US20090050590A1 - Storage system and methods - Google Patents

Storage system and methods Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20090050590A1
US20090050590A1 US11844745 US84474507A US2009050590A1 US 20090050590 A1 US20090050590 A1 US 20090050590A1 US 11844745 US11844745 US 11844745 US 84474507 A US84474507 A US 84474507A US 2009050590 A1 US2009050590 A1 US 2009050590A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
member
shelf
biasing
container
storage
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11844745
Inventor
H. Michael Lutgen
Original Assignee
Lutgen H Michael
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47BTABLES; DESKS; OFFICE FURNITURE; CABINETS; DRAWERS; GENERAL DETAILS OF FURNITURE
    • A47B47/00Cabinets, racks or shelf units, characterised by features related to dismountability or building-up from elements
    • A47B47/0083Cabinets, racks or shelf units, characterised by features related to dismountability or building-up from elements with four vertical uprights
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47BTABLES; DESKS; OFFICE FURNITURE; CABINETS; DRAWERS; GENERAL DETAILS OF FURNITURE
    • A47B67/00Chests; Dressing-tables; Medicine cabinets or the like; Cabinets characterised by the arrangement of drawers
    • A47B67/04Chests of drawers; Cabinets characterised by the arrangement of drawers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47BTABLES; DESKS; OFFICE FURNITURE; CABINETS; DRAWERS; GENERAL DETAILS OF FURNITURE
    • A47B81/00Cabinets or racks specially adapted for other particular purposes, e.g. for storing guns or skis
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47BTABLES; DESKS; OFFICE FURNITURE; CABINETS; DRAWERS; GENERAL DETAILS OF FURNITURE
    • A47B88/00Drawers for tables, cabinets or like furniture; Guides for drawers
    • A47B88/40Sliding drawers; Slides or guides therefor

Abstract

A storage system that includes a storage rack and a plurality of containers. The storage rack includes a frame assembly, a plurality of shelf members, and at least one biasing member. The biasing member is positioned on one of the shelf members and extends into a storage space defined two adjacent shelves that is sized to receive a container. The biasing member applies a biasing force upon a container positioned in the storage space thereby retaining the container in the storage rack. The biasing member can be a separately formed piece that is mounted to the shelf member. Alternatively, the biasing member can be formed integral with the shelf member such that addition of the biasing member to the storage rack does not require additional material.

Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present disclosure generally relates to storage devices and systems, and more particularly relates to storage devices and systems for use in holding containers and related methods.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Different types of specimen storage systems and methods are used in the medical and biological industries. One example storage system is a storage rack that holds a plurality of containers, wherein the containers each house frozen biological specimens. An example storage system includes a plurality of compartments sized to receive the containers. The compartments are stacked vertically. Access to the compartments is available along a single side surface of the storage system. The storage system holds the containers while the containers are placed in a frozen environment that maintains the frozen state of the biological specimens. Some example frozen environments include chest freezers that maintain temperatures as low as −100° F., and liquid Nitrogen freezers that can maintain temperatures as low as −300° F. These types of freezers are typically relatively deep, requiring that the storage racks that hold the containers to be relatively tall.
  • Storage racks with a locking rod that traverses the openings into the storage rack where the containers are inserted have been used to help prevent the containers from falling out of the storage racks during storage and the retrieval process. Locking rods result in several disadvantages. One disadvantage relates to the fabrication problem of providing alignment of all the holes in the storage rack for the locking rod to fit through. Another disadvantage is the extra height and depth of the storage rack required for the locking rod. The most significant disadvantage of locking rods is the operation challenge of having to remove the locking rod to retrieve a sample. When handling a relatively tall storage rack, the locking rod is equally long and must be drawn upward a height sometimes as tall as the operator. Handling the locking rod can be difficult when wearing necessary protective equipment such as gloves that protect against freezer burn when handling the storage rack. Furthermore, removal of the locking rod has to be done while the rack is out of the refrigerated environment, which creates the potential of the specimens inside and outside of the refrigerated environment warming up and thawing out while handling the storage rack.
  • Another storage rack feature that has been used to retain containers are spring clips mounted to the sides of the storage rack. The spring clips are welded in place and exert a biasing force on the sidewalls of the container to hold the containers within the storage rack. Side mounted spring clips also have many disadvantages, such as added cost, increased manufacturing complexity, and additional width requirements for the storage rack.
  • A storage system that addresses these and other shortcomings would be an advance in the art.
  • SUMMARY
  • One aspect of the present disclosure relates to a storage system that includes a storage rack and a plurality of containers. The storage rack includes a frame assembly, at least one shelf member, and at least one biasing member. The at least one biasing member is positioned on the at least one shelf member and extends into a storage space sized to receive a container. The at least one biasing member applies a biasing force upon a container positioned in the storage space thereby retaining the container in the storage rack. Typically, the force required to remove the retained container from the storage rack is a force greater than gravity forces. The at least one biasing member can be a separately formed piece that is mounted to the at least one shelf member. Alternatively, the biasing member can be formed integral with the at least one shelf member such that addition of the biasing member to the storage rack does not require additional material as compared to a similar storage rack that is void of a biasing member.
  • It is desired to produce another system which will retain the specimens during storage and retrieval and to allow for easy, quick retrieval of a desired specimen with reduced risk of warming all the stored specimens.
