • The backrest 10 is intended to provide benefits by way of facilitating desired motion rather than by strength training per se, and thus the resistance to the movement between the unflexed position illustrated in FIG. 4 and the flexed position illustrated in FIG. 5 provided by the backrest 20 is preferably relatively minimal. Preferably, the resistance is adjustable.
  • The backrest 10 is preferably configured to permit adjustment of the location of the lumbar support 24 relative to the seat 14. The backrest 10 is preferably configured so as to permit vertical adjustment of the location of the pivot axis relative to the seat 14 and lumbar support 24. The backrest 10 is preferably attached to the seat 14 and base 16 in such a way as to permit adjustment of the tilt of the backrest 10 relative to the seat 14 and base 16.
  • Variations
  • Referring to FIG. 6, there is illustrated a variation of the backrest 10 which includes a height adjustable headrest or an upper-back roller 26 which is provided in the vicinity of the upper end of the upper member 20. In the illustrated embodiment, the upper-back roller 26 is rotatably attached to the upper member 20 so as to rotate about a generally horizontal axis. The upper-back roller 26 preferably has a padded or resiliently flexible surface 28 for user comfort. The upper-back roller 26 shown in the drawings is generally cylindrical, but other configurations may also be suitable, such as spherical, combined conical, ridged, irregular etc. Upper-back roller 26 rolls during the flexing to prevent rubbing with the spine, and to help massage the upper back muscles.
  • In order to use the backrest 10 with upper-back roller 26, the user engages his or her back with the lumbar support 24, and by applying a force to the upper-back roller 26 by means of a rearward (or anterior) flexing of the upper body, moves the backrest 10 between the unflexed position illustrated in FIG. 4 and flexed position illustrated in FIG. 5, preferably several times. The upper-back roller 26 rolls during such flexing, which tends to reduce frictional resistance to the flexing and to have a massaging effect along the user's upper spine. Used in this way, the backrest 10 assists to: correct the posture of the one who is sitting; to strengthen the internal muscles associated with spinal support; and to increase circulation up and down the entire spine. The upper-back roller 26 is preferably positioned so that it will be adjacent the users upper thoracic vertebrae (T1-T7) in the unflexed position and when moving between the unflexed position and the flexed position illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5. Since this is a common area for the accumulation of sitting-related stress, the rolling action has a desirable ancillary massage effect. Some who have tried the backrest 10 have expressed a desire to have the roller extend in to the cervical area, up to and including C1. Since the amount of force required to flex the backrest 10 is minimal, it is understood that there should be no spinal problems associated with this upper limit of roller extension. The range of travel of the upper-back roller along the user's back and the resistance to the movement between the unflexed position and the flexed position illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5 provided by the backrest 20, may be determined by user comfort.
  • While the apparatus and method have been described in terms of what are presently considered to be the most practical and preferred embodiments, it is to be understood that the disclosure need not be limited to the disclosed embodiments. It is intended to cover various modifications and similar arrangements included within the spirit and scope of the claims, the scope of which should be accorded the broadest interpretation so as to encompass all such modifications and similar structures. The present disclosure includes any and all embodiments of the following claims.

Claims (3)

1. A backrest for use with a chair having a seat and a base, the backrest comprising:
a) a lower member having a proximal end and a distal end, and attached to the chair at the proximal end;
b) an upper member;
c) a spring-hinge mechanism pivotally connecting the lower member in the vicinity of the distal end to the upper member; and
d) a lumbar support attached to the upper member and the lower member and spanning the spring-hinge mechanism wherein, in use a user sitting on the seat may, by anterior flexing of the user's upper back cause the upper member to pivot relative to the lower member from an unflexed position to a flexed position.
2. The backrest as defined in claim 1, wherein an upper-back roller is attached to the upper member distal from the spring-hinge mechanism.
3. A backrest for use with a chair having a seat and a base, the backrest comprising:
a) a lower member having a proximal end and a distal end, and attached to the chair at the proximal end;
b) an upper member;
c) a spring-hinge mechanism pivotally connecting the lower member in the vicinity of the distal end to the upper member;
d) a lumbar support attached to the upper member and the lower member and spanning the spring-hinge mechanism; and
c) an upper-back roller attached to the upper member distal from the spring-hinge mechanism;
wherein, in use a user sitting on the seat may, by anterior flexing of the user's upper back cause the upper member to pivot relative to the lower member from an unflexed position to a flexed position.
US12/761,291 2009-04-16 2010-04-15 Back extension backrest Abandoned US20100264709A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US17003609P true 2009-04-16 2009-04-16
US12/761,291 US20100264709A1 (en) 2009-04-16 2010-04-15 Back extension backrest

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/761,291 US20100264709A1 (en) 2009-04-16 2010-04-15 Back extension backrest

Publications (1)

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US20100264709A1 true US20100264709A1 (en) 2010-10-21

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ID=42979742

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/761,291 Abandoned US20100264709A1 (en) 2009-04-16 2010-04-15 Back extension backrest

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US (1) US20100264709A1 (en)
CA (1) CA2699558A1 (en)

