US20100279754A1 - Fantasy sports game - Google Patents

Fantasy sports game Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20100279754A1
US20100279754A1 US12/622,181 US62218109A US2010279754A1 US 20100279754 A1 US20100279754 A1 US 20100279754A1 US 62218109 A US62218109 A US 62218109A US 2010279754 A1 US2010279754 A1 US 2010279754A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
implemented method
computer implemented
athlete
points
bonus
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12/622,181
Inventor
Robert I. Tanenbaum
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Sports Virtually Inc
Original Assignee
Sports Virtually Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US11610408P priority Critical
Application filed by Sports Virtually Inc filed Critical Sports Virtually Inc
Priority to US12/622,181 priority patent/US20100279754A1/en
Publication of US20100279754A1 publication Critical patent/US20100279754A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q50/00Systems or methods specially adapted for specific business sectors, e.g. utilities or tourism
    • G06Q50/34Betting or bookmaking, e.g. Internet betting
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/326Game play aspects of gaming systems
    • G07F17/3272Games involving multiple players
    • G07F17/3276Games involving multiple players wherein the players compete, e.g. tournament
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3286Type of games
    • G07F17/3288Betting, e.g. on live events, bookmaking

Abstract

A computer implemented method for a fantasy sports game comprising a bonus category, real-time athlete substitution, and side-bet wagering so as to allow fantasy participant to more directly influence point accumulation.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims priority under 35 USC §119(e) to U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/116,104, filed on Nov. 19, 2008, the entire contents of which are hereby incorporated by reference.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present invention generally relates to systems and methods for playing and administering a fantasy sports game. More specifically, the present invention relates to a system and method of playing a fantasy sports game involving real time incentives to encourage play throughout a season and on a daily basis.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Fantasy sports league games enjoy wide popularity. Generally, participants or fantasy players select or draft currently active real-life athletes to form fantasy teams. A participant's success or failure in the game corresponds to the performance of the players in real-life games. Such games are often referred to as “rotisserie leagues,” although other forms of play are used also. Owners of such fantasy teams compile win-loss records by competing against the other teams in the league, the winner being determined by which team's players performed better the previous week. The fantasy league style of gaming has been applied to a wide variety of sports including baseball, football, basketball, hockey, soccer, cricket, auto-racing, golf and professional wrestling.
  • In most fantasy leagues, participants play throughout a regular season, tournament, or some other extended time period. Because a fantasy team's performance is directly attributable to the performance of the real-life athletes on a participant's roster, early success or failure can be critical to enjoyment and/or participation throughout the season. For example, if a participant chooses several players who are performing poorly and as a result, the participant looses several fantasy games in a row, it could be statistically impossible or improbable that the participant will win the overall season. Such participants typically loose interest in the fantasy league. Retaining participant interest in later season games has been a problem. In Internet based fantasy leagues, this loss of interest can result in loss of advertising and participation fees.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,860,862, incorporated herein by reference, is directed to an interactive fantasy sports game, which allows for real time participation in the fantasy game. Participants are able to select and trade members on the participant's team while an event, such as an actual game, is occurring. This allows participants to take a more active role in the management of the fantasy team. The fantasy team's performance, however, is still limited to the actual performance of the real-world athletes.
  • Various techniques have been used to maintain participants' interest, including tying fantasy league play to video service of actual games, offering gambling or simulated gambling, or creating financial market commodities based on player ratings. None of the aforementioned allows a participant to influence the fantasy team performance through mechanisms or techniques that allow a team to earn points beyond the actual performance of the real-world athletes.
  • SUMMARY
  • The present invention generally relates to systems and methods for playing a fantasy sports game. More specifically, the present invention is directed to a fantasy sports game that includes opportunities for participants to actively manage team performance, with the opportunity to obtain points greater than those directly attributable to the performance of the real-world athletes on a roster.
  • In an implementation a computer implemented method is provided. Participants choose a line-up from a predetermined roster; the line-up includes one or more real-world athletes. The athletes' actual performance is monitored over a given time period. The athletes' statistics are determined and points awarded based on the statistics. An athlete is traded into the line-up from the roster. A wager is made based on a real-world event associated with the fantasy game or the real-world athletes' performance. Points are aggregated from the statistical point total and the wager point total. And a final point determination is made.
  • Various implantations of the present invention can include one or more of the following features. The participant can select one or more bonus statistical performance categories with points awarded based on the one or more bonus statistical performance categories. The bonus statistical performance categories can be associated with a specific athlete. The bonus statistical performance categories can be applicable during predetermined time periods of the game. The bonus statistical performance categories can be associated with a particular event occurring during a game. The bonus statistical performance category has limited or restricted access. The bonus statistical performance category can be accessed by paying an access fee. The access fee can be in the form of accumulated points. Points earned can comprise a combination of bonus statistical performance category points and performance category points. Trading or substituting an athlete during play can be restricted or conditioned. A substitution fee can be charged for substituting athletes during play. Statistical performance categories can be compiled on a substituted athlete from the time the substituted athlete enters the game. A wager can be made based on an athlete's performance. A wager can be associated with a statistical performance category. A wager can be based on the occurrence of an event during a specified time period. A wager can be made with another player in the fantasy league or against a house account. Total accumulated points during a fantasy game include bonus points, performance points, and wager points.