  • The above summary is not intended to describe each disclosed embodiment or every implementation of the inventive aspects disclosed herein. Figures in the detailed description that follow more particularly describe features that are examples of how certain inventive aspects may be practiced. While certain embodiments are illustrated and described, it will be appreciated that disclosure is not limited to such embodiments.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a schematic front perspective view of an example container storage system in accordance with the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 2 is a schematic partial front view of the example container storage system shown in FIG. 1 with multiple storage containers positioned in the storage rack.
  • FIG. 3 is schematic aerial view of an example shelf member for use in the storage rack shown in FIG. 1 with a pair of biasing members positioned on the shelf member.
  • FIGS. 4A-C are schematic side views of an example shelf member shown in FIG. 3 with different biasing member configurations.
  • FIG. 5 is a schematic aerial view of another example shelf member for use in the storage rack shown in FIG. 1 with a pair of biasing members positioned laterally from each other and formed integral with the shelf member.
  • FIGS. 6A-D are schematic side views of the example shelf member shown in FIG. 5 with different biasing member configurations.
  • FIG. 7 is a schematic aerial view of another example shelf member for use in the storage rack shown in FIG. 1 with a single biasing members formed integral with the shelf member
  • FIGS. 8A-B are schematic side views of the example shelf member shown in FIG. 7 with different biasing member configurations.
  • FIG. 9 is a schematic aerial view of another example shelf member for use in the storage rack shown in FIG. 1 with a pair of biasing members positioned axially aligned with each other and formed integral with the shelf member.
  • FIG. 10 is a schematic side view of the example shelf member shown in FIG. 9 with an example biasing member configuration.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION The Example Storage System of FIGS. 1-4C
  • An example storage system and related methods of storage are now described with reference to FIGS. 1-4C. The storage system 10 includes a storage rack 12 and a container 14. The storage rack 12 defines a plurality of storage spaces 70 into which the container 14 can be removably inserted and retained.
  • The storage rack 12 includes a frame assembly 16, a plurality of shelf members (first, second and third shelf member 18, 20, 22), and first and second biasing members 24, 26. The frame assembly 16 includes a pair of front supports 30, and a pair of rear supports 32 that define four corners and four side surfaces of the storage rack 12. The supports 30, 32 are aligned vertically generally parallel to the Z axis of the XYZ coordinate system shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. The frame assembly 16 further includes a top cover 34 having a pair of vertically downward facing flanges 39, and first and second handles 36, 38 positioned on an upper surface of the top cover 34.
  • The shelf members 18, 20, 22 each include a top support surface 40 facing a generally vertical upward direction, a bottom support surface 42 facing an opposite, vertically downward facing direction, and a pair of side flanges 44, 46 that extend in a generally vertically upward direction and are aligned along side edges of each shelf member. The shelf members 18, 20, 22 are positioned vertically relative to each other with the top and bottom support surfaces of each shelf member arranged in parallel.
  • Individual storage spaces 70 sized to receive the container 14 are defined by spaces within the frame assembly 16 that are positioned between adjacent shelf members 18, 20, 22 and front and rear supports 30, 32. The side flanges 44, 46 of the shelf members 18, 20, 22 restrict access into the storage spaces 70 from opposing sides 31, 33 of the frame assembly 16 (see FIG. 1). The rear supports 32 of the frame assembly 16 include flanges that extend along the side surfaces 31, 33 of the frame assembly 16 and also along a rear surface 35 of the frame assembly 16 thereby also restricting access into the storage spaces 70 from the side 31, 33 and rear surfaces 35 of the frame assembly 16. Access to the storage spaces 70 is provided along a front surface 37 of the frame assembly 16.
  • In alternative arrangements, one or more of the opposing side 31, 33 and rear surfaces 35 can also be configured to provide access into the storage spaces 70. In one example, the rear supports 32 are configured with a single flange portion extending along the side surfaces 31, 33 of the frame assembly 16 without a flange extending across the rear surface 35 of the frame assembly 16, thereby providing access into the storage spaces 70 via the rear surface 35 of the frame assembly 16 in addition to the front surface 37 of the frame assembly 16.
  • Referring to FIG. 3, the first and second biasing members 24, 26 include a connection portion 50 that engages the shelf member top or bottom support surface 40, 42 (e.g., first shelf member 18), a first segment 52 and a second segment 54. A first bend 56 defines the connection portion 50 from the first segment 52, and a second bend 58 defines the first segment 52 from the second segment 54. FIGS. 4A-C illustrate several example configurations for the first and second biasing members 24, 26. Other bend configurations are possible with the addition of further bends or the elimination of one of bends 56, 58. Each bend configuration can provide a unique biasing force that is applied to the container 14 positioned in the storage space 70 (e.g., the direction in which the biasing force is applied and the magnitude of force).
  • The biasing members 24, 26 can be positioned on either the top or bottom support surface 40, 42 of a given shelf member 18, 20, 22 of the storage rack 12. When a container 14 is positioned within a storage space 70 in the storage rack 12, the biasing members 24, 26 can apply a biasing force in either the vertically upward direction to engage a bottom surface 66 of the container 14, or a vertically downward direction to engage the top surface 64 of the container 14 depending on the location of the biasing members 24, 26.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates several different arrangements of the biasing members 24, 26 relative to several example storage spaces 70. The uppermost storage space 70 shown in FIG. 2 includes first and second biasing members 24, 26 positioned on a bottom support surface of the top cover 34 of the frame assembly 16. The biasing members 24, 26 extend in a vertically downward direction thereby exerting a vertically downward directed biasing force upon the top surface 64 of the container 14 positioned in the storage space 70.
