US1663438A - Stove - Google Patents

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Publication number
US1663438A
US1663438A US75845424A US1663438A US 1663438 A US1663438 A US 1663438A US 75845424 A US75845424 A US 75845424A US 1663438 A US1663438 A US 1663438A
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Prior art keywords
burner
top
top member
grate
member
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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Brumbaugh Isaac Vernon
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AMERICAN STOVE Co
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AMERICAN STOVE CO
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24COTHER DOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES; DETAILS OF DOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F24C3/00Stoves and ranges for gaseous fuels
    • F24C3/08Arrangement or mounting of burners
    • F24C3/085Arrangement or mounting of burners on ranges

Description

March 20, 1928.

1,663,438 l. V. BRUMBAUGH STOVE Filed Deg. 27, 1924 2 Shgtsgheet fa 1: 2g. :p

s' if P g Ja.

ci l J 5 2g 92 j@ .yf "25 171 '9115 y ,4 TTORNEY March 20, 1928.

l. V. BRUMBAUGH STOVE .^l TTORNEY Thieme Mar. zo, 192s.

UNITED Israfrlszs PATENT oFFicE. i y

ISAAC VERNON BBUMBAUGH, OF WASHINGTON,'DISTBICT 0F COLUMBIA, ASSIGNOB TO AMERICAN STOVE COMPANY, O ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI, A CORPORATION Ol' NEW JERSEY.

STOVE.

Application filed December 27, 1924. Serial No. 758,454.

So-called grate top ranges are very'diiicult to keep clean, owing to the number of seams and joints, the unshielded injecting tubes of thev burners, the exposed framework, and the large and clumsy grates. When a material is spilled on a stove or boils over the side of the utensil, it is likely -to i lo e on thegrate, the burner head and injecting tube, the framework, and seep into 41 the seams and joints or tall upon the drip pan below.

- Solid top stoves are also open to objection. Grease and some other substances' that spill or boil over upon the top of such stoves usuall unite with the surface and are removed o y with considerable difficulty. In addi,- tion the heat radiates from the top, making them undesirable in warm weather or in poorly ventilated kitchens. Moreover, solid top ranges are not as eilicient as grate top ran es, owing to the rate at which heat is con ucted through a solid top. An object on such a top can be heated only about onehal as fast as on a grate top range.

I have found that the efficiency of even grate top ranges 1can be increased if a top member whose surface is a reflector of heat is placed near the utensil in a position such thatheat waves projected downwardly will be reflected back upon the utensil. It this surface isa good reflector of heat, a person standing near .a range equipped with such a device will not suffer from radiant heat. In general a good reflector of heat is a poor abj sorber of heat.l And a good absorber of heat is generally a good radiator of it, and consequently ismost undesirable for such top member.

Surfaces that are polished, glossy, bright.s 0 burnished, lustrous, shiny, are excellent reflectors of heat. Polished nickel, polished alumin in, enameled metals, etc., are far better heatkrelectors, for inst-ance than cast ironorf uncoated sheet iron. .Surfaces of this character are usually pleasing to the eye, and

are easily7 kept in a sanitary condition.

If a vilanie comes in contact with a .top

lmember. that h'as a reflectino' surface, they intense heat is likely to deteriorate the sur- -face' or lower its reflecting properties'. It is essential therefore to place such atop member in a position relative to the movement ot' the flame so that heattherefrom will .be reflected, but flame contact is unlikely to occur when the appliance is used under conditions for which it is intended. To best serve these two conditions, an air shield should exist between the member and the flame.

Furthermore in most stoves the entire burner becomes j uite hot from radiated, convected and con ucted heat. Especially is heating very pronounced when a burner is operated under a solid top. A burner can be adjusted for what is generally considereda good ame and after it has been operated ,35 under a solid top for a reasonable length of time, the burner may become so heated that the mixture of air and gas flowing through the burner is in turn heated excessively. i This causes such a marked reduction in the rate of injection of air into the burner. that the flame may become unsatisfactory for proper combustion of the gas. The gas may not be completely burned. Carbon monoxide may be formed and soot may be deposited on the underneath surface of such a solid top. If, however, a top member is spaced below an article ofsupport, so that heat waves rojected toward the mixing chamber,`ot erwise known as the injecting tube of the burner, are reflected, this diliiculty ofthe reduction of injection of primary air is greatly minimized.

