US20050008840A1 - Antibacterial material - Google Patents

Antibacterial material Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20050008840A1
US20050008840A1 US10480537 US48053704A US2005008840A1 US 20050008840 A1 US20050008840 A1 US 20050008840A1 US 10480537 US10480537 US 10480537 US 48053704 A US48053704 A US 48053704A US 2005008840 A1 US2005008840 A1 US 2005008840A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
method according
carrier
biocide
antibacterial material
substrate
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10480537
Inventor
Barrie Cooper
Harry Knowles
Original Assignee
Cooper Barrie David
Harry Knowles
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06MTREATMENT, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE IN CLASS D06, OF FIBRES, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS, OR FIBROUS GOODS MADE FROM SUCH MATERIALS
    • D06M23/00Treatment of fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics or fibrous goods made from such materials, characterised by the process
    • D06M23/12Processes in which the treating agent is incorporated in microcapsules
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01NPRESERVATION OF BODIES OF HUMANS OR ANIMALS OR PLANTS OR PARTS THEREOF; BIOCIDES, e.g. AS DISINFECTANTS, AS PESTICIDES, AS HERBICIDES; PEST REPELLANTS OR ATTRACTANTS; PLANT GROWTH REGULATORS
    • A01N25/00Biocides, pest repellants or attractants, or plant growth regulators, characterised by their forms, or by their non-active ingredients or by their methods of application, e.g. seed treatment or sequential application; Substances for reducing the noxious effect of the active ingredients to organisms other than pests
    • A01N25/34Shaped forms, e.g. sheets, not provided for in any other sub-group of this main group
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01NPRESERVATION OF BODIES OF HUMANS OR ANIMALS OR PLANTS OR PARTS THEREOF; BIOCIDES, e.g. AS DISINFECTANTS, AS PESTICIDES, AS HERBICIDES; PEST REPELLANTS OR ATTRACTANTS; PLANT GROWTH REGULATORS
    • A01N31/00Biocides, pest repellants or attractants, or plant growth regulators containing organic oxygen or sulfur compounds
    • A01N31/08Oxygen or sulfur directly attached to an aromatic ring system
    • A01N31/16Oxygen or sulfur directly attached to an aromatic ring system with two or more oxygen or sulfur atoms directly attached to the same aromatic ring system
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L15/00Chemical aspects of, or use of materials for, bandages, dressings or absorbent pads
    • A61L15/16Bandages, dressings or absorbent pads for physiological fluids such as urine or blood, e.g. sanitary towels, tampons
    • A61L15/42Use of materials characterised by their function or physical properties
    • A61L15/44Medicaments
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L2/00Methods or apparatus for disinfecting or sterilising materials or objects other than foodstuffs or contact lenses; Accessories therefor
    • A61L2/0005Methods or apparatus for disinfecting or sterilising materials or objects other than foodstuffs or contact lenses; Accessories therefor for pharmaceuticals, biologicals or living parts
    • A61L2/0082Methods or apparatus for disinfecting or sterilising materials or objects other than foodstuffs or contact lenses; Accessories therefor for pharmaceuticals, biologicals or living parts using chemical substances
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L2/00Methods or apparatus for disinfecting or sterilising materials or objects other than foodstuffs or contact lenses; Accessories therefor
    • A61L2/16Methods or apparatus for disinfecting or sterilising materials or objects other than foodstuffs or contact lenses; Accessories therefor using chemical substances
    • A61L2/23Solid substances, e.g. granules, powders, blocks, tablets
    • A61L2/232Solid substances, e.g. granules, powders, blocks, tablets layered or coated
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L9/00Disinfection, sterilisation or deodorisation of air
    • A61L9/01Deodorant compositions
    • A61L9/014Deodorant compositions containing sorbent material, e.g. activated carbon
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06MTREATMENT, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE IN CLASS D06, OF FIBRES, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS, OR FIBROUS GOODS MADE FROM SUCH MATERIALS
    • D06M13/00Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics or fibrous goods made from such materials, with non-macromolecular organic compounds; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment
    • D06M13/10Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics or fibrous goods made from such materials, with non-macromolecular organic compounds; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment with compounds containing oxygen
    • D06M13/152Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics or fibrous goods made from such materials, with non-macromolecular organic compounds; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment with compounds containing oxygen having a hydroxy group bound to a carbon atom of a six-membered aromatic ring
    • D06M13/156Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics or fibrous goods made from such materials, with non-macromolecular organic compounds; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment with compounds containing oxygen having a hydroxy group bound to a carbon atom of a six-membered aromatic ring containing halogen atoms
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06MTREATMENT, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE IN CLASS D06, OF FIBRES, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS, OR FIBROUS GOODS MADE FROM SUCH MATERIALS
    • D06M16/00Biochemical treatment of fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics, or fibrous goods made from such materials, e.g. enzymatic
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D21PAPER-MAKING; PRODUCTION OF CELLULOSE
    • D21HPULP COMPOSITIONS; PREPARATION THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES D21C OR D21D; IMPREGNATING OR COATING OF PAPER; TREATMENT OF FINISHED PAPER NOT COVERED BY CLASS B31 OR SUBCLASS D21G; PAPER NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D21H21/00Non-fibrous material added to the pulp, characterised by its function, form or properties; Paper-impregnating or coating material, characterised by its function, form or properties
    • D21H21/14Non-fibrous material added to the pulp, characterised by its function, form or properties; Paper-impregnating or coating material, characterised by its function, form or properties characterised by function or properties in or on the paper
    • D21H21/36Biocidal agents, e.g. fungicidal, bactericidal, insecticidal agents
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L2300/00Biologically active materials used in bandages, wound dressings, absorbent pads or medical devices
    • A61L2300/40Biologically active materials used in bandages, wound dressings, absorbent pads or medical devices characterised by a specific therapeutic activity or mode of action
    • A61L2300/404Biocides, antimicrobial agents, antiseptic agents
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L2300/00Biologically active materials used in bandages, wound dressings, absorbent pads or medical devices
    • A61L2300/60Biologically active materials used in bandages, wound dressings, absorbent pads or medical devices characterised by a special physical form
    • A61L2300/602Type of release, e.g. controlled, sustained, slow
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06MTREATMENT, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE IN CLASS D06, OF FIBRES, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS, OR FIBROUS GOODS MADE FROM SUCH MATERIALS
    • D06M2101/00Chemical constitution of the fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics or fibrous goods made from such materials, to be treated
    • D06M2101/02Natural fibres, other than mineral fibres
    • D06M2101/04Vegetal fibres
    • D06M2101/06Vegetal fibres cellulosic
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING, AIR-HUMIDIFICATION, VENTILATION, USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F3/00Air-conditioning systems in which conditioned primary air is supplied from one or more central stations to distributing units in the rooms or spaces where it may receive secondary treatment; Apparatus specially designed for such systems
    • F24F3/12Air-conditioning systems in which conditioned primary air is supplied from one or more central stations to distributing units in the rooms or spaces where it may receive secondary treatment; Apparatus specially designed for such systems characterised by the treatment of the air otherwise than by heating and cooling
    • F24F3/16Air-conditioning systems in which conditioned primary air is supplied from one or more central stations to distributing units in the rooms or spaces where it may receive secondary treatment; Apparatus specially designed for such systems characterised by the treatment of the air otherwise than by heating and cooling by purification, e.g. by filtering; by sterilisation; by ozonisation
    • F24F3/1603Air-conditioning systems in which conditioned primary air is supplied from one or more central stations to distributing units in the rooms or spaces where it may receive secondary treatment; Apparatus specially designed for such systems characterised by the treatment of the air otherwise than by heating and cooling by purification, e.g. by filtering; by sterilisation; by ozonisation by filtering
    • F24F2003/1621Air-conditioning systems in which conditioned primary air is supplied from one or more central stations to distributing units in the rooms or spaces where it may receive secondary treatment; Apparatus specially designed for such systems characterised by the treatment of the air otherwise than by heating and cooling by purification, e.g. by filtering; by sterilisation; by ozonisation by filtering using chemical filtering methods
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/249921Web or sheet containing structurally defined element or component
    • Y10T428/249924Noninterengaged fiber-containing paper-free web or sheet which is not of specified porosity

