US20070111796A1 - Association of peripherals communicatively attached to a console device - Google Patents

Association of peripherals communicatively attached to a console device Download PDF

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Publication number
US20070111796A1
US20070111796A1 US11280736 US28073605A US2007111796A1 US 20070111796 A1 US20070111796 A1 US 20070111796A1 US 11280736 US11280736 US 11280736 US 28073605 A US28073605 A US 28073605A US 2007111796 A1 US2007111796 A1 US 2007111796A1
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US
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
console
controller
headset
device
wireless
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11280736
Inventor
Edward C. Giaimo
Richard Henry Irving
Shaheen Ashok Gandhi
Russell Glaser
Hugh Edward McLoone
Jon Marcus Randall Whitten
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Microsoft Technology Licensing LLC
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Microsoft Corp
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/20Input arrangements for video game devices
    • A63F13/22Setup operations, e.g. calibration, key configuration or button assignment
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/02Accessories
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/20Input arrangements for video game devices
    • A63F13/23Input arrangements for video game devices for interfacing with the game device, e.g. specific interfaces between game controller and console
    • A63F13/235Input arrangements for video game devices for interfacing with the game device, e.g. specific interfaces between game controller and console using a wireless connection, e.g. infrared or piconet
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/50Controlling the output signals based on the game progress
    • A63F13/53Controlling the output signals based on the game progress involving additional visual information provided to the game scene, e.g. by overlay to simulate a head-up display [HUD] or displaying a laser sight in a shooting game
    • A63F13/537Controlling the output signals based on the game progress involving additional visual information provided to the game scene, e.g. by overlay to simulate a head-up display [HUD] or displaying a laser sight in a shooting game using indicators, e.g. showing the condition of a game character on screen
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/70Game security or game management aspects
    • A63F13/79Game security or game management aspects involving player-related data, e.g. identities, accounts, preferences or play histories
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/10Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by input arrangements for converting player-generated signals into game device control signals
    • A63F2300/1025Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by input arrangements for converting player-generated signals into game device control signals details of the interface with the game device, e.g. USB version detection
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/10Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by input arrangements for converting player-generated signals into game device control signals
    • A63F2300/1025Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by input arrangements for converting player-generated signals into game device control signals details of the interface with the game device, e.g. USB version detection
    • A63F2300/1031Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by input arrangements for converting player-generated signals into game device control signals details of the interface with the game device, e.g. USB version detection using a wireless connection, e.g. Bluetooth, infrared connections
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/20Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterised by details of the game platform
    • A63F2300/206Game information storage, e.g. cartridges, CD ROM's, DVD's, smart cards
    • A63F2300/208Game information storage, e.g. cartridges, CD ROM's, DVD's, smart cards for storing personal settings or data of the player
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/60Methods for processing data by generating or executing the game program
    • A63F2300/6063Methods for processing data by generating or executing the game program for sound processing

Abstract

Systems and methods for associating a device to a peripheral that is communicating to a game console or computing device. The peripheral is initially bound to a port of the game console or computing device. The device binds to the game console or computing device via an automatic or user-initiated sequence and then correlated to the port assigned to the peripheral. Data that is associated with the peripheral is communicated to the device after being correlated. The device and peripheral may also be associated based on a user profile. When the user signs-in to the game console or computing device, the device is associated to the peripheral via a peripheral identifier and configuration information in the profile.

Description

    COPYRIGHT NOTICE/PERMISSION
  • [0001]
    A portion of the disclosure of this patent document contains material, which is subject to copyright protection. The copyright owner has no objection to the facsimile reproduction by anyone of the patent document or the patent disclosure, as it appears in the Patent and Trademark Office patent files or records, but otherwise reserves all copyright rights whatsoever. The following notice applies to the software and data as described below and in the drawings hereto: Copyright® 2005, Microsoft Corporation, All Rights Reserved.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • [0002]
    This invention generally relates to the field of computing and gaming devices. The present invention is directed to associating peripheral devices that communicate to a console, controller or other computing device.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0003]
    Online gaming has become a large part of the gaming experience. Initially, players could communicate via text, however texting during game play is difficult. Later, games allowed players to connect to each other or a centralized server to facilitate cooperation using audio-only devices, such as headsets. Now, many gamers use specially designed headsets for these purposes. Conventional headsets connect to the gaming consoles using, e.g., a headset or microphone jack or USB connector. Because of the wired connection to the controller or console, it is relatively easy to correlate the sounds to the particular gamer's play.
