US20080254876A1 - System and method for odds-based sports wagering - Google Patents

System and method for odds-based sports wagering Download PDF

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US20080254876A1
US20080254876A1 US11/734,056 US73405607A US2008254876A1 US 20080254876 A1 US20080254876 A1 US 20080254876A1 US 73405607 A US73405607 A US 73405607A US 2008254876 A1 US2008254876 A1 US 2008254876A1
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bettor
players
odds
method
bet
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US11/734,056
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Nicholas Koustas
John Mix
Alexander Oxman
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AG 18 LLC
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IRONDICE LLC
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Publication of US20080254876A1 publication Critical patent/US20080254876A1/en
Assigned to AG 18, LLC reassignment AG 18, LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: IRONDICE LLC
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/326Game play aspects of gaming systems
    • G07F17/3272Games involving multiple players
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3286Type of games
    • G07F17/3288Betting, e.g. on live events, bookmaking

Abstract

The present invention can provide a system and method for sports wagering and entertainment. In one exemplary embodiment, the present invention can include a method for odds-based sports wagering, the method comprising: receiving, from a bettor, a selection of at least one players; providing, to the bettor, odds associated with the selection of at least one players; receiving, from the bettor, an at least one bet type and an at least one bet amount based on the odds associated with the selection of at least one players; and returning, to the bettor, a result for the at least one bet type and the at least one bet amount.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates generally to systems and methods for sports wagering and entertainment.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • In fantasy sports, fantasy owners generally build and manage a team that competes over an entire season against teams built by other fantasy owners. Fantasy owners typically build or draft a roster of players at the beginning of each season from which they will select a lineup for each game of the season. In current systems and methods, fantasy owners earn points based on the game-by-game statistical performances of their selected players and those point totals are directly compared to the point totals of other fantasy owners. In such systems, fantasy owners need to both pick a quality roster and manage that roster well during the season.
  • In other fantasy sports systems, fantasy owners are given a certain point or salary allotment which they use on a game-by-game or week-by-week basis to select players. Once again, the fantasy owners compete with other fantasy owners to see who can accumulate the highest number of points.
  • With these systems, fantasy owners are limited to competing only against other fantasy owners who wish to participate for the same time duration. Since there is no way to standardize the results, fantasy owners cannot easily join the competition late, compete intermittently, or leave early and still be able to reasonably participate.
  • Moreover, current fantasy sports bettors are generally limited to competing against an undefined opponent. Rather than measuring success by how well their selected team performed, fantasy sports bettors are always betting against how other fantasy sports bettors performed. To this extent, the opponent is undefined until after all fantasy sport bettor have selected a lineup. This limits fantasy sports bettors to a restricted number of wagering options and strategies. Since there is no standardized measure of success, fantasy sports bettors are limited to trying to select the players who will achieve the greatest number of points.
  • Accordingly, there is a need for a system and method for allowing fantasy sports bettors greater bet variety and greater participation flexibility.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Exemplary embodiments of the present invention that are shown in the drawings are summarized below. These and other embodiments are more fully described in the Detailed Description section. It is to be understood, however, that there is no intention to limit the invention to the forms described in this Summary of the Invention or in the Detailed Description. One skilled in the art can recognize that there are numerous modifications, equivalents and alternative constructions that fall within the spirit and scope of the invention as expressed in the claims.
