US20050166303A1 - Head and neck protection system - Google Patents

Head and neck protection system Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20050166303A1
US20050166303A1 US11/095,149 US9514905A US2005166303A1 US 20050166303 A1 US20050166303 A1 US 20050166303A1 US 9514905 A US9514905 A US 9514905A US 2005166303 A1 US2005166303 A1 US 2005166303A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
neck
head
edge
guard
protector
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11/095,149
Inventor
Todd Aaron
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Cooper Technologies Co
Original Assignee
Cooper Technologies Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US10/704,780 priority Critical patent/US6874170B1/en
Application filed by Cooper Technologies Co filed Critical Cooper Technologies Co
Priority to US11/095,149 priority patent/US20050166303A1/en
Publication of US20050166303A1 publication Critical patent/US20050166303A1/en
Assigned to COOPER TECHNOLOGIES COMPANY reassignment COOPER TECHNOLOGIES COMPANY ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: PAHL, CHRISTOPHER JOSEPH
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D13/00Professional, industrial or sporting protective garments, e.g. surgeons' gowns or garments protecting against blows or punches
    • A41D13/05Professional, industrial or sporting protective garments, e.g. surgeons' gowns or garments protecting against blows or punches protecting only a particular body part
    • A41D13/0512Neck or shoulders area
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A42HEADWEAR
    • A42BHATS; HEAD COVERINGS
    • A42B3/00Helmets; Helmet covers ; Other protective head coverings
    • A42B3/04Parts, details or accessories of helmets
    • A42B3/0406Accessories for helmets
    • A42B3/0473Neck restraints
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A42HEADWEAR
    • A42BHATS; HEAD COVERINGS
    • A42B3/00Helmets; Helmet covers ; Other protective head coverings
    • A42B3/04Parts, details or accessories of helmets
    • A42B3/10Linings
    • A42B3/105Linings with additional protection for the neck
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B71/00Games or sports accessories not covered in groups A63B1/00 - A63B69/00
    • A63B71/08Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions
    • A63B71/10Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions for the head
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B71/00Games or sports accessories not covered in groups A63B1/00 - A63B69/00
    • A63B71/08Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions
    • A63B71/12Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions for the body or the legs, e.g. for the shoulders
    • A63B71/1291Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions for the body or the legs, e.g. for the shoulders for the neck
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B71/00Games or sports accessories not covered in groups A63B1/00 - A63B69/00
    • A63B71/08Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions
    • A63B71/12Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions for the body or the legs, e.g. for the shoulders
    • A63B2071/1208Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions for the body or the legs, e.g. for the shoulders for the breast and the abdomen, e.g. breast plates
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2102/00Application of clubs, bats, rackets or the like to the sporting activity ; particular sports involving the use of balls and clubs, bats, rackets, or the like
    • A63B2102/14Lacrosse
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2102/00Application of clubs, bats, rackets or the like to the sporting activity ; particular sports involving the use of balls and clubs, bats, rackets, or the like
    • A63B2102/24Ice hockey
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2243/00Specific ball sports not provided for in A63B2102/00 - A63B2102/38
    • A63B2243/0066Rugby; American football
    • A63B2243/007American football