Perhaps the greatest causel of complaint by the public of poor service with cooking appliances results from clogging of the gas orifice. By providing the top member referred towith an upward rib or raised portion around or near each opening in the member as well as around the entire peripher thus forming a dish-like shape, matter will be retained until removed. A heat refleeting top member to be practical must have strength to resist heat strains therein. It can also be used to partially or entirely 95 support the burners and serve asa base for different forms of supports for utensils. To

' withstand both heat and weight strains the strength of the top member is increased if edges'are turnedup or down. Furthermore 100 the strength of the top member can be increased if .ribs and other shapes are molded or pressed into it. v Such strengthening provisions make it possible to reduce the thickness of the top member and the weight and ultimate cost of the appliance, without reducing its utility for the urpose in view. By the formation of the ri s' or raised porprogr tions, both of the above objects are accomplished.

In order to'maintain `the top member at a. relatively cool temperature other provisions beside a reflecting' surface are' highly desirable. L Hot gases rise owing to their density. ln their movementthere is set up a motion of the surrounding atmosphere.

An opening through the top member Aprovides not only for meansto assemble the reduces the temperature of the top member;V

the temperature of the top mem r is furthermore reduced by maintaining a constantly moving air space between the top 'member and the ame, replacement air being drawn frombelow the surface of the top member.

The to member can be made of any reasonable size and shape. lit can be made larger in any direction than the area represented by the usual grate or combination-of grates. An extension can be made. and used as a supplemental shelf or place to put utensils and other objects while cooking is in ess. The extension can be used as a draln table or 'for various other purposes.

The removable grates can also be placed aside and the area suitable for such purposes greatly increased. There are numerous other purposes for which this top member with .its raised or beaded edges can be used. It may be employed, for example, for mixing dou h.

An appliance constructed as herein escribed, presents still greater neatness and amore cheerful appearance when the grates are removed and the portion of the burner' that` is exposed is neatly covered. Covers cantherefore be made to conceal the openings in tlie top member and also 'cover the exposed portions of the burners. The outer surfaces of the covers can be `made with the same iinish as the top member or some other having an attractive or sanitary appearance so as to harmonize with the surface of the top member.

The top member may be utilized as a means of support` for burners. Frameworkfor suplport of burners which usually becomes thy owing to the diiculty of cleaning can thus be eliminated. Such meansof support may be located belw or above the surface of the top member or the burner or means of support may rest on the upper sur-v face of the member.

It is essential that the center of the burner head be spaced approximately in the Icenter ofthe opening in the top member. The form .of support for the burner may provide that a spacing purpose.

,heldV rmly in place; or a simple means of proper spacing ofthe burner relative to the opening in the top member can be accomplished by joining toor .uniting with the burner or top member one or more parts for There are also a variety of ways the utensil maybe supported satisfactorily. A simple manner is to extend ldownward a series of legs or spacers from the article or grate whose upper surface serves as a base or sup-l port for utensils. The ends 'of these legs or s acers may rest on the top member. There s ould be some provision `to hold or guide the grate in place; this can be accomplished by extending arms with turned-down ends into notches or depressionsin the top member.

The lower ends of the legs or spacers can also be fitted into openings in the top member. and serve the double purpose of means of support and a guide for a grate or other supporting device. It is of course also practical to support the grate or article of support for utensils by framework or some other part of the appliance without utilizing the top member in any manner.

There are also a number of satlsfactory designs of burners which can be used in com-4 bination with the top member. The burner head can be made-in various sha es. preferable to have the parts of t e burner near or slightly above the level or surface of the top member. The opening in the top member can 'thus be made smaller and the possibility of damaging the top member by the iame or the intense heat isquite remote.

Just as the top member is designed with cleanly features, so grates and gas burners should have cleanly features. lA grate or article of support for a utensil is much more easily cleaned if it is not lar e and clumsy. A grate with smooth rods an bars is much easier to cleanthan a rough and irregular surface. The ports of burners clog readily` vif provision is not inade lto conduct away from the port matter that may lodge on or near the port. A slope downward from the ports will accomplish thisl purpose.

To .secure the foregoing 'desirable eects and conditions is the object of the present It isA invention, and in the accompanying drawings are shownillustrative embodiments of the invention.

In the said drawings:

Figure 1 is a lan view of a burner or stove embodying t e present invention,

Figure 2 is a sectional view onthle line 2 2 of Figure 1,

`Figure 3 is a detail sectional view `on the line 3 3 of Figure 1,

Figure 4 is a plan view of a stove equipped with four burners and sion, g

Figure 5 is a detailsectional yView illus showing the' extentrating a cover in place opening,

Figure 6 1s 'a vertical sectional view of modified form Aof? construction, Figure 7 1s afplan new of the same, .Figure'S' 1s a detail vertical sectional view over the burner o f the means for holding and vpositioning the Qingribmay be ,produced atjtlle edges.

In thevembodiment illustrated in Figures v1 3 inclusive' the reflecting lnember or top member is illustrated as consisting of a single metal sheet 12 having a coating r13 on its4 upper surface, this coating being of a polished, glossy or bright character, vand preferably, though n ot necessarily White.

A It may, for example, be of suitable enamel.

The member 12-13 is made sufficiently' strong and rigidby any suitable means, and is provided with one or more burner openings 14.-l Its margins are preferably downturned, as'illustrated at 15, and an 'upstand- Around the burner operlingg'sltv a rib 17 may also be formed.

The burner `illustrated consists of a head composed of radial arms 1S supporting aver'-v tical neck` 19, to the lower end of which -is` Vconnected the usual injecting tube., 20. 'As

shown the head is of greater diameter than the opening 14 and the arms 18 have. on their` terminal 'portions depending spaced-lugs 21 that embrace the 'ib 17. The burner is thus properly positioned and the head, it will be noted, in .this instance is slightlv'above the member 12--13. The. flame orifice or ports are formed in the arms, as shown' at- 22, said` larms"be1n, 1; hollow and 1n communlcation with the interior of the'neck tion tube 20.

vAn article of. support inthe form of a. grate is. illustrated, comprising an angular frame 23 having inset supporting .tingersl24-` i This frame is carried on legs 25 that rest upon vthe member=1213. Inorder to position the grate, inwardly. extending Iarms 26 are carried by opposite sides of the frame 23 and ,have downturned 'terminals 27 at their inner ends, which terminals engage `in notches 28 formed in the 'wall of the open-. ing 14.

With this construction, it will bey/,apparent that theflame from the burner is above the member 12-13 and beneath a utensil'l placed upon. the article of support or grate. The

' 19 and injec- `upper surface of the member '12-13 causes this memberto act as' a reiieetor and thus A form of construction, is'disclosed.

reflect the heat Vrays upwardlv, adding to the heat that is delivered directly to the utensil.

by the fiame.

In Figures 6 and 7 a slightlyv modified V The top member is designated 12K-13 and may be of the same character as that above de'- sc-ribcd. The different portions of the grate are given corresponding numerals, but with the exponent -a. .The burnerainthis instance is of a different type. consists of an lupstanding head- 18a having a central open-ended air tube`19 therethrough and Y carried by an injection tube20. An -annular outlet slot'or oritice. between the upper end of the head 18a and tube 19*is shown' at 22, flared and overhanging said orifice to 'guide away matterand shield the orifice from falling matter respectively. The head is P 'operly spaced within the opening 14 of the the upper end of the tube 19a being.

top member 12 *'-'13a by lugs 21l carried by the head and located inthe said opening.

The burner is supported from below in this instance. by one or more brackets, one of which is illustrated and designatd 21", the brackets depending' from the member 12a-13a and constituting support for the burner. other forms.

For instance, in Fi re 8, a.

-vertical tubularhead is shownat-l ",1 and stem 19", extending upwardly withinthe The burner may assume\ various Y same,carries a flared cap 20", for the same purpose as described, and forming an annularrslot or orifice 22b for the escape of the fuel for combustion.

In `Figure 11y is illustratedia 'diffe-rent;

means for. positioning the grate. In .this modification'the member is designated 12"# 13", and has upstanding socket elements 28",

into which the lower ends ofthe'supporting legs 25b of the grate 23b are inserted. This obviously operates the same as thearms 26, with their terminals 27 engaging in the notches 28 as above described.

In Figure 12 there isdisc`losed a modi? -fied means 'for holding the grate in position and 'may be employed as a substitute for the parts 26-27 and28 of Figures 1 and 3. M'In this modified structure the grate has one or more downturned legs25c that engages,

in a socket 28 formed with elevated walls. As shown in Figure 4 a stove mayv be eiiiployedwvith a4 plurality of burners 'and grates,'a'.nd the top member, 12-13 may be extendedv to Aform a'shelf` as 29'that maybe f used for various' purposes. Asisho'wn in Figure l10 4this extension, therein vdesignated 29?, may be in the form of-a detachable shelf if desired, and as the grates are easily removed, When removed,- the openings 142'* may be covered with detachable cap's as 30 shown l inFiguref. From the foregoing', it is thought that the construction, operation and many advantages of the. herein described invention against a utensil will beapparent. to those skilled in the art, without further description, and it will vbe understood that various changes in the size, shape, proportion and minor details of con- K struction may be resorted to Without departing from vthe spirit or sacricing any 0f the advantages of the Yinvention. What I claim, is:v

1. An improved stove and burner therefor the stove com vrisin a horizontal to i 7 f plate havmg a burner open1ng,'a burner passing through the said opening and lo? cated wholly above the top plate, and a grate Supported above the said burner, whereby heat is reeotedrom the top plate upward nected with the manifold below thel top plate,

the burner located above the topV plate, the top plate having the periphery of the said opening bulged upward for the purpose specied,and a grate supportedv above the I burner whereby a utensil onthe said grate receives reflected heat from the burner.

,In testimony whereof, I aix my signature.

ISAAC VERNON BRUMBAUGH.

US1663438A 1924-12-27 1924-12-27 Stove Expired - Lifetime US1663438A (en)

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Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2480046A (en) * 1945-08-22 1949-08-23 Florence Stove Co Cooking top
US2485145A (en) * 1945-04-09 1949-10-18 Grand Ind Inc Combination burner and grate
US2530991A (en) * 1944-09-28 1950-11-21 Florence Stove Co Gas cookstove burner grate
US2532461A (en) * 1945-08-30 1950-12-05 Florence Stove Co Combination grate and burner bowl structure for gas cookstoves
US2565694A (en) * 1947-12-05 1951-08-28 Coleman Co Means for reatining cooking vessels on cooking ranges or stoves
US2594215A (en) * 1947-10-01 1952-04-22 Perfection Stove Co Stove top grate
US2654359A (en) * 1948-05-04 1953-10-06 Florence Stove Co Gas cookstove with combined top pilot and simmer burner
FR2800846A1 (en) * 1999-11-10 2001-05-11 Brandt Cooking Gas burner for domestic hob
FR2800845A1 (en) * 1999-11-10 2001-05-11 Brandt Cooking Gas burner for domestic hob
US6588417B2 (en) * 2001-10-25 2003-07-08 General Electric Company Reversible burner grate

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2530991A (en) * 1944-09-28 1950-11-21 Florence Stove Co Gas cookstove burner grate
US2485145A (en) * 1945-04-09 1949-10-18 Grand Ind Inc Combination burner and grate
US2480046A (en) * 1945-08-22 1949-08-23 Florence Stove Co Cooking top
US2532461A (en) * 1945-08-30 1950-12-05 Florence Stove Co Combination grate and burner bowl structure for gas cookstoves
US2594215A (en) * 1947-10-01 1952-04-22 Perfection Stove Co Stove top grate
US2565694A (en) * 1947-12-05 1951-08-28 Coleman Co Means for reatining cooking vessels on cooking ranges or stoves
US2654359A (en) * 1948-05-04 1953-10-06 Florence Stove Co Gas cookstove with combined top pilot and simmer burner
FR2800846A1 (en) * 1999-11-10 2001-05-11 Brandt Cooking Gas burner for domestic hob
FR2800845A1 (en) * 1999-11-10 2001-05-11 Brandt Cooking Gas burner for domestic hob
EP1099905A1 (en) * 1999-11-10 2001-05-16 Brandt Cooking Household cooking hob gas burner
EP1099904A1 (en) * 1999-11-10 2001-05-16 Brandt Cooking Household cooking hob gas burner
US6588417B2 (en) * 2001-10-25 2003-07-08 General Electric Company Reversible burner grate

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