  • The middle storage space 70 shown in FIG. 2 includes first and second biasing member 24, 26 positioned on the bottom support surface 42 of the first shelf member 18 and on a top support surface 40 of the second shelf member 20. The biasing members 24, 26 on the bottom support surface 42 of shelf member 18 exert a vertically downward directed biasing force, while the biasing members 24, 26 positioned on the top support surface 40 of the second shelf 20 exert a vertically upward directed biasing force on the bottom surface 66 of the container 14.
  • The bottom oriented storage space 70 shown in FIG. 2 includes first and second biasing members 24, 26 positioned on the top support surface 40 of the third shelf member 22, thereby exerting a vertically upward directed biasing force on the bottom surface 66 of the container 14.
  • The biasing forces exerted by the biasing members 24, 26 on a storage container 14 are typically exerted only when the container 14 is inserted into a storage space thereby forcing the biasing members 24, 26 out of a rest state. When the biasing members 24, 26 are forced out of a rest state due to, for example bending of the segments 52, 54 at the bends 56, 58 or flexing of the biasing members 24, 26 along their length between the bends 56, 58, the biasing members 24, 26 attempt to return to their rest state, thereby exerting a biasing force in the opposite direction of movement. In this illustrated configuration of FIG. 2, the biasing force is applied at a point of contact with the container 14. This biasing force can include force components in multiple directions (e.g., XZ, or YZ direction). These biasing force components are preferably sufficient to retain the container 14 within the storage space 70 regardless of the orientation of the storage rack 12. These biasing force components are preferably also sufficient to retain the container 14 within the storage space 70 regardless of the presence of flanges 39, 44, or retaining features of the storage rack 16. For example, if the storage rack 12 shown in FIG. 1 is tipped forward when the containers 14 are inserted in the storage spaces 70, the biasing forces exerted by the biasing members 24, 26 exert biasing forces on the containers 14 to prevent them from sliding out through the front surface openings in the frame assembly 16.
  • Preferably the biasing members 24, 26 can alone be used to retain the containers 14 within the storage spaces 70. However, it is possible for additional locking or retaining features to be used in combination with the biasing members 24, 26 on the storage rack 12 to further ensure retention of the containers 14 within the storage spaces 70.
  • Example Biasing Member Configurations of FIGS. 5-10
  • FIGS. 5-10 illustrate several example biasing member configurations in which the biasing member is formed from the existing shelf member material. Referring first to FIGS. 5-6C, a pair of first and second biasing members 24, 26 is formed from a first shelf member 18. A resulting cutout 25, 27 exists around each of the biasing members 24, 26, respectively. In this way, the biasing member 24, 26 are integral (e.g., formed from the same material and being a unitary piece) with the shelf members 18. The connection portion 50 of the biasing members 24, 26 is coextensive and continuous with the material defining the top and bottom support surfaces 40, 42 of the shelf member 18. FIGS. 6A-C illustrate several example configurations for the biasing members 24, 26 shown in FIG. 5. The biasing members of FIGS. 6A-C include three portions that are bent out of a plane P (see FIGS. 6A) of the top or bottom support surface of the shelf member 18. In other arrangements, the biasing members can include one, two, or more than three segments and include one, two, three (as shown in FIGS. 6A-C), or more bends to define the desired number of segments.
  • FIG. 6D illustrates one of the biasing members 24 extending from the top surface 40, while the other biasing member 26 extends from the bottom surface 42.
  • FIGS. 7 and 8A-B illustrate another example biasing member 24 formed from a first shelf member 18. The biasing member 24 as shown in FIGS. 7 and 8A-B includes a greater width. The biasing member 24 of FIGS. 7 and 8A-B is also positioned at a location central across the width W of the shelf member 18. While FIG. 8A illustrates a biasing member 24 having a single bend 56 along the length thereof to define only two segments 50, 52, other configurations including different numbers of bends and segments are possible. FIG. 8B illustrates the biasing member 24 having a contoured portion 51. Other of the biasing member configuration illustrated herein can also include contoured portions.
  • FIGS. 9 and 10 illustrate a pair of biasing members 24, 26 aligned end-to-end along a length L of the shelf member 18 as opposed to the side-by-side (laterally spaced apart across width W) arrangement of biasing members shown in FIG. 5. FIG. 10 illustrates one of the biasing members 24 extending from one of the top or bottom support surfaces of the shelf member 18, wherein the other biasing member protrudes out from the opposing support surface of the shelf member 18. In other arrangements, both of the biasing members 24, 26 shown in FIGS. 9 and 10 could protrude from the same support surface. Likewise, as with the other biasing member configurations discussed above, each of the biasing members 24, 26 shown in FIGS. 9 and 10 can include different numbers of segments and bends as desired to provide the desired biasing forces and direction of applied biasing force.
  • In each of the arrangements shown in FIGS. 3-10, the front end F of the shelf member 18 is preferably aligned with the front surface 39 of the storage rack 12. The connection point of each of the biasing members 24, 26 is typically arranged towards the front F of the shelf member 18 so that when a container is inserted into the storage space 70, the free end of the biasing member does not catch on a surface of the container. The biasing member 26 shown in FIGS. 9 and 10 illustrate an alternative arrangement wherein the free end of at least one of the biasing members 24, 26 is oriented towards the front F. The biasing members 24, 26 can include additional bends at or near the free end of the biasing member to reduce the incidence of catching or snagging inadvertently the free end of the biasing member with the container either during inserting or retraction of the container from the storage space 70.
  • Providing biasing members 24, 26 that are integral with the storage rack 12 can help reduce the total amount of material needed for the storage rack 12 while still providing the desired retention of the containers 14 in the storage spaces 70. A reduction in material can provide a reduced weight for the storage system 10 as well. Integral biasing members 24, 26 typically less likely to detach from the storage rack 12 due to, for example, failure at a connection point to the storage rack 12.
  • Additional Alternative Configurations
  • The biasing members disclosed with reference to FIGS. 1-10 are positioned on either the top or bottom support surface 40, 42 of any one of the shelf members 18, 20, 22, or other shelf members of the storage rack 12 shown in FIG. 1. In an alternative arrangement, one or more of the biasing members 24, 26 can be positioned along a side surface 31, 33 of the storage rack 12 to exert a biasing force in the X direction or in the XY plane. In one example, at least one biasing member is integral with one of the first and second side flanges 44, 46 of a shelf member 18, 20, 22 of the storage rack 12. Such an integral biasing member can be defined in the side flange in a similar manner as described above with reference to the biasing members 24, 26 of FIGS. 5-10.
  • In instances where the side flanges 44, 46 have a relatively small height in the vertical direction, the biasing members can be narrow in width. The side flanges 44, 46 can be increased in height as needed to provide sufficient material for the biasing members to provide the desired biasing force on a container positioned in the storage space 70. Biasing members arranged along the side surface of the storage rack 12 can be used in place of or in addition to biasing members positioned along the top and bottom support surfaces 40, 42 of any given shelf member 18, 20, 22.
  • CONCLUSION
  • One aspect of the present disclosure relates to a storage rack that includes a frame assembly, first and second shelf members, and a biasing member. The first and second shelf members are arranged in parallel and are supported by the frame. The shelf members are spaced apart within the frame assembly to define a storage space that is sized to house a container. The biasing member extends from at least one of the first and second shelf members into the storage space. The biasing member is configured to exert a biasing force upon a container housed in the storage space in a direction toward the other of the first and second shelf members to retain the container in the frame assembly. The frame assembly can include four vertically arranged supports, wherein the first and second shelf members are each supported by the four vertically arranged supports. The first shelf member can be positioned vertically above the second shelf member, and the biasing member can be positioned on a vertically upward facing surface or vertically downward facing surface of the second member. The biasing member can be formed integral with one of the first and second shelf members.
  • Another aspect of the present disclosure relates to a storage system that includes a storage container and a storage rack. The storage rack includes a frame assembly, first and second shelf members, and a biasing member. The first and second shelf members are arranged in parallel and supported by the frame. The shelf members are spaced apart within the frame assembly to define a storage space sized to house the storage container. The biasing member extends from one of the first and second shelf members into the storage space. The biasing member is configured to exert a biasing force upon the container. Typically, the frame assembly is arranged vertically, and the first and second shelf members are arranged horizontally, and the biasing member applies the biasing force in a vertically upward direction or vertically downward direction.
  • A further aspect of the present disclosure relates to a method of retaining a container in a storage rack. The storage rack includes a frame assembly, at least one shelf member, and a biasing member. The biasing member is positioned on the at least one shelf member, and the frame assembly defines a storage space adjacent the at least one shelf member. The method includes inserting the container into the storage space and supported on the at least one shelf member, and applying a biasing force upon the container with the biasing member while the container is supported on the at least one shelf member to retain the container within the storage rack. The step of applying the biasing force can include directing the biasing force in a direction vertically upward or vertically downward. Other method steps and order of steps are possible in alternative configurations.
  • The above specification, examples and data provide a complete description of the manufacture and use of the composition of the invention. Since many embodiments of the invention can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, the invention resides in the claims hereinafter appended.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A storage rack, comprising:
    a frame assembly;
    first and second shelf members arranged in parallel and supported by the frame, wherein the shelf members are spaced apart within the frame assembly to define a storage space that is sized to house a container; and
    a biasing member extending from at least one of the first and second shelf members into the storage space, the biasing member configured to exert a biasing force upon a container housed in the storage space in a direction toward the other of the first and second shelf members to retain the container in the frame assembly.
  2. 2. The system of claim 1, wherein the frame assembly includes four vertically arranged supports, and the first and second shelf members are each supported by the four vertically arranged supports.
  3. 3. The system of claim 2, wherein the first and second shelf members are rectangular shaped having four corners, and one of the four vertically arranged supports is positioned at each of the four corners.
  4. 4. The system of claim 1, wherein the first shelf member is positioned vertically above the second shelf member, and the biasing member is positioned on a vertically upward facing surface of the second member.
  5. 5. The system of claim 1, wherein the first shelf member is positioned vertically above the second shelf member, and the biasing member is positioned on a vertically downward facing surface of the first member.
  6. 6. The system of claim 1, wherein the frame assembly defines an opening into the storage space along one side surface of the frame assembly that is sized to receive the container.
  7. 7. The system of claim 1, wherein the biasing member is integral with one of the first and second shelf members.