  • Various implementations of the present invention include one or more of the following advantages. Fantasy participants can more directly influence total point accumulation through participating in bonus activity and side-bet wagering. Fantasy participants can make-up for poor team or athlete performance. Additional subscription and access fees are available to the game organizer. Participants will be involved in a game that is more interactive, more realistic and results in a daily resolution identical to real world sports. In-game substitution and side bets allow participation at any time in a game, not just during pre-game activities of changing rosters or selecting line-ups. Since real world sports events are played at many different starting times from afternoon to night in multiple time zones, active participation will extend for a longer period. Current sports fantasy games allow the participant to play the role of a general manager (dealing with rosters) but only as a head coach/manager in selecting the line-up. Implementations of the present invention give more realistic manager/head coach powers by allowing in-game substitutions and determining which players are more likely to achieve bonus points. Additionally, daily resolution creates the real-world sports environment of a win or a loss for each participant that are accumulated into won-loss standings as opposed to the artificial environment of a points system based on weekly or season-long statistics.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a flow chart of an exemplary method of the present invention.
  • FIGS. 2A & B depict an exemplary user interface of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • A fantasy sport (also known as rotisserie, roto, or owner simulation) is a game where fantasy owners build a team that competes against other fantasy owners based on the statistics generated by individual players or teams of a professional sport. One common variant converts statistical performance into points that are compiled and totaled according to a roster selected by a participant or “manager” that makes up a fantasy team. These point systems are typically simple enough to be manually calculated by a “league commissioner.” More complex variants use computer modeling of actual games based on statistical input generated by professional sports. In fantasy sports there is the ability to trade, cut, and sign players, like a real sports owner.
  • Fantasy leagues and their descendants typically draft teams before the season begins (or very shortly thereafter). Teams can be selected using an auction, whereby each participant has a fixed amount of money or credits to bid for players. A team roster must be filled within the budget. Team rosters can also be filled using a serpentine system draft of available players until all teams are filled. Real-world athletes making up a roster can be kept on the roster form season to season, often referred to as “Keeper Leagues.” Keeper leagues have the same people in them, and participants keep their players, unless any off-season moves are made.
  • In building a roster, the skills of the participants come into play in the “preseason.” Knowledge of the talent and ability to forecast the performance of the real-world athletes and their prospects for the coming season greatly assists in building a roster.
  • Rosters can be altered during a season using trades with other participants or from a pool of additional athletes. Trades can be made to acquire team members having greater skill or having a better season, to replace poor performing team members or trade to replace players who are injured. Various rules can affect trading, to encourage or discourage mid-season trades.
  • A number of methods can be used to play the fantasy league game. In some implementations, statistics of athletes on a roster are accumulated over the course of the season. Points are awarded for the statistical performance of the players. The team with the most points at the end of the season wins. Various head-to-head formats can be used, wherein a participant's team “plays” another participants team. Typically, teams play over a given time period, such as, a week, a four day tournament, or the length of a bracket in an elimination tournament.
  • In an implementation using head-to-head play, each team competes against only one team each week. At the end of the week, each team tallies wins and losses based on preset criteria, such as four, five, or six predetermined statistical categories. Wins, losses, and ties are determined based on each team's performance in the individual statistical categories. As such, if four categories are tracked, a team could have four wins for having one in each of the categories. In another implementation, the winner of the most categories receives only one win. In yet another implementation, the statistics in each category accumulate points, and the team with the most points at the end of the week is awarded the win. In head-to-head play, the team with the best win-loss record at the end of the season wins the league.
  • FIG. 1 is an exemplary implementation of a method of play directed to a fantasy baseball league. Method 100 includes: determining a line-up 110, wherein the line-up comprises one or more first athletes; compiling a statistical performance record 120 of the one or more athletes; compiling bonus statistical points 130 associated with the one or more athletes; awarding points 140 based on the statistical performance record and the bonus statistical points of the one more athletes; trading 150 a second athlete into the line-up and removing a first athlete; wagering points 160 based on an event associated with a first or second athlete; and aggregating 170 statistical points and wagered points for a point total.
  • The step of determining a line-up 110 can be done from a predetermined pool or roster of real-world athletes. The fantasy league participant can determine the roster prior to the league formation as described above. The roster can also be chosen by the league administrator or automatically chosen. The line-up is chosen from the roster of real-world athletes. Those athletes in the roster but not on the line-up are listed as bench players and can be available for “in-game” substitutions. FIGS. 2A & B show an exemplary user interface displaying the line-up 210 and bench 215 for teams A and B in a head-to-head match. In some implementations the line-up can be chosen from a drop-down menu or a click and drag method from a list of the players in a roster.
  • Having determined the line-up for the game, the statistical performance record for each player in the line-up is compiled 120. Statistics on athlete performance can be collected in a wide range of statistical categories. Exemplary hitting statistical categories included, without limitation: Games, At-Bat, Plate Appearance, Runs Scored, Hits, Total Bases, Runs Batted In (RBI), Stolen Bases, Caught Stealing, Strike Outs, Base on Balls, Hit by Pitch, Sacrifice Hit, Ground into Double Play and Errors. Exemplary hitting statistical categories include, without limitation: Games, Innings Pitched, Batters Faced, Games Started, Complete Games, Wins, Losses, Saves, Holds, Blown Saves, Blown Holds, Earned Runs Allowed, Strike Outs, Base on Balls, and Hit by Pitch.
  • Statistics can be compiled in real-time or according to a predetermined schedule. Statistics can be pulled from interne sources or received as part of an RSS feed. Statistics can be provided by a data aggregator or other subscription service. Statistics can be reported to the fantasy participants in real-time or close to real-time. In other implementations, statistics can be grouped and reported to the fantasy participant according to a preset schedule. Statistics can be available based on the subscription level of the participant.
  • In typical fantasy league play, a participant's success is largely determined by the performance of the real-world athletes making up the participant's line-up. In implementations of the present invention, the fantasy league participant can influence his team's performance by choosing bonus statistical categories. Bonus statistical categories can be specific performance statistics chosen to highlight the skill set of a particular athlete in the line-up. In this manner, the fantasy participant can increase the chances of accumulating points by taking advantage of a player on a streak. For example, a player having an exceptional stolen base record midseason would be an ideal candidate for a bonus category of stolen bases. The bonus category can also be used to hedge against an athlete in a slump. For example, a batter who is hitting poorly but has a high percentage of bases stolen once on base could also be an ideal candidate for a bonus category. By selecting stolen bases as a bonus category, the fantasy participant increases the points payout if the poor batter gets on bases and steals a base.
  • In some implementations, bonus categories can be more arbitrary. For example, bonus points can be awarded at the occurrence of a specific event at a specific time. For example bonus points can be awarded for every hit made by the number one position in the line-up. Bonus categories can require a negative consequence if an outcome does not occur. For example, a fantasy participant could choose as a bonus category the total bases for the number three position in the lineup. But if the number three position is hitless, negative points can be awarded. Inclusion of negative results for failed outcomes in the bonus category increases the stakes and makes the game more interesting for the participant.
  • In some implementations, a participant's access to bonus statistical categories can be based on the subscription level of the participant. In some implementations, the participant can purchase access to bonus categories or additional bonus categories using points accumulated over the playing season.
  • Having compiled the statistical performance record of each athlete in the line-up, including bonus statistical categories, points can be awarded for performance. Points can be of any whole or fractional value. Points can be positive or negative. Points can be tied to a monetary value or be an arbitrary credit. In an exemplary implementation, point values for various statistical performance hitting categories can include: Games (0), At-Bat (−0.25), Plate Appearance (−0.25), Runs Scored (1), Hits (0), Total Bases (0.25), Runs Batted In (RBI) (1), Stolen Bases (0.5), Caught Stealing (−0.5), Strike Outs (−0.25), Base on Balls (0.25), Hit by Pitch (0.25), Sacrifice Hit (0.25), Ground into Double Play (−0.25) and Errors (−1). Exemplary point values for pitching statistical categories include, without limitation: Games (0), Innings Pitched (0), Batters Faced (0.33), Games Started (0), Complete Games (1.5), Wins (3), Losses (−1), Saves (1.5), Holds (1), Blown Saves (−1), Blown Holds (1), Earned Runs Allowed (1), Strike Outs (0.25), Base on Balls (−0.25), and Hit by Pitch (−0.25).
  • The bonus category can include the same point allocation as above. Additional bonus points can be awarded upon the occurrence of specific events, for example, additional points for the team with the highest batting average, least number of substitutions, pitching a no-hitter, most number of strike-outs, etc.
  • Bonus points are awarded 130 and statistical points are awarded 140 based on athlete performance and event occurrence. Points can be accumulated and displayed in real-time as statistics become available. Points can be accumulated and updated to the user on a preset schedule. Points can be displayed in a format similar to that of the game played. For example, FIG. 2A depicts an exemplary user interface wherein points are accumulated on an inning basis and displayed to the user per inning at points tally 230.
  • During the course of a fantasy game, a participant may decide to substitute a player on the bench for a player in the line-up. Substitutions can be made in real-time during the course of the fantasy game. Substitutions can be allowed at any time during the game. Substitutions can be restricted during certain time periods of the game, for example, no substitutions after the 8th inning in a fantasy baseball game. The number of substitutions from the bench can be limited for a game. Substitution from the bench in one game may preclude the player from being eligible for substitution in a subsequent game. Substitution can require a point penalty, for example, participants can be charged a point value for every substitution.
  • Statistical performance measurements for a substituted athlete start to accumulate from when the substituted athlete entered the fantasy game. That time is measured by the point in the real world event that the starting athlete was removed by the participant. In timed sports, such as football or basketball, it would be determined by the quarters, minutes and seconds remaining to be played. In other sports, it would be determined by non-timed units such as innings and outs remaining in a baseball game or holes left to play in a golf game. The game involving the substitute player must be at an earlier point in terms of time or innings than the starting player for the substitution to be valid. The substitute athlete would begin accumulating game statistics when that athlete's game reached the same point in time or non-time units as when the starter was removed.
  • Wagers 160 or side bets can be made at any time before or during a fantasy game. Side-side bets can be for a given point value that a selected event will occur at specific time or during the course of a game. For example, a participant can wager 0.75 point that a specific athlete on a team will hit a home run during the course of a game. The wager can be tied to a specific athlete or to a specific team. The wager can be tied to statistical performance categories. For example, the wager can be that a team reaches a certain minimum number of hits by the 7th inning. The wager can be made with the participant of the opposing team. The wager can be made with other participants in the fantasy league. The wager can be made against a house account.
  • FIG. 2A depicts an exemplary user interface illustrating a side-betting format 250. A point denomination 252 is chosen from the display. The participant can then choose from a roster for each team 254 if the wager is tied to a specific athlete. The participant can choose between hitting and pitching statistical performance categories 256. The participant can also choose the time or time period of the wager 258, for example during the whole game, the rest of the game, or during a specific inning.
  • Embodiments of the subject matter and the functional operations described in this specification can be implemented in digital electronic circuitry, or in computer software, firmware, or hardware, including the structures disclosed in this specification and their structural equivalents, or in combinations of one or more of them. Embodiments of the subject matter described in this specification can be implemented as one or more computer program products, i.e., one or more modules of computer program instructions encoded on a computer readable medium for execution by, or to control the operation of, data processing apparatus. The computer readable medium can be a machine-readable storage device, a machine-readable storage substrate, a memory device, or a combination of one or more of them. The term “data processing apparatus” encompasses all apparatus, devices, and machines for processing data, including by way of example a programmable processor, a computer, or multiple processors or computers. The apparatus can include, in addition to hardware, code that creates an execution environment for the computer program in question, e.g., code that constitutes processor firmware, a protocol stack, a database management system, an operating system, or a combination of one or more of them.
  • A computer program (also known as a program, software, software application, script, or code) can be written in any form of programming language, including compiled or interpreted languages, and it can be deployed in any form, including as a stand alone program or as a module, component, subroutine, or other unit suitable for use in a computing environment. A computer program does not necessarily correspond to a file in a file system. A program can be stored in a portion of a file that holds other programs or data (e.g., one or more scripts stored in a markup language document), in a single file dedicated to the program in question, or in multiple coordinated files (e.g., files that store one or more modules, sub programs, or portions of code). A computer program can be deployed to be executed on one computer or on multiple computers that are located at one site or distributed across multiple sites and interconnected by a communication network.
  • The processes and logic flows described in this specification can be performed by one or more programmable processors executing one or more computer programs to perform functions by operating on input data and generating output. The processes and logic flows can also be performed by, and apparatus can also be implemented as, special purpose logic circuitry, e.g., an FPGA (field programmable gate array) or an ASIC (application specific integrated circuit).
  • Processors suitable for the execution of a computer program include, by way of example, both general and special purpose microprocessors, and any one or more processors of any kind of digital computer. Generally, a processor will receive instructions and data from a read only memory or a random access memory or both. The essential elements of a computer are a processor for performing instructions and one or more memory devices for storing instructions and data. Generally, a computer will also include, or be operatively coupled to receive data from or transfer data to, or both, one or more mass storage devices for storing data, e.g., magnetic, magneto optical disks, or optical disks. However, a computer need not have such devices. Moreover, a computer can be embedded in another device, e.g., a mobile telephone, a personal digital assistant (PDA), a mobile audio player, a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, to name just a few. Computer readable media suitable for storing computer program instructions and data include all forms of non volatile memory, media and memory devices, including by way of example semiconductor memory devices, e.g., EPROM, EEPROM, and flash memory devices; magnetic disks, e.g., internal hard disks or removable disks; magneto optical disks; and CD ROM and DVD-ROM disks. The processor and the memory can be supplemented by, or incorporated in, special purpose logic circuitry.
  • To provide for interaction with a user, embodiments of the subject matter described in this specification can be implemented on a device having a display, e.g., a CRT (cathode ray tube) or LCD (liquid crystal display) monitor, for displaying information to the user and a keyboard and a pointing device, e.g., a mouse or a trackball, by which the user can provide input to the computer. Other kinds of devices can be used to provide for interaction with a user as well; for example, feedback provided to the user can be any form of sensory feedback, e.g., visual feedback, auditory feedback, or tactile feedback; and input from the user can be received in any form, including acoustic, speech, or tactile input.
  • Embodiments of the subject matter described in this specification can be implemented in a computing system that includes a back end component, e.g., as a data server, or that includes a middleware component, e.g., an application server, or that includes a front end component, e.g., a client computer having a graphical user interface or a Web browser through which a user can interact with an implementation of the subject matter described in this specification, or any combination of one or more such back end, middleware, or front end components. The components of the system can be interconnected by any form or medium of digital data communication, e.g., a communication network. Examples of communication networks include a local area network (“LAN”) and a wide area network (“WAN”), e.g., the Internet.
  • The computing system can include clients and servers. A client and server are generally remote from each other and typically interact through a communication network. The relationship of client and server arises by virtue of computer programs running on the respective computers and having a client-server relationship to each other.
  • While this specification contains many specifics, these should not be construed as limitations on the scope of the invention or of what may be claimed, but rather as descriptions of features specific to particular embodiments of the invention. Certain features that are described in this specification in the context of separate embodiments can also be implemented in combination in a single embodiment. Conversely, various features that are described in the context of a single embodiment can also be implemented in multiple embodiments separately or in any suitable subcombination. Moreover, although features may be described above as acting in certain combinations and even initially claimed as such, one or more features from a claimed combination can in some cases be excised from the combination, and the claimed combination may be directed to a subcombination or variation of a subcombination.
  • Similarly, while operations are described in the specification or depicted in the drawings in a particular order, this should not be understood as requiring that such operations be performed in the particular order shown or in sequential order, or that all illustrated operations be performed, to achieve desirable results. In certain circumstances, multitasking and parallel processing may be advantageous. Moreover, the separation of various system components in the embodiments described above should not be understood as requiring such separation in all embodiments, and it should be understood that the described program components and systems can generally be integrated together in a single software product or packaged into multiple software products.
  • Thus, particular embodiments and implementations of the invention have been described. Other embodiments are within the scope of the following claims. For example, the actions recited in the claims can be performed in a different order and still achieve desirable results.