  • [0004]
    Gamers also enjoy using wireless controllers, which provide players with freedom of movement by wirelessly connecting the controller to the gaming console. Typically, the wireless controllers provide features such as vibration feedback, mini-joysticks, D-pad, pressure-sensitive buttons, etc. that players would find on wired controllers. In addition, the systems that connect wireless controllers to gaming consoles often allow multiple players to play at once on the console.
  • [0005]
    Conventionally, associating headset audio with game controllers is performed by plugging-in the wired headset to a jack in the wired or wireless controller. However, when the headset is wireless, due to the nature of wireless devices, there is no physical mechanism to associate the headset to a particular gamer's play or controller. However, due to nature of wireless devices, there is no physical mechanism to associate a wireless headset to a particular gamer's play or controller.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0006]
    Systems and methods for associating a device to a peripheral that is communicating to a game console or computing device are disclosed herein. The peripheral is initially bound to a port of the game console or computing device. The peripheral binds to the game console or computing device via an automatic or user-initiated sequence and then correlated to the port assigned to the peripheral. Data that is associated with the peripheral is communicated to the device after being correlated. The game console (or computing device) and peripheral may also be associated based on a user profile.
  • [0007]
    A non-limiting example of the above is a wireless headset that is used by garners during game play. The headset may be associated with the gamer's controller such that game-related audio associated with the gamer's play is sent from the game console to headset. The gamer may also communicate with other garners using the headset.
  • [0008]
    Additional features and advantages will be made apparent from the following detailed description that proceeds with reference to the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0009]
    The foregoing summary, as well as the following detailed description of preferred embodiments, is better understood when read in conjunction with the appended drawings. For the purpose of illustrating the invention, there is shown in the drawings exemplary constructions of the invention; however, the invention is not limited to the specific methods and instrumentalities disclosed. In the drawings:
  • [0010]
    FIG. 1 is a block diagram showing a gaming console in which aspects of the present invention may be implemented;
  • [0011]
    FIG. 2 illustrates a controller and LED indicators;
  • [0012]
    FIG. 3 illustrates one or more controllers/peripherals being bound and discovered by the console;
  • [0013]
    FIG. 4 illustrates a block diagram of a wireless device;
  • [0014]
    FIG. 5 illustrates exemplary processes performed to associate the wireless device with a peripheral;
  • [0015]
    FIGS. 6-9 illustrate exemplary wireless device designs; and
  • [0016]
    FIGS. 10-11 illustrate alternative processes performed to associate the wireless device with a peripheral.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0017]
    FIG. 1 illustrates the functional components of a multimedia/gaming console 100 in which certain aspects of the present invention may be implemented. The multimedia console 100 has a central processing unit (CPU) 101 having a level 1 cache 102, a level 2 cache 104, and a flash ROM (Read Only Memory) 106. The level 1 cache 102 and a level 2 cache 104 temporarily store data and hence reduce the number of memory access cycles, thereby improving processing speed and throughput. The CPU 101 may be provided having more than one core, and thus, additional level 1 and level 2 caches 102 and 104. The flash ROM 106 may store executable code that is loaded during an initial phase of a boot process when the multimedia console 100 is powered ON.
  • [0018]
    A graphics processing unit (GPU) 108 and a video encoder/video codec (coder/decoder) 114 form a video processing pipeline for high speed and high resolution graphics processing. Data is carried from the graphics processing unit 108 to the video encoder/video codec 114 via a bus. The video processing pipeline outputs data to an A/V (audio/video) port 140 for transmission to a television or other display. A memory controller 110 is connected to the GPU 108 to facilitate processor access to various types of memory 112, such as, but not limited to, a RAM (Random Access Memory).
  • [0019]
    The multimedia console 100 includes an I/O controller 120, a system management controller 122, an audio processing unit 123, a network interface controller 124, a first USB host controller 126, a second USB controller 128 and a front panel I/O subassembly 130 that are preferably implemented on a module 118. The USB controllers 126 and 128 serve as hosts for peripheral controllers 142(1)-142(2), a wireless adapter 148, and an external memory device 146 (e.g., flash memory, external CD/DVD ROM drive, removable media, etc.). It is noted that additional USB controllers may be provided. The network interface 124 and/or wireless adapter 148 provide access to a network (e.g., the Internet, home network, etc.) and may be any of a wide variety of various wired or wireless adapter components including an Ethernet card, a modem, a Bluetooth module, a cable modem, and the like.