  8. 8. The system of claim 1, wherein the biasing member includes at least one bend formed therein.
  9. 9. The system of claim 1, wherein biasing member includes a contoured portion.
  10. 10. The system of claim 1, comprising first and second biasing members extending from at least one of the first and second shelf members.
  11. 11. The system of claim 10, wherein the first and second biasing members are constructed with substantially the same size and shape.
  12. 12. The system of claim 10, wherein the first biasing member extends from the at least one of the first and second shelf members in a first direction, and the second biasing member extends from the at least one of the first and second shelf members in a second direction that is opposite the first direction.
  13. 13. A storage system, comprising:
    a storage container; and
    a storage rack, comprising:
    a frame assembly;
    first and second shelf members arranged in parallel and supported by the frame, wherein the shelf members are spaced apart within the frame assembly to define a storage space sized to house the storage container; and
    a biasing member extending from one of the first and second shelf members into the storage space, the biasing member configured to exert a biasing force upon the container.
  14. 14. The system of claim 13, wherein the frame assembly is arranged vertically, and the first and second shelf members are arranged horizontally.
  15. 15. The system of claim 13, wherein the storage container is cuboid shaped and the storage space is cuboid shaped.
  16. 16. The system of claim 14, wherein the biasing member applies the biasing force in a vertically upward direction or vertically downward direction.
  17. 17. A method of retaining a container in a storage rack, the storage rack including a frame assembly, at least one shelf member, and a biasing member, the biasing member positioned on the at least one shelf member, and the frame assembly defining a storage space adjacent the at least one shelf member, the method comprising:
    inserting the container into the storage space and supported on the at least one shelf member; and
    applying a biasing force upon the container with the biasing member while the container is supported on the at least one shelf member to retain the container within the storage rack.
  18. 18. The method of claim 17, wherein applying the biasing force includes directing the biasing force in a direction vertically upward or vertically downward.
  19. 19. The method of claim 17, wherein the storage rack includes first and second shelf members that are spaced apart vertically within the frame, the biasing member positioned on one of the first and second shelf members, and the step of applying a biasing force includes engaging the container against one of the first and second shelf members with the biasing forces from the biasing member.
  20. 20. The method of claim 17, wherein the frame assembly is arranged vertically and the at least one shelf member is arranged horizontally, and the frame assembly defines engagement surfaces along three vertically arranges sides of the storage rack and an opening along a fourth vertically arranged side of the storage rack, the step of inserting the container includes engaging the container against at least one of the engagement surfaces defined by the frame assembly.
US11844745 2007-08-24 2007-08-24 Storage system and methods Abandoned US20090050590A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11844745 US20090050590A1 (en) 2007-08-24 2007-08-24 Storage system and methods

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11844745 US20090050590A1 (en) 2007-08-24 2007-08-24 Storage system and methods

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20090050590A1 true true US20090050590A1 (en) 2009-02-26

Family

ID=40381186

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11844745 Abandoned US20090050590A1 (en) 2007-08-24 2007-08-24 Storage system and methods

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20090050590A1 (en)

Citations (71)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US460252A (en) * 1891-09-29 File-rack
US751466A (en) * 1904-02-09 A corpora
US893648A (en) * 1908-04-03 1908-07-21 Fred A Peters Sprouting apparatus.
US937659A (en) * 1909-03-09 1909-10-19 Floyd F Todd Assorting-cabinet.
US1089518A (en) * 1910-11-21 1914-03-10 Lamson Co Transfer-bin.
US1216250A (en) * 1916-03-10 1917-02-13 John F Plander Collapsible mail-rack.
US1252816A (en) * 1913-11-24 1918-01-08 Baker Vawter Company Metal filing-case.
US1290782A (en) * 1917-07-02 1919-01-07 Grand Rapids Show Case Co Combination sectional furniture and knockdown shelving-section.
US1505308A (en) * 1923-09-21 1924-08-19 Internat Show Case Company Sectional furniture
US1530711A (en) * 1923-08-17 1925-03-24 Brunhoff Mfg Company Advertising and display apparatus
US1554011A (en) * 1920-08-12 1925-09-15 Edward G Lehman Rack shelving
US1623244A (en) * 1925-01-22 1927-04-05 John E Hooper Shoe rack
US1640083A (en) * 1926-05-11 1927-08-23 Ladd George Frank Device for use in sorting and delivering mail
US1847066A (en) * 1929-03-23 1932-03-01 Mathilde C Berg Collapsible shoe bag
US2325039A (en) * 1941-04-09 1943-07-27 Gustave E Chesler Portable desk
US2440192A (en) * 1945-08-02 1948-04-20 Irma M Cowan Collapsible hanging garment container
US2555178A (en) * 1949-06-15 1951-05-29 Paul O Young Folding maid service truck
US2559699A (en) * 1950-03-29 1951-07-10 Bard Melvin Hat holder
US2604213A (en) * 1945-03-16 1952-07-22 Lyon Metal Products Inc Commercial shelving
US2635762A (en) * 1950-02-24 1953-04-21 Stackbin Corp Stack of racks of different sizes and adapter therefor
US2986284A (en) * 1959-06-18 1961-05-30 Thomas S Colbert Portable pallet rack
US3030163A (en) * 1960-08-15 1962-04-17 Gotham Ind Inc Nesting slide drawer receptacle
US3111915A (en) * 1962-02-05 1963-11-26 Ekco Products Company Merchandise handling rack
US3203744A (en) * 1962-12-12 1965-08-31 Ethicon Inc Cabinet assembly unit
US3221894A (en) * 1963-07-02 1965-12-07 Lyon Metal Products Inc Adjustable storage rack
US3231322A (en) * 1964-07-10 1966-01-25 Ralph E Shaw Pilfer-proof storage rack and containers
US3346316A (en) * 1965-04-09 1967-10-10 Kenneth S Morioka Modular cabinet structure
US3443851A (en) * 1968-01-05 1969-05-13 Dallas W Earl Easy-to-mount and easy-to-dismount storage container
US3552579A (en) * 1968-11-25 1971-01-05 Safco Products Co Tile case assembly and stacking clip therefor
US3591245A (en) * 1969-09-29 1971-07-06 Cardinal Container Corp Erectable and collapsible drawer receiving cabinet
US3877396A (en) * 1973-07-30 1975-04-15 Coca Cola Co Knockdown display rack
US3891288A (en) * 1973-12-27 1975-06-24 John L Marquette Plug-in equipment shipping container and rack system
US3901164A (en) * 1973-07-16 1975-08-26 Gibson Greeting Cards Modular display structure
US4119045A (en) * 1977-08-11 1978-10-10 Victor Galileo Michelotti Knock-down shelving structure
US4382640A (en) * 1980-12-11 1983-05-10 Closet Systems Corp. Portable storage shelf unit
US4403701A (en) * 1981-03-30 1983-09-13 Corcoran Patrick G Expansible rack for locker baskets and garment storage
US4537451A (en) * 1983-04-13 1985-08-27 Theodore Bredderman Hanging locker shelves
US4715669A (en) * 1986-06-27 1987-12-29 Russ Bassett Company Cartridge cabinet drawer
US4771900A (en) * 1987-04-09 1988-09-20 Nalge Company Storage rack for box-like container
US4815598A (en) * 1987-10-27 1989-03-28 Herbert Richter, Metallwaren-Apparafebau Gmbh & Co. Storage magazine with plural leaf springs for recording tape cassettes in the cassette boxes
US4817079A (en) * 1988-06-27 1989-03-28 Eastman Kodak Company Carrier retainer for disk cartridge
US4830440A (en) * 1987-06-15 1989-05-16 Haworth, Inc. Tool-free cabinet attachment
US4941578A (en) * 1988-08-05 1990-07-17 Devening Charles K High density storage system
USD325680S (en) * 1989-05-29 1992-04-28 Treston Oy Rack for boxes
US5168725A (en) * 1990-08-24 1992-12-08 National Health Guard, Inc. Cryogenic storage of perishable fluids
US5255970A (en) * 1992-05-26 1993-10-26 Theosabrata Yos S Storage cabinet
US5334904A (en) * 1991-01-16 1994-08-02 Kramer Dale C Compact disc case
US5350073A (en) * 1991-10-17 1994-09-27 Mckechnie (Uk) Limited Free-standing shelving system
US5452811A (en) * 1994-01-13 1995-09-26 Anchor Bay Packaging Corporation Stackable partitioned shipping container
US5460277A (en) * 1994-03-25 1995-10-24 Silva; Glenn Organizer rack and system
US5532888A (en) * 1993-05-27 1996-07-02 International Business Machines Corporation Cartridge magazine with cartridge processing status indicator
US5713646A (en) * 1996-12-13 1998-02-03 Wang; Wen-Tsan Daughter wardrobe adapted for use inside a mother wardrobe
US5893618A (en) * 1997-07-21 1999-04-13 Poly Vac, Inc. Stacking sterilizing tray system
US5902024A (en) * 1996-12-04 1999-05-11 Mckechnie Uk Limited Storage system
US5931551A (en) * 1998-05-29 1999-08-03 Wang; Wen-Tsan Storage cabinet with detachable sliding storage boxes
US6098822A (en) * 1999-05-04 2000-08-08 Decade Industries, Inc. Shelving system
US6142589A (en) * 1999-10-22 2000-11-07 Wang; Wen-Tsan Combination storage rack
US6164738A (en) * 1999-01-29 2000-12-26 Poly Vac, Inc. Stacking sterilizing tray system
US6193336B1 (en) * 1995-11-28 2001-02-27 Daniel Jencka Holder with retaining device for compact disc and other media cases
US6267253B1 (en) * 1999-08-19 2001-07-31 Spacehab, Inc. Logistics rack for space flight
US6315136B1 (en) * 1998-11-02 2001-11-13 Albert L. Baldoni Storage bin shelving system
US6390573B1 (en) * 2001-05-11 2002-05-21 Wen-Tsan Wang Wardrobe internal clothes cabinet
US20020179552A1 (en) * 2001-05-30 2002-12-05 Andrew Marraffa Battery rack and system
US6732659B2 (en) * 2002-09-09 2004-05-11 Enoch M. Poon Hanging shelf system
US6923516B2 (en) * 2003-08-04 2005-08-02 Sourcing Solutions, Inc. Cabinet with soft storage drawers
US20060124568A1 (en) * 2004-12-14 2006-06-15 De Alba Luis F R Self-standing exhibiting package
US20070080614A1 (en) * 2005-10-07 2007-04-12 Suncast Corporation Drawer cabinet storage kit
US20070125737A1 (en) * 2005-12-07 2007-06-07 Sfpd, Inc. Adjustable, stackable shelving with a slide groove
US20070125736A1 (en) * 2005-12-07 2007-06-07 Sfpd, Inc. Shelving with a drop leaf
US20080193247A1 (en) * 2006-10-26 2008-08-14 Martin Marietta Materials, Inc. Movable storage racks for transportation of goods
US7575828B2 (en) * 2004-07-23 2009-08-18 Kim Manufacturing Co. Modular rack assemblies for sealed lead acid batteries

Patent Citations (73)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US460252A (en) * 1891-09-29 File-rack
US751466A (en) * 1904-02-09 A corpora
US893648A (en) * 1908-04-03 1908-07-21 Fred A Peters Sprouting apparatus.