Abstract

A head and neck protection system includes a head protector, a shoulder protector, and a neck guard for protecting a person from injury. The neck guard detachably connects between the head protector and the shoulder protector and includes a collar. The collar has a first edge and a second edge spaced apart from the first edge. The first and second edges include fastening means for detachably coupling the collar between the head protector and the shoulder protector. In one embodiment, the collar has a perimeter that flares outwardly as the collar extends from the head protector to the shoulder protector. The collar is formed of an anti-ballistic material to protect the person from injury from bullets, fragments and other projectiles. The collar interconnects the head protector with the shoulder protector to form a restraint that limits displacement of the head protector relative to the shoulder protector.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. application Ser. No. 10/704,780 filed Nov. 10, 2003, the entirety of which is incorporated herein by reference.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates generally to safety equipment, and particularly to protective gear for the head and neck that can be used in a variety of activities involving risk of injury.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Athletes use a variety of protective helmets and pads when participating in sports. For example, athletes who participate in football, lacrosse, hockey, auto racing and equestrian competition routinely use helmets for head protection. Safety standards for protective gear frequently conflict with other concerns, such as comfort. As a result, many head and neck guards sacrifice comfort for safety, or vice versa. A number of head and neck guards in the present state of the art have large bulky components that surround the head, neck and shoulders. Although these guards reduce the risk of injury, they add significant weight to the athlete's gear and interfere with the athlete's mobility. Some head and neck guards include elaborate cages or masks around the head that obstruct the athlete's vision. A few head and neck guards include springs or hydraulic pistons that are designed to absorb shocks. Although springs and pistons can dissipate energy during a head collision, they are prone to wear and add significant weight to the equipment. Other head and neck guards provide support only for the rear of the head and neck. The rear support protects the person's head and neck when the head is deflected rearwardly, but fails to provide protection when the head is deflected in other directions.
  • Head and neck guards in the present state of the art are also costly for the user. Many head and neck guards are designed for specific sports or are compatible only with specific brands of equipment. Individuals who participate in multiple sports must purchase equipment that is specifically designed for each sport. The expense of purchasing separate equipment for each sport can be excessive. In addition to cost, many head and neck guards are difficult to put on and remove. For all of the foregoing reasons it can be seen that head and neck guards in the present state of the art leave much to be desired in the areas of safety, comfort, cost and ease of use.
  • The protective gear presently used in football has specific drawbacks arising from the extreme level of physical contact in the sport. Football players routinely collide with opponents as part of the game, and a large number of body contacts occur on a player's helmet. Impact forces on a football helmet are directed into the player's head and down through the neck and spine. As a result, compression forces are directly imposed on the neck and spine, creating significant risk of injury. The known football helmets are usually unrestrained other than by a chin strap. Furthermore, the helmets are usually disconnected from other parts on the uniform. These design limitations permit a player's head to deflect in any direction and at a severe angle during a collision with another player. If the player experiences a high speed helmet collision, the collision can cause severe neck injury, including neck hyperextension (rearward deflection of the neck) or neck hyperflexion (forward deflection of the neck). Football players seldom wear padding over their necks, leaving their necks completely exposed. As a result, there is no protection against cuts, abrasions, or other surface injuries on the neck, which can be caused by contact with other players. Nor is there any protection against the effects of cold winds, rain, snow, or other elements.
  • Most football helmets are secured on the football player's head by a chin strap, which prevents the helmet from being knocked off of the player's head during a helmet collision. The chin strap can rub against the player's chin, collect perspiration, and prove very uncomfortable for the player. This discomfort can discourage players from using chin straps, subjecting the players to a greater risk of head injury. Even when worn, chin straps are not without their own risks, and tightly worn chin straps can actually exacerbate a head injury. The disadvantages of tight chin straps are best understood by appreciating the advantages of a football helmet that slides a small degree on the player's head. To protect a player from head injury, the football helmet must absorb and dissipate energy from the collision before the impact force reaches the player's head. A small amount of sliding between the helmet and the player's scalp is preferable, because the friction between the sliding helmet and the scalp dissipates some of the energy from the helmet collision. A tight chin strap prevents sliding motion of the helmet on the scalp, and energy from the helmet collision travels through the helmet and directly to the player's head. Therefore, it is desirable to have a football helmet restraint that secures the football helmet to the head, while avoiding the problems associated with chin straps.
  • The foregoing drawbacks are not just seen in safety equipment used in sports. Helmets used by military and law enforcement personnel have many of the same problems, including excessive bulk and weight, limited flexibility, lack of comfort and insufficient support of the head and neck and other limitations. Many helmets used in the military leave large areas of head and neck exposed and unprotected. In addition, many military helmets are prone to significant shifting on the head, requiring the use of chin straps similar to those used with football helmets. As noted above, chin straps can be very uncomfortable, discouraging many from using them. Military personnel who decline to use chin straps are at risk of losing their helmets, putting themselves at greater risk of sustaining a serious head injury.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The problems associated with the known types of protective gear are solved to a great degree by a head and neck protection system in accordance with the present invention. In a first aspect of the invention, a head and neck protector includes a neck guard formed of anti-ballistic material having a first edge and a second edge in spaced relation to the first edge. A first fastening means is disposed along the first edge for attaching the neck guard to clothing or head gear. The neck guard may also include a second fastening means disposed along the second edge for attaching the neck guard to gear worn over the person's torso. The first edge may be shorter in length than the second edge, so that the neck guard forms a frusto-conical shape around the neck. The anti-ballistic material is preferably formed of one or more para-aramid fiber materials.
  • In a second aspect of the invention, a head and neck protection system includes a head protector and a neck guard formed of an anti-ballistic material. The neck guard includes a first edge, a second edge in spaced relation from the first edge, and a first fastening means extending along the first edge of the neck guard. The first fastening means is configured to detachably couple the neck guard with the head protector. The head and neck protection system may include additional components, such as shoulder gear that is connected to the neck guard. The neck guard may include a second fastening means extending along the second edge of the neck guard for coupling the neck guard to the shoulder gear. The neck guard may be adapted to form a frusto-conical shape that surrounds the neck. The anti-ballistic material may be formed of one or more para-aramid fiber materials.
  • In a third aspect of the invention, a head and neck guard for use with a head protector and shoulder gear includes a strip of anti-ballistic material having first and second edge portions in spaced relation to each other, and first and second end portions in spaced relation to each other. The strip of anti-ballistic material has a length that is dimensioned such that said strip can be extended substantially around the entire neck area of the person. A first fastening means is disposed along the first edge portion for attaching the strip to the head protector. A second fastening means is disposed along the second edge portion for attaching the strip to the shoulder gear. The strip of anti-ballistic material may be formed of one or more para-aramid fibers. In addition, the strip of anti-ballistic material is preferably adapted to form a frusto-conical shape when attached between the head gear and the shoulder gear and around the neck of a wearer.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The foregoing summary as well as the following description will be better understood when read in conjunction with the drawing figures in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a head and neck protection system in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of the head and neck protection system of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 is a side elevation view of a neck guard used in the head and neck protection system of FIG. 1, showing a first side of the neck guard.
  • FIG. 4 is a side elevation view of the neck guard used in the head and neck protection system of FIG. 1, showing a second side of the neck guard.
  • FIG. 5 is a side elevation view of an alternate embodiment of a neck guard in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 6 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of a head and neck protection system in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 7 is an exploded perspective view of the head and neck protection system of FIG. 6.
  • FIG. 8 is a side elevation view of a neck guard used in the head and neck protection system of FIG. 6, showing a first side of the neck guard.
  • FIG. 9 is a side elevation view of the neck guard used in the head and neck protection system of FIG. 6, showing a second side of the neck guard.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • Referring to the drawing figures, and in particular to FIG. 1, a head and neck protection system 12 is shown. The protection system 12 includes a head protector 20, a neck guard 30, and shoulder gear 50. The neck guard 30 is connected between the head protector 20 and the shoulder gear 50 to form a shock-absorbing brace between the head protector and shoulder gear that substantially prevents hyperextension of the neck, hyperflexion of the neck, and other serious head and neck injury. The neck guard 30 is sufficiently flexible and light-weight to permit normal head rotation about the axis of the wearer's neck.
  • The protective system 12 is intended for use in a variety of activities that involve risk of injury to the head, neck and spine. For example, the protective system 12 may be used in a variety of sports and recreational activities, including but not limited to football, auto racing, motorcycling, lacrosse, and equestrian competition. Therefore, the protective system 12 may include different forms of protective gear. In the case of auto racing, for example, the neck guard 30 may be connected between a racing helmet and a fire suit. In equestrian competition, the neck guard 30 may be connected between a helmet and a jacket or vest. The term “head protector” encompasses a variety of head gear, including but not limited to hats, helmets, face guards and face shields. The term “shoulder gear” or “shoulder protector” encompasses a variety of equipment and apparel worn over the shoulder, chest or torso, including but not limited to shoulder pads, jerseys, vests, jackets, fire suits, or body armor. In the following description, the protection system 12 will be described as it would be applied in sports, and particularly in the sport of football, where the protection system may include a football helmet 20 and shoulder pads 50.
  • Referring now to FIG. 2, the neck guard 30 includes a collar 31 that is formed to extend substantially around a person's neck. The collar 31 has a first edge portion 32 constructed to connect with a base portion of the football helmet 20, and a second edge portion 34 constructed to connect with the shoulder pads 50. When the collar 31 is connected with the football helmet 20 and shoulder pads 50, the collar forms a protective restraint that absorbs shock and limits displacement of the head and neck. The neck guard 30 secures the helmet 20 to the shoulder pads 50, substantially preventing the dislodging or removal of the helmet during contact. As a result, the neck guard 30 may be used in conjunction with or in place of a chin strap.
  • The helmet 20 has a hollow body 23 and a face opening 24 that partially exposes the player's face when the helmet is placed over the player's head. A face mask 26 extends over the face opening 24 to protect the player's face from injury. The neck guard 30 engages with the base of helmet 20 and provides an annular buttress or brace around the base of the helmet. The first edge 32 of the collar 31 extends around the base of the helmet 20 in a generally circular arrangement. The neck guard 30 extends downwardly toward the shoulder pads 50 and surrounds the person's neck. The second edge 34 of the collar 31 connects with the shoulder pads 50 in a generally circular arrangement, similar to the circular arrangement of the first edge 32.
  • The neck guard 30 extends around the player's neck in a tubular fashion, covering a substantial portion of the player's neck. In this arrangement, the neck guard shields the neck to substantially prevent the occurrence of neck abrasions, lacerations, cuts or irritations caused by contact with other players, harsh winds or other elements. Referring to FIGS. 3-4, the second edge 34 of the collar 31 is preferably longer than the first edge 32, so that the collar 31 has a generally trapezoidal shape when the collar is laid flat. In this configuration, the collar 31 forms a generally frusto-conical enclosure around the player's neck when the collar is connected between the helmet 20 and shoulder pads 50. The collar 31 flares radially outwardly as it extends from the helmet 20 toward the shoulder pads 50. The flared profile of the neck guard 30 distributes forces outwardly and away from the neck and spine. The neck guard 30 may also be formed with other configurations to distribute forces away from the helmet. For example, the strip may be hourglass-shaped with the first and second edges of the collar 31 of more or less equal length so as to form a generally cylindrical tube of uniform diameter when the neck guard is placed around the neck between the helmet 20 and shoulder pads 50.
  • The outwardly expanding neck guard 30 in the preferred embodiment provides significant advantages over other neck guard configurations. Since the wall of the collar 31 expands outwardly as it extends from the helmet 20 to the shoulder pads 50, the collar absorbs forces applied to the helmet and disperses those forces outwardly to the shoulders and torso. With this arrangement, forces are directed outwardly and away from the spine and vertebrae, reducing the risk of head and spinal injury. The collar 31 also anchors the position of the helmet 20 relative to the shoulder pads 50 to limit lateral deflection of the head and over extension of the neck during a helmet collision. The collar 31 is configured to extend substantially around the entire neck area, limiting displacement of the neck regardless of the direction of contact.
  • The collar 31 may be formed using a variety of materials, and the specific material used may be selected based on a number of factors, including but not limited to the desired amounts of flexibility and ventilation of body heat from the neck area. In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the collar 31 is formed of a strip of resilient elastomer, such as neoprene. The elastomeric material has a thickness which is selected to provide resistance to lateral deflection while providing sufficient flexibility to permit rotation of the head about the axis of the neck. Other materials and having different properties and thicknesses may also be used in the neck guard 30 with satisfactory results. The elastic property of elastomers provides variable resistance to stress that increases as the material deforms. During initial stress, the elastomer provides a relatively small amount of tensile elasticity, allowing the collar to deform a small degree. This permits the player to turn his/her head through a limited range about the axis of the neck. As the collar material is stressed further, however, the tensile elasticity increases dramatically to limit further movement of the head about any of the axes of rotation relative to the shoulder pads. As a result, the elastomer provides controlled displacement of the head and neck relative to the shoulder pads. Aside from their elastic properties, many elastomers provide a relatively light-weight material that adds very little weight to the player's uniform. The tensile elasticity of elastomeric material can also provide beneficial exercise to neck muscles when worn and stretched between a helmet and shoulder pads.
  • The collar 31 may be formed of one or more solid panels or sections of material that connect around the base of the helmet 31 to form an annular restraint and shock absorbing brace. The number of sections that form the collar is not a critical aspect of the present invention. In FIGS. 1-5, the collar 31 is formed from a single solid strip of material. The collar 31 may also be formed of two or more separate panels or sections that connect around the base of the helmet. The separate panels collectively form a restraint and shock absorbing brace, similar to a single strip of material.
  • Thus far, the collar 31 has been illustrated and described as a solid strip of material, or solid sections of material, that surround a substantial portion of the player's neck when connected between the helmet 20 and shoulder pads 50. However, a solid collar is not essential, and other collar configurations may be desirable within the scope of the present invention. Referring to FIG. 5, an alternate neck guard 130 is shown. The neck guard 130 includes a partially open collar 131 with an array of web-like panels or extensions 133. The panels 133 are spaced incrementally from one another between apertures 135 formed in the collar 131. In this arrangement, the panels 133 provide restraints that stabilize the helmet and limit displacement of the helmet relative to the shoulder pads. The apertures 135 provide increased flexibility and ventilation, while reducing the weight of the neck guard 130. The neck guard 130 may be desirable for use during hotter weather, football practices, football scrimmages, or other conditions where greater flexibility and ventilation are desired.
  • The neck guard 30 may be connected with the helmet 20 and shoulder pads 50 in a variety of ways. For example, the neck guard 30 may be permanently connected with the helmet 20, permanently connected with the shoulder pads 50, or permanently connected with both the helmet and the shoulder pads. The neck guard 30 may be permanently attached to the helmet and shoulder pads using any suitable connection, including but not limited to high strength adhesive or metallic rivets. In the preferred embodiment, the neck guard 30 is detachably connected with the helmet 20 and shoulder pads. A variety of detachable connection means may be used, including but not limited to zippers, hook and loop fastener strips, snap fasteners, and combinations thereof.
  • Referring to FIGS. 2-4, the neck guard 30 comprises a plurality of snap fasteners 40 for connecting the collar 31 to the helmet 20 and shoulder pads 50. The collar 31 has an inner face 47 and an outer face 48. The inner face 47 has a plurality of snap fasteners 40 incrementally spaced along the first and second edges 32, 34 of the collar 31. The helmet 20 includes a series of snap connectors 22 incrementally spaced around the base of the helmet. The shoulder pads 50 include a series of similar snap connectors 52 that extend around the neck opening. The snap fasteners 40 on the first edge 32 of the collar 31 detachably connect with the snap connectors 22 on the helmet 20, and the snap fasteners on the second edge 34 of the collar detachably connect with the snap connectors 52 on the shoulder pads 50.
  • Referring to FIGS. 3-4, the collar 31 includes a third edge 42 and a fourth edge 44 that extend between the first and second edges 32, 34. The first edge 32 of the collar 31 intersects with the third and fourth edges 42, 44 of the collar to form a pair of upper corners 37, and the second edge 34 of the collar 31 intersects with the third and fourth edges 42, 44 of the collar to form a pair of lower corners 39. The upper corners 37 each preferably include a snap fastener 40 configured to connect with a snap connector 22 on the sides of face opening 24 on the helmet 20. The lower corners 39 each preferably include a snap connector 40 configured to connect with a snap connector 52 on the front section of the shoulder pads 50. When the neck guard 30 is connected between the helmet 20 and shoulder pads 50, the third and fourth edges 42, 44 of the collar are preferably separated, forming a gap or opening 46 beneath the face mask at the front of the helmet. The gap 46 permits ventilation of body heat that accumulates between the neck guard and the player's skin. The gap 46 also forms a clearance space through which the player may insert one or more fingers to remove the neck guard from the helmet and shoulder pads, while leaving the helmet and shoulder pads on. In this arrangement, the neck guard can be readily connected to and detached from the helmet 20 and shoulder pads 50. The snap fasteners 40 and snap connectors 22, 52 may be mounted to the collar 31, helmet 20 and shoulder pads 50 with a bonding agent, stitching, a combination of bonding and stitching, or other connection suitable for mounting the snap fasteners and connectors.