  • The present invention can provide a system and method for sports wagering and entertainment. In one exemplary embodiment, the present invention can include a method for odds-based sports wagering, the method comprising: receiving, from a bettor, a selection of at least one players; providing, to the bettor, odds associated with the selection of at least one players; receiving, from the bettor, an at least one bet type and an at least one bet amount based on the odds associated with the selection of at least one players; and returning, to the bettor, a result for the at least one bet type and the at least one bet amount.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Various objects and advantages and a more complete understanding of the present invention are apparent and more readily appreciated by reference to the following Detailed Description and to the appended claims when taken in conjunction with the accompanying Drawings wherein:
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a typical architecture on which embodiments of the present invention could be utilized;
  • FIG. 2 illustrates exemplary software modules that could be operated by the server;
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a paper sports betting slips that could be used with embodiments of the present invention;
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a betting interface screen that could be used with embodiments of the present invention;
  • FIG. 5 illustrates one method by which a bettor can make an odds-based wager on fantasy sports;
  • FIG. 6 illustrates one method for collecting event and player information for fantasy sports wagering;
  • FIG. 7 illustrates one method for collecting a bettor's bet and wager information for odds-based fantasy sports wagering;
  • FIG. 8 illustrates one method for returning bet and wager outcomes to bettors;
  • FIG. 9 illustrates one method for evaluating player event data; and
  • FIG. 10 illustrates one method of evaluating bettor information and returning bettor outcomes.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Referring now to the drawings, where like or similar elements are generally designated with identical reference numerals throughout the several views, and referring in particular to FIG. 1, it illustrates an exemplary architecture on which embodiments of the present invention could be utilized. This embodiment includes a server connected to bettors through a network. The server generally contains software for collecting, generating and displaying information for use by bettors, collecting information from bettors, and for analyzing that information. By way of example, a bettor or bettors could be connected to the server through a network device such as a personal computer, an interactive television, a kiosk, or a wireless device, such as a PDA or cell phone. The illustrated arrangement of these components is logical and not meant to be an actual hardware diagram. The network that connects the bettors to the server could be the internet, an intranet, a corporate LAN, or any other type of network. Thus, the components can be combined, hardwired or further separated in an actual implementation. Moreover, the construction of each individual component is well-known to those of skill in the art.
  • Referring now to FIG. 2 it illustrates exemplary software modules that could be the server. These modules are described according to their functions and could be grouped differently. As those of skill in the art understand, many of these functions could be combined together into one software module and similarly, many of these functions could be divided into several different software modules. These functional modules are described briefly with regard to FIG. 2 and in more detail with regard to the subsequent flow charts.
  • Referring first to the bettor interface module, it is an input-output controller and serves as the interface for the bettor or the bettor's computing devices to interact with the other modules. Similarly, the bettor interface directs the communications from the other modules to the bettor. For example, the bettor interface could be used to present lineup odds from the lineup odds generator module to the bettor.
  • The second software module shown in FIG. 2 is a bet, wager and player data collection module. This module is designed to collect and provide information such as bet, wager and player data to and from both the bettor and other external and internal sources. For example, the bet, wager and player data collection module could be designed to communicate with the lineup odds generator so that after player data has been collected, the lineup odds generator could calculate the given lineup's odds. The bet, wager and player data collection module could read and write the information to long-term and short-term storage.
  • The bettor score determination module from FIG. 2 could communicate with other internal modules in order to determine the bettor's score. For example, the bettor score determination module could communicate with the bet, wager and player data collection module in order to acquire external, non-bettor supplied, information needed to calculate scores.
  • The final module shown in FIG. 2 is a bettor payout evaluator. This module could communicate with other modules in order to determine the bettor payout, if any, and then have that payout information reported to the bettor.
  • Although one embodiment disclosed herein uses interactive electronic devices in order to present information to and acquire information from a bettor, FIG. 3 represents an exemplary embodiment of how paper sports betting slips could be used. The front of the paper sports betting slip in FIG. 3 lists the available players for a specific event. On the back of the paper betting slip there are eight form fields where the bettor can fill in his or her selected players. As those skilled in the art can understand, numerous variations could be made to the betting slips without affecting the present invention. Additionally, those skilled in the art can understand how the use of betting slips could be combined with electronic devices. For example, the available players list could be displayed on an electronic device, such as a television display, while the bettors used paper betting slips to indicate player selections.
  • After the bettor has filled out the betting slip to indicate his or her selected players, the information from the betting slip would need to be collected (not shown). In one embodiment, the information from the betting slip could be read and entered manually. In another embodiment the betting slips may be electronically scanned in order to collect the bettor's selected lineup. Those skilled in the art can understand various ways the information from the betting slips would be collected consistent with the present invention.
  • Referring now to FIG. 4 it represents an exemplary embodiment of a betting interface screen for the devices from FIG. 1. FIG. 4 illustrates a screen with areas to display players lists and bettor information, to input selected players and an event ID, and to provide a bet slip. It would be obvious to those skilled in the art that this information can be further separated, combined or reorganized within the scope of the present invention. The betting interface screen may be a touch screen display that, for example, allows bettors to drag and drop selected players into their lineup. In another embodiment the screen may include data entry fields that allow users to use an attached keyboard or keypad to enter selected players by number and bet amounts. Those skilled in the art can understand many variations on the functionality of the betting interface screen consistent with the present invention.