Citations (42)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US2707465A (en) * 1954-02-16 1955-05-03 Nemeth Steffen Paul Mechanical exercise and physical therapy device
US3632170A (en) * 1970-07-24 1972-01-04 Jack C Witt Modular furniture
US3663055A (en) * 1970-07-10 1972-05-16 Monsanto Co Chair with adjustable seating portions
US4157203A (en) * 1977-05-09 1979-06-05 Center For Design Research And Development N.V. Articulated double back for chairs
US4169625A (en) * 1978-04-05 1979-10-02 Burd, Inc., Howell Division Knock-down pedestal chair
US4316632A (en) * 1978-09-08 1982-02-23 Protoned Bv Ergonomic chair
US4333683A (en) * 1978-12-04 1982-06-08 Center For Design Research And Development N.V. Chair with automatically adjustable tilting back
US4541669A (en) * 1982-07-13 1985-09-17 Keiper Recaro Gmbh & Co. Vehicle seat having an adjustable thigh supports
US4541666A (en) * 1983-06-03 1985-09-17 Vanderminden Robert D Sand chair
US4549764A (en) * 1983-09-14 1985-10-29 K. L. Spring & Stamping Corporation Flexible chair back
US4585272A (en) * 1982-10-22 1986-04-29 Castelli S.P.A. Chair having a back comprising a plurality of articulated segments
US4603444A (en) * 1984-10-15 1986-08-05 Suits Bevan D Convertible furniture apparatus
US4603904A (en) * 1985-08-12 1986-08-05 Shelby Williams Industries, Inc. Chair with articulated, flexible spring backrest
US4641885A (en) * 1983-07-20 1987-02-10 Protoned B.V. Work chair having a vertically adjustable chair support
US4703974A (en) * 1984-10-23 1987-11-03 Protoned B.V. Seat furniture
US4799732A (en) * 1987-10-06 1989-01-24 Okamura Corporation Chair seat inclining and moving device
US4830430A (en) * 1987-01-30 1989-05-16 Equus Marketing Ag Split-back chair, particularly office chair
US4834453A (en) * 1986-09-08 1989-05-30 Girsberger Holding Ag Swivel chair
US4834072A (en) * 1988-05-31 1989-05-30 Goodman Loren M Dual mode exercise device
US4856846A (en) * 1986-02-13 1989-08-15 Hartmut Lohmeyer Chair with a seat and an inherently elastically pliable back rest
US4869552A (en) * 1988-09-14 1989-09-26 Shelby Williams Industries, Inc. Flexible backrest assembly for a chair
US4966413A (en) * 1989-08-17 1990-10-30 Palarski Timothy D Articulated relaxation chair
US5108149A (en) * 1989-11-14 1992-04-28 Center For Design Research And Development N.V Adjustable seating
US5113851A (en) * 1990-03-01 1992-05-19 Eugenio Gamba Chair equipped with a singing seat
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US5288127A (en) * 1993-01-19 1994-02-22 Berg Joseph A Rocking seat
US5597203A (en) * 1994-06-14 1997-01-28 Board Of Trustees Operating Michigan State University Seat with biomechanical articulation
US5649739A (en) * 1993-09-13 1997-07-22 Zapf; Otto W. Backrest for a seat arrangement
US5704688A (en) * 1994-08-05 1998-01-06 Mauser Office Gmbh Chair
US5887946A (en) * 1997-01-03 1999-03-30 Raftery Design, Inc. Chair with movable back support
US5904397A (en) * 1995-05-02 1999-05-18 Hag A/S Seating unit comprising two adjacent, pivotal support elements
US5944382A (en) * 1996-10-09 1999-08-31 Center For Design Research And Development N.V. Adjustable seating
US6116687A (en) * 1998-02-12 2000-09-12 Vogtherr; Burkhard Functional chair
US6340207B1 (en) * 1997-09-30 2002-01-22 Dual Seat Technologies Two platform motion seat
US6478379B1 (en) * 2000-06-07 2002-11-12 Center For Design Research And Development N.V. Chair
US6626494B2 (en) * 2000-09-19 2003-09-30 Han-Keel Yoo Chair and method for correcting an improper alignment of spinal vertebrae
US20040015108A1 (en) * 2001-07-20 2004-01-22 Mcnally Lynda Jeanne Passive exercise apparatus
US6739663B2 (en) * 2001-02-23 2004-05-25 Krueger International, Inc. Flexible bar-type back pivot mounting arrangement for a chair
US7237841B2 (en) * 2004-06-10 2007-07-03 Steelcase Development Corporation Back construction with flexible lumbar
US7422287B2 (en) * 2005-03-08 2008-09-09 Steelcase Inc. Seating with shape-changing back support frame
US7490901B2 (en) * 2006-10-18 2009-02-17 Sedus Stoll Aktiengesellschaft Back rest for a chair
US7896439B2 (en) * 2006-08-30 2011-03-01 Itoki Corporation Chair

Patent Citations (44)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2707465A (en) * 1954-02-16 1955-05-03 Nemeth Steffen Paul Mechanical exercise and physical therapy device
US3663055A (en) * 1970-07-10 1972-05-16 Monsanto Co Chair with adjustable seating portions
US3632170A (en) * 1970-07-24 1972-01-04 Jack C Witt Modular furniture
US4157203A (en) * 1977-05-09 1979-06-05 Center For Design Research And Development N.V. Articulated double back for chairs
US4169625A (en) * 1978-04-05 1979-10-02 Burd, Inc., Howell Division Knock-down pedestal chair
US4316632A (en) * 1978-09-08 1982-02-23 Protoned Bv Ergonomic chair
US4333683A (en) * 1978-12-04 1982-06-08 Center For Design Research And Development N.V. Chair with automatically adjustable tilting back
US4541669A (en) * 1982-07-13 1985-09-17 Keiper Recaro Gmbh & Co. Vehicle seat having an adjustable thigh supports
US4585272A (en) * 1982-10-22 1986-04-29 Castelli S.P.A. Chair having a back comprising a plurality of articulated segments
US4541666A (en) * 1983-06-03 1985-09-17 Vanderminden Robert D Sand chair
US4641885A (en) * 1983-07-20 1987-02-10 Protoned B.V. Work chair having a vertically adjustable chair support
US4549764A (en) * 1983-09-14 1985-10-29 K. L. Spring & Stamping Corporation Flexible chair back
US4603444A (en) * 1984-10-15 1986-08-05 Suits Bevan D Convertible furniture apparatus
US4703974A (en) * 1984-10-23 1987-11-03 Protoned B.V. Seat furniture
US4603904A (en) * 1985-08-12 1986-08-05 Shelby Williams Industries, Inc. Chair with articulated, flexible spring backrest
US4856846A (en) * 1986-02-13 1989-08-15 Hartmut Lohmeyer Chair with a seat and an inherently elastically pliable back rest
US4834453A (en) * 1986-09-08 1989-05-30 Girsberger Holding Ag Swivel chair
US4830430A (en) * 1987-01-30 1989-05-16 Equus Marketing Ag Split-back chair, particularly office chair
US4799732A (en) * 1987-10-06 1989-01-24 Okamura Corporation Chair seat inclining and moving device
US4834072A (en) * 1988-05-31 1989-05-30 Goodman Loren M Dual mode exercise device
US4869552A (en) * 1988-09-14 1989-09-26 Shelby Williams Industries, Inc. Flexible backrest assembly for a chair
US4966413A (en) * 1989-08-17 1990-10-30 Palarski Timothy D Articulated relaxation chair
US5108149A (en) * 1989-11-14 1992-04-28 Center For Design Research And Development N.V Adjustable seating
US5113851A (en) * 1990-03-01 1992-05-19 Eugenio Gamba Chair equipped with a singing seat
US5258019A (en) * 1991-01-14 1993-11-02 United Apothecary, Inc. Lumbar spine therapy device
US5288127A (en) * 1993-01-19 1994-02-22 Berg Joseph A Rocking seat
US5649739A (en) * 1993-09-13 1997-07-22 Zapf; Otto W. Backrest for a seat arrangement
US5597203A (en) * 1994-06-14 1997-01-28 Board Of Trustees Operating Michigan State University Seat with biomechanical articulation
US5704688A (en) * 1994-08-05 1998-01-06 Mauser Office Gmbh Chair
US5904397A (en) * 1995-05-02 1999-05-18 Hag A/S Seating unit comprising two adjacent, pivotal support elements
US5944382A (en) * 1996-10-09 1999-08-31 Center For Design Research And Development N.V. Adjustable seating
US5887946A (en) * 1997-01-03 1999-03-30 Raftery Design, Inc. Chair with movable back support
US5988746A (en) * 1997-01-03 1999-11-23 Raferty Design, Inc. Split back chair
US6357827B1 (en) * 1997-09-30 2002-03-19 Dual Seat Technologies, Inc. Two platform motion seat
US6340207B1 (en) * 1997-09-30 2002-01-22 Dual Seat Technologies Two platform motion seat
US6116687A (en) * 1998-02-12 2000-09-12 Vogtherr; Burkhard Functional chair
US6478379B1 (en) * 2000-06-07 2002-11-12 Center For Design Research And Development N.V. Chair
US6626494B2 (en) * 2000-09-19 2003-09-30 Han-Keel Yoo Chair and method for correcting an improper alignment of spinal vertebrae
US6739663B2 (en) * 2001-02-23 2004-05-25 Krueger International, Inc. Flexible bar-type back pivot mounting arrangement for a chair
US20040015108A1 (en) * 2001-07-20 2004-01-22 Mcnally Lynda Jeanne Passive exercise apparatus
US7237841B2 (en) * 2004-06-10 2007-07-03 Steelcase Development Corporation Back construction with flexible lumbar
US7422287B2 (en) * 2005-03-08 2008-09-09 Steelcase Inc. Seating with shape-changing back support frame
US7896439B2 (en) * 2006-08-30 2011-03-01 Itoki Corporation Chair
US7490901B2 (en) * 2006-10-18 2009-02-17 Sedus Stoll Aktiengesellschaft Back rest for a chair

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