  • [0020]
    System memory 143 is provided to store application data that is loaded during the boot process. A media drive 144 is provided and may comprise a DVD/CD drive, hard drive, or other removable media drive, etc. The media drive 144 may be internal or external to the multimedia console 100. Application data may be accessed via the media drive 144 for execution, playback, etc. by the multimedia console 100. The media drive 144 is connected to the I/O controller 120 via a bus, such as a Serial ATA bus or other high speed connection (e.g., IEEE 1394).
  • [0021]
    The system management controller 122 provides a variety of service functions related to assuring availability of the multimedia console 100. The audio processing unit 123 and an audio codec 132 form a corresponding audio processing pipeline with high fidelity and stereo processing. Audio data is carried between the audio processing unit 123 and the audio codec 132 via a communication link. The audio processing pipeline outputs data to the A/V port 140 for reproduction by an external audio player or device having audio capabilities.
  • [0022]
    The front panel I/O subassembly 130 supports the functionality of the power button 150 and the eject button 152, as well as any LEDs (light emitting diodes) or other indicators exposed on the outer surface of the multimedia console 100. A system power supply module 136 provides power to the components of the multimedia console 100. A fan 138 cools the circuitry within the multimedia console 100.
  • [0023]
    The CPU 101, GPU 108, memory controller 110, and various other components within the multimedia console 100 are interconnected via one or more buses, including serial and parallel buses, a memory bus, a peripheral bus, and a processor or local bus using any of a variety of bus architectures. By way of example, such architectures can include a Peripheral Component Interconnects (PCI) bus, PCI-Express bus, etc.
  • [0024]
    When the multimedia console 100 is powered ON, application data may be loaded from the system memory 143 into memory 112 and/or caches 102, 104 and executed on the CPU 101. The application may present a graphical user interface that provides a consistent user experience when navigating to different media types available on the multimedia console 100. In operation, applications and/or other media contained within the media drive 144 may be launched or played from the media drive 144 to provide additional functionalities to the multimedia console 100.
  • [0025]
    The multimedia console 100 may be operated as a standalone system by simply connecting the system to a television or other display. In this standalone mode, the multimedia console 100 allows one or more users to interact with the system, watch movies, or listen to music. However, with the integration of broadband connectivity made available through the network interface 124 or the wireless adapter 148, the multimedia console 100 may further be operated as a participant in a larger network community.
  • [0026]
    When the multimedia console 100 is powered ON, a set amount of hardware resources are reserved for system use by the multimedia console operating system. These resources may include a reservation of memory (e.g., 16 MB), CPU and GPU cycles (e.g., 5%), networking bandwidth (e.g., 8 kbs), etc. Because these resources are reserved at system boot time, the reserved resources do not exist from the application's view.
  • [0027]
    In particular, the memory reservation preferably is large enough to contain the launch kernel, concurrent system applications and drivers. The CPU reservation is preferably constant such that if the reserved CPU usage is not used by the system applications, an idle thread will consume any unused cycles.
  • [0028]
    With regard to the GPU reservation, lightweight messages generated by system applications (e.g., popups) are displayed by using a GPU interrupt to schedule code to render popup into an overlay. The amount of memory required for an overlay depends on the overlay area size and the overlay preferably scales with screen resolution. Where a full user interface is used by the concurrent system application, it is preferable to use a resolution independent of application resolution. A scaler may be used to set this resolution such that the need to change frequency and cause a TV resynch is eliminated.
  • [0029]
    After the multimedia console 100 boots and system resources are reserved, concurrent system applications execute to provide system functionalities. The system functionalities are encapsulated in a set of system applications that execute within the reserved system resources described above. The operating system kernel identifies threads that are system application threads versus gaming application threads. The system applications are preferably scheduled to run on the CPU 101 at predetermined times and intervals in order to provide a consistent system resource view to the application. The scheduling is to minimize cache disruption for the gaming application running on the console.
  • [0030]
    When a concurrent system application requires audio, audio processing is scheduled asynchronously to the gaming application due to time sensitivity. A multimedia console application manager (described below) controls the gaming application audio level (e.g., mute, attenuate) when system applications are active.
  • [0031]
    Input devices (e.g., controllers 142(1) and 142(2)) are shared by gaming applications and system applications. The input devices are not reserved resources, but are to be switched between system applications and the gaming application such that each will have a focus of the device. The application manager preferably controls the switching of input stream, without the gaming application's knowledge, and a driver maintains state information regarding focus switches.
  • [0032]
    Referring to FIG. 2, there is illustrated an exemplary wireless controller 154 having a four quadrant LED indicator 156 (and enlarged view) and console 100 having a four quadrant indicator 158. The controller 154 also includes vibration feedback, mini-joysticks, pressure-sensitive buttons, etc. A game is shown on the screen 160. The console indicator 158 is shown surrounding a power button, however, other configurations may be implemented. Each quadrant of the ring may be illuminated by an LED, which may be either a single color or bi-colored to illuminate in plural colors. As will be described below, the quadrants may be illuminated in patterns indicating the notifications, system status, binding and discovery.
  • [0033]
    To support an environment where multiple consoles 100 and wireless controllers 154 may coexist, each controller is logically “bound” to a single console 100 so that a link is established with only that console 100. A controller 154 can not be bound to more than one console 100 at a time. Binding is the process by which a console 100 transmits information to a controller 154 that will enable that controller to establish a link with the console 100. Once “bound” to a console 100, the controller 154 attempts to establish a link with the console 100 to which it is bound whenever the controller 154 is turned on.
  • [0034]
    It is preferable that binding information is retained only in the controller. Binding is one to one with respect to the controller 154, but it is one to many with respect to the console 100. Binding, thus, persists on the controller 154 across battery discharge/charge cycles, until a new binding relationship is established. Establishing a binding relationship is attempted when a BIND button on the console and a BIND button on a wireless controller 154 are pressed within a predetermined period of time of each other. Successfully establishing a binding relationship is dependent on successfully establishing a radio communication link and executing a mutual verification algorithm.
  • [0035]
    The console is preferably powered up before pressing its BIND button. If a user initiates binding on a controller 154 that is currently connected to a console 100, the controller 154 drops the connection to the console 100 prior to attempting the binding process. As the binding process operates, a status notification screen may display binding and discovery process (e.g., binding . . . bound . . . discovered). Binding is a one to one event. In other words, pressing the binding button on the console 100 will bind one controller 154 at a time. To bind a second controller 154, the BIND button on the console 100 is pressed a second time. If binding is not successful within a predetermined time, the console 100 or controller 154 will automatically time out and return to a previous state such that the previous binding relationship is not lost.
  • [0036]
    There are four (or other) virtual controller ports on the console 100, referred to herein as “Vports.” The Vports represent the active game controllers connected to the console 100, either wired or wirelessly. The numbered Vports are automatically assigned to controllers in the order they are connected to the console 100. Each Vport is represented by a quadrant of the LED indicator 156 and the console indicator 158. “Discovery” is the process during which a wired or wireless game device is recognized by the console 100, assigned a Vport, and made available for game play.
  • [0037]
    Thus, the acts of “binding” and “discovery” are preferably two different acts. The act of binding is initiated by pressing the BIND buttons on the controller and console. Once bound, the controller will begin the discovery process, and if successful, will be assigned the first available Vport, which in this case is Vport 1 as described. If one to three controllers had previously been bound and discovered, then the next controller discovered would be assigned Vport 2, 3, 4, etc., respectively. If, a total number controllers equaling the total number of Vports were already discovered, then the binding process could still be performed, however no Vport would be available to assign, so the controller would not be assigned a Vport. However it would still be bound to the console and available to be discovered if one of the other controllers were either turned off or bound to a new console.
  • [0038]
    Referring to FIG. 3 there is a visualization of the binding and discovery processes and how the LED indicator 156 and the console indicator 158 visually convey the processes to players. As shown in FIG. 3, the controller has been powered on and the BIND button on the console 100 and the controller have been pressed. After the binding process has completed, the discovery process takes place. Because this is the first controller to be discovered by the console 100, it is associated with Vport 1 and the top left quadrant of the indicators 156 and 158 will illuminate to signal the connection. If more than one controller is discovered by the console 100, the other quadrants of indicator 158 are illuminated in succession. Thus, if two controllers are connected, two quadrants of the indicator 158 will illuminate, and so on up to four controllers and four quadrants. It is noted that while additional quadrants are successively illuminated on the console, only a single quadrant is illuminated on any single controller at a time except in error conditions or other status displayed to the user.
  • [0039]
    Referring to FIG. 4, there is illustrated a block diagram of an exemplary wireless device (e.g., headset) 200. The headset 200 may include an electronics module 202 that houses a radio 203, a microcontroller (MCU)/digital signal processor (DSP), Voice CODEC 204, an I/O device 205, a digital to analog converter (DAC) 208, an analog to digital to converter (ADC) 210, a power supply 212, an input device 214, and visual indicator 216. The components within the electronics module 203 connect to a speaker 216 and a microphone 218.
  • [0040]
    The radio 203 may be a Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS) radio operating at the 2.4 GHz frequency band that communicates data (e.g., audio, configuration, etc.) to the console 100. The MCU/DSP/CODEC 204 processes audio communication to and from the headset 200. Output audio is communicated via the DAC 208 to the speaker 216. Input audio is received by the microphone 218 and converted by the ADC 210 to digital information and passed to the MCU/DSP/CODEC 204 to the radio 203 for communication to the console 100.
  • [0041]
    The input device 214, which will be described in greater detail below with reference to FIGS. 6-9, is used to associate the headset 200 with a particular Vport. The visual indicator 206 provides a user with an indication or confirmation of the associated Vport. As will be described below, the audio related to user's game play is communicated to/from the headset 200 based on an association of the headset 200 to a Vport assigned to the user's controller 154 or other discovered peripheral.
  • [0042]
    As noted above, the wireless headset 200 communicates directly to the console 100, rather than the controller 154. As such, the headset performs a binding/discovery similar to the controller 154. To accomplish this, the wireless headset 200 is associated with console and assigned a Vport. There are separate Vports for controller and voice device ports.
  • [0043]
    FIG. 5 illustrates the process of binding and discovery for a wireless headset 200. At step 220, a user connects (binds) to the console by, e.g., pressing a button on the console 100, wireless controller 154 or headset 200 (via input device 214). Preferably, the headset 200 and/or the console 100 is powered-up after the bind button is pressed, which advantageously reduces RF emissions. However, in the case of the headset 200, the user may first power up the headset 200 or the act of pressing the button may power up the headset 200. Optionally, step 220 may be accomplished by bringing the headset 200 into communication range of the console 100. At step 222, the console 100 initiates and completes bind process with the headset 200. At step 224, it is determined if there is one active controller 154. If so, then at step 226, the headset 222 is assigned the same Vport as the active controller 154.
  • [0044]
    The user is then notified of the success of the association at step 228. The notification may be audible or visual. An audible confirmation of Vport assignment may be made by sending a sending a chime or tone to the headset. Personalized settings may be ignored/overridden in order to ensure the chime or tone is played on the headset. Visual notification may be made by a flashing LED (or other visual indicator 206) on the headset. If a single LED is provided on the headset, it may be flashed at a predetermined rate. If several LEDs are provided, an LED pattern may be flashed. It is preferable in the later scenario that that pattern be the same as the associated controller 154. Further, an on-screen display notification may be used. If the association is unsuccessful, a different set of notifications may be used than for successful associations.
  • [0045]
    However, if at step 224, there is more than one active controller 154, then the user is notified to selects a Vport to which the headset 200 is to be associated by the console 100. This notification may be performed through a visual on-screen display, audibly or visually on the headset 200 via the indicator 206. Referring now to FIGS. 6-9, the user selection of a Vport may be accomplished through an input device 214 such as a dial or jog shuttle (FIG. 6), slider (FIG. 7), button (FIG. 8) or toggle switch (FIG. 9). One of ordinary skill in the art would recognize that other mechanical input devices may be provided to make a selection of the Vport.
  • [0046]
    The visual indicator 206 may include LEDs, a seven segment display, etc. to convey to the user which Vport is selected on the headset 200. The use of the input device aids in resolving/avoiding conflicts between multiple headsets and a particular controller 154. Further, if multiple headsets are set to the same Vport, it is preferable that the first one to be discovered is assigned to the Vport. At step 232 the headset 200 is discovered and associated by the console 100 to the selected Vport. A notification of the successful association is provided at step 234. The notification may be similar to that noted above.
  • [0047]
    Alternatively, the process may be performed using an on-screen display. This may be desirable because the user may find using the on-screen display more familiar and convenient for configuring devices as the on-screen display is used to configure many options for game play. Referring now to FIG. 10, the on-screen process may begin when the user powers-up the wireless headset (step 240). Next, a button is pressed on the controller and the user navigates to an Options screen (steps 242 and 244). A “Find wireless headset” option may be presented, and if selected, the console initiates a bind process with headset (step 246). An on-screen display is presented indicated to the user to press a bind button on the headset (step 248). The user presses the headset's bind button and the console completes the bind process to associate the headset with controller. The headset may then notify the user of a successful bind and association (step 250).
  • [0048]
    As another alternative, the user may power-up the wireless headset and presses the headset's bind button (steps 240 and 242). These two steps may be accomplished by a single press of a power button. The user presses a button on the controller and navigates to an Options screen (step 244). Next the user selects an “Assign wireless headset” button from the Options screen (step 252). The console initiates bind process with headset and associates headset to the Vport of the controller that initiated the process. The headset and/or on-screen display notify the user of a successful bind and association (step 250).
  • [0049]
    The above processes may be repeated for every user that wants to associate a wireless headset with their controller.
  • [0050]
    Thus, as described above, the console 100 manages the association of headsets to controllers. Headsets are bound to consoles, which allows the management of headsets and other peripherals to evolve over time as the console 100 can be upgraded with new features with relative ease. In addition, it is preferable that a one-to-one association is made between headsets and controllers.
  • [0051]
    In addition to the binding/discover notifications, a user may be notified if the Vport assignment is lost and/or re-associated. For example, the controller 100 association preferably should be persisted between power/sleep cycles of the console 100. However, the wireless controller discovery process may reassign Vports after a power cycle. This means a controller 154 associated with Vport3 before the power cycle may be associated with Vport1 after. The headset 200 will follow the controller 154 to Vport1.
  • [0052]
    The headset 200 originally associated with the controller 154 should follow the controller 154 to its newly assigned Vport. This may be accomplished through some headset identifier or preferably to a gamer profile used to associate a headset 200 to a controller 154. In later instance, when a gamer signs-in, the profile determines which headset 200 should be associated to the controller 154 via a unique identifier of the headset 200 associated with the gamer profile. The controller 154 is automatically assigned to a Vport at time of discovery and the headset 200 is then associated to that Vport, as noted above.
  • [0053]
    It is possible that a user may wish to use a wired headset during game play. When a wired headset is inserted to the headset jack on a controller, the wireless headset association will be dropped in favor of the wired headset. This is because it is assumed that the wired headset is being used because of a user preference and an accidental insertion of a wired headset is unlikely.
  • [0054]
    In addition to a control to select a Vport, the headset may include controls for power on/off, microphone mute, volume up/down, connect to console, etc. Indicators may be provided for battery level (e.g., LEDs or audible alert), headset ON, etc. A buzzer or other audible mechanism may be provided to locate a missing headset 200.
  • [0055]
    While the processes above have been described with reference to a wireless controller, it is noted they may equally apply to a wired controller to which a wireless headset is to be associated.
  • [0056]
    While the present invention has been described in connection with the preferred embodiments of the various Figs., it is to be understood that other similar embodiments may be used or modifications and additions may be made to the described embodiment for performing the same function of the present invention without deviating therefrom.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A wireless communication device, comprising:
    a radio that communicates to a console;
    an selector for selecting a port setting used by said wireless communication device which correlates to a port assigned by said console to a peripheral; and
    an indicator that indicates said port setting,
    wherein communications associated with said peripheral are communicated to said wireless communication device.
  2. 2. The wireless communication device of claim 1, wherein said port setting is automatically assigned to said wireless communication device if said peripheral is the only peripheral assigned a port by said console.
  3. 3. The wireless communication device of claim 1, said selector comprising a bind input device, wherein when said bind input device is actuated, said wireless communication device will bind with said console, and wherein said console will provide an on-screen display option to discover said wireless communication device.
  4. 4. The wireless communication device of claim 1, wherein said wireless communication device is set to said port setting based on a user profile and an identifier associated with said peripheral.
  5. 5. The wireless communication device of claim 1, wherein said notification comprises an audible component.
  6. 6. The wireless communication device of claim 1, wherein said indicator is illuminated in a predetermined sequence convey a notification that said wireless communication device has successfully been associated with said peripheral.
  7. 7. The wireless communication device of claim 1, wherein communications associated with said peripheral are communicated between said wireless communication device and said console.
  8. 8. A method of establishing an association between a wireless device and a peripheral that communicate with a computing device, comprising:
    initiating a binding sequence;
    recognizing said wireless device and binding it to said computing device;
    setting said wireless device to a port setting correlated to a port assigned to peripheral; and
    communicating data between said wireless device and said computing device, said data being associated with said peripheral.
  9. 9. The method of claim 8, further comprising automatically assigning said port setting if said peripheral is the only assigned peripheral communicating with said computing device.
  10. 10. The method of claim 8, said initiating further comprising:
    receiving an input via bind input device; and
    providing an on-screen display option to discover said wireless device.
  11. 11. The method of claim 10, further comprising setting said wireless communication device to said port setting based on a selected on-screen display option.
  12. 12. The method of claim 8, further comprising providing a notification that said wireless device has been associated with said peripheral.
  13. 13. The method of claim 12, further comprising illuminating a visual indicator in a predetermined sequence to convey said notification.
  14. 14. The method of claim 8, said setting further comprising receiving a user input via a mechanical input device to set said wireless device to said port setting.
  15. 15. The method of claim 8, further comprising:
    establishing communication between a wired device and said computing device;
    removing said association of said wireless device and said peripheral; and
    establishing said associated between said wired device and said peripheral.
  16. 16. The method of claim 7, said setting further comprising:
    accessing a user profile;
    determining peripheral settings in said user profile; and
    setting said port setting based on said peripheral settings and an identifier of said peripheral.
  17. 17. A method of establishing an association between a wireless headset and a game controller that communicate with a gaming console, comprising:
    initiating a binding sequence to bind said wireless headset to said gaming console;
    setting said wireless headset to a port setting correlated to a port assigned to game controller; and
    communicating audio between said wireless headset and said gaming console, said audio being associated with said game controller and port.
  18. 18. The method of claim 17, said initiating further comprising:
    providing an on-screen display option to discover said wireless headset; and
    setting said wireless headset to said port setting based on a selected on-screen display option.
  19. 19. The method of claim 17, further comprising maintaining a radio in said gaming console in an OFF condition until said binding sequence is initiated.
  20. 20. The method of claim 17, said setting further comprising:
    accessing a gamer profile;
    determining peripheral settings in said gamer profile; and
    setting said port setting based on said game controller settings and an identifier of said game controller.
US11280736 2005-11-16 2005-11-16 Association of peripherals communicatively attached to a console device Abandoned US20070111796A1 (en)

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US11280736 US20070111796A1 (en) 2005-11-16 2005-11-16 Association of peripherals communicatively attached to a console device
JP2008541176A JP2009520387A (en) 2005-11-16 2006-10-18 Ties of communication peripheral devices connected to the console device
KR20087014510A KR20080069689A (en) 2005-11-16 2006-10-18 Association of peripherals communicatively attached to a console device
EP20060826258 EP1960071A4 (en) 2005-11-16 2006-10-18 Association of peripherals communicatively attached to a console device
CN 200680042579 CN102137697B (en) 2005-11-16 2006-10-18 Association of peripherals communicatively attached to a console device
PCT/US2006/040839 WO2007061542A2 (en) 2005-11-16 2006-10-18 Association of peripherals communicatively attached to a console device

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EP (1) EP1960071A4 (en)
JP (1) JP2009520387A (en)
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WO (1) WO2007061542A2 (en)

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EP1960071A4 (en) 2010-10-13 application
CN102137697B (en) 2012-12-26 grant
KR20080069689A (en) 2008-07-28 application
CN102137697A (en) 2011-07-27 application
EP1960071A2 (en) 2008-08-27 application
WO2007061542A2 (en) 2007-05-31 application
JP2009520387A (en) 2009-05-21 application

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