  • In FIG. 5 a flow chart represents broadly one method by which a bettor wagers on odds-based fantasy sports. The use of the term ‘fantasy’ is intended to be descriptive for those who are skilled in the art, and is not in any way meant to limit the present invention to fantasy sports. In the first step in FIG. 5 the bettor is provided with a list of available events such as “NCAA I-A Football Games for Saturday September 4”, “MLB Games for Saturday and Sunday September 4-5”, “NFL Games for Sunday Morning”, “NFL Week 6 Games”, “Football Games (NCAA I-A and NFL) for Thursday through Monday September 2-6”. This allows the bettor to select an event that meets the bettor's time and curiosity constraints. Once an event has been selected, the bettor is presented with a list of available players, and the players' corresponding odds, for the selected event.
  • For example, as displayed in FIG. 4, if a bettor wanted to wager on fantasy football and wanted to be done before Sunday night, he could select the event ID that corresponds to the Sunday morning football games. The bettor would then be provided with a list of players available for those games only. So if the Miami Dolphins were playing Monday Night Football, none of the members of the Miami dolphin team nor the team itself, would be available players for selection. In this exemplary embodiment, events refers to a selection of football games limited by some time constraint. Those skilled in the art, however, can realize that event can refer to various fantasy sports and various time parameters consistent with the present invention. Moreover, in one embodiment of the present invention players can refer to the members of the football teams, the defense of the football team, or the football teams themselves. Those skilled in the art can realize that player could have other meanings in various fantasy sports schemes that would also be consistent with the present invention.
  • Returning to FIG. 5, once the bettor is presented with the list of available players the bettor is then able to select a lineup for the event. In an exemplary embodiment, a lineup for a fantasy football wager would include selecting two running backs, a quarterback, two wide receivers, a tight end, a kicker, and a defense. Odds for the lineup would then be generated and presented to the bettor. The bettor would then be able to make a bet and wager on the selected lineup. Finally, the bettor would receive the results of his or her bet and wager. The types and kinds of bets the bettor can make are discussed more fully later, but it is worth mentioning here that the wager could be both a monetary and a non-monetary wager. In this way, the system and method could be used for traditional gambling or recreational use. Moreover, even in the context of monetary wagering the wager here could be some portion of a bettor's point allotment that is only part of a wagering system. Those skilled in the art would be aware of many variations on bets and wagering consistent with the present invention.
  • The present invention is not limited to having to select multiple player lineups, nor is it limited to selecting lineups composed of multiple different player types. In another embodiment of the present invention, a bettor could select a single player for the lineup. For example, a player could select the quarterback from the Indianapolis Colts if he thinks that particular player is going to do well but doesn't want to bet on which running backs, defenses, etc., are going to do well. In other sports, such as baseball, a bettor might just select a pitcher or a batter. In a different embodiment of the present invention, a player could be allowed to select multiple players from a limited subset of player types. For example, a bettor might select multiple quarterbacks but not select players from any other positions. A bettor could also select only quarterbacks and running backs. For other sports, for example basketball, a bettor might select all guards and defenses. Those skilled in the art will realize the numerous variations consistent with the present invention.
  • FIG. 5 presents only one possibility of what would happen after the bettor is presented his odds. Those skilled in the art would realize that after a bettor is presented with his odds, the bettor could further be given the ability to go back and change the selected lineup. In this way, the bettor would be given a chance to make changes until the bettor received odds that he wanted to bet and wager on. Moreover, in another embodiment, the odds calculation may be dynamic, allowing the bettor to monitor the odds as each player is selected. Other modifications consistent with the present invention would be obvious to those skilled in the art. Finally, after the bettor makes a bet and wager on the selected lineup the bettor waits to receive results.
  • Now referring to FIG. 6, it is a flowchart that illustrates one method for collecting event and player information for fantasy sports wagering. First, a list of all available events is collected. This can be done in numerous fashions. In the exemplary embodiment, the bet, wager and player data collection module from FIG. 2 could collect this information. This could be collected from manual entry or automatically via the internet through a statistics provider. Once the event list has been collected, the bet, wager and data collection module could then collect player information for all the events. For example, information on lineups for a given game, schedules, injury lists would be needed in order to determine what players are actually available for a given event.
  • Once the player information has been collected, an available players list for all events can be populated. The bet, wager and data collection module could be used to evaluate the data and populate an available players list for all events. In the exemplary embodiment, for fantasy football this would include checking which teams (defensive teams are included as players) are playing, what players are hurt, etc. In other fantasy sports there will be other considerations. For example, in baseball, the pitching rotation would be relevant to evaluate in order to determine what pitchers are available for a given event.
  • Once the available players list has been populated the next step in FIG. 6 is to collect odds for available players for all events. Once again, the bet, wager and data collection module could be used to collect the odds for all available players for all events. These odds may be entered manually or collected automatically from an odds provider. Alternatively, the lineup odds generator could be used to generate odds for available players.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates one method for collecting a bettor's bet and wager information for odds-based fantasy sports wagering. First, FIG. 7 shows presenting a bettor with a list of available events. Here, the bettor interface module could access the bet, wager and player data collection module (FIG. 2) in order to transfer the stored event list for presentation to the bettor. For example: the list might include baseball games split up into events that cover individual days, or multi-day periods; the list might have different events for college football and pro-football; the list could include a weekend or a weekday basketball games event. The bettor interface module might present this information by printing the information out or by electronically displaying the information (not shown).
  • Next, in FIG. 7, the bettor's event selection is collected. In one embodiment the bettor interface might communicate information directly with the bettor's computing device, or the information may be input by another person or machine using a written selection made by the bettor. Once the players event selection is collected, a list of available players and odds are presented to the bettor for the selected event. Again, in the exemplary embodiment the bettor interface could be used to present this information. It can be realized by those skilled in the art that other modules or other schemes could be used consistent with the present invention. For example, the bet, wager and player data collection module may be fully capable of returning information without using the bettor interface module.
  • While the exemplary embodiment splits the first three steps of FIG. 7 up, it would be realized by those skilled in the art that a list of available events may be presented simultaneously with a list of available players and odds for those players. For example, FIG. 4 shows an exemplary embodiment of the invention as described in FIG. 7 where the players list displays only available players for the selected event. However, it could be imagined that numerous betting slips, such as the one in FIG. 3, are provided to the player for all the available events with the available players listed on the betting slip.
  • Back to FIG. 6, after presenting the information to the bettor, the bettor's lineup is collected. The bettor interface could take the bettor's lineup and communicate it both to the bet, wager and player data collection module for storage, and to the lineup odds generator module. Storage is not necessary for the present invention but may serve additional purposes beyond the present invention, including tracking betting habits of bettors. The lineup odds generator could then generate odds for the bettor's lineup. After lineup odds are generated the lineup odds are presented to the bettor. The bettor interface could present the bettor with lineup odds for the selected lineup.
  • Various types or forms of lineup odds could be presented to the bettor. In the exemplary embodiment as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, odds are represented by positive or negative values. Positive values reflect the net return for a bet of 100 and negative values reflect the (negative of the) amount that needs to be bet in order to net a return of 100. In the exemplary embodiment as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, the use of negative values has been selected. In order to get lineup odds of the same form, the lineup odds generator would need to take the average of every player in the lineup. This average then represents the betting odds on the selected lineup beating a predetermined or selected point total. For example, the bettor could be told that the selected lineups odds are −250 on beating a predetermined point total of 50 points. This would mean that for every 250 the bettor wagers, the bettor will receive 100 if the selected lineup collects more than 50 points.
  • Other variations on lineup odds could be used consistent with the present invention. In one exemplary embodiment, a bettor could be presented with varying odds for the selected lineup beating a variation of point totals. For example, a bettor could be told that the selected lineups odds are −250 on beating 50 total points, −120 on beating 60 total points, −320 on beating 40 total points, and −500 on beating 30 total points. In this way, a bettor could be presented with various odds for the same lineup. The bettor could then select a specific point total to bet against. In a different embodiment the bettor could be presented with various payouts for a bet on a given lineup. In this example, the bettor would bet on the lineup generally and be given odds for various point totals. A bettor would not bet against a specific point total, but would bet on the lineup. For example, a lineup could be given −200 on getting over 60 total points, −300 on getting 50-59 total points, −450 on getting 40-49 total points, −600 on getting 30-39 total points, and no odds (a loss) for getting less that 30 total points. The bettor could then bet on the lineup without selecting a specific point total to beat. These are exemplary embodiments only, and those skilled in the art will realize many other variations consistent with the present invention.
  • In another embodiment, the lineup odds could represent a projected lineup point total which the bettor could then use to bet against another bettor using a handicap system. In a competitive setting with another bettor, the bettor with the higher projected point total could give the other bettor the difference in points as a handicap in a head-to-head bet. Alternatively, a projected lineup point total could also be used for an over-under bet. For example, for fantasy football a selected lineup may be projected to collect 43 points. The bettor could make a wager that the lineup will collect more, an over bet, or less, an under bet, points than the projected lineup point total of 43 points. Many other forms of lineup odds, which allow other forms of bets and wagers, will be realized by those who are skilled in the art.
  • Returning to the final step in FIG. 7, the bettor's bet and wager on lineup are collected. The bettor interface could once again collect this information from the bettor and communicate it to the bet, wager and player data collection module for storage. It will be realized by those skilled in the art that the bettor may additionally receive some sort of bet receipt or verification. As discussed previously, there are numerous types of bets and wagers that could be collected from the bettor.
  • Now referring to FIG. 8 there is a flowchart representing one method for returning bet and wager outcomes to bettors. First, player event data for each event is collected. The bet, wager and player data collection module could be used to collect this information. The information could be collected on a real-time basis or it could be collected after an event is finished. If the player event data is collected on a real-time basis, bettors may be updated with the progress of their selected lineup (not shown) and even alerted about bet outcome before the event is completed.
  • Player event data includes player statistics and results. In the exemplary embodiment for fantasy football, this would including collecting, at least, all relevant statistics such as touchdowns, touchdown passes, turnovers, field goals, etc. In another embodiment such as fantasy baseball, statistics such as homeruns, strikeouts, saves, RBIs, etc. would be collected. Those skilled in the art will be aware of the player event data that would need to be collected for various fantasy sports.
  • Once the player event data for each event has been collected, the next step in FIG. 8 is to evaluate the player event data. This step, which is described in more detail in relation to FIG. 9, can be accomplished using the bettor score determination module. The general purpose of this step is to convert event statistics into fantasy sports points consistent with the types of bets being received. It should be realized by those skilled in the art, that as the popularity of fantasy sports increases, player event data for each event may simply be collected with a fantasy sports point total already included. In this sense, the step of evaluating player event data may be done by another system or method and simply collected for use in this method and system.
  • Referring back to FIG. 8, after the player event data is evaluated the next step is to retrieve bettor information. In the exemplary embodiment the bettor information can be stored in the bet, wager and player data collection module and would be retrieved by the bettor score determination module. Once the bettor score determination module retrieved the bettor information it will evaluate the bettor information, which is discussed more thoroughly in the discussion relating to FIG. 10.
  • The final step in FIG. 8 is to present the bettor with an outcome. For the exemplary embodiment, this step could involve using the bettor interface module to communicate the bettor outcome from the bettor payout evaluator to the bettor. This could include simply informing the bettor that she lost or it could include actually paying out winnings to the bettor.
  • Referring now to FIG. 9, there is a flowchart that illustrates one method for evaluating player event data. In the exemplary embodiment the event data could be evaluated by the bettor score determination module. First, the player event data is reviewed for relevant results. In the exemplary embodiment the relevant results are the statistics that score in fantasy football: touchdowns, touchdown throws, field goals, etc. Second, the player type and the applicable scoring algorithm must be determined. Player type includes both determining the proper fantasy sport and the specific type of player within the fantasy sport. For example, it may not be enough to say that Champ Bailey is a football player, but you would also have to identify that Champ Bailey is part of the defensive player Denver Broncos. Since Champ Bailey is not selected individually his player type is important in order to fit his statistics into the applicable scoring algorithm.
  • Once the player type and scoring algorithm are identified, the system should assign points to each player based on the scoring algorithm and player event results. For example, in the exemplary embodiment if Champ Bailey has an interception for a touchdown, the scoring algorithm would appoint eight points to defensive player Denver Broncos, two for the interception and six for the touchdown. In the exemplary embodiment, this process could take place in the bettor score determination module which will transfer all player point totals to the bet, wager and player data collection module for storage.
  • Referring now to FIG. 10 there is an illustration of one method of evaluating bettor information and returning bettor outcomes. First, for each player in the bettor's lineup, the player event data point total must be retrieved. In the exemplary embodiment, this could involve the bettor payout evaluator module communicating with the bet, wager and player data collection module both to collect the bettor's lineup and to collect player event point totals. Alternatively, the bettor score determination module could also be where player event point totals are stored for collection. Once that information is retrieved the bettor lineup point total can be calculated. In the exemplary embodiment for fantasy football this simply involves totaling the points for each player in the bettor's lineup. Those skilled in the art will be aware of how lineup totals are determined in other fantasy sports.
  • Once the bettor's lineup point total is calculated, the lineup point total is compared with the bettor's bet. In the exemplary embodiment this could be done in the bettor payout evaluator module. If the bettor wagered 250 that the selected lineup would beat the predetermined or selected value of 50 total points, as discussed in exemplary embodiments herein, the lineup total would be compared to see if it was above 50 total points. If the bet was above 50 total points a win would be determined. If not, the bettor's bet would result as a loss. Various rules for ties could be imagined. Other point totals, whether predetermined or selected by the bettor, could receive similar treatment.
  • After the bettor's bet has been ruled a win or a loss, the final step in FIG. 10 is to calculate better payout for a win, or determine bettor's loss. A bettor's payout is based on the type of bet and the amount of the wager the bettor made. In the exemplary embodiment, if the bettor received lineup odds of −250 and bet 250, a winning bet would payout 100 gain. Conversely, a losing bet would mean the bettor loses 250. In other forms of bets, a loss determination may be more complicated. For example, if a bettor bet 100 for each point against another bettor and lost by five points then the bettor's loss would be determined 500. How to calculate the bettor's winnings or determine bettor's losses from the bet and wager will be understood by those skilled in the art.
  • In another embodiment of the present invention, the bettor could have wagered on the selected lineup but not against a specific point total. The lineup point total could then be compared to a range of selected payouts for that lineup. For example, a bettor could have wagered 200 on the selected lineup. For point totals of 0-29 the lineup could pay 0 or perhaps some portion of the original bet could be returned; for a point total of 25-29 for example, half the bet amount might be returned. For point totals of 30-39 the bettor could have been given −600 odds and would receive a payout of 33.33 gain, for point totals of 40-49 the bettor could have been given −450 odds and would receive a payout of 44.44 gain, etc.
  • In conclusion, the present invention provides, among other things, a system and method for odds-based fantasy sports wagering. Those skilled in the art can readily recognize that numerous variations and substitutions may be made in the invention, its use and its configuration to achieve substantially the same results as achieved by the embodiments described herein. Accordingly, there is no intention to limit the invention to the disclosed exemplary forms. Many variations, modifications and alternative constructions fall within the scope and spirit of the disclosed invention as expressed in the claims.

Claims (14)

1. A method for odds-based sports wagering, the method comprising:
receiving, from a bettor, a selection of at least one players;
providing, to the bettor, odds associated with the selection of at least one players;
receiving, from the bettor, an at least one bet type and an at least one bet amount based on the odds associated with the selection of at least one players; and
returning, to the bettor, a result for the at least one bet type and the at least one bet amount.
2. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
providing, to the bettor, a list of available players.
3. The method of claim 2, further comprising:
providing, to the bettor, odds associated with the list of available players.
4. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
providing, to the bettor, a list of events;
receiving, from the bettor, an event selection;
providing, to the bettor, a list of available players associated with the event selection.
5. The method of claim 4, further comprising:
providing, to the bettor, odds associated with the list of available players.
6. The method of claim 1, wherein the odds comprise a projected point total for the selection of at least one players.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein the odds comprise odds that the selection of at least one players will receive a certain number of points.
8. The method of claim 1, wherein the at least one bet amount is a monetary bet amount.
9. The method of claim 1, wherein the at least one bet type comprises a bet that the selection of at least one players will receive a certain number of points.
10. The method of claim 1, wherein the result is a monetary payout.
11. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
calculating odds for the selection of at least one players based on odds associated with each player from the selection of at least one players.
12. The method of claim 11, wherein calculating odds comprises averaging the odds associated with each player from the selection of at least one players.
13. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
determining a result for the at least one bet type and the at least one bet amount.
14. The method of claim 13, wherein determining a result comprises comparing a point total for the selection of at least one players with a number of points and, if the point total for the selection of at least one players is higher, calculating a payout amount based on the at least one bet amount and the odds associated with the selection of at least one players, or, if the point total for the selection of at least one players is lower, determining the result is a loss.
US11/734,056 2007-04-11 2007-04-11 System and method for odds-based sports wagering Pending US20080254876A1 (en)

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