Claims (25)

1. A computer implemented method of playing a fantasy sports game, comprising:
determining a line-up, wherein the line-up comprises one or more first athletes;
compiling a statistical performance record of the one or more athletes;
awarding points based on the statistical performance record of the one more athletes;
trading a second athlete into the line-up and removing a first athlete;
wagering points based on an event associated with a first or second athlete;
aggregating statistical points and wagered points for a point total.
2. The computer implemented method of claim 1 further wherein the line up is chosen from a predetermined roster.
3. The computer implemented method of claim 2 wherein the roster is automatically chosen.
4. The computer implemented method of claim 1 wherein the statistical performance record of the one or more athletes is compiled according to a predetermined list of performance categories.
5. The computer implemented method of claim 4 wherein the predetermined list of
categories comprise: Games, At-Bat, Plate Appearance, Runs Scored, Hits, Total Bases, Runs Batted In (RBI), Stolen Bases, Caught Stealing, Strike Outs, Base on Balls, Hit by Pitch, Sacrifice Hit, Ground into Double Play, Errors, Innings Pitched, Batters Faced, Games Started, Complete Games, Wins, Losses, Saves, Holds, Blown Saves, Blown Holds, and Earned Runs Allowed.
6. The computer implemented method of claim 1 wherein the statistical performance record is compiled in real time.
7. The computer implemented method of 1 further comprising:
selecting one or more bonus statistical performance categories; and
awarding points based on the one or more bone statistical performance categories.
8. The computer implemented method of claim 7 wherein the bonus statistical performance categories are associated with a first or second athlete.
9. The computer implemented method of claim 7 wherein the bonus statistical performance categories are applicable during predetermined time periods of the game.
10. The computer implemented method of claim 7 wherein the bonus statistical performance categories are associated with a particular event occurring during a game.
11. The computer implemented method of claim 7 wherein the bonus statistical performance category has limited or restricted access.
12. The computer implemented method of claim 7 wherein the bonus statistical performance category can be accessed by paying an access fee.
13. The computer implemented method of claim 7 wherein points are awarded based on bonus statistical performance category points and performance category points.
14. The computer implemented method of claim 1 wherein trading or substituting an athlete from the line up is restricted.
15. The computer implemented method of claim 1 wherein the second athlete is chosen from a predetermined roster.
16. The computer implemented method of claim 14 wherein a substitution fee is charged before making a substitution.
17. The computer implemented method of claim 15 wherein the substitution fee comprises points accumulated during play.
18. The computer implemented method of claim 13 wherein the second athlete is chosen from a pool of athletes maintained by a house administrator.
19. The computer implemented method of claim 13 wherein statistical performance categories are compiled on the second athlete from the time the second athlete is substituted.
20. The computer implemented method of claim 1 wherein a wager is made based on either a first or second athlete's performance.
21. The computer implemented method of claim 1 wherein the wager is associated with a statistical performance category.
22. The computer implemented method of claim 1 wherein the wager is based on the occurrence of an event during a specified time period.
23. The computer implemented method of claim 1 wherein the wager is made with a player in a fantasy league.
24. The computer implemented method of claim 1 wherein the wager is made against a house account.
25. The computer implemented method of claim 1 wherein the wager includes a point value.
US12/622,181 2008-11-19 2009-11-19 Fantasy sports game Abandoned US20100279754A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11610408P true 2008-11-19 2008-11-19
US12/622,181 US20100279754A1 (en) 2008-11-19 2009-11-19 Fantasy sports game

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/622,181 US20100279754A1 (en) 2008-11-19 2009-11-19 Fantasy sports game

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20100279754A1 true US20100279754A1 (en) 2010-11-04

Family

ID=43030792

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/622,181 Abandoned US20100279754A1 (en) 2008-11-19 2009-11-19 Fantasy sports game

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20100279754A1 (en)

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100035672A1 (en) * 2007-05-02 2010-02-11 John Root Interactive sports-themed game
US20100203935A1 (en) * 2009-01-21 2010-08-12 Open Sports Network, Inc. Method and system for conducting an online fantasy game
US20110111857A1 (en) * 2009-11-06 2011-05-12 Isaac Sayo Daniel System and method for conducting a fantasy sports game
US20120316659A1 (en) * 2011-06-09 2012-12-13 Mark Andrew Magas Coaching Strategies in Fantasy Sports
US8485877B2 (en) 2011-09-21 2013-07-16 Finishers Llc Method and system for a mixed martial arts fantasy game
WO2014110364A2 (en) * 2013-01-10 2014-07-17 Pool Of Ages, Ltd. Fantasy league across multiple sports
US8888584B2 (en) 2011-02-03 2014-11-18 Igt Gaming system and method providing a fantasy sports game
US20150005076A1 (en) * 2013-06-27 2015-01-01 Sports Gamet International LLC Fantasy sports game enhancements and platform
US20150005072A1 (en) * 2013-06-26 2015-01-01 Yahoo! Inc. Fantasy sports with situational substitutions of players
WO2015164544A1 (en) * 2014-04-22 2015-10-29 Hotbox Sports Llc Systems, methods and computer readable medium related to sports performance
CN105392537A (en) * 2013-05-01 2016-03-09 瑞柯有限责任公司 System for managing direct challenges between users in fantasy sports and other games
WO2016019301A3 (en) * 2014-07-31 2016-03-24 Max Sports Gaming Llc Fantasy sports gaming with player substitutions
US9589418B2 (en) 2012-07-19 2017-03-07 Philip Paul Givant Specialized slot machine for conducting a wagering game using real time or live action event content
US20170319970A1 (en) * 2016-05-06 2017-11-09 David A. Thorman Fantasy Sports System
US9855503B2 (en) * 2010-03-01 2018-01-02 Rishi Nangia System and method for providing secondary gaming
WO2019094649A1 (en) * 2017-11-10 2019-05-16 Starting 11 Methods and systems for managing a fantasy competition