Abstract

An antibacterial material, a method of producing an antibacterial material and a method of inhibiting infection during the treatment of wounds using an antibacterial material. The antibacterial including a fibrous substrate impregnated with a carrier and a controlled release biocide dispersed through the carrier.

Description

  • The present invention relates to antibacterial material and in particular to material suitable as a dressing for wounds such as ulcerated or burned tissue.
  • The invention has been developed primarily for use in dressing wounds and will be described hereinafter with reference to this application. However, it will be appreciated that the invention is not limited to this particular field of use.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The treatment and dressing of slow healing open wounds has been a long-standing medical problem. Wound healing is an extremely complex biological process and there are many factors to be taken into account when considering the best possible treatment and dressing. Factors such as risk of infection, time of treatment and patient comfort are important considerations.
  • Ulcers are a particularly painful form of slow healing wound and are often difficult to treat due to underlying circulatory problems and the continuous risk of infection.
  • Ulcers are secreting skin wounds which produce exudates such as blood, pus and other wound fluids. These fluids can accumulate in the wound cavity and form a rich pool of nutrients which promotes bacterial growth. This, in turn, delays or prevents the healing process, or in some cases leads to further tissue damage or even the possibility of systemic life threatening infection.
  • It is would be desirable to allow such wounds to heal in a slightly moist environment provided infection can be controlled and excess wound exudates can be removed to prevent blisters forming under the dressing or the dressing becoming embedded in the wound.
  • Examples of conventional dressings used to protect open wounds and promote the healing process include traditional cloth, cotton or lint pads, non-adherent latex dressings and synthetic-algin coatings.
  • However, each of these dressings has drawbacks. Traditional dressings in direct contact with a wound can interfere with the healing process. This is particularly so with chronic ulcerated wounds because of the repeated mechanical impact and interaction of the bandage with the fragile and pressure sensitive tissues within the wound. This problem is amplified by the repeated dressing changes which are often required. In many cases because there is new tissue growth the dressings adhere to the wound. This makes them difficult to remove without disrupting the healing process.
  • Non-adherent latex dressings have a high rate of allergic reaction. Along with some other types of conventional dressings, they are unable to absorb exuded fluids at a rate commensurate with the rate of fluid production by the wound or alternatively, their fluid holding capacity is not significant to allow long periods of time in contact with the wound. The progressive build up of bacteria then delays healing and may also produce unpleasant odours.
  • Algin type dressings are designed to avoid adhering to healing wounds and for easy removal. They present the appearance of being coated with jelly-like substance. While these may avoid adhering to a healing wound, they have a propensity to go mouldy when exposed to bacteria filled fluids for extended periods.
  • There is a need for a wound dressing that can continuously inhibit the growth of bacteria and be easily removed from the wound. Moreover, it would be particularly desirable if the dressing could be left on the wound for a longer period of time than conventional dressings allow, in order to avoid disrupting the wound and thus accelerating the healing process.
  • It is an object of the invention to overcome or ameliorate at least some of the disadvantages of the prior art, or to provide a useful alternative.
  • DISCLOSURE OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to an antibacterial material, a method of producing an antibacterial material and methods of inhibiting infection during the treatment of wounds using the antibacterial material of the present invention.
  • According to a first aspect, the present invention provides an antibacterial material including:
      • a fibrous substrate impregnated with a carrier; and
      • a controlled release biocide dispersed through said carrier.
  • According to a second aspect, the present invention provides a process for making an antibacterial material according to the first aspect, said process including:
      • dispersing a controlled release biocide within a carrier to provide an active carrier mixture; and
      • impregnating a fibrous substrate with said active carrier mixture.
  • According to a third aspect, the present invention provides a method of inhibiting infection during the treatment of wounds by applying an antibacterial material according to the first aspect to an affected skin area on a patient.
  • According to a fourth aspect, the present invention provides use of an antibacterial material according to the first aspect in the manufacture of a dressing for inhibiting infection during the treatment of wounds.
  • The term “wound” includes tissue injury such as flesh wounds, mechanical injuries, ulcers, burns, open surgical wounds and lesions and also skin conditions such as acne.
  • Preferably, the substrate is paper. The carrier is preferably propylene glycol, although other glycols may be used as carriers. Other suitable carriers include alcohols.
  • Water based carriers may also be used. The biocide is preferably triclosan, mobile within the carrier. Other suitable biocides may also be employed.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • A preferred embodiment of the invention will now be described, by way of example only, with reference to several examples.
  • The antibacterial material includes a fibrous substrate impregnated with a carrier having a controlled release biocide dispersed therethrough. Once the controlled release takes place, the biocide is mobile within the carrier so that it can travel to the site of action.
  • In its preferred embodiment, the substrate is a substantially cotton cellulose fibre blend, most preferably a soft sheet of open weave paper. In other embodiments, the substrate may be creped paper which has a high surface area and increased stretch and flexibility. This enables the material in use to adapt readily to various configurations of the patient.
  • The preferred paper substrate has sufficient wet strength to be pulled intact from a wound. However, in some embodiments the paper strength may be selected to be disintegrable or dissolvable such that it can be washed out of a wound if necessary. The weight of the substrate may vary. Depending on particular requirements, the weight may be in the range of 50 to 200 gsm, more preferably in the range of 80 to 150 gsm, and most preferably in the range of 100 to 120 gsm.
  • Importantly, the biocide of the present invention is a controlled release biocide. In its preferred form, the biocide is encapsulated so as to be in a latent state capable of being activated by external stimuli. The encapsulation for example, may be by means of polypropylene microspheres for instance. The external stimuli may include pressure or light, in particular ultraviolet light. The level of antibacterial effect may be varied by increasing or decreasing the amount of biocide.
  • When the biocide is released from encapsulation, it is taken up in the carrier and dissolves therethrough.
  • The biocide itself is preferably triclosan. The preferred form of encapsulated triclosan is that known under the trademark CANSAN®TCH.
  • Triclosan is non-toxic and non-allergenic to humans and inhibits the growth of bacteria such as E. coli Legionella or Staphylococcus and low titre viruses for example HIV. Preferably, the biocide is deactivated by blood serum such that it is effective in killing bacteria but has no effect on humans. Preferably, the biocide is present in an amount of 10 to 10,000 ppm of the carrier, depending upon the intended use.
  • For instance, use for dressings for non-serious wounds is 10-1,000 ppm biocide, or 10-200 ppm biocide in even less serious cases. For serious wounds, the concentration of biocide in the carrier is anywhere up to about 3,000-6,000 ppm.
  • For other applications, such as handwipes, an amount of 10-100 ppm is found to be appropriate. For air conditioning filters, a concentration of about 100-500 ppm biocide in carrier is an appropriate concentration. These concentrations are those which would be used when the carrier is applied at its preferred rate of 100 ml/m2, or 1 litre of carrier per 10 m2. Appropriate adjustments to the concentration and rate of application to the substrate can be made to provide equivalent amounts of active if required.
  • Surprisingly, when triclosan itself is applied to wounds or dressings in a conventional manner, it is rapidly degraded by serum and becomes ineffective within a fairly short time.
  • The encapsulated biocide is dispersed through a carrier which is preferably a glycol and most preferably propylene glycol. The carrier is applied to the substrate at a rate of between 80 and 120 ml per square metre, and more preferably around 100 ml of the carrier is used per square metre of the substrate. As well as acting as a carrier to take the biocide to the necessary site of action, the humectant properties of propylene glycol keep the dressing damp and enable it to be easily removed from the wound.
  • The preferred method of adjusting the total amount of active in a dressing or other article of the present invention is through varying the concentration of active in the carrier, rather than by the alternative procedure of varying the amount of carrier applied to the substrate.
  • Preferably, the fibrous substrate further includes strengthening material, such as a nylon resin and most preferably a Kymene resin. Typically, the strengthening resin is present in an amount of around 0.01% to 0.06% by weight of the paper. Most preferably, the amount of Kymene resin is around 0.03%. The higher the amount of Kymene, the harder the paper. For example, air conditioning filters will have an amount of Kymene near the high end of the range as they require high strength.
  • The antibacterial material of the present invention has a wide range of possible applications in the medical, dental and veterinary fields. In its preferred form, the material is most suitable as a wound dressing. Unlike conventional dressings, which are changed daily, in its preferred form the material of the present invention can be left on the wound for extended periods of time, for example 3 to 4 days in some cases. By minimising the number of dressing changes the wound has a better chance of healing over a shorter period of total treatment time. The controlled release of active biocide kills bacteria or maintains a low bacterial population throughout this time, thus inhibiting infection and reducing odour. It will be appreciated that the material is particularly applicable to the treatment of sensitive skin wounds such as burns and ulcers.
  • Similarly, the material of the present invention may be adapted for use to inhibit infection during treatment of animal wounds such as injuries to the front forelegs of horses. The skin in this area is particularly thin and prone to injury. Such injuries behave like ulcers in that they are open and slow healing. The antibacterial material of the present invention can be used to accelerate the healing time of such wounds and thus return the horse more quickly to an active state.
  • The antibacterial material of the present invention has other uses in the field of infection control.
  • One such alternative use is as a dressing during dental surgery. Gum wounds have a tendency to become ulcerated because of the favourable conditions for bacterial growth. Triclosan can be applied to the buccal mucosa without adverse effects.
  • Another use is as a surgical barrier, such as a bib for the protection of surgeons, or as a sheet to protect patients. Any disruption to the surgical barrier would result in immediate release of the antibacterial agent from the antibacterial material of the present invention.
  • The antibacterial material of the present invention may also be used to wrap autoclaved instruments. The controlled release of active biocide ensures sterility for longer periods of time than wrapping with standard plastic material which is susceptible to bacterial infection.
  • In other embodiments, the material of the present invention may be employed as a wipe, including surface wipe to sterilise surfaces or a hand cleansing wipe to reduce the hand transfer of bacteria. It is well-known that hand to mouth transfer of bacteria is a major cause of bacterial infection. The material of the present invention may also be useful in the treatment of acne. It will be appreciated that the biocidal material of the present invention may be used with, for example, waterproof backing materials or elastic backed sticking plasters.
  • In still further embodiments, the material of the present invention may be used to combat airborne pathogens. Examples of this include production of medical or other microbiologically protective masks formed from the antibacterial material.
  • The antibacterial material of the present invention may also be adapted for use as an air conditioning filter to combat Legionella or other bacteria in the recirculated air within air conditioning ducts. Breakdown of the encapsulated biocide is proportional to the air flow velocity through the filter. Thus, when air flow (and consequently bacterial flux through the filter) is high, the amount of triclosan released is also high. When the air flow is off, there is not a significant increase of airborne bacteria, and nor is there significant further release of triclosan. Thus, the biocide is delivered when it is needed, and is not overproduced during times of low demand.
  • The antibacterial material of the present invention can be easily cut to any size, contributing to its wide range of applications.
  • By its very nature, the preferred material of the present invention is inherently sterile in its packaged form and is not fully activated until placed in use. This avoids the necessity for complex autoclaving procedures. The packaged material of the present invention can be treated with gamma radiation in order to verify that the material is sterile. Should any damage occur to the packaged material the damage itself releases the biocide to inhibit bacterial contamination.
  • Manufacture of the preferred material includes the step of producing an open weave paper by conventional methods. However, before the final drying stage, the paper is sprayed with the carrier, which may be an aqueous carrier, an alcohol or a glycol, such as propylene glycol containing a dispersion of encapsulated triclosan at the requisite concentration for the intended purpose and then drying the paper with heat. For preference, roller drying is not used after the encapsulated biocide has been applied. The mechanical effect of packaging the dressing in a sealed package means that the paper of the present invention is self-sterilising when packaged. The material of the present invention thus avoids the need for expensive and complex autoclaving.
  • It will be appreciated that reduction in the amount of latex and plastics materials normally used in many of the above-mentioned applications hugely reduces waste levels as well as costs.
  • The following examples illustrate preferred embodiments of the invention adapted for particular applications.
  • EXAMPLE 1 Dressing for non-serious wounds
  • CANSAN ® TCH 1,000 ppm available triclosan
    Propylene glycol   100 ml
    Open weave paper    1 m2
    Kymene resin 0.03% by weight of paper
  • EXAMPLE 2 Dressing for Serious Wounds
  • CANSAN ® TCH 3,000 ppm available triclosan
    Propylene glycol   100 ml
    Open weave paper    1 m2
    Kymene resin 0.03% by weight of paper
  • EXAMPLE 3 Air Conditioning Filter
  • CANSAN ® TCH 500 ppm
    Propylene glycol 100 ml
    Open weave paper  1 m2
    Kymene resin 0.06% by weight of paper
  • EXAMPLE 4 Hand Wipe
  • CANSAN ® TCH  80 ppm
    Propylene glycol 100 ml
    Open weave paper  1 m2
    Kymene resin 0.03% by weight of paper
  • The following tests demonstrate the effectiveness of the preferred embodiment of the invention against several known forms of bacteria
  • EXAMPLE 5 Determination of the antimicrobial Activity of Paper Sheet, Treated with CANSAN® TCH
  • In Test 1, the antimicrobial activity of the different antibacterial Paper Sheets, treated with Cansan® TCH has been determined under agar diffusion test conditions.
  • In Test 2, the remaining antibacterial effect on hands after usage of the Cansan®TCH containing Paper Sheets have been tested under in-vivo fingerprint test conditions against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.
  • EXAMPLE 5 Test 1
  • Samples: Paper Sheets
  • Cansan TCH Sprayed on Hand Sheets
  • Microbiological Evaluation
  • 1. Determination of the Bacteriostatic Activity According to the Bacterial Growth Inhibition Test.
  • Principle:
  • Discs with a diameter of 2 cm were punched out from the hand Sheets. The discs were applied on the top layer of the solidified agar containing the bacteria. For the preparation of the top agar layer, from overnight cultures, a 1:100 (Staphyloccocus aureus and Micrococcus luteus) and a 1:1000 (Escherichia coli) dilution were made and 3.5 ml of the dilutions were added to 500 ml agar.
    • Test bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 9144
      • Escherichia coli NCTC 8196
    • Nutrient medium: Casein soy meal pepton agar (two layers of agar: 15 ml bottom layer without germs and 5 ml top layer with bacteria)
    • Incubation: 18-24 hours at 37° C.
  • Results
    Staphylococcus aureus Escherichia coli
    Cansan TCH sprayed on ATCC 9144 NCTC 8196
    Sheets ZI VR ZI VR
    Sample 1: 10/10 5/4 5/5 4/4
    Original ENCAP-AM-37-
    155A-1T

    Legend:

    ZI = zone of inhibition in mm

    VR = Vinson rating, for growth under the disc

    0 = strong growth (no activity)

    4 = no growth (good activity)

    L. J. Vinson et al. J. Pharm. Sci. 50, 827-830, 1961
  • EXAMPLE 5 Test 2
  • Finger Print Test
  • In Vivo Test for Determination of the Bacteriostatic Activity of a Product that Contains an Antimicrobial Agent.
  • Samples: Paper Sheets
  • Cansan TCH Sprayed on Hand Sheets
    • Test bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 9144
      • Escherichia coli NCTC 8196
    • Nutrient medium: Casein soy meal pepton agar
    • Incubation: 24 hours at 37° C.
    • Principle:
    • 1. The hands were wetted for 15 sec. under running tap water.
    • 2. Hands were washed with a placebo soap, rinsed with tap water and dried.
    • 3. Filter paper discs (2 cm diameter) soaked with ethanol were placed in sterile plates. The fingertips were applied on the filter paper discs for 30 sec. in order to allow a migration of Cansan due to the excellent adsorption of ethanol. After 1 minute contact time, the filter discs were dried in the plates and then placed in the middle of agar plates containing the test germs (placebo sample).
    • 4. The hands were rinsed under running lukewarm tap water and subsequently washed with the placebo soaps for 60 seconds. Subsequently the later was washed off under running lukewarm tap water. The hands have been dried with the test Paper Sheets for 1 minute.
    • 5. Ethanol soaked filter paper disks (2 cm diameter) were placed in sterile plates and the same procedure as described under 3. has been performed.
    • 6. The procedure after application of the test Sheets in order to determine the activity of Cansan®TCH on the skin.
    • 7. The plates were incubated under optimal conditions according to the germ's requirements on temperature and media.
  • Due to the diffusion of the antimicrobial ingredient from the filter into the surrounding agar medium the growth of the test germs is inhibited in the diffusion zone.
  • For the assessment of the bacteriostatic activity, zones of inhibition around the filter discs are measured and given in mm.
  • EXAMPLE 5 Results
  • Cansan TCH Sprayed on Sheets
    Staphylococcus aureus Escherichia coli
    ATCC 9144 NCTC 8196
    Sample 1: ZI Vr ZI Vr
    Placebo (without Cansan) 0/0 0/0 0/0 0/0
    Immediately after application 12/12 4/4 5/5 4/4
  • Each test was performed twice and both results are given in the table.
      • ZI=Zone of inhibition in mm
      • Vr=Vinson rating
      • 0=strong growth (no activity)
      • 4=no growth (good activity)
    EXAMPLE 5 CONCLUSIONS
  • The Paper Sheets with Cansan® TCH showed good antibacterial effects against gram-positive and gram-negative test bacteria under agar diffusion test conditions where the Paper Sheets were in direct contact with the contaminated agar.
  • In order to show the effects under real in-vivo test conditions, an in-vivo finger print test has been performed. For this test the hands were washed with a placebo soap and dried with Cansan containing Paper Sheets.
  • It was possible to show clear antibacterial effects on the hands, dried with the “antibacterial Sheets”.
  • The results show clearly, that the use of Cansan® TCH containing Paper Sheets can help to protect the hands from growth of pathogenic bacteria and increase the hygiene on hands.
  • EXAMPLE 6 Preliminary Patient Test
  • A patient with a leg ulcer had the ulcer dressed with the antibacterial material of the present invention. The dressing was changed after 3 days, and the condition of the wound was observed after one week.
  • The natural healing of the wound was scored by a registered nurse as being 8/10.
  • A normal natural healing score for a leg ulcer dressed with a conventional dressing is expected to be around 4/10. While there is a degree of subjectivity in the scores, the preliminary test result is believed by the present applicants to be significant.
  • The dressing was readily removed, and did not adhere to the wound.
  • Conventional dressings would be expected to adhere to the wound to varying degrees after only about one day, which is the life span of the dressing. The condition of the dressing was also examined and triclosan was determined to be present. It was estimated that the dressing could be used for a further period, possibly being allowed to remain untouched on the wound for as long as 4-5 days.
  • EXAMPLE 7 Preliminary Patient Test
  • A medical practitioner applied a dressing according to the present invention on the skin ulcers of six patients. The dressings of the present invention maintained a high standard of cleanliness of the wounds. After 2-3 weeks, the wounds exhibited accelerated healing relative to comparable ulcers dressed with conventional dressings.
  • EXAMPLE 8 Preliminary Patient Test
  • A medical practitioner applied a dressing of the present invention to a minor burn as a result of scalding. The dressing contained 100 ppm Cansan TCH in propylene glycol (applied at 100 ml per square metre) impregnated onto 120 gsm paper. After five days, the burn was almost completely healed, with only slight signs of scarring.
  • Although the invention has been described with reference to specific tests and examples, it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the invention may be embodied in many other forms.

Claims (48)

  1. 1. A method of inhibiting infection during the treatment of a wound by applying an antibacterial material to an affected skin area on a patient, said antibacterial material including:
    a fibrous substrate, said fibrous substrate being impregnated with a carrier; and
    a controlled release biocide dispersed through said carrier.
  2. 2. A method according to claim 1, wherein said biocide is mobile within said carrier.
  3. 3. A method according to claim 1, wherein said substrate is a substantially cellulose fibre blend.
  4. 4. A method according to claim 3, wherein said substrate is paper.
  5. 5. A method according to claim 4, wherein said paper has an open weave configuration.
  6. 6. A method according to claim 3, wherein the weight of said substrate is in the range of 50 to 200 gsm.
  7. 7. A method according to claim 6, wherein the weight of said substrate is in the range of 80 to 150 gsm.
  8. 8. A method according to claim 7, wherein the weight of said substrate is in the range of 100 to 120 gsm.
  9. 9. A method according to claim 3, wherein said substrate dissolves in water.
  10. 10. A method according to claim 1, wherein said biocide is in a latent state capable of subsequent activation by external stimulus.
  11. 11. A method according to claim 10, wherein said external stimulus is pressure.
  12. 12. A method according to claim 10, wherein said external stimulus is light.
  13. 13. A method according to claim 12, wherein said light is ultraviolet light.
  14. 14. A method according to claim 10, wherein said biocide is encapsulated.
  15. 15. A method according to claim 1, wherein said biocide is inactivated by blood serum.
  16. 16. A method according to claim 1, wherein said biocide is non-allergenic to humans.
  17. 17. A method according to claim 1, wherein said biocide inhibits the growth of E. coli, Legionella or Staphylococcus.
  18. 18. A method according to claim 1, wherein said biocide is triclosan.
  19. 19. A method according to claim 18, wherein said triclosan is that known under the trademark CANSAN®TCH.
  20. 20. A method according to claim 1, wherein said biocide is present in an amount of 10 to 10,000 ppm.
  21. 21. A method according to claim 1, wherein said carrier transports said biocide to the site of action.
  22. 22. A method according to claim 1, wherein said carrier is a glycol.
  23. 23. A method according to claim 22, wherein said glycol is propylene glycol.
  24. 24. A method according to claim 1, wherein 100 ml of said carrier is used per m2 of said substrate.
  25. 25. A method according to claim 1, wherein said material further includes a nylon resin.
  26. 26. A method according to claim 25, wherein said nylon is a Kymene resin.
  27. 27. A method according to claim 1, wherein said wound is an ulcer.
  28. 28. A method according to claim 1, wherein said wound is a burn.
  29. 29. Use of an antibacterial material including a fibrous substrate impregnated with a carrier, and a controlled release biocide dispersed through said carrier, in the manufacture of a dressing for inhibiting infection during the treatment of wounds.
  30. 30. A wound dressing including an antibacterial material including a fibrous substrate impregnated with a carrier, and controlled release biocide dispersed through said carrier.
  31. 31. A wound dressing according to claim 30, further including a waterproof backing material or an elastic-backed sticking plaster.
  32. 32. An antibacterial material suitable for use as a wound dressing including:
    a fibrous substrate having a weight of from 50 to 200 gsm, said fibrous substrate being impregnated with a carrier; and
    a controlled release biocide dispersed through, and mobile within, said carrier.
  33. 33. An antibacterial material according to claim 32, wherein said substrate is a substantially cellulose fibre blend.
  34. 34. An antibacterial material according to claim 33, wherein said substrate is paper.
  35. 35. An antibacterial material according to claim 34, wherein said paper has an open weave configuration.
  36. 36. An antibacterial material according to claim 35, wherein the weight of said substrate is in the range of 80 to 150 gsm.
  37. 37. An antibacterial material according to claim 36, wherein the weight of said substrate is in the range of 100 to 120 gsm.
  38. 38. An antibacterial material according to claim 33, wherein said substrate dissolves in water.
  39. 39. An antibacterial material according to claim 32, wherein said biocide is encapsulated.
  40. 40. An antibacterial material according claim 32, wherein said biocide is triclosan.
  41. 41. An antibacterial material according to claim 40, wherein said triclosan is that known under the trademark CANSAN®TCH.
  42. 42. An antibacterial material according to claim 32, wherein said biocide is present in an amount of 10 to 10,000 ppm.
  43. 43. An antibacterial material according to claim 32 wherein said carrier is a glycol.
  44. 44. An antibacterial material according to claim 43, wherein said glycol is propylene glycol.
  45. 45. An antibacterial material according to claim 32, wherein 100 ml of said carrier is used per m2 of said substrate.
  46. 46. An antibacterial material according to claim 32, wherein said material further includes a nylon resin.
  47. 47. An antibacterial material according to claim 46, wherein said nylon is a Kymene resin.
  48. 48. A process for making an antibacterial material according to claim 32, said process including:
    dispersing a controlled release biocide within a carrier to provide an active carrier mixture; and
    impregnating a fibrous substrate having a weight of from 50 to 200 gsm with said active carrier mixture.
US10480537 2001-06-13 2002-06-13 Antibacterial material Abandoned US20050008840A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AUPR5643 2001-06-13
AUPR564301 2001-06-13
PCT/AU2002/000772 WO2002100448A1 (en) 2001-06-13 2002-06-13 Antibacterial material

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20050008840A1 true true US20050008840A1 (en) 2005-01-13

Family

ID=3829616

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10480537 Abandoned US20050008840A1 (en) 2001-06-13 2002-06-13 Antibacterial material

Country Status (5)

Country Link
US (1) US20050008840A1 (en)
EP (1) EP1401509A4 (en)
JP (1) JP2005501016A (en)
CN (1) CN1527728A (en)
WO (1) WO2002100448A1 (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080008865A1 (en) * 2006-06-23 2008-01-10 Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products Lp Antimicrobial hand towel for touchless automatic dispensers
US20110070284A1 (en) * 2008-02-22 2011-03-24 Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation Biologic matrices comprising anti-infective methods and compositions related thereto

Families Citing this family (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2006113967A1 (en) * 2005-04-27 2006-11-02 Novapharm Research (Australia) Pty Ltd Biostatic filter and water insoluble biocide formulation therefor
WO2016055839A1 (en) 2014-10-10 2016-04-14 Uab "Biocentras" Extraction of enzyme complexes from streptomyces gougerotii 101, preparation of multienzyme biopreparations and their application
GB201704921D0 (en) * 2016-03-31 2017-05-10 Riaz Sajid An absorbent sheet material product

Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4176664A (en) * 1978-03-13 1979-12-04 Stanley Kalish Impregnated bandage
US4837079A (en) * 1988-09-09 1989-06-06 James River Corporation Antimicrobially active, non-woven web used in a wet wiper
US4904524A (en) * 1988-10-18 1990-02-27 Scott Paper Company Wet wipes
US5098417A (en) * 1990-04-12 1992-03-24 Ricoh Kyosan, Inc. Cellulosic wound dressing with an active agent ionically absorbed thereon
US5334388A (en) * 1993-09-15 1994-08-02 Becton, Dickinson And Company Antimicrobial drying substrate
US5441742A (en) * 1993-03-24 1995-08-15 Financiere Elysees Balzac Cellular cellulosic material containing a biocide agent and process for preparing same
US5807295A (en) * 1994-03-30 1998-09-15 Smith & Nephew Plc Medical articles
US5958420A (en) * 1997-03-13 1999-09-28 Nortrade Medical, Inc. Treatment of burns, cuts, and abrasions of the skin
US6517849B1 (en) * 1999-10-19 2003-02-11 The Procter & Gamble Company Tissue products containing antiviral agents which are mild to the skin
US6582683B2 (en) * 2000-01-04 2003-06-24 Skinvisible Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Dermal barrier composition
US6656923B1 (en) * 1997-06-09 2003-12-02 The Procter & Gamble Company Uncomplexed cyclodextrin compositions for odor and wrinkle control
US6785989B2 (en) * 2000-03-31 2004-09-07 The Procter & Gamble Company Methods and apparatus for removal of wrinkles from fabrics

Family Cites Families (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB8720799D0 (en) * 1987-09-04 1987-10-14 Biocompatibles Ltd Dressing
EP0370097A1 (en) * 1988-05-30 1990-05-30 Licencia Talalmanyokat Ertekesito Es Innovacios Külkereskedelmi Vallalat Therapeutic material for covering wounds and skin lesions and process for the preparation thereof
JPH0646968A (en) * 1992-07-31 1994-02-22 Daio Paper Corp Wet Tissue
JPH06199614A (en) * 1993-01-08 1994-07-19 Green Cross Corp:The Antimicrobial agent containing allyl isothiocyanate
JPH072615A (en) * 1993-03-03 1995-01-06 Honsyu Kosan Kk Cloth impregnated with antimicrobial disinfectant
US6238682B1 (en) * 1993-12-13 2001-05-29 The Procter & Gamble Company Anhydrous skin lotions having antimicrobial components for application to tissue paper products which mitigate the potential for skin irritation
JPH11200296A (en) * 1998-01-09 1999-07-27 Fukuyoo:Kk Hydrolyzable cleanly wiping paper and its packed body
US6015763A (en) * 1998-02-17 2000-01-18 Dotolo Research Corp. Cleaner impregnated towel
GB9926178D0 (en) * 1999-11-04 2000-01-12 Jeyes Group Ltd Antimicrobial wiping article
US6916480B2 (en) * 1999-12-28 2005-07-12 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Wiper containing a controlled-release anti-microbial agent

Patent Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4176664A (en) * 1978-03-13 1979-12-04 Stanley Kalish Impregnated bandage
US4837079A (en) * 1988-09-09 1989-06-06 James River Corporation Antimicrobially active, non-woven web used in a wet wiper
US4904524A (en) * 1988-10-18 1990-02-27 Scott Paper Company Wet wipes
US5098417A (en) * 1990-04-12 1992-03-24 Ricoh Kyosan, Inc. Cellulosic wound dressing with an active agent ionically absorbed thereon
US5441742A (en) * 1993-03-24 1995-08-15 Financiere Elysees Balzac Cellular cellulosic material containing a biocide agent and process for preparing same
US5334388A (en) * 1993-09-15 1994-08-02 Becton, Dickinson And Company Antimicrobial drying substrate
US5807295A (en) * 1994-03-30 1998-09-15 Smith & Nephew Plc Medical articles
US5958420A (en) * 1997-03-13 1999-09-28 Nortrade Medical, Inc. Treatment of burns, cuts, and abrasions of the skin
US6656923B1 (en) * 1997-06-09 2003-12-02 The Procter & Gamble Company Uncomplexed cyclodextrin compositions for odor and wrinkle control
US6517849B1 (en) * 1999-10-19 2003-02-11 The Procter & Gamble Company Tissue products containing antiviral agents which are mild to the skin
US6582683B2 (en) * 2000-01-04 2003-06-24 Skinvisible Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Dermal barrier composition
US6785989B2 (en) * 2000-03-31 2004-09-07 The Procter & Gamble Company Methods and apparatus for removal of wrinkles from fabrics

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080008865A1 (en) * 2006-06-23 2008-01-10 Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products Lp Antimicrobial hand towel for touchless automatic dispensers
US20110070284A1 (en) * 2008-02-22 2011-03-24 Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation Biologic matrices comprising anti-infective methods and compositions related thereto

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
CN1527728A (en) 2004-09-08 application
WO2002100448A1 (en) 2002-12-19 application
JP2005501016A (en) 2005-01-13 application
EP1401509A1 (en) 2004-03-31 application
EP1401509A4 (en) 2006-12-20 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Connell et al. Povidone-iodine: extensive surgical evaluation of a new antiseptic agent
White et al. Wound colonization and infection: the role of topical antimicrobials
US5811471A (en) Disinfectant plastic sponge material
US6720006B2 (en) Anti-microbial body care product
US5071648A (en) Polymeric broad-spectrum antimicrobial materials
US6572878B1 (en) Method and device for treating scars
Molan Honey as a topical antibacterial agent for treatment of infected wounds
US5707736A (en) Products having anti-microbial activity
Lawrence Dressings and wound infection
US6001345A (en) Application of cyanoacrylate/anti-microbial compositions to the peri-wound or peri-mucosal area
US20060008514A1 (en) Wipe and methods for improving skin health
US8178746B2 (en) Delivery device
US5829442A (en) Antimicrobial containing solventless hot melt adhesive composition
US20050033251A1 (en) Controlled release of biologically active substances from select substrates
US6700032B1 (en) Wound care management
US5958420A (en) Treatment of burns, cuts, and abrasions of the skin
Khan et al. Antiseptics, iodine, povidone iodine and traumatic wound cleansing
US5807563A (en) Methods for draping surgical incision sites
US20020177828A1 (en) Absorbent materials with covalently-bonded, nonleachable, polymeric antimicrobial surfaces, and methods for preparation
O'meara et al. Systematic review of antimicrobial agents used for chronic wounds
US5643589A (en) Desiccant formulated for treating wounds or lesions
Subrahmanyam Honey impregnated gauze versus polyurethane film (OpSiteR) in the treatment of burns—a prospective randomised study
US6592888B1 (en) Composition for wound dressings safely using metallic compounds to produce anti-microbial properties
Olson et al. Healing of porcine donor sites covered with silver‐coated dressings
WO2000071183A1 (en) Antimicrobial articles