  • The operation and function of the protective system 12 will now be described in more detail. In football, a large number of head collisions occur on the side of the helmet, with impact forces concentrated on one side of the player's helmet. In response to the impact, the player's head deflects away from the source of impact. Without neck restraints or guards, the player's head is free to tilt and deflect in response to the collision. Helmet collisions that occur at high speed can result in hyperextension of the neck, hyperflexion of the neck, or other serious neck injury. The neck guard 30 is configured to substantially prevent serious head and neck injury by partially immobilizing the head and neck relative to the shoulders. The collar 31 extends between the helmet 20 and shoulder pads 50 in a relatively snug arrangement that limits the extent to which the player's helmet can be tilted relative to the shoulder pads. When the player experiences contact at the front of the helmet, for example, the impact force is directed rearwardly. The front section of the collar 31, which is initially in a relaxed state, deflects and deforms a small amount before being pulled taut. The small amount of deflection and deformation in the collar permits the player's head to tilt back slightly until the collar is pulled taut. At this point, the tensile strength of the collar 31 resists additional deformation at the front of the collar (beneath the player's chin), thereby limiting rearward displacement of the player's head. In the relaxed condition, the annular collar 31 is pulled snugly between the helmet 20 and shoulder pads 50 on all sides of the player's helmet. Therefore, the collar 31 provides tensile resistance against head and neck displacement in any direction. As the tensile resistance of the elastomeric collar increases during elastic deformation, the collar effectively absorbs energy from the impact. The flexibility of the collar 31 allows limited horizontal rotation of the neck to permit the player's head to pivot in the horizontal plane.
  • The head and neck protection system of the present invention is not limited to use in sports and recreational activities. The system can be used in any activity, occupation or endeavor which poses a risk of injury to the head, the neck, and/or the spine. For example, the head and neck protection system may be used by riot police or military personnel to absorb shock, limit displacement of the person's head and neck, and protect the person's head and neck from being injured by flying projectiles.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 6 and 7, an alternate embodiment of a head and neck protection system 212 is shown, in an arrangement for use by police and military personnel. The protection system 212 includes a helmet 220, a neck guard 230, and a vest 250. The neck guard 230 is connected between the helmet 220 and the vest 250, forming a shock-absorbing brace between the helmet and vest that substantially prevents hyperextension of the neck, hyperflexion of the neck, and other serious head and neck injury. The neck guard 230 is sufficiently flexible and light-weight to permit normal head rotation about the axis of the wearer's neck.
  • The neck guard 230 includes one or more strips of material that extend substantially around a person's neck. Referring now to FIGS. 8 and 9, the neck guard includes a collar 231 having the same attributes shown and described in connection with the collar shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. The collar 231 has a first edge portion 232 adapted to connect with a base portion of the helmet 220 or other head protector, and a second edge portion 234 adapted to connect with the vest 250 or other shoulder gear. When the collar 231 is connected to the helmet 220 and vest 250, the collar forms a protective restraint that absorbs shock and limits displacement of the head and neck. The neck guard 230 also secures the helmet 220 on the head by limiting movement of the helmet relative to the vest 250, substantially preventing the dislodging or removal of the helmet during contact. As a result, the neck guard 230 may be used in place of a chin strap.
  • The head and neck protection system 212 may include one or more pieces of armor that shield and protect the body from high speed projectiles. In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, the helmet 220, neck guard 230 and vest 250 are formed of anti-ballistic materials to shield the head, neck and torso from bullets, fragments and other high speed projectiles. The helmet 220, neck guard 230 and vest 250 may be formed of one or more anti-ballistic materials, including but not limited to ceramic materials or para-aramid fiber materials, such as “KEVLAR” brand fiber or “TWARON” brand fiber. Preferably, the material in the neck guard 230 has a thickness which is selected to provide resistance to lateral deflection while providing sufficient flexibility to permit rotation of the head about the axis of the neck.
  • The helmet 220 has a hollow body 223 and a face opening 224 that partially exposes the wearer's face when the helmet is placed on the wearer's head. The neck guard 230 engages with the base of helmet 220 and provides an annular buttress or brace around the base of the helmet. The first edge 232 of the collar 231 extends around the periphery of the base of the helmet 220. The neck guard 230 extends downwardly toward the vest 250 and surrounds the wearer's neck. The second edge 234 of the collar 231 connects with the vest 250 around the periphery of the head opening, similar to the arrangement of the first edge 232. In this arrangement, the neck guard 230 forms a continuous barrier substantially completely around the person's neck and portions of his/her head.
  • The neck guard 230 wrapped around the neck forming a protective brace that covers a substantial portion of the neck. The anti-ballistic materials in the neck guard 230 protects the head and neck area from bullets, fragments and other high speed projectiles. The neck guard 230 also shields the head and neck to substantially prevent the occurrence of abrasions, lacerations, insect bites, sun burn and other injuries. In addition, the neck guard 230 acts as a noise insulator over the person's ears. If desired, areas of the neck guard 230 that cover the person's ears may be padded with noise insulating materials such as polyurethane acoustical foam to provide additional noise insulation. This may be desirable for personnel who discharge firearms or artillery, or who operate loud machinery.
  • The second edge 234 of the collar 231 is preferably longer than the first edge 232, so that the collar 231 has a generally trapezoidal shape when the collar is laid flat. The collar 231 forms a generally frusto-conical enclosure when it is wrapped around the neck and connected between the helmet 220 and vest 250. The collar 231 flares radially outwardly as it extends from the helmet 220 toward the vest 250. The flared profile of the neck guard 230 distributes forces outwardly and away from the neck and spine. The neck guard 230 may also be formed with other configurations to distribute forces away from the helmet. For example, the collar 231 may be hourglass-shaped with the first and second edges of more or less equal length so as to form a generally cylindrical tube of uniform diameter when the neck guard 230 is placed around the neck and connected between the helmet 220 and vest 250.
  • The neck guard 230 may be connected with the helmet 220 and vest 250 in a variety of ways. For example, the neck guard 230 may be permanently connected with the helmet 220, permanently connected with the vest 250, or permanently connected with both the helmet and the vest. The neck guard 230 may be permanently attached to the helmet 220 and vest 250 using any suitable connection, including but not limited to high strength adhesive or metallic rivets. In the preferred embodiment, the neck guard 230 is detachably connected with the helmet 220 and vest 250. A variety of detachable connection means may be used, including but not limited to zippers, hook and loop fastener strips, snap fasteners, and combinations thereof.
  • Referring again to FIGS. 8 and 9, the neck guard 230 comprises a plurality of snap fasteners 240 for connecting the collar 231 to the helmet 220 and vest 250. The collar 231 has an inner face 247 and an outer face 248. The inner face 247 has the plurality of snap fasteners 240 incrementally spaced along the first and second edges 232, 234 of the collar 231. The helmet 220 includes a series of snap connectors 222 incrementally spaced around the base of the helmet. The vest 250 includes a series of similar snap connectors 252 that extend around the neck opening. The snap fasteners 240 on the first edge 232 of the collar 231 detachably connect with the snap connectors 222 on the helmet 220, and the snap fasteners on the second edge 234 of the collar detachably connect with the snap connectors 252 on the vest 250.
  • The collar 231 includes a third edge 242 and a fourth edge 244 that extend between the first and second edges 232, 234. The first edge 232 of the collar 231 intersects with the third and fourth edges 242, 244 of the collar to form a pair of upper corners 237, and the second edge 234 of the collar 231 intersects with the third and fourth edges 242, 244 of the collar to form a pair of lower corners 239. The upper corners 237 each preferably include a snap fastener 240 configured to connect with a snap connector 222 on the sides of face opening 224 on the helmet 220. The lower corners 239 each preferably include a snap connector 240 configured to connect with a snap connector 252 on the front section of the vest 250. When the neck guard 230 is attached to the helmet 220 and vest 250, the third and fourth edges 242, 244 of the collar are preferably separated, forming a gap or opening 246 beneath the face opening 224 at the front of the helmet. The gap 246 permits ventilation of body heat that accumulates between the neck guard and the person's skin. The gap 246 also forms a clearance space through which the person may insert one or more fingers to remove the neck guard from the helmet and vest, while leaving the helmet and vest on. In this arrangement, the neck guard can be readily attached to and detached from the helmet 220 and vest 250. The snap fasteners 240 and snap connectors 222, 252 may be mounted to the collar 231, helmet 220 and vest 250 with a bonding agent, stitching, a combination of bonding and stitching, or other means suitable for mounting the snap fasteners and connectors.
  • The dimensions on the neck guard will vary depending on the desired amount of neck protection. In some instances, it may be desirable to use a neck guard that protects the neck without interfering with a person's hearing. In such a case, the neck guard may include a shorter collar that covers the back of the neck but does not extend over the ears. Alternatively, the neck guard may be include a longer collar that extends over the ears and includes small apertures to expose a small area around the ear opening.
  • The components of the head and neck protection system may be manufactured, distributed and sold individually, or as a package containing two or more items of protective gear. For example, the neck guard may be sold alone or in conjunction with helmets, jerseys, vests, or other gear having fasteners designed to interconnect with fasteners on the neck guard. Alternatively, the neck guard may be sold in conjunction with kits that permit helmets, jerseys, vests and other gear to be retrofitted with fasteners that connect with fasteners on the neck guard. The neck guard may be sold with a helmet, a helmet and vest, or any other combination of items.
  • The terms and expressions which have been employed are used as terms of description and not of limitation. There is no intention in the use of such terms and expressions of excluding any equivalents of the features shown and described or portions thereof. It is recognized, therefore, that various modifications are possible within the scope and spirit of the invention. Accordingly, the invention incorporates variations that fall within the scope of the following claims.

Claims (22)

1. A head and neck protector for use with head gear and gear worn over the torso, comprising:
A. a neck guard formed of anti-ballistic material having a first edge and a second edge in spaced relation to the first edge; and
B. a first fastening means disposed along the first edge for attaching said neck guard to said head gear.
2. The head and neck protector of claim 1 comprising a second fastening means disposed along the second edge of said neck guard for attaching said neck guard to said gear worn over the person's torso.
3. The head and neck protector of claim 1, wherein the first fastening means comprises a detachable fastening means selected from the group consisting of snap fasteners, zippers, hook and loop fasteners, and combinations thereof.
4. The head and neck protector of claim 1, wherein the first fastening means comprises a plurality of snap fasteners that engage with a plurality of snap connectors on the head gear.
5. The head and neck protector of claim 1, wherein the first edge is shorter in length than the second edge, and said neck guard forms a frusto-conical neck brace surrounding the neck.
6. The head and neck protector of claim 1, wherein the neck guard forms a continuous barrier surrounding the neck.
7. The head and neck protector of claim 1, comprising a third edge and a fourth edge, said third edge and said fourth edge extending generally transverse to the first and second edges.
8. The head and neck protector of claim 1, wherein the anti-ballistic material comprises a para-aramid fiber.
9. A head and neck protection system for protecting a person against injury, comprising:
A. a head protector; and
B. a neck guard formed of an anti-ballistic material, said neck guard being connected with the head protector, said neck guard comprising:
(1) a first edge and a second edge in spaced relation from the first edge; and
(2) a first fastening means extending along the first edge of the neck guard, said first fastening means being configured to detachably couple the neck guard with the head protector.
10. The head and neck protection system of claim 9 comprising shoulder gear connected with said neck guard.
11. The head and neck protection system of claim 10 comprising a second fastening means extending along the second edge of the neck guard, said second fastening means being configured to detachably couple the neck guard with said shoulder gear.
12. The head and neck protection system of claim 10 wherein said shoulder gear is selected from the group consisting of a vest, a jacket and a uniform.
13. The head and neck protection system of claim 9, wherein the first fastening means comprises a detachable fastener selected from the group consisting of snap fasteners, zippers, hook and loop fasteners, and combinations thereof.
14. The head and neck protection system of claim 9, wherein the neck guard comprises a frusto-conical neck brace surrounding the neck.
15. The head and neck protection system of claim 9, wherein the neck guard comprises a continuous barrier around the neck.
16. The head and neck protection system of claim 9, wherein the neck guard comprises a third edge and a fourth edge, said third edge and said fourth edge extending generally transverse to the first and second edges.
17. The head and neck protection system of claim 9, wherein the anti-ballistic material comprises a para-aramid fiber.
18. A head and neck guard for use with a head protector and shoulder gear for protecting a person against injury to the head or neck, comprising:
a strip of anti-ballistic material having first and second edge portions in spaced relation to each other, and first and second end portions in spaced relation to each other, said strip of anti-ballistic material having a length that is dimensioned such that said strip can be extended substantially around the entire neck area of the person;
a first fastening means disposed along the first edge portion for attaching said strip to the head protector; and
a second fastening means disposed along the second edge portion for attaching said strip to the shoulder gear.
19. A head and neck guard as set forth in claim 18 wherein said strip of anti-ballistic material comprises a para-aramid fiber.
20. A head and neck guard as set forth in claim 18 wherein the first edge portion has a length that is shorter than the length of the second edge portion, whereby said strip of anti-ballistic material is adapted to form a frusto-conical shape when attached between the head gear and the shoulder gear.
21. A head and neck guard as set forth in claim 18 wherein said strip of anti-ballistic material has a thickness that is selected to provide resistance to elongation, and provide flexibility to permit rotation of the person's head about a vertical axis of the person's neck.
22. A head and neck guard as set forth in claim 18 wherein the length of said strip is dimensioned to provide a gap between the first and second end portions when the guard is positioned around the neck area of the person.
US11/095,149 2003-11-10 2005-03-31 Head and neck protection system Abandoned US20050166303A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/704,780 US6874170B1 (en) 2003-11-10 2003-11-10 Head and neck protection system
US11/095,149 US20050166303A1 (en) 2003-11-10 2005-03-31 Head and neck protection system

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/095,149 US20050166303A1 (en) 2003-11-10 2005-03-31 Head and neck protection system

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/704,780 Continuation-In-Part US6874170B1 (en) 2003-11-10 2003-11-10 Head and neck protection system

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20050166303A1 true US20050166303A1 (en) 2005-08-04

Family

ID=46304252

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/095,149 Abandoned US20050166303A1 (en) 2003-11-10 2005-03-31 Head and neck protection system

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20050166303A1 (en)

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2008079525A3 (en) * 2006-11-03 2008-10-16 Lineweight Llc Vented ballistic combat helmet
US20080301862A1 (en) * 2007-06-06 2008-12-11 Michael Montgomery Personal debris shield and system
US20090031472A1 (en) * 2007-07-31 2009-02-05 Helmet House, Inc. Garment with deployable hood and method for using same
US20100005576A1 (en) * 2008-07-14 2010-01-14 Ryan Scott Andrews Wetsuit neck and arm protective members
US20110083240A1 (en) * 2006-03-02 2011-04-14 Lineweight Llc Ballistic Helmet with Nape Protector
US20110145964A1 (en) * 2007-03-19 2011-06-23 Lineweight Llc Face Armor
US20110145965A1 (en) * 2008-08-01 2011-06-23 Hirano Trading Company Bulletproof protector and bulletproof clothes
US8046845B1 (en) * 2009-01-09 2011-11-01 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Lightweight combat helmet
WO2011149895A1 (en) * 2010-05-28 2011-12-01 Sawyer Philip Nicholas Sports helmet providing head and neck protection
US8146169B2 (en) * 2004-12-17 2012-04-03 Fabio Massimo Marchesi Clothing endowed with bulletproof and knife-proof properties
US20130239310A1 (en) * 2012-03-16 2013-09-19 Brian Charles Flug Anti-concussion compression, survibility and sustainbilty safty device for the neck and spine
US20130276215A1 (en) * 2012-04-19 2013-10-24 Kenneth Stuart Eley, Sr. Protection apparatus
US20150033431A1 (en) * 2013-08-05 2015-02-05 Optrel Ag Face protector
US20160287969A1 (en) * 2015-04-03 2016-10-06 H & H Sports, Inc Protective apparatus and equipment with adjustable neck roll
US9586125B2 (en) * 2012-10-30 2017-03-07 Mioflex, Llc Head and neck protection apparatus and methods
AT517915A1 (en) * 2015-10-21 2017-05-15 Mario Camondo Neck protection for ice hockey
US20180042314A1 (en) * 2016-08-12 2018-02-15 Amy Morisch Hurst Shirt with UV Protection Collar
US9913501B1 (en) 2012-03-16 2018-03-13 Athletek Sports Safety Gear Llc Methods of reducing impact forces and injuries using a synthetic neck muscle system
AU2017221832B2 (en) * 2016-08-31 2018-11-01 Tyr Tactical, Llc Ballistic collar

Citations (61)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US69873A (en) * 1867-10-15 James l
US100109A (en) * 1870-02-22 Improvement in the manufacture of paper
US2597764A (en) * 1949-08-29 1952-05-20 Northrop Aircraft Inc Crash helmet
US3134106A (en) * 1962-05-01 1964-05-26 Shaffer Archie Protective football apparatus
US3551910A (en) * 1968-11-12 1971-01-05 Bullard Co Neck and head protector for mounting on safety helmets
US3577562A (en) * 1969-10-01 1971-05-04 Mike C Holt Athletes{3 {0 protective helmet particularly football
US3590388A (en) * 1969-02-04 1971-07-06 Mike C Holt Athletic helmet
US3600713A (en) * 1969-07-07 1971-08-24 Mike C Holt Athletic helmet
US3628190A (en) * 1970-01-07 1971-12-21 American Safety Equip Helmet neckguard
US3668706A (en) * 1970-06-10 1972-06-13 Willie Velasquez Shield attachment for safety helmets
US3671974A (en) * 1970-09-04 1972-06-27 Don D Sims Football training harness
US3688314A (en) * 1969-12-10 1972-09-05 Ilc Ind Inc Protective garment
US3818509A (en) * 1973-08-24 1974-06-25 L Romo Apparatus for preventing neck injury
US3873996A (en) * 1974-07-05 1975-04-01 Levon Antoine Varteressian Articulated head and neck protector apparatus
US3879761A (en) * 1973-04-12 1975-04-29 Bothwell P W Head and chest protectors, for example for motor cyclists
US3900896A (en) * 1974-11-25 1975-08-26 Eugene J Ackerman Neck brace for athletes
US3925822A (en) * 1974-06-18 1975-12-16 John H Sawyer Safety harness for a helmet
US3978525A (en) * 1974-01-05 1976-09-07 Bothwell P W Head and chest protectors for example for motor cyclists
US4042976A (en) * 1976-02-12 1977-08-23 Jay Carter Reynolds Protective collar
US4094015A (en) * 1977-02-07 1978-06-13 Howard Frank N Neck roll for helmet
US4215437A (en) * 1979-05-30 1980-08-05 Ti Kao Helmet-mask for cold weather and/or particulate laden environments
US4219193A (en) * 1977-11-03 1980-08-26 Newman Joseph W Simultaneous neck strengthener, neck protector, neck rehabilitator
US4274161A (en) * 1976-11-29 1981-06-23 Littler Brian J Crash helmet collar
US4319362A (en) * 1979-10-29 1982-03-16 Ettinger Donald N Protective neck apparatus
US4467476A (en) * 1981-07-10 1984-08-28 Herbert M Linton Bullet-proof garment
US4477041A (en) * 1982-08-19 1984-10-16 Michael Dunne Head and neck restraint system
US4638510A (en) * 1985-11-29 1987-01-27 Hubbard Robert P Neck protection device with occupant of a high performance vehicle
US4697289A (en) * 1984-09-10 1987-10-06 Nava & C. S.P.A. Protective device applicable to helmets, especially for sports use
US4821339A (en) * 1987-06-23 1989-04-18 Fair Jeffrey D Protective vest having a cervical collar
US4825476A (en) * 1987-11-09 1989-05-02 Andrews Donald L Articulated head, neck and shoulder protective device
US4885807A (en) * 1987-07-09 1989-12-12 Snow Jr Paul D Quick release face mask for use with contact sports helmets
US4985938A (en) * 1987-07-09 1991-01-22 Snow Jr Paul D Quick release face mask for use with contact sports helmets
US4996720A (en) * 1987-06-23 1991-03-05 Fair Jeffrey D Protective vest having a cervical collar
US5095550A (en) * 1989-10-30 1992-03-17 Perlinger Jon A Helmet closure
US5261125A (en) * 1992-01-08 1993-11-16 Rudolph Cartwright Head impact force diversion system
US5272770A (en) * 1992-11-16 1993-12-28 Allen Richard K Head restraining system
US5295271A (en) * 1993-01-25 1994-03-22 Butterfield James N Shoulder rest helmet
US5329641A (en) * 1993-05-24 1994-07-19 Tom Kalhous Helmet with neck-shield
US5371905A (en) * 1993-08-31 1994-12-13 Keim; Hugo A. Neck and spine protection device
US5437613A (en) * 1993-08-23 1995-08-01 Reggio; David Neck brace
US5517699A (en) * 1993-09-14 1996-05-21 Abraham, Ii; George E. Devices for preventing cervical spine injuries in contact sports
US5566399A (en) * 1994-11-14 1996-10-22 Cartwright; Rudolph Head impact force diversion system with layered shell
US5581816A (en) * 1993-11-24 1996-12-10 Davis; Emsley A. Head and neck protective apparatus
US5787513A (en) * 1996-11-19 1998-08-04 Sharmat; Samuel L. Safety helmet having means for easy removal from the head of a wearer
US5946719A (en) * 1998-08-14 1999-09-07 Med-Eng Systems, Inc. Neck and head protection system
US5956777A (en) * 1998-07-22 1999-09-28 Grand Slam Cards Helmet
US6009566A (en) * 1998-01-29 2000-01-04 Hubbard; Robert P. Head and neck support for racing
US6009563A (en) * 1998-05-26 2000-01-04 Swanson; David A. Sports safety helmet
US6032299A (en) * 1995-10-30 2000-03-07 Welsh; Nicole Jacket for reducing spinal and compression injuries associated with a fall from a moving vehicle
US6044498A (en) * 1997-12-16 2000-04-04 E. I. Du Pont Nemours And Company Slash and cut resistant garments for protecting a person from injury
US6163891A (en) * 1997-04-17 2000-12-26 Viitalahti; Kari Arto Olavi Protector for hockey player
US6182300B1 (en) * 1999-11-12 2001-02-06 Claude M. Severance Neck protective gear
US6253389B1 (en) * 2000-12-07 2001-07-03 Charles Scaglione Protective garment
US6374423B1 (en) * 2001-05-18 2002-04-23 Kris A. Anderson Sports helmet with full flexible brim
US6381750B1 (en) * 2001-09-25 2002-05-07 Norman B. Mangan Headgear mountable shield and method of use
US6385781B1 (en) * 1999-03-23 2002-05-14 Carl Martin Rose Adaptive, energy absorbing shoulder pad mounted head cage
US6434756B1 (en) * 2001-01-31 2002-08-20 Vohn Hoop Neck and spine protection apparatus
US6481026B1 (en) * 2002-01-03 2002-11-19 Mcintosh Thomas John Athlete's neck and spine safety brace
US6720277B1 (en) * 1994-08-29 2004-04-13 Warwick Mills, Inc. Protective fabric having high penetration resistance
US6874170B1 (en) * 2003-11-10 2005-04-05 Todd D. Aaron Head and neck protection system
US6893989B2 (en) * 1999-10-21 2005-05-17 Twaron Products V.O.F. Stab-resisting material, a coated carrier to be used therewith, and clothing made of said material

Patent Citations (62)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US100109A (en) * 1870-02-22 Improvement in the manufacture of paper
US69873A (en) * 1867-10-15 James l
US2597764A (en) * 1949-08-29 1952-05-20 Northrop Aircraft Inc Crash helmet
US3134106A (en) * 1962-05-01 1964-05-26 Shaffer Archie Protective football apparatus
US3551910A (en) * 1968-11-12 1971-01-05 Bullard Co Neck and head protector for mounting on safety helmets
US3590388A (en) * 1969-02-04 1971-07-06 Mike C Holt Athletic helmet
US3600713A (en) * 1969-07-07 1971-08-24 Mike C Holt Athletic helmet
US3577562A (en) * 1969-10-01 1971-05-04 Mike C Holt Athletes{3 {0 protective helmet particularly football
US3688314A (en) * 1969-12-10 1972-09-05 Ilc Ind Inc Protective garment
US3628190A (en) * 1970-01-07 1971-12-21 American Safety Equip Helmet neckguard
US3668706A (en) * 1970-06-10 1972-06-13 Willie Velasquez Shield attachment for safety helmets
US3671974A (en) * 1970-09-04 1972-06-27 Don D Sims Football training harness
US3879761A (en) * 1973-04-12 1975-04-29 Bothwell P W Head and chest protectors, for example for motor cyclists
US3818509A (en) * 1973-08-24 1974-06-25 L Romo Apparatus for preventing neck injury
US3978525A (en) * 1974-01-05 1976-09-07 Bothwell P W Head and chest protectors for example for motor cyclists
US3925822A (en) * 1974-06-18 1975-12-16 John H Sawyer Safety harness for a helmet
US3873996A (en) * 1974-07-05 1975-04-01 Levon Antoine Varteressian Articulated head and neck protector apparatus
US3900896A (en) * 1974-11-25 1975-08-26 Eugene J Ackerman Neck brace for athletes
US4042976A (en) * 1976-02-12 1977-08-23 Jay Carter Reynolds Protective collar
US4274161A (en) * 1976-11-29 1981-06-23 Littler Brian J Crash helmet collar
US4094015A (en) * 1977-02-07 1978-06-13 Howard Frank N Neck roll for helmet
US4219193A (en) * 1977-11-03 1980-08-26 Newman Joseph W Simultaneous neck strengthener, neck protector, neck rehabilitator
US4215437A (en) * 1979-05-30 1980-08-05 Ti Kao Helmet-mask for cold weather and/or particulate laden environments
US4319362A (en) * 1979-10-29 1982-03-16 Ettinger Donald N Protective neck apparatus
US4467476A (en) * 1981-07-10 1984-08-28 Herbert M Linton Bullet-proof garment
US4477041A (en) * 1982-08-19 1984-10-16 Michael Dunne Head and neck restraint system
US4697289A (en) * 1984-09-10 1987-10-06 Nava & C. S.P.A. Protective device applicable to helmets, especially for sports use
US4638510A (en) * 1985-11-29 1987-01-27 Hubbard Robert P Neck protection device with occupant of a high performance vehicle
US4821339A (en) * 1987-06-23 1989-04-18 Fair Jeffrey D Protective vest having a cervical collar
US4996720A (en) * 1987-06-23 1991-03-05 Fair Jeffrey D Protective vest having a cervical collar
US4885807A (en) * 1987-07-09 1989-12-12 Snow Jr Paul D Quick release face mask for use with contact sports helmets
US4985938A (en) * 1987-07-09 1991-01-22 Snow Jr Paul D Quick release face mask for use with contact sports helmets
US4825476A (en) * 1987-11-09 1989-05-02 Andrews Donald L Articulated head, neck and shoulder protective device
US5095550A (en) * 1989-10-30 1992-03-17 Perlinger Jon A Helmet closure
US5261125A (en) * 1992-01-08 1993-11-16 Rudolph Cartwright Head impact force diversion system
US5581820A (en) * 1992-01-08 1996-12-10 Cartwright; Rudolph Head impact force diversion system with transfer arm
US5272770A (en) * 1992-11-16 1993-12-28 Allen Richard K Head restraining system
US5295271A (en) * 1993-01-25 1994-03-22 Butterfield James N Shoulder rest helmet
US5329641A (en) * 1993-05-24 1994-07-19 Tom Kalhous Helmet with neck-shield
US5437613A (en) * 1993-08-23 1995-08-01 Reggio; David Neck brace
US5371905A (en) * 1993-08-31 1994-12-13 Keim; Hugo A. Neck and spine protection device
US5517699A (en) * 1993-09-14 1996-05-21 Abraham, Ii; George E. Devices for preventing cervical spine injuries in contact sports
US5581816A (en) * 1993-11-24 1996-12-10 Davis; Emsley A. Head and neck protective apparatus
US6720277B1 (en) * 1994-08-29 2004-04-13 Warwick Mills, Inc. Protective fabric having high penetration resistance
US5566399A (en) * 1994-11-14 1996-10-22 Cartwright; Rudolph Head impact force diversion system with layered shell
US6032299A (en) * 1995-10-30 2000-03-07 Welsh; Nicole Jacket for reducing spinal and compression injuries associated with a fall from a moving vehicle
US5787513A (en) * 1996-11-19 1998-08-04 Sharmat; Samuel L. Safety helmet having means for easy removal from the head of a wearer
US6163891A (en) * 1997-04-17 2000-12-26 Viitalahti; Kari Arto Olavi Protector for hockey player
US6044498A (en) * 1997-12-16 2000-04-04 E. I. Du Pont Nemours And Company Slash and cut resistant garments for protecting a person from injury
US6009566A (en) * 1998-01-29 2000-01-04 Hubbard; Robert P. Head and neck support for racing
US6009563A (en) * 1998-05-26 2000-01-04 Swanson; David A. Sports safety helmet
US5956777A (en) * 1998-07-22 1999-09-28 Grand Slam Cards Helmet
US5946719A (en) * 1998-08-14 1999-09-07 Med-Eng Systems, Inc. Neck and head protection system
US6385781B1 (en) * 1999-03-23 2002-05-14 Carl Martin Rose Adaptive, energy absorbing shoulder pad mounted head cage
US6893989B2 (en) * 1999-10-21 2005-05-17 Twaron Products V.O.F. Stab-resisting material, a coated carrier to be used therewith, and clothing made of said material
US6182300B1 (en) * 1999-11-12 2001-02-06 Claude M. Severance Neck protective gear
US6253389B1 (en) * 2000-12-07 2001-07-03 Charles Scaglione Protective garment
US6434756B1 (en) * 2001-01-31 2002-08-20 Vohn Hoop Neck and spine protection apparatus
US6374423B1 (en) * 2001-05-18 2002-04-23 Kris A. Anderson Sports helmet with full flexible brim
US6381750B1 (en) * 2001-09-25 2002-05-07 Norman B. Mangan Headgear mountable shield and method of use
US6481026B1 (en) * 2002-01-03 2002-11-19 Mcintosh Thomas John Athlete's neck and spine safety brace
US6874170B1 (en) * 2003-11-10 2005-04-05 Todd D. Aaron Head and neck protection system

Cited By (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8146169B2 (en) * 2004-12-17 2012-04-03 Fabio Massimo Marchesi Clothing endowed with bulletproof and knife-proof properties
US9846012B2 (en) 2006-03-02 2017-12-19 Lineweight Llc Ballistic nape protector for ballistic helmet
US9243872B2 (en) 2006-03-02 2016-01-26 Lineweight Llc Helmet with ballistic nape protector
US8505113B2 (en) 2006-03-02 2013-08-13 Lineweight Llc Ballistic helmet with nape protector
US20110083240A1 (en) * 2006-03-02 2011-04-14 Lineweight Llc Ballistic Helmet with Nape Protector
US20170030683A1 (en) * 2006-11-03 2017-02-02 Lineweight Llc Ballistic Combat Helmet with Two Side Wing Face Guards
US9494388B2 (en) 2006-11-03 2016-11-15 Lineweight Llc Vented ballistic combat helmet
WO2008079525A3 (en) * 2006-11-03 2008-10-16 Lineweight Llc Vented ballistic combat helmet
US8490214B2 (en) 2007-03-19 2013-07-23 Lineweight Llc Face armor
US20110145964A1 (en) * 2007-03-19 2011-06-23 Lineweight Llc Face Armor
US20080301862A1 (en) * 2007-06-06 2008-12-11 Michael Montgomery Personal debris shield and system
US20100325771A1 (en) * 2007-07-31 2010-12-30 Helmet House, Inc. Garment with deployable hood and method for using same
US20090031472A1 (en) * 2007-07-31 2009-02-05 Helmet House, Inc. Garment with deployable hood and method for using same
US8156573B2 (en) 2007-07-31 2012-04-17 Helmet House, Inc. Garment with deployable hood and method for using same
US7779485B2 (en) 2007-07-31 2010-08-24 Helmet House, Inc. Garment with deployable hood and method for using same
US8011017B2 (en) 2008-07-14 2011-09-06 Andrews Water Sports, Llc Wetsuit neck and arm protective members
US20100005576A1 (en) * 2008-07-14 2010-01-14 Ryan Scott Andrews Wetsuit neck and arm protective members
US20110145965A1 (en) * 2008-08-01 2011-06-23 Hirano Trading Company Bulletproof protector and bulletproof clothes
US8046845B1 (en) * 2009-01-09 2011-11-01 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Lightweight combat helmet
WO2011149895A1 (en) * 2010-05-28 2011-12-01 Sawyer Philip Nicholas Sports helmet providing head and neck protection
US20130239310A1 (en) * 2012-03-16 2013-09-19 Brian Charles Flug Anti-concussion compression, survibility and sustainbilty safty device for the neck and spine
US9913501B1 (en) 2012-03-16 2018-03-13 Athletek Sports Safety Gear Llc Methods of reducing impact forces and injuries using a synthetic neck muscle system
US20130276215A1 (en) * 2012-04-19 2013-10-24 Kenneth Stuart Eley, Sr. Protection apparatus
US9586125B2 (en) * 2012-10-30 2017-03-07 Mioflex, Llc Head and neck protection apparatus and methods
US20150033431A1 (en) * 2013-08-05 2015-02-05 Optrel Ag Face protector
US10736782B2 (en) * 2013-08-05 2020-08-11 Optrel Holding AG Face protector
US20160287969A1 (en) * 2015-04-03 2016-10-06 H & H Sports, Inc Protective apparatus and equipment with adjustable neck roll
AT517915A1 (en) * 2015-10-21 2017-05-15 Mario Camondo Neck protection for ice hockey
US20180042314A1 (en) * 2016-08-12 2018-02-15 Amy Morisch Hurst Shirt with UV Protection Collar
AU2017221832B2 (en) * 2016-08-31 2018-11-01 Tyr Tactical, Llc Ballistic collar

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US20050166303A1 (en) Head and neck protection system
US6874170B1 (en) Head and neck protection system
US6378140B1 (en) Impact and energy absorbing product for helmets and protective gear
US4937888A (en) Helmet cover
US5930841A (en) Soccer headguard
US7120941B2 (en) Crash helmet assembly
US7062795B2 (en) Lightweight impact resistant helmet system
US6588022B1 (en) Head dome and strap connection system
US6397399B1 (en) Protective headguard
US6272692B1 (en) Apparatus for enhancing absorption and dissipation of impact forces for all protective headgear
US5353437A (en) Combination helmet and body protection device
US6772447B2 (en) Protective sport helmet
US6839910B2 (en) Protective athletic equipment
US6349416B1 (en) Headguard-protective sports headband
US8555426B2 (en) Energy absorbing and displacing structure for athletic protective equipment
US9205320B2 (en) Head and neck protection system
US8484762B2 (en) Protective sports headgear
US5148550A (en) Protective face and head gear
US20110209272A1 (en) Protective sports helmet with energy-absorbing padding and a facemask with force-distributing shock absorbers
US20090064385A1 (en) Head and neck protector
US5652967A (en) Sport protector
WO1998047575A1 (en) A protector for hockey player
GB2220556A (en) Head protector
US6397402B1 (en) Protective uniform for combination football and skating game and other high-impact applications
US6842914B1 (en) Protective impact-absorbing helmet

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: COOPER TECHNOLOGIES COMPANY, TEXAS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:PAHL, CHRISTOPHER JOSEPH;REEL/FRAME:016794/0171

Effective date: 20050527

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION