US20100032167A1 - Method for Making Wellbore that Maintains a Minimum Drift - Google Patents

Method for Making Wellbore that Maintains a Minimum Drift Download PDF

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Publication number
US20100032167A1
US20100032167A1 US12/511,804 US51180409A US2010032167A1 US 20100032167 A1 US20100032167 A1 US 20100032167A1 US 51180409 A US51180409 A US 51180409A US 2010032167 A1 US2010032167 A1 US 2010032167A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
liner
tubular string
string
upper
method
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Abandoned
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US12/511,804
Inventor
Mark K. Adam
Dennis G. Jiral
Lance M. Rayne
Michael E. McMahan
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Baker Hughes Inc
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Baker Hughes Inc
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Priority to US8726908P priority Critical
Application filed by Baker Hughes Inc filed Critical Baker Hughes Inc
Priority to US12/511,804 priority patent/US20100032167A1/en
Assigned to BAKER HUGHES INCORPORATED reassignment BAKER HUGHES INCORPORATED ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: ADAM, MARK K., JIRAL, DENNIS G., MCMAHAN, MICHAEL E., RAYNE, LANCE M.
Publication of US20100032167A1 publication Critical patent/US20100032167A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/02Subsoil filtering
    • E21B43/10Setting of casings, screens, liners or the like in wells
    • E21B43/103Setting of casings, screens, liners or the like in wells of expandable casings, screens, liners, or the like
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/02Subsoil filtering
    • E21B43/10Setting of casings, screens, liners or the like in wells
    • E21B43/103Setting of casings, screens, liners or the like in wells of expandable casings, screens, liners, or the like
    • E21B43/105Expanding tools specially adapted therefor

Abstract

A well having a minimum drift between or among strings is provided using strings that have a recessed segment and a hanging segment. The length of the recessed segment in the lower end of the upper string is substantially longer than the hanging segment of the lower string that is passed through it. The hanging segments define the drift dimension. In the event the lower string gets stuck in the open hole before it is fully advanced, the hanging segment of the lower string may still be in the recess of the upper string so that the drift dimension can be preserved. Preferably the recess segment is the substantial length of the tubular string apart from its hanging segment near its top end. One or more laterals can be extended through the recessed segments while retaining the drift dimension.

Description

    PRIORITY INFORMATION
  • This application claims priority from U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/087,269, filed on Aug. 8, 2008.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The field of the invention relates to techniques for tubular expansion and sealing in open hole with attachment techniques to an existing tubular.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Various techniques have been developed to expand liners and attach them to existing casing already in the wellbore. Some of these techniques involve running a liner with a wide bell at the bottom where the expansion equipment is located and then driving the swage up the liner and out the top and along the way setting external seals to the surrounding casing as the swage makes an exit. One such process is shown in U.S. Pat. No. 6,470,966. The extensive list of prior art included in that patent is representative of the state of the art in downhole tubular expansion techniques that include attachment to an existing tubular. Other patents show the use of swages that include a series of retractable rollers that can be radially extended downhole to initiate a tubular expansion such as of a casing patch as for example is illustrated in U.S. Pat. No. 6,668,930. Some devices swage in a top to bottom direction as illustrated in U.S. Pat. No. 6,705,395.