Citations (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5018736A (en) * 1989-10-27 1991-05-28 Wakeman & Deforrest Corporation Interactive game system and method
US5263723A (en) * 1989-10-27 1993-11-23 Wakeman & Deforrest Corporation Interactive contest system
US5971854A (en) * 1989-10-27 1999-10-26 William Junkin Trust Interactive contest system
US20020068633A1 (en) * 2000-12-01 2002-06-06 Schlaifer Roger L. Real-time odds-based gaming
US7001279B1 (en) * 2002-08-30 2006-02-21 Interactive Sports Holdings, Inc. Systems and methods for providing multiple user support for shared user equipment in a fantasy sports contest application
US20060252476A1 (en) * 2005-05-09 2006-11-09 Tarek Bahou Fantasy sports system and method thereof
US20080215168A1 (en) * 2007-03-01 2008-09-04 Charchian Paul W Transaction and administration management system, such as for fantasy sports
US20080242386A1 (en) * 2007-03-27 2008-10-02 Aruze Gaming America, Inc. Gaming machine that changes the number of free games depending on golf game result thereof
US20080280685A1 (en) * 2006-12-13 2008-11-13 Voodoo Gaming Llc Video games including real-life attributes and/or fanstasy settings
US20090026706A1 (en) * 2007-07-26 2009-01-29 St Clair Eric Sports wagering based on player verses player matchups
US7548242B1 (en) * 2002-08-30 2009-06-16 Interactive Sports Holdings, Inc. Systems and methods for integrating graphic animation technologies in fantasy sports contest applications
US20090197684A1 (en) * 2006-06-02 2009-08-06 Wms Gaming Inc. Handheld wagering game system and methods for conducting wagering games thereupon
US20090247259A1 (en) * 2008-03-26 2009-10-01 Gtech Corporation Method and system for facilitating extended play of a wagering game
US7614944B1 (en) * 2002-08-30 2009-11-10 Interactive Sports Holdings, Inc. Systems and methods for providing multi-level fantasy sports contests in fantasy sports contest applications
US7762878B2 (en) * 2005-02-11 2010-07-27 Dizpersion Technologies, Inc. Method and system for operating and participating in fantasy leagues
US20110053681A1 (en) * 2009-08-28 2011-03-03 Justin Edward Goldman System and Method for Fantasy Sports Gambling

Patent Citations (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5263723A (en) * 1989-10-27 1993-11-23 Wakeman & Deforrest Corporation Interactive contest system
US5971854A (en) * 1989-10-27 1999-10-26 William Junkin Trust Interactive contest system
US5018736A (en) * 1989-10-27 1991-05-28 Wakeman & Deforrest Corporation Interactive game system and method
US20020068633A1 (en) * 2000-12-01 2002-06-06 Schlaifer Roger L. Real-time odds-based gaming
US7001279B1 (en) * 2002-08-30 2006-02-21 Interactive Sports Holdings, Inc. Systems and methods for providing multiple user support for shared user equipment in a fantasy sports contest application
US7614944B1 (en) * 2002-08-30 2009-11-10 Interactive Sports Holdings, Inc. Systems and methods for providing multi-level fantasy sports contests in fantasy sports contest applications
US7548242B1 (en) * 2002-08-30 2009-06-16 Interactive Sports Holdings, Inc. Systems and methods for integrating graphic animation technologies in fantasy sports contest applications
US7762878B2 (en) * 2005-02-11 2010-07-27 Dizpersion Technologies, Inc. Method and system for operating and participating in fantasy leagues
US20060252476A1 (en) * 2005-05-09 2006-11-09 Tarek Bahou Fantasy sports system and method thereof
US7699707B2 (en) * 2005-05-09 2010-04-20 Hotbox Sports Llc Fantasy sports system and method thereof
US20090197684A1 (en) * 2006-06-02 2009-08-06 Wms Gaming Inc. Handheld wagering game system and methods for conducting wagering games thereupon
US20080280685A1 (en) * 2006-12-13 2008-11-13 Voodoo Gaming Llc Video games including real-life attributes and/or fanstasy settings
US20080215168A1 (en) * 2007-03-01 2008-09-04 Charchian Paul W Transaction and administration management system, such as for fantasy sports
US20080242386A1 (en) * 2007-03-27 2008-10-02 Aruze Gaming America, Inc. Gaming machine that changes the number of free games depending on golf game result thereof
US20090026706A1 (en) * 2007-07-26 2009-01-29 St Clair Eric Sports wagering based on player verses player matchups
US20090247259A1 (en) * 2008-03-26 2009-10-01 Gtech Corporation Method and system for facilitating extended play of a wagering game
US20110053681A1 (en) * 2009-08-28 2011-03-03 Justin Edward Goldman System and Method for Fantasy Sports Gambling

Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20150024814A1 (en) * 2007-05-02 2015-01-22 Bleacher League Entertainment, Inc. Interactive sports-themed game
US20100035672A1 (en) * 2007-05-02 2010-02-11 John Root Interactive sports-themed game
US8634943B2 (en) * 2007-05-02 2014-01-21 Bleacher League Entertainment Inc. Interactive sports-themed game
US20100203935A1 (en) * 2009-01-21 2010-08-12 Open Sports Network, Inc. Method and system for conducting an online fantasy game
US20110111857A1 (en) * 2009-11-06 2011-05-12 Isaac Sayo Daniel System and method for conducting a fantasy sports game
US8333642B2 (en) * 2009-11-06 2012-12-18 F3M3 Companies, Inc. System and method for conducting a fantasy sports game
US9855503B2 (en) * 2010-03-01 2018-01-02 Rishi Nangia System and method for providing secondary gaming
US10369478B2 (en) 2010-03-01 2019-08-06 Rishi Nangia System and method for providing secondary gaming
US8888584B2 (en) 2011-02-03 2014-11-18 Igt Gaming system and method providing a fantasy sports game
US20120316659A1 (en) * 2011-06-09 2012-12-13 Mark Andrew Magas Coaching Strategies in Fantasy Sports
US8485877B2 (en) 2011-09-21 2013-07-16 Finishers Llc Method and system for a mixed martial arts fantasy game
US9589418B2 (en) 2012-07-19 2017-03-07 Philip Paul Givant Specialized slot machine for conducting a wagering game using real time or live action event content
WO2014110364A2 (en) * 2013-01-10 2014-07-17 Pool Of Ages, Ltd. Fantasy league across multiple sports
WO2014110364A3 (en) * 2013-01-10 2015-02-05 Pool Of Ages, Ltd. Fantasy league across multiple sports
CN105392537A (en) * 2013-05-01 2016-03-09 瑞柯有限责任公司 System for managing direct challenges between users in fantasy sports and other games
US10105595B2 (en) * 2013-06-26 2018-10-23 Oath Inc. Fantasy sports with situational substitutions of players
US20150005072A1 (en) * 2013-06-26 2015-01-01 Yahoo! Inc. Fantasy sports with situational substitutions of players
US20170106292A1 (en) * 2013-06-27 2017-04-20 Sport Gamet International Llc Stack roster fantasy sports game and platform
US20150005076A1 (en) * 2013-06-27 2015-01-01 Sports Gamet International LLC Fantasy sports game enhancements and platform
US10052562B2 (en) * 2013-06-27 2018-08-21 Sport Gamet International Llc Stack roster fantasy sports game and platform
WO2015164544A1 (en) * 2014-04-22 2015-10-29 Hotbox Sports Llc Systems, methods and computer readable medium related to sports performance
WO2016019301A3 (en) * 2014-07-31 2016-03-24 Max Sports Gaming Llc Fantasy sports gaming with player substitutions
US10343074B2 (en) * 2016-05-06 2019-07-09 David A. Thormann Fantasy sports system
US20170319970A1 (en) * 2016-05-06 2017-11-09 David A. Thorman Fantasy Sports System
WO2019094649A1 (en) * 2017-11-10 2019-05-16 Starting 11 Methods and systems for managing a fantasy competition

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US9399168B2 (en) Method for implementing a computer game
US8585482B2 (en) Method and apparatus for providing an advantage to a player in a bonus game
US10102707B2 (en) Sorting games of chance
CA2623765C (en) Automatic game play
Preston et al. Cheating in contests
US8328644B2 (en) Asynchronous challenge gaming
US6135881A (en) Sports forecasting game
AU2007211906B2 (en) Online blackjack tournaments with option to purchase card counting report
AU2003220234B2 (en) Pari-mutuel sports wagering system
US8323102B2 (en) Remote play of a table game through a mobile device
US9293003B2 (en) Secondary game
US7390255B2 (en) System and method for facilitating play of a video game via a web site
US6929550B2 (en) Network game method and network game system
US20140148238A1 (en) Skill based lottery system
US8740683B2 (en) System and method for using draft position information to aid player selection in a fantasy league draft
US6371855B1 (en) Fantasy internet sports game
US20060217198A1 (en) Onsite fantasy sports game using onsite and network-based data collection and processing
US9123205B2 (en) Online gaming tournament system having prizes for players in winning categories and method therefor
US9070257B1 (en) Systems and methods for betting pools
US7172508B2 (en) Multi-person parimutuel betting games based on sporting events
US20050003878A1 (en) Methods and apparatus for fairly placing players in bet positions
US20060100006A1 (en) Strategy gaming format with outcomes determined by external events and auction- and market-based transactions by the players
US20040048656A1 (en) System and method for pari-mutuel wagering on sporting events
US20070087804A1 (en) Method and apparatus for wagering on event outcomes of a game
US6425828B2 (en) Database driven online distributed tournament system

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION