US20080207326A1 - Method for Conducting Challenges in a Fantasy Simulation - Google Patents

Method for Conducting Challenges in a Fantasy Simulation Download PDF

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US20080207326A1
US20080207326A1 US11/678,876 US67887607A US2008207326A1 US 20080207326 A1 US20080207326 A1 US 20080207326A1 US 67887607 A US67887607 A US 67887607A US 2008207326 A1 US2008207326 A1 US 2008207326A1
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participant
challenge
method
stock
plurality
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US11/678,876
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Christopher R. Carlevato
Daniel J. Carroll
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HEDGEGROUP LLC
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HEDGEGROUP LLC
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/70Game security or game management aspects
    • A63F13/79Game security or game management aspects involving player-related data, e.g. identities, accounts, preferences or play histories
    • A63F13/795Game security or game management aspects involving player-related data, e.g. identities, accounts, preferences or play histories for finding other players; for building a team; for providing a buddy list
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/10Control of the course of the game, e.g. start, progess, end
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/70Game security or game management aspects
    • A63F13/79Game security or game management aspects involving player-related data, e.g. identities, accounts, preferences or play histories
    • A63F13/798Game security or game management aspects involving player-related data, e.g. identities, accounts, preferences or play histories for assessing skills or for ranking players, e.g. for generating a hall of fame
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/40Processing input control signals of video game devices, e.g. signals generated by the player or derived from the environment
    • A63F13/44Processing input control signals of video game devices, e.g. signals generated by the player or derived from the environment involving timing of operations, e.g. performing an action within a time slot
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/50Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by details of game servers
    • A63F2300/55Details of game data or player data management
    • A63F2300/5546Details of game data or player data management using player registration data, e.g. identification, account, preferences, game history
    • A63F2300/5566Details of game data or player data management using player registration data, e.g. identification, account, preferences, game history by matching opponents or finding partners to build a team, e.g. by skill level, geographical area, background, play style
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/50Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by details of game servers
    • A63F2300/55Details of game data or player data management
    • A63F2300/5546Details of game data or player data management using player registration data, e.g. identification, account, preferences, game history
    • A63F2300/558Details of game data or player data management using player registration data, e.g. identification, account, preferences, game history by assessing the players' skills or ranking

Abstract

A fantasy simulation allows participants to challenge each other by comparing the performance of one participant's reality-based selection to another participant's reality-based selection. The simulation also allows participants to wager a limited or unlimited amount of simulated funds on the outcome of the challenge. Participants challenge other, individual participants or groups of participants while the simulation measures a reality-based metric associated with all challenge participants' reality-based selection over a period of time. At the conclusion of the period of time, a challenge winner is determined from the change of the metric.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • Web-based simulations exist for a variety of topics and scenarios. For example, “fantasy” simulations in almost every form of organized athletics are well-known. In a typical fantasy league, participants sign up with a web service and choose a number of players or teams to be included on their fantasy team or league. Once a number of fantasy players have made their choices, the fantasy players are awarded points or other incentives based on the performance of their chosen players or teams in actual contests and compete against other fantasy participants.
  • A similar “fantasy” concept may be applied to almost any other group of participants wherein reality-based performance statistics are readily accessible and quantifiable. For example, a web site may host a fantasy stock market game or simulation. Fantasy players would choose a number of stocks, commodities, bonds, funds, or any instrument that is traded in a financial market. The players would then be awarded points or other incentives based on the performance of their individual portfolios as compared to other participant's portfolios in the simulation.
  • Interaction between participants in fantasy games or simulations is limited to reality-based events or transactions. For example, in sports fantasy leagues, fantasy players may consummate transactions that mirror the ability of managers and players to move to other teams or perform other reality-based bargains. Limiting fantasy players to reality-based transactions may provide a realistic simulation experience, but may restrict the fantasy players' options for interaction among other players or other leagues.
  • SUMMARY
  • In a fantasy game or simulation, a method allows fantasy players to issue challenges to other fantasy players. One fantasy player may propose that his reality-based selections will outperform a second player's portfolio. If the second player accepts the challenge, then a negotiated performance indicator common to both portfolios may be monitored for a period of time. At the end of the period, the winner of the challenge may be determined based on the change of the performance indicator.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 illustrates an embodiment of a data network;
  • FIG. 2 illustrates an embodiment of a computing device; and
  • FIG. 3 is a flowchart of one embodiment of a method for conducting challenges between participants in an on-line fantasy game.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • FIG. 1 illustrates an embodiment of a data network 100 including a first group of network computers 105 operatively coupled to a web host 110 via a network 115. The plurality of computers 105 may be located, by way of example rather than limitation, in separate geographic locations from each other, in different areas of the same city, or in different states. The network 115 may be provided using a wide variety of techniques for the transfer of electronic data as well known to those skilled in the art. For example, the network 115 may comprise dedicated access lines, plain ordinary telephone lines, satellite links, combinations of these, etc. Additionally, the network 115 may include a plurality of network computers or server computers (not shown), each of which may be operatively interconnected in a known manner. Where the network 115 comprises the Internet, data communication may take place over the network 115 via an Internet communication protocol.
  • The web host 110 may be a server computer of the type commonly employed in networking solutions. The web host 110 may be used to accumulate, analyze, and download user data. For example, the web host 110 may periodically receive data from each of the network computers 105 indicative of information pertaining to a user profile, a user choice or transaction regarding a fantasy game or account, a desired course of action, or any other data that may be transferred from a fantasy game player to other players or to the web host 110. The web host 110 may also be a personal computer at which a user may access and view information served from other network computers or servers. For example, the network computers 105 may include one or more servers that may be utilized to store information for a plurality of users.
  • Although the data network 100 is shown to include one web host 110 and three network computers 105, it should be understood that different numbers of computers and hosts may be utilized. For example, the network 100 may include a plurality of web hosts 110 and dozens of network computers 105, all of which may be interconnected via the network 115. According to the disclosed example, this configuration may provide several advantages, such as, for example, enabling real time uploads and downloads of information as well as periodic uploads and downloads of information. This provides for a primary backup of all the information generated in the process of updating and accumulating user data.
  • The web host 110 may be connected to a network, including local area networks (LANs), wide area networks (WANs), portions of the Internet such as a private Internet, a secure Internet, a value-added network, or a virtual private network. Suitable web hosts 110 may also include personal computers, laptops, workstations, disconnectable mobile computers, mainframes, information appliances, personal digital assistants, and other handheld and/or embedded processing systems. The signal lines that support communications links to a host 110 may include twisted pair, coaxial, or optical fiber cables, telephone lines, satellites, microwave relays, modulated AC power lines, and other data transmission “wires” known to those of skill in the art. Further, signals may be transferred wirelessly through a wireless network or wireless LAN (WLAN) using any suitable wireless transmission protocol, such as the IEEE series of 802.11 standards. Although particular individual and network computer systems and components are shown, those of skill in the art will appreciate that the present invention also works with a variety of other networks and computers.
  • FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of one possible embodiment of the web host 110 shown in FIG. 1. The host 110 may have a controller 200 that is operatively connected to a database 205 via a link 210. It should be noted that, while not shown, additional databases may be linked to the controller 200 in a known manner.
  • The controller 200 may include a program memory 215, a microcontroller or a microprocessor (MP) 220, a random-access memory (RAM) 225, and an input/output (I/O) circuit 230, all of which may be interconnected via an address/data bus 235. It should be appreciated that although only one microprocessor 220 is shown, the controller 200 may include multiple microprocessors 220. Similarly, the memory of the controller 200 may include multiple RAMs 225 and multiple program memories 215. Although the I/O circuit 230 is shown as a single block, it should be appreciated that the I/O circuit 230 may include a number of different types of I/O circuits. The RAM(s) 225 and program memories, 215 may be implemented as semiconductor memories, magnetically readable memories, and/or optically readable memories, for example.
  • Much of the inventive functionality and many of the inventive principles are best implemented with or in software programs or instructions and integrated circuits (ICs) such as application specific ICs. It is expected that one of ordinary skill, notwithstanding possibly significant effort and many design choices motivated by, for example, available time, current technology, and economic considerations, when guided by the concepts and principles disclosed herein will be readily capable of generating such software instructions, programs, and ICs with minimal experimentation. Therefore, in the interest of brevity and minimization of any risk of obscuring the principles and concepts in accordance to the present invention, further discussion of such software and ICs, if any, will be limited to the essentials with respect to the principles and concepts of the preferred embodiments.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates one embodiment of a method 300 of issuing and managing challenges to participants in a stock market fantasy game or simulation. At block 305, a first participant in a stock market or other reality-based, on-line fantasy simulation game may initiate a portfolio challenge proposal to another participant. A portfolio may be a collection of stocks, bonds, commodities, or any other item or instrument that may be traded on a public exchange market that includes a publicized performance metric. For example, a portfolio may be a collection, i.e. an account, of stocks that are traded on a major market such as the New York Stock Exchange, while the performance metric may be the stock price. Other performance metrics may include a net gain in price, a performance relative to another stock, or an equity ratio. Of course, many other performance metrics exist.
  • In another embodiment, a portfolio may also be any collection of objects or people for which there is a publicly-known and currently-changing metric that cannot be readily influenced by the fantasy game participants. For example, a portfolio may be an athletic team made up of a participant's selected players and a metric may be the number of rushing yards complied by the portfolio players. As with stocks, there are also many other metrics that measure the performance of an object or person.
  • The challenge may include a number of challenge parameters that may define the basis for a first participant's challenge against a second participant. For example, a challenge may be a prediction that a metric common to all or a portion of the first participant'portfolio may reach a specific value after a period of time. At the conclusion of the time period, the same metric may be measured against the second participant's portfolio over the same period of time. In one embodiment, the first participant may challenge the second participant that all or a portion of the first participant's portfolio of stocks will, over a specific time period, achieve a higher net gain in value than the second participant's portfolio over the same period. In another embodiment, the first participant may issue a challenge that a number of sector-specific stocks will outperform a number of stocks from a same or different category that are part of the second participant's portfolio. For example, the first participant may issue a challenge that his consumer goods stocks will outperform the second participant's consumer goods stocks over the same period. In another embodiment, the challenge may include two distinct sectors and/or two distinct time periods. The challenge may include a number of other challenge parameters.
  • The challenge may also include a wager of a value. In one embodiment, the wager may be less than or equal to the total value of the first participant's account. For example, the account value may be a dollar amount based on the value of the first participant's stock or other investment instrument account holdings. If the first participant maintains a portfolio containing 50 shares of ABC Corporation and 20 shares of XYZ Corporation that are valued, respectively, at the time of the challenge at $100 and $40, the first participant may have a total account value of $140. The first participant may then issue, as part of the challenge, a wager of up to $140 that a second participant's portfolio may not perform over a given period of time according to a chosen performance metric. In another embodiment, the first participant may wager more than his or her account value. In a still further embodiment, challenge wagers may be capped at a value or percentage of a first or second participant's total account assets or may be capped at a fixed amount. For example, continuing with the previous amounts, the method 300 may determine that the second participant only has a total account value of $100. The first participant, who may issue the challenge, may then be prevented from wagering an amount over $100 despite having a total account value of $140. Of course, other forms of challenges and wagers related to stock market and other types of portfolios.
  • At block 310, the first participant may send the challenge to a number of second participants. Challenges may be sent electronically through a message system incorporating any number of HTML or other protocol commands as are well known. The challenges may be conveyed through a system that is internal to a web server that hosts the simulation. In another embodiment, the challenges may be convoyed electronically through an external messaging system and sent, for example, to a second participant's e-mail account that may or may not be hosted by the same web server that hosts the simulation. Additionally, the first participant may send the challenge to a single, second participant. In another embodiment, the first participant may send the challenge to a plurality of second participants. For example, the first participant may initially send the challenge to multiple second participants. Alternatively or additionally, the first participant may send the challenge to a single, second participant. The second participant, may, in turn, forward the challenge to a number of third participants who may, at their option, participate in the challenge. In a still further embodiment, participation by a third participant may be conditioned upon acceptance of the challenge by the third participant and subsequent approval by the first participant who initiated the challenge. Other embodiments of conveying the challenge to another participant may also exist.
  • At block 315, the second participant may accept the challenge. In one embodiment, the second participant may receive the challenge, as discussed in relation to block 310, through a message system that is hosted by the same web server, or within the same system that hosts or maintains the simulation. As also previously discussed, the second participant may receive the challenge through an externally-hosted electronic messaging system. The second participant may accept the challenge by selecting a button, radio button, checkbox, or other control structure within the message. In another embodiment, the second participant may be directed to a website via an embedded hyperlink associated with the challenge of block 310. Many other methods also exist for optionally accepting the challenge.
  • If, at block 315, the second participant does not accept the challenge, the method 300 may permit the first or second participant to modify the challenge terms as initiated and described in relation to block 305. In one embodiment, the second participant may review the challenge parameters, decline the challenge at block 315, modify the challenge parameters or suggest new challenge parameters, and initiate a new portfolio challenge proposal with the first participant at block 305. In another embodiment, the second participant may communicate declining the challenge to the first participant at block 315. The first participant may, at block 317, modify the challenge or propose new challenge parameters and, at block 305, initiate the new portfolio challenge proposal to the second participant. In a still further embodiment, a third participant that is not a party to the original proposal of block 305 may, at block 317, modify the challenge between the first and second participants. The third participant may be another user that maintains a distinct portfolio. Further, the third participant may be a system administrator or other monitor that may communicate suggestions to a first or second participant to modify the challenge. Additionally, the third participant may, at block 317, modify the challenge in an attempt to persuade the original parties to the challenge to permit the third participant to join the challenge.
  • If, at block 315, the second participant accepts the challenge issued by the first participant, a message indicating acceptance may be sent back to the first participant using the same or a different message delivery method as described in relation to block 310. In another embodiment, an acceptance message may be sent to a challenge monitor or other service that gathers and records challenge data. For example, the acceptance message may include the challenge parameters as accepted by the second participant and any additional parameters or information added by the second participant. Also, the acceptance may include a personalized message to the first participant.
  • At block 320, the method 300 may monitor the challenge. In one embodiment, the method 300 may monitor the performance indicator(s) as included in the challenge accepted by the second participant. For example, at block 320, the method may monitor a market price for a specific challenge stock included in both the first and second participant's portfolio to determine a performance indicator of net gain, percentage net gain, or other metric. The method 300 may access real-time stock market or other reality-based data to monitor the challenge. The method may then compare the challenge parameters against the reality-based data. In one embodiment, the method 300 may monitor the stock price continuously during the challenge period. For example, the method 300 may provide an application that provides the challenge participants or other participants with a real-time measurement of the performance indicator. Also, the method 300 may present a graphical representation of the performance indicator's change during the challenge period, for example, a line or other graph indicating the rise and fall of the performance indicator. The method 300 may also display the progress of the challenge in a dedicated area of a website by displaying the performance indicator, or a representation of he indicator, along with the challenge parameters.
  • In another embodiment, the method 300 may monitor the stock price to determine a net gain during discrete times over the challenge period. For example, at block 320, the method may record only the closing price for a challenge stock on each day or another period of time within the challenge period.
  • In a still further embodiment, while monitoring the challenge 320, the method 300 may allow the first and second participants to modify, add, or otherwise manipulate their respective portfolios during the challenge period. For example, after a second participant accepts the challenge 315, the first and second participants may continue to sell and purchase traded instruments within their respective portfolios. Therefore, when monitoring the challenge parameters 320, the method 300 may record the performance indicator for a changing set of portfolio items wherein each item of the set may match a challenge parameter.
  • Another embodiment may include targeted advertising while monitoring a challenge in block 320. For example, the challenge participants' portfolios contain the stock ticker symbols for a number of companies. As a participant is online to monitor the challenge, advertising associated with the companies making up the participant's portfolio may be visible. Further, as a participant checks on a particular stock, either form his current challenge portfolio or unrelated to the challenge portfolio, advertising for that company may be visible. For example, a user desiring a stock quote on Company A may type that company's symbol, “CPA,” in an online field. Upon completion of the symbol, advertising for Company A or advertising for companies in competition with Company A may appear in an online sidebar. In one embodiment, the visible advertising may be associated with the portfolio of the currently-online participant. In another embodiment, the advertising may be associated with other challenge participants. Of course, other methods of monitoring a fantasy game challenge and displaying advertising may also exist.
  • At block 325, the method 300 may determine a challenge winner. In one embodiment, the method 300 may compare the monitored data of block 320 with the challenge parameters as accepted in block 315. For example, a challenge performance indicator may be stock price. Based on difference between the stock price(s) at the beginning and end of the challenge, the method 300 may compare the net gain of the first participant's portfolio to the net gain of the second participant's portfolio. The method 300 may then determine the challenge winner 325 by identifying the participant that is closest to matching the challenge parameter(s) of net gain. In another embodiment, after determining a challenge winner 325, the method may deposit a wagered value from the losing participant into the account of the winning participant. From the previous example, if the first participant won over the second participant, a wagered value may be subtracted from the second participant's account and added to the first participant's account. Block 325 may also include other methods for determining a challenge winner.
  • Thus, a method 300 for conducting challenges in a fantasy simulation may include initiating a challenge proposal 305 including challenge parameters based on performance metrics, sending the challenge to one or more second participants 310, accepting or declining the challenge 315, optionally modifying the challenge parameters 317, monitoring the challenge 320, and determining a challenge winner 325. Although the forgoing text sets forth a detailed description of numerous different embodiments, it should be understood that the scope of the patent is defined by the words of the claims set forth at the end of this patent. The detailed description is to be construed as exemplary only and does not describe every possible embodiment because describing every possible embodiment would be impractical, if not impossible. Numerous alternative embodiments could be implemented, using either current technology or technology developed after the filing date of this patent, which would still fall within the scope of the claims.
  • Thus, many modifications and variations may be made in the techniques and structures described and illustrated herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the present claims. Accordingly, it should be understood that the methods and apparatus described herein are illustrative only and are not limiting upon the scope of the claims.

Claims (30)

1. In a stock market simulation including a first participant having a first stock portfolio and a second participant having a second stock portfolio, each of the first and second stock portfolios having a performance indicator, a method for imposing a challenge between the first and second participant comprising:
communicating a proposal that the first stock portfolio will outperform the second stock portfolio;
communicating the proposal from the first participant to the second participant;
receiving an acceptance of the proposal;
monitoring the first and second stock portfolio performance indicator for a period of time; and
determining a winner of the challenge based on a difference between the performance indicator at the beginning of the period of time and the performance indicator at the end of the period of time;
wherein the first stock portfolio outperforms the second stock portfolio when, at the end of the period of time, the difference of the performance indicator associated the first stock portfolio is greater than the difference of the performance indicator associated with the second stock portfolio.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the first participant includes a first participant account and the second participant includes a second participant account.
3. The method of claim 2, wherein the first participant account includes a first account total value and the second participant account includes a second account total value.
4. The method of claim 3, wherein proposing that the first stock portfolio will outperform the second stock portfolio includes the first participant placing a wager on the proposal that the first stock portfolio will outperform the second stock portfolio.
5. The method of claim 4, further comprising:
determining a lowest account total value between the first account total value and the second account total value; and
limiting the wager to the lowest account total value.
6. The method of claim 5, further comprising limiting the wager to an amount between $200,000 and $2,000,000.
7. The method of claim 4, wherein the wager does not include a maximum or a minimum value.
8. The method of claim 1, further comprising proposing that the first stock portfolio will outperform a plurality of second stock portfolios, each of the plurality of second stock portfolios belonging to a different participant.
9. The method of claim 8, further comprising limiting the plurality of second stock portfolios to three.
10. The method of claim 1, wherein the period of time includes one week.
11. The method of claim 1, further comprising selecting a start date and an end date for the period of time.
12. The method of claim 1, wherein the performance indicator includes at least one of a first or second stock portfolio net gain, a percent gain, a first or second stock portfolio relative performance, or a first or second stock portfolio equity ratio.
13. The method of claim 1, wherein the first and second stock portfolios include a plurality of stocks.
14. The method of claim 13, further comprising selecting a subset of the plurality of stocks, wherein each stock of the subset includes a stock sector, wherein the stock sector includes at least one of a technology sector, a stock type, or a stock classification;
wherein monitoring the first and second stock portfolio performance indicator for a period of time comprises monitoring the performance indicator for the subset of the plurality of stocks.
15. The method of claim 1, further comprising the first participant sending a private electronic message to the second participant.
16. The method of claim 1, further comprising the first participant posting a public message, the public message including content associated with the second participant.
17. The method of claim 1, further comprising the second participant restricting the first participant from at least one of communicating the proposal from the first participant to the second participant, or sending a private electronic message to the second participant.
18. The method of claim 1, further comprising displaying advertising related to at least one of the first stock portfolio, the second stock portfolio, or a requested stock quote.
19. A method for comparing a first selection belonging to a first participant with a second selection belonging to a second participant, the first and second selections including a plurality of elements, each of the plurality of elements including a reality-based equivalent element that includes a plurality of performance metrics, the method comprising:
the first participant formulating a challenge, wherein the challenge includes a prediction that at least one of the plurality of performance metrics associated with the first selection will achieve a result while the at least one of the plurality of performance metrics associated with the second selection will not achieve the result;
the first participant communicating the challenge to the second participant;
the second participant evaluating the challenge;
the second participant accepting the challenge;
the first and second participants agreeing to a period of time over which the challenge will occur, the period of time including a start time and an end time;
measuring a first difference of the at least one of the plurality of performance metrics associated with the first selection over the period of time;
measuring a second difference of the at least one of the plurality of performance metrics associated with the second selection over the period of time;
comparing the first difference to the second difference; and
determining if the at least one of the plurality of performance metrics associated with the first selection achieved the result while the at least one of the plurality of performance metrics associated with the second selection did not achieve the result.
20. The method of claim 19, wherein the first and second selection comprises a plurality of market-traded stocks.
21. The method of claim 19, further comprising the first and second participants wagering an amount on the outcome of the challenge, the wager including a value.
22. The method of claim 21, wherein the wager does not have a maximum or a minimum value.
23. The method of claim 19, wherein the first participant formulating a challenge, wherein the challenge includes a prediction that at least one of the plurality of performance metrics associated with the first selection will achieve a result while the at least one of the plurality of performance metrics associated with a plurality of second selections will not achieve the result.
24. The method of claim 19, wherein the at least one of the plurality of performance metrics includes at least one of a first or second selection net gain, a percent gain, a first or second selection relative performance, or a first or second selection equity ratio.
25. The method of claim 19, further comprising displaying advertising related to at least one of the first selection, the second selection, or a requested selection.
26. A stock portfolio challenge apparatus comprising:
a memory that stores computer executable instructions;
a processor being adapted to the execute computer-executable instructions, the computer-executable instructions comprising instructions for:
formulating a proposal indicating that, based on a stock performance indicator common to at least a subset of both a first stock portfolio belonging to a first participant and a second stock portfolio belonging to a second participant, the first stock portfolio will outperform the second stock portfolio;
communicating the proposal from the first participant to the second participant;
initiating a challenge between the first participant and the second participant based on the proposal;
monitoring the first and second stock portfolio performance indicator for a period of time; and
determining a winner of the challenge based on a difference between the performance indicator at the beginning of the period of time and the performance indicator at the end of the period of time.
27. The apparatus of claim 26, further comprising computer-executable instructions for wagering an amount on the outcome of the challenge, the wager including a value.
28. The apparatus of claim 26, further comprising computer-executable instructions for:
communicating the proposal from the first participant to a plurality of second participants; and
initiating a challenge between the first participant and the plurality of second participants based on the proposal.
29. The method of claim 26, wherein the first and second stock portfolio performance indicator includes at least one of a first or second selection net gain, a percent gain, a first or second selection relative performance, or a first or second selection equity ratio.
30. The method of claim 26, further comprising computer-executable instructions for displaying advertising related to at least one of the first stock portfolio, the second stock portfolio, or a requested stock quote.
US11/678,876 2007-02-26 2007-02-26 Method for Conducting Challenges in a Fantasy Simulation Abandoned US20080207326A1 (en)

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