US20100140875A1 - Method of Competitive Marksmanship and Game Therefore - Google Patents

Method of Competitive Marksmanship and Game Therefore Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20100140875A1
US20100140875A1 US12704040 US70404010A US2010140875A1 US 20100140875 A1 US20100140875 A1 US 20100140875A1 US 12704040 US12704040 US 12704040 US 70404010 A US70404010 A US 70404010A US 2010140875 A1 US2010140875 A1 US 2010140875A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
target
elements
graphic
fig
element
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12704040
Inventor
Clifford J. Broadley
Original Assignee
Broadley Clifford J
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41JTARGETS; TARGET RANGES; BULLET CATCHERS
    • F41J11/00Target ranges
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41JTARGETS; TARGET RANGES; BULLET CATCHERS
    • F41J1/00Targets; Target stands; Target holders
    • F41J1/01Target discs characterised by their material, structure or surface, e.g. clay pigeon targets characterised by their material

Abstract

The method of competitive marksmanship includes the steps of providing a first shooter with a first designated target system having a first target composition, the composition including various graphic elements. Respective selectable rule-based values are, in accordance with rules, assigned for respective graphic elements of the first target composition. A second shooter is provided with a second designated target system, the system having a second target composition, visually different from the first composition, and the target composition also including various graphic elements. Each respective graphic element of the second target composition is then assigned a rule-based respective value. As the game progresses, and in accordance with variations of the game, there is calculated a progressive accumulation of values resultant of a successful scoring of hits upon elements of the target composition of each shooter's respective designated target system, until a winner is declared.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates to a novel method of competitive marksmanship and, preferably, simulated combat marksmanship. An aspect of the present novel method of marksmanship lies in its use of novel types of targets, elements therein and novel rules for the use of the targets.
  • [0002]
    Historically, shooting targets have always been identical for each competitor as, for example, is shown in FIG. 1, labeled “Prior Art.”
  • [0003]
    Further, within the art of targets, numerous forms and types of single competitor targets, or like targets for use by multiple competitors, are known in the art. These for example are reflected in U.S. Pat. No. 6,213,470 (2001) to Miller, entitled Precise Aim Sighting Target; and U.S. Pat. No. 7,175,181 (2007) to Bateman, entitled Portable Shooting Target.
  • [0004]
    Also known in the art are targets of numerous different individual appearances as, for example, may be seen in The Glock FAQ target gallery website glockfaq.com/targets.htm. Therein are shown dozens of targets having almost every conceivable appearance and image thereupon. Various targets of other forms may be seen at www.lyndenhuggins.com/Hunting/Targets, www.tjtarget.com and site for “My Real Picture Targets” in which the targets consist of photographs of typical hunted animals, such as rabbits, deer and elk
  • [0005]
    There, as well, exist many dozens of United States design patents directed to the ornamental appearance of marksmanship targets. Some of these, for example, U.S. Des. Pat. No. 392,687 (1998) to Wilson, entitled Target Game and U.S. Des. Pat. No. 381,732 (1997) to Tenor, entitled Indicia for a Target are directed to a design portion of a target game, the rules of which however are not disclosed in said design patents. The same is similarly in the case in several other design patents, that is, the rules or protocols associated with a given ornamental target are not disclosed in any fashion in the design patent itself.
  • [0006]
    There also exists in the art psychedelic targets, as are reflected in U.S. Design Pat. No. 269,631 (1983) to Dulude, entitled Gun Target, again without any rules or protocol associated therewith. There also exists in the art actual battlefield or combat training target as is reflected in U.S. Pat. No. 5,326,265 (1994) to Prevou, entitled Battlefield Reference Marking System Signal Device.
  • [0007]
    Finally, there is shown in the prior art a system which simulates a complete hunting environment, that is, a virtual hunting range within an environment projected onto a hemispherical enclosure of the system. See United States Patent Application Publication US 2007/0015116 (2007) to Coleman, entitled Method of and Apparatus for Virtual Shooting Practice. The concept of a target projected by cinematic means has been known in the art since 1935, as is reflected in United Kingdom Patent No. 459,313 (1935) to Chollat, entitled Shooting Target with Cinematographic or Animated Pictures.
  • [0008]
    The concept of mechanically moveable or physically variable targets is also known as is reflected in published German Patent Specification DE 195 43 492 A1 (1997) to Stechemesser.
  • [0009]
    In distinction, the instant invention differs from those targets and target systems, above described, not only in its differences of appearance but, more particularly, in the manner and concept of use thereof. The invention also differs from all art of record in that it provides a unique platform for competitive marksmanship between two or more competitors of a type unlike that heretofore known in the art.
  • [0010]
    Yet further, the platform of a present game, as described below, is one having a potential for numerous variations thereof, as may suit the needs and preferences of particular competitors.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0011]
    The present invention relates to a method of competitive marksmanship relative to specific target types, as is more fully set forth below. The method includes the steps of providing a first shooter with a first designated target system having a first target composition, the composition comprising a plurality of graphic elements. Therein, respective selectable rule-based values are, in accordance with rules, assigned for respective graphic elements of the first target composition. Thereafter, a second shooter is provided with a second designated target system, said system having a second target composition, visually different from said first composition, and said target composition also comprising a plurality of graphic elements. Thereafter, each respective graphic element of said second target composition is assigned a rule-based respective value. As the game progresses, and in accordance with variations of the game, there is calculated a progressive accumulation of values resultant of a successful scoring of hits upon elements of said target composition of each shooter's respective designated target system, until a winner is declared.
  • [0012]
    In broad concept, there exist three categories of targets, namely, full Force targets, split targets in which the players share the same firing lane or position, and mixed targets, also used when players share the same firing position or lane. In each of these three such categories, there exists in turn three bases upon which the competitive marksmanship may proceed, namely, unlimited time rules and slot limited time rules, and limited shot rules.
  • [0013]
    As may be more fully appreciated with respect to the following, the inventive method of competitive marksmanship has as object the provision of completely new and different kind of competitive shooting, namely, one in which each competitor shoots at a dissimilar target.
  • [0014]
    It is accordingly an object of the present invention to provide a novel method of marksmanship in which, within the context of shooting by each competitor at a dissimilar target, there exist a multiplicity of combinations and sub-combinations of target selection and therein distinct rules of time and shot selection. Each option thereof is yet subject to numerous refinements in order to add interest to the shooting experience and competitive stimulation thereof.
  • [0015]
    The above and yet other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the hereinafter set forth Brief Description of the Drawings, Detailed Description of the Invention and Claims appended herewith.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0016]
    FIG. 1 is a schematic view of the prior art method of competitive marksmanship in which two competitors are shooting at separate like targets.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 2 is a flow diagram showing the basic target and rule variations applicable to the present method, as well as the variations which are available within each target/rule sub-rule.
  • [0018]
    FIGS. 3A and 3B are examples showing the use of dissimilar targets comprising different elements within the target composition of each respective competitor.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 4 is a schematic view of a target in accordance with the present invention showing the split field type target.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 5 is a view of the target used with the present method, employing so-called mixed targets.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 6 corresponds to FIG. 3A in which however a graphic expression of the elements of the first target composition of the first designated target system of the first shooter is shown.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 7 corresponds to FIG. 3B in which however a graphic expression of the elements of the second target composition comprising the second designated target system used by the second shooter is shown,
  • [0023]
    FIG. 8 corresponds to FIG. 4 in that it shows a graphic expression of a target of the split target type.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 9 corresponds to the schematic of FIG. 5 however showing a graphic expression of the respective elements of each of the respective target compositions and elements of a mixed target system.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0025]
    With reference to FIG. 1 (Prior Art), there is shown a representative shooting and target format for competitive marksmanship as it is generally known in the art. Therein, as may be noted, each competitor, noted in FIG. 1 as Competitor 1 and Competitor 2 shoots at identical targets 10 and 12 having thereon identical graphics 14 which, in the classical type of target, is simply that of a series of concentric circles, although enumerable other target configurations are known, as is set forth in the Background of the Invention. Therein, competitors fire a given number of shots and the shooter having the most closest to the center of their respective targets thereby score the highest number of points and win the competition.
  • [0026]
    In the instant inventive method, there is offered an entirely new and different format of competitive marksmanship in which, at essence, each competitor shoots at a dissimilar target. As such, the experience of competitive shooting may be expressed not only with traditional guns, pistols, rifles or arrows but, alternatively, in electronic form or in a children's analog in which non-lethal bullets are used in the shooting device. Paramount in the instant method is that each competitor shoots at a dissimilar target and that each dissimilar target is defined by a particular target composition comprising a multiplicity of graphic elements that provide to the target composition in distinctive character or connotation.
  • [0027]
    An overview of the rules which govern the method of competitive marksmanship, also termed herein the “rules of engagement,” begin (see FIG. 2) with a target type selection, that is, a selection between three different types of respectively dissimilar targets. In the so-called full Force target selection, each competitor is provided with an entirely separate target 16 and 18 (see FIGS. 3A and 3B), thereby completely isolating Force elements 20 of Force A from Force elements 30 of Force B that appear in target 18 (also target B). Simply stated, competitor one will shoot at target N16 while competitor two will shoot at target B/18. Therein, all of the shown elements 20 will, as a group, comprise a first target composition 24 of a first designated target system 16. Similarly, a second shooter (competitor 2) is provided with a second designated target B/18 having a second target composition 26 and therein a multiplicity of graphics which are common in theme or connotation with all other graphic elements 30 (Force B) of target B/18. The same is conversely true with target A. Elements 30 will exhibit an opposite or opposing connotation of these of elements 20. This form of practice of the inventive method is reflected in the left hand one third of the flow diagram of FIG. 2. It is to be appreciated that elements 20 are expressed as a plurality thereof, namely, elements 20.1 to 20.5. The same is true of elements 30, shown as elements 30.1 to 30.5.
  • [0028]
    In the next general mode in which the inventive method may be practiced, there are provided so-called split targets 100 and 102 (see FIG. 4) upon a single physical target 104 which is used when the respective shooters or competitors wish to share the same firing position or lane. However, within the respective upper and lower portions 100 and 102 of the split target 104 are provided the same respective designated target systems, namely, first designated target system 116 and second designated target system 118 as are correspondingly employed in the separate so-called individual full Force targets shown in FIGS. 3A and 3B. Similarly, within each respective split target 100 and 102 is shown a similar or comparable first target composition 124 and second target composition 126. Therein, in similar to that fashion above described with respect to separate targets A and B shown in FIGS. 3A and 3B respectively are a multiplicity of graphic elements 120 of first target composition 124 of split target 104 and second graphic elements, visually different from those first composition 124. These would take the form of elements 130, which, in aggregate, correspond to Force B, related in subject matter or connotation to that of Force B elements 30 of target composition 26 target B/18 shown in FIG. 3B.
  • [0029]
    In summary, split targets 100 and 102, which, in combination, comprises physical target 104, each exhibiting a correspondence, but typically having fewer elements therein, to Force A/element 20 of FIG. 3A and Force B/elements 30 of target B, above described, of FIG. 3B.
  • [0030]
    The instant method of competitive marksmanship may be executed in a yet further physical format, namely, that of so-called mixed target 200 (see FIG. 5). Therein, as is the case in FIGS. 3 and 4, all Force A elements are indicated by a square and all Force B elements by a circle or oval, Force A elements being denoted by reference numerals 220 in FIG. 4, and Force B elements by reference numerals 230 in FIG. 5. Accordingly, as may be appreciated with regard to said figure, graphic elements 220.1 to 220.6 and 230.1 to 230.6, of the respective Forces are mixed, or interspersed with each other in the mixed target 200 of the invention. Therein, the first and second target compositions 224 and 226 are intermixed although the elements 220 and 230 thereof retain their particular opposing appearance or identity.
  • [0031]
    With reference to FIG. 6, there is shown the appearance, in graphic expression, of target A of Competitor 1 in FIG. 3A. Therein, the graphic expression of Force A element 20.1 is shown as a Zero aircraft of design element 20A.1. The target N16 Force A element 20.2 is expressed as elements 20A.2 which is a rendering of a Kate aircraft. The same correspondence proceeds throughout FIG. 6, that is, target A/16 design element 20A.3 comprising a graphic expression of element 20.3 of Force A; design element 20A.4 comprising a design element expression of Force A element 20.4, the aircraft carrier element 28A.5 in FIG. 6 comprising a graphic expression of element 20.5 of Force A of target N16, and the aircraft carrier 20A.6 of FIG. 6 comprising a graphic element corresponding to Force A element 20.6 of target A/16.
  • [0032]
    In FIG. 6 is shown a similar correspondence relative to the conceptual view of FIG. 3B showing target 6/18. That is, graphic element 30A.1 of Fig. B corresponds to element 30.1 of FIG. 3B; 30A.2 to element 30.2; 30A.3 to element 30.3; 30A.4 to element 30.4; 30A.5 to element 30.5, and 30.6 to aircraft carrier 30A.6 of FIG. 6.
  • [0033]
    With respect to the split target protocol 104 shown in FIG. 4 and described above, the graphic expression thereof is shown in FIG. 8 as a single target 104A. Therein the upper field 100A of split target of FIG. 8 is seen to represent a graphic expression of the conceptual target 100 shown in FIG. 4. More particularly, element 120.1 is expressed in target 100A as a Sherman tank 120A.1; element 120.2 of target 100 is expressed as personnel and machine gun carrier 120A.2 in target 100A of FIG. 8. The same form of graphic expression corresponds throughout target 100A, that is, element 120.3 of FIG. 4 corresponding to graphic element 120A.3; element 120.4 corresponding to the tank of element 120A.4 of FIG. 4; element 120.5 corresponding to the Sheffield tank of element 120A.5; and element 120.6 of FIG. 4 corresponding to element 120A.6 expressed as artillery piece on target 100A of FIG. 8.
  • [0034]
    As may be noted, lower field composition 118 of lower target 102 corresponds to the lower target 102A shown in FIG. 8 in which each of the graphic elements thereof represents graphic expressions of the elements 130 of Force B shown in FIG. 4. Therein, element 130.1 corresponds to the Mark 4 Panzer tank of element 130A.1; element 130.2 corresponds to the armored personnel half track of element 130A.2 of FIG. 8; element 130.3 corresponds to the armored personnel carrier and mobile machine gun of element 130A.3; element 130.4 of target field 118 of target B of FIG. 4 is expressed as element 130A.4 upon target 102A of FIG. 8; element 130.5 is expressed as element 130A.5; and element 130.6 is expressed as element as 130A.6 on lower target 102A of split target 104A in FIG. 8.
  • [0035]
    With reference to the mixed target embodiment of the present invention, the graphic expression of the mixed target, target 200, of FIG. 4 is shown as target 200A in FIG. 9. Therein it may be appreciated that, within the interdispersal of Force A elements with Force B elements upon field 224 (field 224A in FIG. 9) is a mix of the forces of the respective shooters. In FIG. 9, aircraft of World War II vintage Royal Air Force are shown interspersed between “enemy” German aircraft of the same period. All Force A elements begin with the digits 220 while all element of the opposing Force begin with the digits 230. Therefrom, it may be seen that Force A element 220.1 of FIG. 4 is expressed as Force A element 220A.1 in FIG. 9; Force A element 220.2 is expressed as element 220A.2; Force A element 220.3 as element 220A.3; and Force A element 220.5 as Force A element 220A.5 in FIG. 9. Correspondingly, with respect to Force B, element 230.1. of FIG. 4 as expressed as Force B element 230A.1 in FIG. 9; element 230.2 as element 230A.2; element 230.3 as element 230A.3; element 230.4 of FIG. 4 is element 230A.4 of FIG. 9; element 230.5 as element 230A.5, and element 230.6 as element 230A.6 of FIG. 9. Therein, opposing “allied” and “enemy” forces, that is, Forces A and B are shown interspaced with each other in the target 200A of FIG. 9 at which both competitors/shooters attempt to score in accordance with the rules of engagement set forth herein.
  • [0036]
    With reference to the flow chart of FIG. 2, there is shown the above set forth methods of target selection, namely, full Force (FIGS. 3A and B), split target (FIG. 4), and mixed target (FIG. 5). However, with respect to further terms, conditions or limitations with which each of said forms of target may be employed, these areas relate to the basic rules of engagement, i.e., unlimited time for shooting, shooting within a limited time, and limited shot rules. As noted in FIG. 2, these are defined as follows:
  • [0037]
    Unlimited time: each side fires at respective targets, whether at the full Force, split, or mixed type, until one side eliminates all of the targets in a designated target system.
  • [0038]
    Limited time: a predetermined total amount of time, as stipulated, within which each shooter is permitted to attempt to score. Within that limited time, each shooter is permitted an unlimited number of shots at his designated target system, namely, Force A or Force B.
  • [0039]
    Limited shot rules: each shooter/player is permitted a pre-determined number of shots at his selected first or second target composition.
  • [0040]
    Within any of the above nine target/rule selections, shown in FIG. 2, various additional limitations or rules may be agreed upon by the parties in each of the target/variations, these as follows:
  • [0041]
    1. Kill ratio basis of scoring. In either of the ‘limited’ versions of the game, at the end of the game, scores are determined by adding the “kill ratios” of all individual components of a “force” that has been completely eliminated. For example, if there five are individual elements 20/30, each with a “kill ratio” of 3, and they have each been hit three times, they would represent a score of 15. However, if one of those components had only been hit twice, that element would not score any points.
  • [0042]
    2. Qualifying shots. Contestants determine what constitutes a ‘hit’ on target, for example, whether flags, masts and/or antennae on ships constitute a hit (see Handicapping below).
  • [0043]
    3. Target order/Contestants may determine the order in which the targets are to be engaged, for example, all fighter aircraft must be eliminated before bombers may be targeted. Other forms of “Target Order” may be: order of target value (i.e., targets are to be destroyed in ascending/descending order or value), or row order (i.e., front rank first, and the like).
  • [0044]
    4. Target elimination. Contestants may determine that once a target with a “kill ratio” of two or more has been hit once, then that target must be completely, eliminated before any other target may be acquired.
  • [0045]
    5. Order of firing. Contestants may decide, particularly when sharing a firing position, to alternate either single or a specified number of shots, or elect an independent ‘fire at will.’
  • [0046]
    6. Penalties for infraction: A penalty may be applied to any infraction of the agreed upon “rules of engagement.” Examples of infractions may include: exceeding the time allowed (if applied to the limited time variant of the game), exceeding the agreed number of shots (if applying the limited shot version of the game), requiring eliminating individual components of Force A or B before acquiring another element of the target composition, and hitting elements out-of-order. Such penalties are of course agreed upon before the commencement of the game and, penalties for such infraction may include the following:
  • [0047]
    1. Point reduction: a competitor's score may be reduced if one of the agreed rules of engagement are breached.
  • [0048]
    2. Shot deduction: if playing the limited shot version of the game, infractions may call for a reduction of total number of shots allowed.
  • [0049]
    3. Time deduction: if using the limited time variant of the game, points may be deducted for a time infraction or, in the case of individual time shots, the player's next shot time allocation may be reduced.
  • [0050]
    4. Handicapping: Handicapping may be applied either as another form of penalty, or as a means of, equalizing any unfair advantage due to differing skill levels or experience. Handicapping may include:
  • [0051]
    “Kill Ratios”—Higher “kill ratios” may be applied to one player/team to equalize skill levels or as a penalty. When using any of the scoring versions of the game, then the original score value of each component will apply to both sides, irrespective of the number of hits required for that component to be eligible to score.
  • [0052]
    “Target Zones”—Specific target zones may be applied to individual components to make it more difficult to eliminate/score. For example, it may be determined that for one player/team, only shots to aircraft from the cockpit to the propeller—or only shots on ships above the hull—or only shots to tanks above the tracks—constitute a hit.
  • [0053]
    “Target Range”—Particularly with “Full Force” targets, distance to target is adjusted to allow for differences in skill levels.
  • [0054]
    While there has been shown and described the preferred embodiment of the instant invention it is to be appreciated that the invention may be embodied otherwise than is herein specifically shown and described and that, within said embodiment, certain changes may be made in the form and arrangement of the parts without departing from the underlying ideas or principles of this invention as set forth in the Claims appended herewith.

Claims (20)

  1. 1-20. (canceled)
  2. 21. A method of competitive marksmanship between at least two shooters shooting at dissimilar and distinct targets, comprising the steps of:
    (a) providing a first shooter with a first target of a first multiplicity of first graphic elements;
    (b) providing a second shooter with a second target of a second multiplicity of second graphic elements, each of the second graphic elements being dissimilar and visually different from each of the first graphic elements;
    (c) selecting target categories for the first target and the second target selected from a group consisting of: separate full force targets with the first target separate from and adjacent to the second target, a single split image target with the first target and the second target split on the single image target, and a single mixed target with the first graphic elements interspersed and mixed together with the second graphic elements in the single mixed target;
    (d) selecting engagement rules for the first shooter and the second shooter selected from the group consisting of: unlimited time and shots for firing at the first target and the second target, a pre-determined amount of time and unlimited shots for firing at the first target and the second target, and a pre-determined number of shots for firing at the first target and the second target; and
    (e) determining a winner based on the first shooter and the second shooter engaging the first target and the second target after selecting one of the selected categories and selecting one of the engagement rules.
  3. 22. The method of claim 21, wherein the steps of providing the first shooter with the first target and providing the second shooter with the second step include the steps of:
    selecting one of the first graphic elements and the second graphic elements to be selected from the group consisting of circles and non-circles, and
    selecting another one of the first and the second graphic elements to be selected from the group consisting of the non-circles and the circles, so that the first graphic elements being the circles has the second graphic elements being the non-circles, and so that the first graphic elements being the non-circles has the second graphic elements being the circles.
  4. 23. The method of claim 21, wherein the steps of providing the first shooter with the first target and providing the second shooter with the second step include the steps of:
    selecting one of the first graphic elements and the second graphic elements to be selected from the group consisting of allied military forces images and enemy military forces images, the allied military forces images being dissimilar and visually different from the enemy military forces images, and
    selecting another one of the first and the second graphic elements to be selected from the group consisting of the enemy military forces images and the allied military forces images, so that the first graphic elements being the allied military forces images has the second graphic elements being the enemy military forces images, and so that the first graphic elements being the enemy military forces images has the second graphic elements being the allied military forces images.
  5. 24. The method of claim 24, wherein the allied military forces images and enemy military forces images are selected from the group consisting of allied and enemy aircraft, allied and enemy tanks, and allied and enemy vessels.
  6. 25. The method of claim 21, wherein the step of determining the winner includes the steps of:
    determining the winner from the unlimited time and shots for firing at the first target and the second target until one shooter eliminates all respective graphic elements;
    determining the winner from the a pre-determined amount of time and unlimited shots for firing at the first target and the second target when greatest accumulate hit value in the pre-determined amount of time occurs;
    determining the winner in the pre-determined number of shots when highest accumulation of hit value after the pre-determined number of shots has been exhausted.
  7. 26. The method of claim 21, wherein the first and the second graphic elements in the single split image target comprise less elements than the first and the second graphic elements the separate full force targets.
  8. 27. The method of claim 21, wherein the category of the separate full force targets includes the first shooter and the second shooter each being in different firing positions or different firing lanes.
  9. 28. The method of claim 21, wherein the category of the single image target includes the first shooter and the second shooter each sharing the same firing position or the same firing lane.
  10. 29. The method of claim 21, wherein the category of the single mixed target includes the first shooter and the second shooter each sharing the same firing position or the same firing lane.
  11. 30. A method of competitive marksmanship between at least two shooters shooting at dissimilar and distinct targets, comprising the steps of:
    (a) providing a first shooter with a first target of a first multiplicity of first graphic elements;
    (b) providing a second shooter with a second target of a second multiplicity of second graphic elements, each of the second graphic elements being dissimilar and visually different from each of the first graphic elements;
    (c) selecting target categories for the first target and the second target selected from a group consisting of separate full force targets with the first target separate from and adjacent to the second target, a single split image target with the first target and the second target split on the single image target, and a single mixed target with the first graphic elements interspersed and mixed together with the second graphic elements in the single mixed target,
    wherein the first and the second graphic elements in the single split image target comprise less elements than the first and the second graphic elements the separate full force targets,
    wherein the category of the separate full force targets includes the first shooter and the second shooter each being in different firing positions or different firing lanes,
    wherein the category of the single image target and the category of the single mixed target each includes the first shooter and the second shooter each sharing the same firing position or the same firing lane,
    (d) selecting engagement rules for the first shooter and the second shooter selected from the group consisting of: unlimited time and shots for firing at the first target and the second target until one shooter eliminates all respective graphic elements to be declared a winner, a pre-determined amount of time and unlimited shots for firing at the first target and the second target wherein greatest accumulate hit value in the pre-determined amount of time is a winner, and a pre-determined number of shots wherein highest accumulation of hit value is a winner after the pre-determined number of shots has been exhausted; and
    (e) determining a winner based on the first shooter and the second shooter engaging the first target and the second target after selecting one of the selected categories and selecting one of the engagement rules.
  12. 31. The method of claim 30, wherein the steps of providing the first shooter with the first target and providing the second shooter with the second step include the steps of:
    selecting one of the first graphic elements and the second graphic elements to be selected from the group consisting of circles and non-circles, and
    selecting another one of the first and the second graphic elements to be selected from the group consisting of the non-circles and the circles, so that the first graphic elements being the circles has the second graphic elements being the non-circles, and so that the first graphic elements being the non-circles has the second graphic elements being the circles.
  13. 32. The method of claim 30, wherein the steps of providing the first shooter with the first target and providing the second shooter with the second step include the steps of:
    selecting one of the first graphic elements and the second graphic elements to be selected from the group consisting of allied military forces images and enemy military forces images, the allied military forces images being dissimilar and visually different from the enemy military forces images, and
    selecting another one of the first and the second graphic elements to be selected from the group consisting of the enemy military forces images and the allied military forces images, so that the first graphic elements being the allied military forces images has the second graphic elements being the enemy military forces images, and so that the first graphic elements being the enemy military forces images has the second graphic elements being the allied military forces images.
  14. 33. The method of claim 32, wherein the allied military forces images and enemy military forces images are selected from the group consisting of allied and enemy aircraft, allied and enemy tanks, and allied and enemy vessels.
  15. 34. A system for competitive marksmanship between at least two shooters, shooting at dissimilar and distinct targets, comprising:
    (a) a first target having a first multiplicity of first graphic elements adapted for a first shooter;
    (b) a second target of a second multiplicity of second graphic elements adapted for a second shooter, each of the second graphic elements being dissimilar and visually different from each of the first graphic elements;
    (c) target categories for the first target and the second target selected from a group consisting of: separate full force targets with the first target separate from and adjacent to the second target, a single split image target with the first target and the second target split on the single image target, and a single mixed target with the first graphic elements interspersed and mixed together with the second graphic elements in the single mixed target;
    (d) engagement rules for the first shooter and the second shooter, the engagement rules selected from the group consisting of: unlimited time and shots for firing at the first target and the second target until one shooter eliminates all respective graphic elements to be declared a winner, a pre-determined amount of time and unlimited shots for firing at the first target and the second target wherein greatest accumulate hit value in the pre-determined amount of time is a winner, and a pre-determined number of shots wherein highest accumulation of hit value is a winner after the pre-determined number of shots has been exhausted.
  16. 35. The system of claim 34, wherein the first and the second graphic elements in the single split image target comprise less elements than the first and the second graphic elements the separate full force targets.
  17. 36. The system of claim 34, wherein the category of the separate full force targets includes the first shooter and the second shooter each being in different firing positions or different firing lanes.
  18. 37. The system of claim 34, wherein the category of the single image target and the category of the single mixed target each includes the first shooter and the second shooter each sharing the same firing position or the same firing lane.
  19. 38. The system of claim 34, wherein the system includes paper targets.
  20. 39. The system of claim 34, wherein the system includes digital targets.
US12704040 2007-08-14 2010-02-11 Method of Competitive Marksmanship and Game Therefore Abandoned US20100140875A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11891927 US20090045579A1 (en) 2007-08-14 2007-08-14 Method of competitive marksmanship and game therefore
US12704040 US20100140875A1 (en) 2007-08-14 2010-02-11 Method of Competitive Marksmanship and Game Therefore

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12704040 US20100140875A1 (en) 2007-08-14 2010-02-11 Method of Competitive Marksmanship and Game Therefore

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20100140875A1 true true US20100140875A1 (en) 2010-06-10

Family

ID=40362349

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11891927 Abandoned US20090045579A1 (en) 2007-08-14 2007-08-14 Method of competitive marksmanship and game therefore
US12704040 Abandoned US20100140875A1 (en) 2007-08-14 2010-02-11 Method of Competitive Marksmanship and Game Therefore

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11891927 Abandoned US20090045579A1 (en) 2007-08-14 2007-08-14 Method of competitive marksmanship and game therefore

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (2) US20090045579A1 (en)

Citations (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US111969A (en) * 1871-02-21 Improvement in miniature war games
US459313A (en) * 1891-09-08 Brick-mold
US3817528A (en) * 1972-06-16 1974-06-18 E Stuhler Toy shooting gallery with magnetically held targets
US4155552A (en) * 1977-11-25 1979-05-22 Emilio Jacobo Dumbbell shaped projectile and balloon target game
US4222564A (en) * 1977-06-13 1980-09-16 Aba Electromechanical Systems, Inc. Automated scoring target system
US4266776A (en) * 1979-02-12 1981-05-12 Goldfarb Adolph E Multi target-shooter game apparatus
US4269631A (en) * 1980-01-14 1981-05-26 International Business Machines Corporation Selective epitaxy method using laser annealing for making filamentary transistors
US4462598A (en) * 1981-12-14 1984-07-31 Chalin Manuel L Vanishing target and arrowhead projectile therefor
US5020806A (en) * 1990-04-16 1991-06-04 Arachnid, Inc. Multiple target electronic dart game
US5050890A (en) * 1991-01-07 1991-09-24 Havens Randal L Dart board game
US5114154A (en) * 1986-08-15 1992-05-19 Sellner Productions, Inc. Scorable shooting gallery amusement ridge with simulated laser weapons at multiple sitations
US5326265A (en) * 1993-02-04 1994-07-05 Prevou J Michael Battlefield reference marking systen signal device
USD381732S (en) * 1995-06-20 1997-07-29 Indicia for a target
US5850885A (en) * 1997-12-19 1998-12-22 Clark; W. Steve Method and apparatus for a game
US6213470B1 (en) * 1999-04-16 2001-04-10 Terry K. Miller Precise aim sighting target
US6323838B1 (en) * 1998-05-27 2001-11-27 Act Labs, Ltd. Photosensitive input peripheral device in a personal computer-based video gaming platform
US20040036223A1 (en) * 2002-03-08 2004-02-26 Wilkus Gerald A. Stand for targets
US20070015116A1 (en) * 2005-07-12 2007-01-18 Coleman Ronald F Method of and apparatus for virtual shooting practice
US7175181B1 (en) * 2004-06-17 2007-02-13 Action Target, Inc. Portable shooting target

Family Cites Families (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US381732A (en) * 1888-04-24 Projector for sea-oiling shells
US392687A (en) * 1888-11-13 payne
US269631A (en) * 1882-12-26 Barb for fences

Patent Citations (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US111969A (en) * 1871-02-21 Improvement in miniature war games
US459313A (en) * 1891-09-08 Brick-mold
US3817528A (en) * 1972-06-16 1974-06-18 E Stuhler Toy shooting gallery with magnetically held targets
US4222564A (en) * 1977-06-13 1980-09-16 Aba Electromechanical Systems, Inc. Automated scoring target system
US4155552A (en) * 1977-11-25 1979-05-22 Emilio Jacobo Dumbbell shaped projectile and balloon target game
US4266776A (en) * 1979-02-12 1981-05-12 Goldfarb Adolph E Multi target-shooter game apparatus
US4269631A (en) * 1980-01-14 1981-05-26 International Business Machines Corporation Selective epitaxy method using laser annealing for making filamentary transistors
US4462598A (en) * 1981-12-14 1984-07-31 Chalin Manuel L Vanishing target and arrowhead projectile therefor
US5114154A (en) * 1986-08-15 1992-05-19 Sellner Productions, Inc. Scorable shooting gallery amusement ridge with simulated laser weapons at multiple sitations
US5020806A (en) * 1990-04-16 1991-06-04 Arachnid, Inc. Multiple target electronic dart game
US5050890A (en) * 1991-01-07 1991-09-24 Havens Randal L Dart board game
US5326265A (en) * 1993-02-04 1994-07-05 Prevou J Michael Battlefield reference marking systen signal device
USD381732S (en) * 1995-06-20 1997-07-29 Indicia for a target
USD392687S (en) * 1996-12-09 1998-03-24 Target game
US5850885A (en) * 1997-12-19 1998-12-22 Clark; W. Steve Method and apparatus for a game
US6323838B1 (en) * 1998-05-27 2001-11-27 Act Labs, Ltd. Photosensitive input peripheral device in a personal computer-based video gaming platform
US6213470B1 (en) * 1999-04-16 2001-04-10 Terry K. Miller Precise aim sighting target
US20040036223A1 (en) * 2002-03-08 2004-02-26 Wilkus Gerald A. Stand for targets
US7175181B1 (en) * 2004-06-17 2007-02-13 Action Target, Inc. Portable shooting target
US20070015116A1 (en) * 2005-07-12 2007-01-18 Coleman Ronald F Method of and apparatus for virtual shooting practice

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20090045579A1 (en) 2009-02-19 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Davidson Under fire: the NRA and the battle for gun control
US5320362A (en) Computer controlled amusement structure
Bourke et al. An intimate history of killing
Murray et al. The Iraq War
Morison Gunfire at sea: a case study of innovation
US20060287113A1 (en) Lazer tag advanced
Bidwell et al. Fire Power: The British Army Weapons & Theories of War 1904-1945
Mané et al. The space fortress game
US20090205239A1 (en) System and Method for Determining Target Range and Coordinating Team Fire
US20080146302A1 (en) Massive Multiplayer Event Using Physical Skills
US3343841A (en) Game board having superimposed grids of different sizes
US6604946B2 (en) Non-lethal small arms projectile for use with a reader-target for amusement, sports and training
US5664782A (en) Football dartboard game
Taylor The Art of War in Italy 1494-1529: Prince Consort Prize Essay 1920
US5642886A (en) Method of playing a simulated golf game
US5035622A (en) Machine gun and minor caliber weapons trainer
US20060038349A1 (en) Set of cards for game playing and related method
Clarke et al. How computer gamers experience the game situation: a behavioral study
US4508508A (en) Firearm training system
US7803048B2 (en) Radar manipulation in a video game
US4801148A (en) Military boardgame
Veitch 'Play up! Play up! and Win the War!'Football, the Nation and the First World War 1914-15
US6209873B1 (en) Role and war game playing system
Lidén Artificial stupidity: The art of intentional mistakes
US4016939A (en) Board game apparatus