  • What is needed and addressed by the present invention are refinements to the previous techniques that improve performance, mitigate risk and save time to reduce the cost to the operator. Techniques involving expansion in stages coupled with cementing in between are envisioned. An adjustable swage to expand on location removes the need for oversized bells to house the expansion equipment as done in some techniques. Techniques using cement or just sealing externally in open hole are envisioned. Composite materials facilitate subsequent drill out while improved shoe configuration improves circulation when tripping into the hole. The shoe and/or liner can be rotationally locked to work the string for delivery downhole. These and other advantages will become more apparent to one skilled in the art from a review of the description of the preferred embodiments and the associated drawings, while recognizing that the full scope of the invention is given by the claims.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • An expansion and cementing assembly is run into the well as the expandable liner is made up. A work string is tagged into the expansion assembly and run to depth. Pressure drives the swage to initially expand and move uphole with the attached work string until the liner is expanded above the location of the subsequent cement placement. The assembly is then lowered to engage the guide/float shoe to perform the cementing step. The swage assembly is then released from the guide/float shoe and the balance of the expansion is performed without further expansion against the recently placed cement. The expansion assembly can start at the guide/float shoe or higher, in which case expansion can occur initially in a downhole direction and later be completed in an uphole direction. Variations without cementing are also contemplated.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a view of a wellbore that has been cased with an open hole segment below;
  • FIG. 2 is the view of FIG. 1 showing a liner with a float shoe inserted into the open hole segment through the casing;
  • FIG. 3 is the view of FIG. 2 with the swage assembly being run in;
  • FIG. 4 is the view of FIG. 3 with the circulation established through the swage assembly and the float shoe as the liner is run in;
  • FIG. 5 is the view of FIG. 4 with the swage assembly expanded but not yet driven;
  • FIG. 6 is the view of FIG. 5 with the swage assembly released from the supporting string and being driven down to the float shoe;
  • FIG. 7 is the view of FIG. 6 with the circulation re-established after the swage assembly engages the float shoe;
  • FIG. 8 is the view of FIG. 7 with the support string releasing the liner and being advanced further into the liner using additional stands added above;
  • FIG. 9 is the view of FIG. 8 with the swage assembly again latched to the supporting string and cement pumped through the float shoe to fill the annulus around the already expanded liner;
  • FIG. 10 is the view of FIG. 9 with the swage assembly now driven up to complete the expansion of the liner top into the casing;
  • FIG. 11 is the view of FIG. 10 with the swage assembly out of the fully expanded liner and the liner hanger to the surrounding casing engaged;
  • FIG. 12 is a view similar to FIG. 1 to illustrate an alternative method;
  • FIG. 13 is the view of FIG. 12 with the liner in the well showing a swage assembly connected to the float shoe;
  • FIG. 14 is the view of FIG. 13 with the work string run in to engage the swage assembly;
  • FIG. 15 is the view of FIG. 14 with the circulation established as the liner is run into the open hole;
  • FIG. 16 is the view of FIG. 15 with the swage assembly extended in the liner;
  • FIG. 17 is the view of FIG. 16 with the swage assembly pressure released from the float shoe and ready to move uphole;
  • FIG. 18 is the view of FIG. 17 with the swage assembly driven uphole;
  • FIG. 19 is the view of FIG. 18 with the swage assembly again engaged to the float show after initial expansion;
  • FIG. 20 is the view of FIG. 19 with the annulus around the expanded portion of the liner being cemented;
  • FIG. 21 is the view of FIG. 20 with the swage assembly driven up to complete the expansion above the cemented zone and engage the hanger on the liner to the casing;
  • FIG. 22 is the view of FIG. 21 with the swage assembly removed from the liner;
  • FIG. 23 is another view of FIG. 1 for an alternative embodiment without cementing the liner;
  • FIG. 24 is the view of FIG. 23 with the liner in the hole and suspended from the surface with an open hole packer outside the liner;
  • FIG. 25 is the view of FIG. 24 with the string latched into the swage assembly that is supported at the float shoe;
  • FIG. 26 is the view of FIG. 25 with the circulation established for running in the liner;
  • FIG. 27 is the view of FIG. 26 with the swage assembly expanded;
  • FIG. 28 is the view of FIG. 27 with the swage assembly released to move uphole from the float shoe;
  • FIG. 29 is the view of FIG. 28 with the liner expanded and the open hole packer set;
  • FIG. 30 is the view of FIG. 29 with the swage expanding the hanger on the liner into contact with the casing; and
  • FIG. 31 is the view of FIG. 30 with the swage assembly out of the liner and the float shoe ready to be drilled out or retrieved to the surface.
  • FIG. 32 shows an open hole that can be under reamed with respect to the cased hole above;
  • FIG. 33 shows a liner inserted and expanded to hang off the casing above with options to seal it with cement or external packers or both or neither;
  • FIG. 34 shows an under reamed open hole below the already expanded and hung off liner;
  • FIG. 35 shows a production string through the expanded liner and hung off the casing where the production string can be cemented or not as needed;
  • FIG. 36 shows a casing patch application using expansion;
  • FIG. 37 shows an open hole patch using expansion;
  • FIG. 38 shows an open hole patch in an under reamed hole;
  • FIG. 39 shows an under reamed open hole below a cased hole;
  • FIG. 40 is the view of FIG. 39 with a liner inserted and expanded to create a lower bell in the under reamed portion of the well;
  • FIG. 41 is the view of FIG. 40 with the shoe drilled out of the bottom of the expanded liner and further showing a variety of sizes of new hole to be drilled deeper;
  • FIG. 42 is the view of FIG. 41 with a production string run in and hung off the casing and optionally cemented;
  • FIG. 43 is the view of FIG. 41 with a second liner hung off from the bell of the liner above and optionally externally sealed with cement or/and one or more packers pr neither;
  • FIG. 44 is the view of FIG. 43 with the lower liner expanded in two dimensions to create a lower bell;
  • FIG. 45 is the view of FIG. 44 with the length of the liner below the liner lap expanded to allow for high setting a subsequent liner in the event of a hole collapse;
  • FIG. 46 shows a sequence of liners allowing the sidetrack exit while maintaining bore size;
  • FIG. 47 shows a cased hole with a bell on the lower end of the casing that can be there for run in or created with expansion of a subsequent liner and an under reamed open hole below;
  • FIG. 48 is the view of FIG. 45 with a liner run in and hung off in the casing bell and optionally sealed with cement or/and one or more external packers or neither;
  • FIG. 49 shows a casing with a lower bell and an upper liner hung from the bell with an open hole below the size of the expanded liner or under reamed; and
  • FIG. 50 is the view of FIG. 47 with a production liner inserted through the expanded liner above it and the production liner hung from above the bell in the casing;
  • FIG. 51 shows a cased hole with a bell on the lower end of the casing that can be there for run in or created with expansion of a subsequent liner and an under reamed open hole below.
  • FIG. 52 is the view of FIG. 51 with a liner run in and hung off in the casing bell with a second casing bell positioned at the bottom that can be created upon expansion of the liner or created with expansion of a subsequent liner and is optionally sealed with cement and/or one or more external packers or neither.
  • FIG. 53 is the view of FIG. 52 with the shoe drilled out and the open hole below under reamed to accommodate a subsequent liner.
  • FIG. 54 is the view of FIG. 53 with an additional liner shown run in and hung off as the one above it and as subsequent liners can also be installed.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • FIG. 1 shows casing 10 in a wellbore 12 that extends from the surface 14. The open hole portion 16 has a pilot hole 18 at the lower end. A rig 19 is illustrated schematically at the surface 14. In FIG. 2 a liner 20 is supported from the rig 19 and extends into the open hole 16. Liner 20 has a hanger/packer 22 on the outside that will eventually support the liner 20 and seal it to the casing 10. A sealed latch assembly 24 is located inside the float shoe 26. Float shoe 26 has a spring loaded one way valve 28 as well as a bottom exit 30 as well as side exits 32. The side exits promote well conditioning during circulation when running in the liner 20. The float shoe 26 allows flow in the liner 20 to exit but prevents reverse flow such as cement later pumped through the liner 20 and into the surrounding annulus 34. The float shoe 26 can also be made of a soft composite material or other similar materials that promote rapid drill out after the cementing is completed.
  • FIG. 3 shows the insertion of an assembly 36 that comprises from the bottom up a latch component 38 designed to seal and latch to component 24 when brought into contact with it. Further uphole is a piston assembly 40 designed to selectively change the size of the adjustable swage 42 such as is illustrated in U.S. Pat. No. 7,128,146, for example. Further up is an uphole oriented swab cup 44 and a disconnect 46. A section of pipe 50 spaces the lower swab cup 44 from an oppositely oriented upper swab cup 48. Further up is a running tool 52 shown gripping the interior of the liner 20 and finally an annular debris barrier 54 is designed to keep debris from getting into the liner 20 as it is circulated when being run into the well 12.
  • FIG. 4 shows a run in string 56 starting to be assembled above the debris barrier 54 and the liner 20 now supported through the string 56 off of rig 19 as it is delivered deeper into the wellbore with circulation through the assembly 36 represented by arrow 58 and return flow represented by arrow 60. In this view it is easy to see the function of the debris barrier 54. The valve 28 responds to delivered pressure from the surface 14 to open and let the flow out through the lateral shoe passages 32 to allow for a secondary flow path in case the bottom is plugged when resting on bottom.
  • In FIG. 5 a plug or dart or some other obstructing device 62 is dropped or pumped until landed to seal off passage 64. Then with passage 64 closed at its lower end and pressurized the pressure 66 acts on piston assembly 40 as indicated by arrows 66. The swage assembly 42 grows in radial dimension to create an initial bump out 68 in the liner 20.
  • In FIG. 6 the pressure in passage 64 has been further increased to cause a separation between components 46 so that the applied pressure in passage 64 now can enter space 70 as indicated by arrows 72. That pressure acts on lower swab cup 44 that looks uphole while the liner 20 which is gripped by running tool 52 and is supported off of string 56 from rig 19 remains immobile despite uphole pressure on upper swab cup 48 which is downhole oriented. Arrows 66 indicate that pressure on the piston assembly 40 continues to keep the swage assembly 42 at an enlarged dimension as it travels toward the float shoe 26 until components 38 and 24 re-latch and seal as shown in FIG. 7.
  • In FIG. 7 components 38 and 24 have latched and a pressure buildup has popped a disc internal to dart 62 so that circulation can be established with the bulk of the liner 20 below the casing 10 already expanded. Arrows 72 and 74 represent circulation flow through passages 32 and 36 in the float shoe 26.
  • FIG. 8 shows that circulation has stopped and the float shoe 28 is resting on bottom in the pilot hole 18. The string 56 is being added to at the surface 14 to again bring together the connection 46 so that cementing around the already expanded portion of the liner 20 can take place.
  • In FIG. 9 the connection 46 is brought together in a sealing relationship and cement 76 is delivered into annulus 34 to the top 77 of the expanded portion of liner 20. The cement 76 goes down passage 64 and through the one way valve 28 in the float shoe 26 to the annulus 34. A wiper plug or dart 78 wipes passage 64 clear of the cement 76. Optionally some cement 76 can be pumped above plug 78 to ease subsequent drill out as shown in FIG. 10.
  • In FIG. 10 with wiper plug 78 remaining landed a buildup of pressure in passage 64 builds an uphole pressure on sealed latch 24 which has a downhole oriented swab cup 80 whose presence results in an uphole force represented by arrow 82 to drive the assembly 36 uphole to finish the expansion of the liner 20 into a sealed relationship with the casing 10. The swage assembly 42 remains at maximum dimension because the piston assembly 40 is pressurized at this time as the movement uphole of the 36 continues.
  • FIG, 11 shows the expansion of the liner 20 to be complete and the hanger/packer 24 set to the casing 10 as a result of the conclusion of the expansion. It should be noted that the uphole oriented expansion of FIG. 10 does not occur against cement 76 already in annulus 34. Rather, expansion continues once the extended swage assembly 42 reaches the location 77 which marked the end of expansion. The assembly 36 can now come all the way out of the liner 20. The shoe 26 can now be drilled out and more hole can be drilled.
  • FIG. 12 begins another embodiment for a well with casing 100 and an open hole portion 102 terminating in a pilot hole 104. In FIG. 13 a liner string 106 is supported from a rig 108. At the bottom of the liner 106 is a float shoe 110 with a one way valve 112 and lateral exits 114. The float shoe 110 has a seat 116 for landing a plug as will be later described. A latch assembly 118 releasably holds the swage assembly 120 and the piston assembly 122 that controls the dimension of the swage assembly 120 to the float shoe 110. Above the piston assembly 122 is one portion 124 of a latch assembly. Outside the liner 106 is a hanger/packer 126.
  • FIG. 14 shows a string 128 with another portion 130 of a connection that will seal and connect to portion 124. Alternatively, the running string 128 could deliver the piston assembly 122 and the swage assembly 120 with a latch below that engages the float shoe 110. This engagement can be with a type HRD running tool sold by Baker Oil Tools or an equivalent.
  • FIG. 15 shows the liner 106 lowered to the pilot hole 104 and circulation through string 128 out ports 112 and 114 and up through the annulus 133 as represented by arrows 132 and 134 as such lowering is taking place. A debris barrier 136 is at the top of liner 106 for the reason explained before. String 128 supports the liner 106 near its lower end using latch assembly 118.
  • FIG. 16 shows that circulation has stopped and a plug 138 has been landed on seat 116 to allow pressure built up in string 128 to reach the piston assembly 122 so that its movement causes the swage assembly 120 move out to a larger dimension putting a bump out 142 in liner 106. Further pressure buildup as shown in FIG. 17 releases the latch connection 118 to the float shoe 110.
  • FIG. 18 shows pressure buildup against the plug 138 increasing the volume of chamber 144 as the swage assembly 120 continues to hold its enlarged dimension by virtue of continuous pressure on the piston assembly 122 schematically represented by arrow 140. The uphole expansion is allowed to continue to a point below the bottom of the casing 100 but leaves the liner 106 expanded over substantially its entire length.
  • FIG. 19 shows the string 128 lowered so that latch 118 is back inside float shoe 110 and secured and a follow on pressure buildup blows a passage through the plug 138 so that the assembly is ready for cementing as shown in FIG. 20. In FIG. 20 cement 145 is delivered through passages 112 and 114 at a pressure that keeps the piston assembly 122 ports closed. After cement 145 is delivered to annulus 133 up to location 146 on the liner 106 representing where expansion stopped, a wiper plug 148 is landed on the now opened plug 138. Optionally some cement 145 can be pumped above plug 148 to ease subsequent drill out as shown in FIG. 20.
  • Once again pressure is built up from the FIG. 20 position to cause latch 118 to release and to allow the swage assembly 120 held extended by piston assembly 122 that is now under pressure to be driven up through the already expanded portion to location 146 and then further up to the top of the liner 106. The swage assembly 120 can optionally have a backup seal like a swab cup 150 shown in FIG. 20 so that it can keep a seal while driven up to the location 146 where expansion will continue until the hanger/packer 126 is against the casing 100, as shown in FIG. 21, and for continued movement until the entire liner 106 is expanded and all the expansion equipment is removed as shown in FIG. 22. At that point the float shoe 110 can be milled out.
  • FIG. 23 starts an embodiment that tracks the previous embodiment only without cementing and instead using an open hole packer to seal the annulus around the expanded liner. As before a casing 200 is above an open hole 202 that is drilled or 204 if it is under-reamed. A rig 206 is at the surface 208. As shown in FIG. 24, the liner string 210 has a hanger/packer 212 for eventual support and sealing contact with the casing 200 and one or more external open hole packers 214 such as for example FORMpac® or REPacker® sold by Baker Oil Tools. At the lower end of the liner 210 is a float shoe 216 with a one way valve 218 and side outlets 220 and a lower port 220A. A latch assembly 222 is latched into the float shoe 216 for ultimate support of the liner 210 as will be explained below. Going uphole there is an adjustable swage assembly 224 with a piston operating assembly 226 and a connector profile 228. FIG. 25 illustrates a running string 230 with a connector 232 at its lower end adapted to contact connector profile 228 for a supporting and sealed connection to allow running in the liner 210 to the pilot hole 234 as shown in FIG. 26. As stated before for an alternative, the assembly that is above the float shoe 216 can be run into the liner 210 after the liner is assembled in the wellbore 202 or 204. In FIG. 26, string 230 is used to lower liner 210 while circulation represented by arrows 236 and 238 flowing through lateral outlets 220 and lower port 220A facilitate the advancement of the liner 210. A debris barrier 240 prevents debris from entering the liner 210 during circulation as it is advanced into the wellbore.
  • In FIG. 27 a plug 242 is landed to allow pressure buildup in the string that is represented by arrow 244, This pressure actuates the piston assembly 226 to increase the size of the swage assembly 224 and to create a bump out 246 in the liner 210. As shown in FIG. 28 further pressure increase and set down weight releases the latch assembly 222 so that the swage assembly 224 start being powered uphole with pressure and/or overpull. An optional seal such as a swab cup 248 could be used with the swage assembly 224 in the event that the swage assembly itself will not sufficiently seal against the liner it is trying to expand as better illustrated in FIG. 29. Also in FIG. 29 the swage assembly is moved up the substantial length of the liner 210 with the result being that the open hole packer 214 is sealed against the open hole 202. Multiple open hole packers can be run. Because there is no cementing in this embodiment, the swage assembly can be driven continuously until the hanger/packer is set against the casing 200 as shown in FIG. 30. The expansion equipment is removed as shown in FIG. 31 out the top of the liner 210 and the float shoe 216 can be milled out.
  • The remaining FIGS. focus on some applications of the techniques described above. FIG. 32 shows a parent casing 300 and more hole drilled that can include under reaming as represented by 301 or simply an extension of the hole that is the size of the parent casing 300 as represented by the dashed line in FIG. 32. This view was previously illustrated in other FIGS. discussed earlier.
  • FIG. 33 is a split view indication that liner 302 is hung off the casing 300 using a hanger/packer 320. At the lower end is a shoe 303. The view is split showing that liner 302 is sealed with cement 304 on the left or with an external packer or seal 305 on the right as an alternative. As another alternative the cement 304 and seal 305 can be used together. There can be one or more seals 305 employed. The packer 305 can seal either to the smaller or larger bore such as 301 depending on how the hole is drilled and which sealing device is used.
  • FIG. 34 shows the liner 302 expanded and hung off the parent casing 300 and the shoe 303 drilled out with the annulus around the liner 302 isolated. More hole 310 is drilled which could be a straight bore or an under reamed bore as actually shown.
  • FIG. 35 shows a second liner 311 through the expanded liner 302 and hung off the parent casing 300. Although the liner 311 is shown cemented, it could also be in open hole without cement and it could be slotted. Alternatively it could be hung off liner 302 but hanging off the casing 300 allows a larger inside diameter for liner 311. Additionally, the hanging of liner 311 from casing 300 allows for subsequent flow to be isolated from the expanded liner 302 which might have not have the required pressure capacity or corrosion resistance. The extension bore if under reamed allows lower circulation pressure when cementing the production liner 311. The staging of the liners 302 and 311 allows different mud weights to be used to account for differing formation properties so as to avoid mud loss or formation damage during drilling and subsequent running of the string 311.
  • FIG. 36 shows a casing patch application where the casing 400 has a break or a crack or is otherwise damaged 401 and a section of tubular 402 can be inserted into position and expanded by the techniques described above so that pair of straddling seals 403 are disposed on opposed sides of the break 401. Alternatively, longer continuous seals can be expanded to cover the damaged sections in place of straddling. Alternatively, the tubular 402 can be expanded into the inside wall of the casing 400 without seals such as 403 and simple expansion results in a tight seal that can be metal to metal.
  • FIG. 37 illustrates an open hole patch application where additional hole 411 has been drilled past the casing 410 and in the open hole region there is a fluid loss zone, water or other undesirable fluid is being produced into the wellbore, and/or sloughing formation. The tubular patch 412 can be run in and expanded in the manner shown before with the use of external packers 413 to straddle the zone where the losses or unwanted inflow or sloughing is occurring. Alternatively, longer continuous seals can be expanded to cover the damaged sections in place of straddling. It should be noted that there may be a reduction in the drift diameter in the patch 412 as compared to the drift diameter of the casing 420 which will restrict the passage of bit and drill string assemblies, possibly leading to a smaller open hold being drilled below the open hole patch. However, FIG. 38 is the same view as FIG. 37 with the drilled hole 411 having been under reamed in the troublesome zone so that after expansion of the patch 412 to engage the seals 413 the drift diameter of the patch is at least as large as the drift diameter in the casing 420 and maintains the bit passage diameter for continuous drilling of the hole further.
  • FIG. 39 starts another sequence of views with a cased hole 430 and an under reamed open hole 431 below it. In FIG. 40 a liner 432 has been inserted and expanded to two diameters or possibly more diameters depending on the cone capabilities. The smaller diameter is in casing 433 and the larger diameter is in the under reamed open hole 431 below. As covered before, a shoe 434 can be run if cement 435 is the option selected or if the alternative of external packers 436 is used. In either even the shoe provides a seat as a part of the expansion process previously discussed. The inside dimension of the liner 437 in the open hole is at least as large as its inside diameter inside the casing 433. In FIG. 41 the shoe 434 is drilled out and additional hole 438 is drilled with a possible variation of the degree of under reaming which accounts for the dashed and solid line in the FIG. The innermost dashed line 439 represents the hole that would be made with the largest bit to fit through the top of the liner 432 while the next series of dashed lines represent under reaming to get the inside dimension of the lower end 437 of the same liner that had previously been expanded into an under reamed portion of the well above. The solid line represents a continuation of the bore size above. FIG. 42 shows another tubular 440 which can be the production string inserted and optionally cemented with cement 441 although it could be left in open hole without cement. Essentially what will pass through the top 432 of the liner above can be used. Again the lower bore size depends on formation conditions and whether cementing is to be done. In FIG. 42 the hole is under reamed to be about the size of the expanded portion 437 of the liner above. The string 440 is hung and/or sealed off inside the casing 442 but could optionally be hung off the bell portion 437 of the upper liner. The latter is illustrated in FIG. 43 where the second liner 446 is expanded and hung and/or sealed off at 445 to the already expanded liner above and in the enlarged bell portion. The string 446 can be cemented 448 or sealed with external packers 447. At the top, it can be hung from the bell of the previously expanded liner above using a hanger/packer 445. Note that there is no reduction in drift size as between the smallest dimension of the liner above 432 and the expanded dimension of the string 446. This is due to the lower string 446 being hung off in the bell of the liner above at hanger/packer 445.
  • In FIG. 44 the upper and lower liners are expanded to two or more different dimensions. The lower liner is hung with hanger packer 452 in the bell of the liner above it. The lower portion 453 of the lower liner is flared out so that the choke points for flow are at the hanging areas of both liners and in each case there is no reduction of drift regardless how many strings are run and sequentially hung from the string above. Here again the option of cementing 455 or using an external packer or packers 454 is also illustrated. The process can be repeated to add additional expandable liners until depth is reached. Open hole production can be another option.
  • FIG. 45 shows a progression of FIG. 44 where the second liner 456 has been drilled out and the open hole 457 has been under reamed to accommodate another expandable liner. The third liner 458 is shown off bottom due to a collapse of the open hole 459. Alternatively, the liner could become stuck in the open hole for a variety of reasons including differential sticking and fill. Although the third liner 458 did not reach its targeted depth, it is still able to be expanded in two or more dimensions, maintaining flexibility for further wellbore construction. The extended recess section length of the previous liner 456 accommodates the length that the third liner 458 is set high by means of a longer liner lap. It can therefore be seen that the extended recess diameter section of the previous liner increases the flexibility of operations and mitigates risk beyond that of a shorter recess length. If a shorter recess length were present in the second liner 456, then the third liner 458 would not have been able to be expanded without restricting the pass through diameter.
  • FIG. 46 is a further embodiment of the operational flexibility and risk mitigation provided by the extended recess diameter length. A third liner 460 has been installed into the wellbore below a second expandable liner 461. The third liner 460 is shown in a no longer useable form as collapsed. Alternatively, the third liner could be leaking, not fully expanded, or otherwise damaged. Alternatively, the open hole below an undamaged third liner 460 could render the third liner unusable if for example the open hole stopped producing hydrocarbons, started producing water, or opened up for fluid losses. The sidetrack technique is then employed above the third liner 460 milling a window out of the side of the second liner 461 in a section that has been expanded to the recess diameter. After the window is milled the open hole section is further drilled and under reamed as required to accommodate running in a fourth liner 463 out of the window. The fourth liner is expanded in two or more dimensions and a hanger packer 462 is hung and/or sealed off in the recess diameter section of the second liner 461. The section of the fourth liner 463 outside of the milled window in the second liner 461 is able to be expanded to the recess diameter. Open hole isolation for the fourth liner 463 is accomplished with cement 464 and/or the use of open hole packer or packers 465. The bottom of the fourth liner 463 has been drilled out for further wellbore construction. All of the operational flexibility and risk mitigation provided by the two or more dimension expansion of the fourth liner and the recess resulting can be utilized in further wellbore construction such as: several additional Monobore liners are able to be run, ability to perform additional sidetracks, ability to set subsequent liners off of bottom, and running production strings of pipe to produce reservoirs without reducing the size of these production strings due to restricted pass through.
  • FIG. 47 shows and upper casing 470 that has a bell at the lower end either in the condition installed or due to expansion into it of the first liner to be hung. In FIG. 45 there is no liner in the hole but the FIG. is intended to be schematic of both ways a bell can be formed. FIG. 48 shows a liner 473 hung with hanger/packer 472 in the bell of casing 470. Again the shoe is used to expand the string 473 and to facilitate cementing 476 or use of an external packer or packers 475 or both or neither if production will occur from open hole. FIG. 49 shows the shoe 474 drilled out and the hole 477 extended to the diameter of the expanded liner above. It can be under reamed to make it even larger should the formation characteristics and the cement delivery pressure be an issue. Running clearance could also be an issue that would warrant under reaming for running in of the liner 478 shown in FIG. 50. The production liner 478 can be cemented 479 or it can be in open hole without cement or sealed with external packers. The string 478 is hung off the smaller dimension of the casing above the bell where the upper liner is supported. As a result of two dimension expansion of the upper liner with the upper end in the bell of the casing and the upper wellbore under reamed, the resulting internal dimension to depth is not reduced and the use of the upper liner for staged completion of the well does not narrow the size of the production liner 478 which is dictated by the casing size where the production liner 478 is shown to be supported in FIG. 50.
  • FIGS. 51-54 show a progression of the wellbore construction concepts shown in FIGS. 47-50 in which the subsequent liner also contains a bell for the sake of being able to repeat the process multiple times without restriction of pass through. FIG. 51 shows and upper casing 480 that has a bell 481 at the lower end either in the condition installed or due to expansion into it of the first liner to be hung. In FIG. 51 there is no liner in the hole but the FIG. is intended to be schematic of both ways a bell can be formed. FIG. 52 shows a liner 483 hung with hanger/packer 482 in the bell 481 of casing 480. Again the shoe 484 is used to expand the string 483 and to facilitate cementing 486 or use of an external packer or packers 485 or both or neither. FIG. 52 shows a bell section at the bottom of the liner 483 that is created either as a part of the process of expansion of this string or upon the installation of subsequent liner. FIG. 53 shows the shoe 484 drilled out and the hole 487 drilled out and under reamed as above. FIG. 54 shows the installation of a second liner 489 hung with a hanger/packer 488 in the bell of the previous liner. Zonal isolation is shown to be performed either with cement 492, one or more open hole packers 490, or both or neither. The second liner 489 contains a bell section 491 as the previous liner that can be used to hang off subsequent liners without restricting the wellbore.
  • Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the various embodiments offer many advantages that include improved circulation from the lateral ports in the float shoe and a fast drill out from using soft materials for the float shoe. There is an ability to transmit torque through the liner string as it is being advanced right down to the float shoe. Using an adjustable swage removes the need for a bell portion in the liner assembly reducing surge/swab effects. The liner is substantially expanded prior to cementing making for a smaller volume to cement with shorter pump times and earlier compressive strength. The balance of the expansion to tie the liner to the casing is not done against cement. The adjustable swage also allows removal through the liner at any time should the full expansion of the liner become impossible for some reason.
  • The above description is illustrative of the preferred embodiment and many modifications may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the invention whose scope is to be determined from the literal and equivalent scope of the claims below.

Claims (14)

1. A method of creating a well while maintaining a minimum drift between or among when connected successive tubular strings, comprising:
providing at least one upper tubular string for support in a wellbore;
configuring said upper tubular string to have a hanging segment adjacent an upper end thereof whose internal dimension defines the drift dimension and an adjacent recess segment having a larger dimension than said internal dimension that defines said drift dimension;
positioning at least one lower tubular string through said internal dimension and overlapping said recess segment of said upper tubular string;
providing at least one of a sealing and a hanging device extending on said lower string down a predetermined distance from a top of said lower tubular string;
configuring the height of said recess dimension of said upper string to be substantially longer than said predetermined distance;
expanding said one of a sealing and hanging device of said lower tubular string into said recess segment so that the internal diameter of said predetermined distance is at least as large as said drift dimension.
2. The method of claim 1, comprising:
configuring the height of said recess dimension of said upper string to be long enough to accommodate at least one window that allows said lower tubular string to exit through said recess segment of said upper tubular string.
3. The method of claim 2, comprising:
creating a lateral by extending a portion of said lower tubular string through said window where the internal dimension of said window is at least as large as said drift dimension.
4. The method of claim 1, comprising:
making the recess segment of said upper tubular string extend the balance of the overall length of said upper tubular string beyond said hanging segment.
5. The method of claim 1, comprising:
extending the wellbore beyond said upper tubular string a sufficient depth to allow the top of said lower tubular string to reach a lower end within the recess segment of said upper tubular string;
being unable to fully advance said top of said lower tubular string to said lower end of said recess segment of said upper tubular string;
securing said at least one of a hanging and a sealing device on said lower tubular string to said recessed segment of said upper tubular string at whatever location said lower tubular string ceases to advance.
6. The method of claim 3, comprising:
creating at least one lateral drift dimension by adding at least one liner string to said lateral beyond said window.
7. The method of claim 1, comprising:
expanding another portion of said second tubular string to a larger dimension than said internal dimension that defines said drift to create a second tubular string recess segment.
8. The method of claim 7, comprising:
configuring said recess segment on said lower tubular string at least as long as said recess segment on said upper tubular string.
9. The method of claim 7, comprising:
creating a main bore with at least said upper and lower tubular strings that retains said drift dimension.
10. The method of claim 9, comprising:
providing at least one lateral from said main bore through at least one of said recess segments using another string.
11. The method of claim 1, comprising:
sealing an annular space around at least one of said upper and lower tubular strings with a sealing material.
12. The method of claim 1, comprising:
sealing an annular space around at least one of said upper and lower tubular strings with an open hole packer.
13. The method of claim 12, comprising:
using a swelling sealing element in said open hole packer.
14. The method of claim 11, comprising:
sealing an annular space around at least one of said upper and lower tubular strings with an open hole packer.
US12/511,804 2008-08-08 2009-07-29 Method for Making Wellbore that Maintains a Minimum Drift Abandoned US20100032167A1 (en)

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US20100032168A1 (en) 2010-02-11
US8225878B2 (en) 2012-07-24
US8215409B2 (en) 2012-07-10

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