US1698103A - Oil burner - Google Patents

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US1698103A
US1698103A US109638A US10963826A US1698103A US 1698103 A US1698103 A US 1698103A US 109638 A US109638 A US 109638A US 10963826 A US10963826 A US 10963826A US 1698103 A US1698103 A US 1698103A
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burner
casing
oil
manifold
firebox
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US109638A
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Albert W Morse
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D5/00Burners in which liquid fuel evaporates in the combustion space, with or without chemical conversion of evaporated fuel

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  • This invention relates" to, improvements in oil burners, and is especially adapted for "use with thekind known as natural draft. burners, that "is, burners suitable for installation in small boilers or furnaces of the'domestic type, in which airis' in through the open door of the ash pit to be passed through a manifold which discharges the air so drawn-in over the hot plate to cause combustion. The resulting flame is propagated between the branches of the manifold thereby slightly preheating the air.
  • one objectionable feature is frequent carbonizing of the burner, that is, the space around the-manifold and the walls of the firebox of the furnace or boiler become coated with carbon due to the comparatively cool temperature of the heating surfaces of the boiler and the burner with which the flame comes in contact.
  • the unconsumed articles of oil which are usually deposite in form of carbon are entirely consumed, and carbonizing with its subsequent frequent cleaning entirely eliminated.
  • a perforatedv dome-shaped casingof preferably, a: refractory material, the walls of which are in spaced relation from the walls of the firebox of the boiler and from the manifold, providin effectively a primary combustion chamlier for the burner within the firebox which latter may be considered a secondary combustion chamber.
  • a perforatedv dome-shaped casingof preferably, a: refractory material, the walls of which are in spaced relation from the walls of the firebox of the boiler and from the manifold, providin effectively a primary combustion chamlier for the burner within the firebox which latter may be considered a secondary combustion chamber.
  • Fig. 1 shows a diagrammatic fragmentary vertical sectional View through a heating boiler of the domestic type with a typical burner placed within its firebox and a domeshaped casing in accordance the principle of my inventlon' placed over the same; j
  • Fig. 2 is a horizontal cross sectional view and along the plane of line 2-2 in F ig. 1.
  • I 10 is a boiler or furnace having a firebox 11 and an ashpit 12 provided with adoor opening 13.
  • 14 are grate bars. Placed upon the grate bars 14 is a circular base plate 15 of a burner, having four passages 16, preferably, oblong with corners rounded. Fit-, ted into recesses 17 on topofj the base 15 is a manifold or housing 18 consisting of four upwardly extendin hollow branches 19, shaped in cross section to match the'inlets 16 of the base, connected to a top chamber 20 which has a downwardly,extending open branch 21 in its center.
  • the base 15 has a bowl-shaped open recess 22 at its top.
  • a vaporizer or hot plate 24 Screwed into a boss 23 in the center of the recess 22 is a vaporizer or hot plate 24 consisting of a shank 25 and a slightly down- 'wardly slanting circular top' 26. 27 are-cir--- cular grooves inthe top 26, and 28 is a central oil passage. Vaporizer 24 is in central alignment with downwardly extending branch 21 of the manifold 18.
  • 29 is an oil pipe nipple connected to the lower side of the base 15 in line with oil as sage 28 of the vaporizer and extending mto the ashpit 12.
  • 30 is a dish-shaped overflow pan, fastened to the oil pipe n1pplei29.
  • 31 is an oil supply pipe. led into the ashpit through its door opening 13 and connected to the underside of overflow pan 30 in communication with the nipple 29 and oilpassage 28 of the vaporizer.
  • Casing 37 is a casing having upwardly extending circular walls 38merging into a dome-shape top 39. .40 are perforations through the casing. Casing 37 is placed upon the layer of cement 41 on the grate bars and completely encloses the manifold 18 of the burner. This casing is shown diagrammatically only asin one piece. In practical use, in order to insert it conveniently into the firebox of the boiler, it may be built up in horizontal zones of several layers with a top placed thereon, or it may be made of radially extending seg ments, or a combination of both.
  • the mate- I rial to be used is preferably a refractory com position such as silica carbide, or the like, which becomes incandescent when heated and ossesses the desired radiant characteristics. ile preferring a refractory material, a metal having similar characteristics may, of course, also be used for the casing.
  • the operation of the device is, as followsi
  • the vaporizer is heated by oil-soaked wicking placed in the bowl 22 below it or by any other convenient means.
  • An oil supply valve (snot shown) is then opened to admit oil uner slight pressure to pipe 31, nipple 29, assage 28, onto the top of the vaporizer, fil ing circular grooves 27.
  • Air is drawn into the branches 19 of the manifold 18 through base openings 16 from the ashpit communicating with the atmosphere and discharged from outlet 21 directly over the vaporizer where it mixes with-the oil gases and breaks into a flame which issues out from within the inner sides of the branches 19 through the relatively small spaces between them and envelops the manifold, practically filling the entire space between the manifold and the in ner wall of the casing 37.
  • the casing 37 becomes incandescent and its radiant heat characteristics raise the temperature within it to an appreciable degree, so that the air drawn into the branches of the manifold is preheated to a much greater degree than in the-usual form of burner not em lo ing this casing.
  • the air being preheate will vaporize the oil much more thoroughly and more quickly and will not chill the top of the vaporizer.
  • I have shaped the branches of oblong cross section. and reduced the flame outlets between.
  • the manifold 18 must be made of a particularly well heat resisting composition, and a refractory material similar to that of the easing may also be very advantageously used.
  • the high tern rature chamber surrounding the manifol and the high temperature of the casing itself through perforations of which the flame or its gases must ass, burns up all carbon and results in a 0 can flame within the chamber.
  • the casing itself being entirely incandescent, subjects the 'eatest possible amount of heating surface 0 the boiler to the action of its radiant heat.
  • any other form of communication between the burner flame and no the chimney may be used, such as an annular -slot on top of the dome, for instance, and the term perforation should be interpreted in its broadest sense.
  • the combination w the firebox of a heating boiler, of an 01 burner adapted to be placed upon the grate bars of the firebox, 130
  • 1,698,103 v x o burner having a housing for conducting eir to the point'of oil discharge, the said hous- Eng having air inletsatits bottom and its out-' let being adapted to discharge air down- 9 wasdly, and, resting upon the grate bars, a perforated casing of refractory material around the said housing and in spaced relation to the heating surfaces of the boiler, the

Description

v EfiQfiJW A. w. MORSE OIL BURNER Filed May 17, 1926 ALBERT W ORSE 1N VE N T01? Patented Jan. 8, 1929.
UETED; STATES 011. B RNER.
ALBERT W. MORSE, 0F LONG ISLANDCITY, NEW YORK.
Application filed I lay 17,1926. Serial in. 109,638,
This invention relates" to, improvements in oil burners, and is especially adapted for "use with thekind known as natural draft. burners, that "is, burners suitable for installation in small boilers or furnaces of the'domestic type, in which airis' in through the open door of the ash pit to be passed through a manifold which discharges the air so drawn-in over the hot plate to cause combustion. The resulting flame is propagated between the branches of the manifold thereby slightly preheating the air.
With burners of this type, however, the
one objectionable feature is frequent carbonizing of the burner, that is, the space around the-manifold and the walls of the firebox of the furnace or boiler become coated with carbon due to the comparatively cool temperature of the heating surfaces of the boiler and the burner with which the flame comes in contact. w I have found by carefulexperiments that by raising the temperature of the combustion space around the flame and the surfaces with which it contacts, the unconsumed articles of oil which are usually deposite in form of carbon, are entirely consumed, and carbonizing with its subsequent frequent cleaning entirely eliminated.
I accomplish this desired result by completely enclosing the burner manifold in the firebox of the furnace with a perforatedv dome-shaped casingof, preferably, a: refractory material, the walls of which are in spaced relation from the walls of the firebox of the boiler and from the manifold, providin effectively a primary combustion chamlier for the burner within the firebox which latter may be considered a secondary combustion chamber. By so doing, I increase greatly the temperature around the manifold of the burner which preheats the air drawn in therethrough and discharges it over the hot plate at a much higher'degree than heretofore which results in quicker vaporization of the oil. Furthermore, the casing, being of refractory or other suitable material which when heated beoomes incandescent, radiates such amt amount of heat that all pa ticles of unconsumed oil, i. e. carbon,--
areburn ed up. No carbonescapes'tlirough" the perforations ofthe casing after "the latter' becomes entirely incandescent and the radiant characteristics ofiwhich furnish an I evenly distributed heat over the entireheatk ing surface of the boiler exposed" thereto WhlCll 1s so greatly desired to'increa'se"the! efficiency of the heatin'g'plant.
In the accompanying drawings, illustra tive of a preferred embodiment of my invention, I I
Fig. 1 shows a diagrammatic fragmentary vertical sectional View through a heating boiler of the domestic type with a typical burner placed within its firebox and a domeshaped casing in accordance the principle of my inventlon' placed over the same; j
Fig. 2 is a horizontal cross sectional view and along the plane of line 2-2 in F ig. 1.
Like characters of reference denote simi-' lar parts throughout both views. I 10 is a boiler or furnace having a firebox 11 and an ashpit 12 provided with adoor opening 13. 14 are grate bars. Placed upon the grate bars 14 is a circular base plate 15 of a burner, having four passages 16, preferably, oblong with corners rounded. Fit-, ted into recesses 17 on topofj the base 15 is a manifold or housing 18 consisting of four upwardly extendin hollow branches 19, shaped in cross section to match the'inlets 16 of the base, connected to a top chamber 20 which has a downwardly,extending open branch 21 in its center. The base 15 has a bowl-shaped open recess 22 at its top. Screwed into a boss 23 in the center of the recess 22 is a vaporizer or hot plate 24 consisting of a shank 25 and a slightly down- 'wardly slanting circular top' 26. 27 are-cir--- cular grooves inthe top 26, and 28 is a central oil passage. Vaporizer 24 is in central alignment with downwardly extending branch 21 of the manifold 18.
29 is an oil pipe nipple connected to the lower side of the base 15 in line with oil as sage 28 of the vaporizer and extending mto the ashpit 12. 30 is a dish-shaped overflow pan, fastened to the oil pipe n1pplei29. 31 is an oil supply pipe. led into the ashpit through its door opening 13 and connected to the underside of overflow pan 30 in communication with the nipple 29 and oilpassage 28 of the vaporizer. 32'is an overflow nipple screwed into the bottom of base 1 5 III - The the boiler'and fastened thereto mlevel posigim by a la or 41 of cement or other suitle material which fills up the space around the burner base and the walls of the firebox 11, completely closin ofi communication between the firebox and the ashpit.
37 is a casing having upwardly extending circular walls 38merging into a dome-shape top 39. .40 are perforations through the casing. Casing 37 is placed upon the layer of cement 41 on the grate bars and completely encloses the manifold 18 of the burner. This casing is shown diagrammatically only asin one piece. In practical use, in order to insert it conveniently into the firebox of the boiler, it may be built up in horizontal zones of several layers with a top placed thereon, or it may be made of radially extending seg ments, or a combination of both. The mate- I rial to be used is preferably a refractory com position such as silica carbide, or the like, which becomes incandescent when heated and ossesses the desired radiant characteristics. ile preferring a refractory material, a metal having similar characteristics may, of course, also be used for the casing.
The operation of the device is, as followsi The vaporizer is heated by oil-soaked wicking placed in the bowl 22 below it or by any other convenient means. An oil supply valve (snot shown) is then opened to admit oil uner slight pressure to pipe 31, nipple 29, assage 28, onto the top of the vaporizer, fil ing circular grooves 27. Air is drawn into the branches 19 of the manifold 18 through base openings 16 from the ashpit communicating with the atmosphere and discharged from outlet 21 directly over the vaporizer where it mixes with-the oil gases and breaks into a flame which issues out from within the inner sides of the branches 19 through the relatively small spaces between them and envelops the manifold, practically filling the entire space between the manifold and the in ner wall of the casing 37. Gases of combustion communicate with the chimney through perforations 40 of the casing. If too much oil is fed to the vaporizer, the surplus will overflow into the overflow pan 30 through duct 33 and nipple 32 to actuate the usual form of safety valve (not shown) which automatically reducesor shuts oil the supply of oil to the burner.
During operation, the casing 37 becomes incandescent and its radiant heat characteristics raise the temperature within it to an appreciable degree, so that the air drawn into the branches of the manifold is preheated to a much greater degree than in the-usual form of burner not em lo ing this casing. The air being preheate will vaporize the oil much more thoroughly and more quickly and will not chill the top of the vaporizer. In order to impart the maximum amount of heat to the air passing through the manifold, I have shaped the branches of oblong cross section. and reduced the flame outlets between. Because of the high heat within the casing 37, the manifold 18 must be made of a particularly well heat resisting composition, and a refractory material similar to that of the easing may also be very advantageously used. In practice it has been found that the high tern rature chamber surrounding the manifol and the high temperature of the casing itself, through perforations of which the flame or its gases must ass, burns up all carbon and results in a 0 can flame within the chamber. The casing itself, being entirely incandescent, subjects the 'eatest possible amount of heating surface 0 the boiler to the action of its radiant heat.
While I have shown, by way of illustration, a burner of the natural draft type using atmospheric air for combustion, I do not wish to limit the application of the casing embodying the principal feature of my inven tion to burners of such type, but any type burner may be used in which air is forced into it by atmospheric pressure or by blower and which is connected to either a vaporizer, as shown, or to mix with Oll or gas discharged from a nozzle, or other source of supply, the 100 principal object being to surround that part of the burner which contains the air passages and the primary combustion chamber of the burner with a high temperature zone confined within a casing having walls possessing m5 radiant characteristics.
Moreover, while the casing surrounding the burner has been illustrated with round perforations, obviously any other form of communication between the burner flame and no the chimney may be used, such as an annular -slot on top of the dome, for instance, and the term perforation should be interpreted in its broadest sense.
Furthermore, while I have shown the casing indelpendently of the manifold of the burner, do not wish to limit myself to this recise arrangement, but may desire to emfold the casing integrally with the mani- It is understood that'vari ous other changes, in the form, proportion, minor details of con struction may be resorted to without departing from the principle or sacrificing any of the invention, as defined in the appended 12: claim.
What I claim as new, is:
The combination w: the firebox of a heating boiler, of an 01 burner adapted to be placed upon the grate bars of the firebox, 130
1,698,103 v x o burner having a housing for conducting eir to the point'of oil discharge, the said hous- Eng having air inletsatits bottom and its out-' let being adapted to discharge air down- 9 werdly, and, resting upon the grate bars, a perforated casing of refractory material around the said housing and in spaced relation to the heating surfaces of the boiler, the
ALBERT W. MORSE.
US109638A 1926-05-17 1926-05-17 Oil burner Expired - Lifetime US1698103A (en)

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2552301A (en) * 1947-07-30 1951-05-08 Young Cyril Charles Combination oil and gas burner

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2552301A (en) * 1947-07-30 1951-05-08 Young Cyril Charles Combination oil and gas burner

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