US937659A (en) * 1909-03-09 1909-10-19 Floyd F Todd Assorting-cabinet.
US1089518A (en) * 1910-11-21 1914-03-10 Lamson Co Transfer-bin.
US1252816A (en) * 1913-11-24 1918-01-08 Baker Vawter Company Metal filing-case.
US1216250A (en) * 1916-03-10 1917-02-13 John F Plander Collapsible mail-rack.
US1290782A (en) * 1917-07-02 1919-01-07 Grand Rapids Show Case Co Combination sectional furniture and knockdown shelving-section.
US1554011A (en) * 1920-08-12 1925-09-15 Edward G Lehman Rack shelving
US1530711A (en) * 1923-08-17 1925-03-24 Brunhoff Mfg Company Advertising and display apparatus
US1505308A (en) * 1923-09-21 1924-08-19 Internat Show Case Company Sectional furniture
US1623244A (en) * 1925-01-22 1927-04-05 John E Hooper Shoe rack
US1640083A (en) * 1926-05-11 1927-08-23 Ladd George Frank Device for use in sorting and delivering mail
US1847066A (en) * 1929-03-23 1932-03-01 Mathilde C Berg Collapsible shoe bag
US2325039A (en) * 1941-04-09 1943-07-27 Gustave E Chesler Portable desk
US2604213A (en) * 1945-03-16 1952-07-22 Lyon Metal Products Inc Commercial shelving
US2440192A (en) * 1945-08-02 1948-04-20 Irma M Cowan Collapsible hanging garment container
US2555178A (en) * 1949-06-15 1951-05-29 Paul O Young Folding maid service truck
US2635762A (en) * 1950-02-24 1953-04-21 Stackbin Corp Stack of racks of different sizes and adapter therefor
US2559699A (en) * 1950-03-29 1951-07-10 Bard Melvin Hat holder
US2986284A (en) * 1959-06-18 1961-05-30 Thomas S Colbert Portable pallet rack
US3030163A (en) * 1960-08-15 1962-04-17 Gotham Ind Inc Nesting slide drawer receptacle
US3111915A (en) * 1962-02-05 1963-11-26 Ekco Products Company Merchandise handling rack
US3203744A (en) * 1962-12-12 1965-08-31 Ethicon Inc Cabinet assembly unit
US3221894A (en) * 1963-07-02 1965-12-07 Lyon Metal Products Inc Adjustable storage rack
US3231322A (en) * 1964-07-10 1966-01-25 Ralph E Shaw Pilfer-proof storage rack and containers
US3346316A (en) * 1965-04-09 1967-10-10 Kenneth S Morioka Modular cabinet structure
US3443851A (en) * 1968-01-05 1969-05-13 Dallas W Earl Easy-to-mount and easy-to-dismount storage container
US3552579A (en) * 1968-11-25 1971-01-05 Safco Products Co Tile case assembly and stacking clip therefor
US3591245A (en) * 1969-09-29 1971-07-06 Cardinal Container Corp Erectable and collapsible drawer receiving cabinet
US3901164A (en) * 1973-07-16 1975-08-26 Gibson Greeting Cards Modular display structure
US3877396A (en) * 1973-07-30 1975-04-15 Coca Cola Co Knockdown display rack
US3891288A (en) * 1973-12-27 1975-06-24 John L Marquette Plug-in equipment shipping container and rack system
US4119045A (en) * 1977-08-11 1978-10-10 Victor Galileo Michelotti Knock-down shelving structure
US4382640A (en) * 1980-12-11 1983-05-10 Closet Systems Corp. Portable storage shelf unit
US4403701A (en) * 1981-03-30 1983-09-13 Corcoran Patrick G Expansible rack for locker baskets and garment storage
US4537451A (en) * 1983-04-13 1985-08-27 Theodore Bredderman Hanging locker shelves
US4715669A (en) * 1986-06-27 1987-12-29 Russ Bassett Company Cartridge cabinet drawer
US4771900A (en) * 1987-04-09 1988-09-20 Nalge Company Storage rack for box-like container
US4830440A (en) * 1987-06-15 1989-05-16 Haworth, Inc. Tool-free cabinet attachment
US4815598A (en) * 1987-10-27 1989-03-28 Herbert Richter, Metallwaren-Apparafebau Gmbh & Co. Storage magazine with plural leaf springs for recording tape cassettes in the cassette boxes
US4817079A (en) * 1988-06-27 1989-03-28 Eastman Kodak Company Carrier retainer for disk cartridge
US4941578A (en) * 1988-08-05 1990-07-17 Devening Charles K High density storage system
USD325680S (en) * 1989-05-29 1992-04-28 Treston Oy Rack for boxes
US5168725A (en) * 1990-08-24 1992-12-08 National Health Guard, Inc. Cryogenic storage of perishable fluids
US5334904A (en) * 1991-01-16 1994-08-02 Kramer Dale C Compact disc case
US5350073A (en) * 1991-10-17 1994-09-27 Mckechnie (Uk) Limited Free-standing shelving system
US5255970A (en) * 1992-05-26 1993-10-26 Theosabrata Yos S Storage cabinet
USD361687S (en) * 1993-04-19 1995-08-29 Hewlett-Packard Company Magazine for tape cartridges or cassettes
US5532888A (en) * 1993-05-27 1996-07-02 International Business Machines Corporation Cartridge magazine with cartridge processing status indicator
US5452811A (en) * 1994-01-13 1995-09-26 Anchor Bay Packaging Corporation Stackable partitioned shipping container
US5460277A (en) * 1994-03-25 1995-10-24 Silva; Glenn Organizer rack and system
US6193336B1 (en) * 1995-11-28 2001-02-27 Daniel Jencka Holder with retaining device for compact disc and other media cases
US5902024A (en) * 1996-12-04 1999-05-11 Mckechnie Uk Limited Storage system
US5713646A (en) * 1996-12-13 1998-02-03 Wang; Wen-Tsan Daughter wardrobe adapted for use inside a mother wardrobe
US5893618A (en) * 1997-07-21 1999-04-13 Poly Vac, Inc. Stacking sterilizing tray system
USD409866S (en) * 1998-02-02 1999-05-18 Westerlund Products Corporation Drawer for a shelving console unit
US5931551A (en) * 1998-05-29 1999-08-03 Wang; Wen-Tsan Storage cabinet with detachable sliding storage boxes
US6315136B1 (en) * 1998-11-02 2001-11-13 Albert L. Baldoni Storage bin shelving system
US6164738A (en) * 1999-01-29 2000-12-26 Poly Vac, Inc. Stacking sterilizing tray system
US6098822A (en) * 1999-05-04 2000-08-08 Decade Industries, Inc. Shelving system
US6267253B1 (en) * 1999-08-19 2001-07-31 Spacehab, Inc. Logistics rack for space flight
US6142589A (en) * 1999-10-22 2000-11-07 Wang; Wen-Tsan Combination storage rack
US6390573B1 (en) * 2001-05-11 2002-05-21 Wen-Tsan Wang Wardrobe internal clothes cabinet
US20020179552A1 (en) * 2001-05-30 2002-12-05 Andrew Marraffa Battery rack and system
US6732659B2 (en) * 2002-09-09 2004-05-11 Enoch M. Poon Hanging shelf system
US6923516B2 (en) * 2003-08-04 2005-08-02 Sourcing Solutions, Inc. Cabinet with soft storage drawers
US7575828B2 (en) * 2004-07-23 2009-08-18 Kim Manufacturing Co. Modular rack assemblies for sealed lead acid batteries
US20060124568A1 (en) * 2004-12-14 2006-06-15 De Alba Luis F R Self-standing exhibiting package
US20070080614A1 (en) * 2005-10-07 2007-04-12 Suncast Corporation Drawer cabinet storage kit
US20070125737A1 (en) * 2005-12-07 2007-06-07 Sfpd, Inc. Adjustable, stackable shelving with a slide groove
US20070125736A1 (en) * 2005-12-07 2007-06-07 Sfpd, Inc. Shelving with a drop leaf
US20080193247A1 (en) * 2006-10-26 2008-08-14 Martin Marietta Materials, Inc. Movable storage racks for transportation of goods

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5746328A (en) Pegboard-mountable adjustable merchandising rack
US20080037228A1 (en) Electronic equipment cabinet expansion kit with offset brackets
US20100310225A1 (en) High density patching system for cable and optical fiber
US6724970B2 (en) Cable management device for mixed media
US7032277B2 (en) Cable management system and method of use thereof
US5247427A (en) Disk array subsystem having elongated T-shaped guides for use in a data processing system
US2018002A (en) Bottle shelf
US20110268408A1 (en) Door fiber management for fiber optic housings, and related components and methods
US4426008A (en) Storage system for canned goods
US6870095B1 (en) Cable management for rack mounted computing system
US5093887A (en) Sliding cable tray with cable pivot arm
US6068437A (en) Automated laboratory specimen organizer and storage unit
US5381315A (en) Shelf assembly in electronic switching system
US20030024889A1 (en) Universal shelving
US20060045674A1 (en) Automated store
US7944692B2 (en) Method and apparatus for installation and removal of overhead cooling equipment
US7516856B2 (en) Space adjustable rack for cocktail glasses to endure earthquake
US7258241B2 (en) Method and apparatus for facilitating bar-code scanning of rack contents using rack column mounted display
US5004393A (en) Autoloader magazine for tape cartridges and method therefor
US20060096938A1 (en) Shelf structure of showcase
US7429701B1 (en) Power cord automatic retainer
US5853090A (en) Convertible retail product display columns and systems
US7946066B2 (en) Sign holder and sign display system
US4771900A (en) Storage rack for box-like container
US6669029B1 (en) Mounting bracket for efficiently storing electronic devices