US1630367A - Sound collecting and transmitting - Google Patents

Sound collecting and transmitting Download PDF

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Publication number
US1630367A
US1630367A US716626A US71662624A US1630367A US 1630367 A US1630367 A US 1630367A US 716626 A US716626 A US 716626A US 71662624 A US71662624 A US 71662624A US 1630367 A US1630367 A US 1630367A
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United States
Prior art keywords
sound
mouthpiece
handle
horn
collector
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Expired - Lifetime
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US716626A
Inventor
Charles K Woodbridge
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Dictaphone Corp
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Dictaphone Corp
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Publication date
Application filed by Dictaphone Corp filed Critical Dictaphone Corp
Priority to US716626A priority Critical patent/US1630367A/en
Priority claimed from US15057826 external-priority patent/US1804485A/en
Priority claimed from US18557027 external-priority patent/US1827719A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1630367A publication Critical patent/US1630367A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10KSOUND-PRODUCING DEVICES; METHODS OR DEVICES FOR PROTECTING AGAINST, OR FOR DAMPING, NOISE OR OTHER ACOUSTIC WAVES IN GENERAL; ACOUSTICS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10K11/00Methods or devices for transmitting, conducting or directing sound in general; Methods or devices for protecting against, or for damping, noise or other acoustic waves in general
    • G10K11/18Methods or devices for transmitting, conducting, or directing sound
    • G10K11/22Methods or devices for transmitting, conducting, or directing sound for conducting sound through hollow pipes, e.g. speaking tubes
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10KSOUND-PRODUCING DEVICES; METHODS OR DEVICES FOR PROTECTING AGAINST, OR FOR DAMPING, NOISE OR OTHER ACOUSTIC WAVES IN GENERAL; ACOUSTICS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10K13/00Cones, diaphragms, or the like, for emitting or receiving sound in general
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T74/00Machine element or mechanism
    • Y10T74/20Control lever and linkage systems
    • Y10T74/20207Multiple controlling elements for single controlled element
    • Y10T74/20256Steering and controls assemblies
    • Y10T74/20268Reciprocating control elements
    • Y10T74/2028Handle bar type
    • Y10T74/20287Flexible control element
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T74/00Machine element or mechanism
    • Y10T74/20Control lever and linkage systems
    • Y10T74/20396Hand operated
    • Y10T74/20468Sliding rod
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T74/00Machine element or mechanism
    • Y10T74/20Control lever and linkage systems
    • Y10T74/20576Elements
    • Y10T74/20732Handles
    • Y10T74/2078Handle bars
    • Y10T74/20828Handholds and grips

Description

C. K. WOODBRIDGE SOUND COLLECTING AND TRANSMITTING May 31, 1927. 1,630,367

Filed May 29, 1924 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fl 6. I

//v v/v Ta R c/mm E5 K. woman/06E ATTORNEY y 1927' c. K. .WOODBRIDGE SOUND CDLLECTING AND TRANSMITTING Filed May 29, 1924 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fl 6.5 [Ba f 36 I3 5 l5 i 5 2 I 57 N i I i l. H [/4 2) 30 I z ii i P J l i 1 z 0-1) i i v v 1 ,.1 BY )0 I W ATTORNEY Patented May 31, 1&27.

a s s e a Ulll CHARLES K. VTQQIDBBIDGE O? 5613K. N. 3 .1,

PORATION, 03. BRIDGEIORT, GGNNECTEEUT A ASSIGT QR 'lO DICTAPHONE COR- GILPQBATION OF NEW YORK.

SOUND CQLLECTING 1135i]? TTKZANSMXTTING.

Application filed This invention relates to sound-collectii and transmitting means and in the ember. meet shown as illustrative ot the invention, it is particularly adapted for use with dictating machines.

In the accompanying drawings. which show by way of example several enibodimerits of this invention,

Figure 1 is a side elevation. partly in section, of one form t souinl-collector made in accordance with the present invention. showing a relative large horn-shaped soundcollecting portiou. and n'ieans for allowing); swiveling movement of same on the ban Fig. 2 is a sectional detail view show on an enlarged scale the connection between the sound-collecting portion and the handle.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view of the mouthpiece sho ing means for securing it to the body portion of the sound-collector.

Fig. t is a side view. partly in section. oil a modification of the device shown in 1, the mouthpiece and body portion ot' the sound-collector being merged into one piece and different means for securing the soundcollector to the handle being shown.

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Figs. 1 and 4; of another modification of the present invention. the body of the sound-collector having O provision for pivotal movement in addition to provision for swiveling movement.

As in the usual form of device now used upon dictating machines to collect and transmit sound from the dictator to the recording mechanism, the speaking-tube is connccted in any suitable manner to a handle 11, having a hook-shape guard 12 which engages a part of the dictators hand. while the handle 11 is being held. and which sists the dictator in holding the handle. And. opposite the guard 12 on the handle 11 there is provided a button 13 which is used to control the operation of the machine from the handle 11.

In sound-collectors heretofore provided for use in dictating machines. the mouthpiece was connected to the handle portion by a tube which was bent so that. when held substantially vertical in front of the ciictator, the mouthpiece would extend at a. angle from the handle in the direction of the dictators mouth. lVhen held in this position. the control button 13 was directly in front of the operator. while the guard 12 Wasat the opposite side of the handle a May 253, 1924.

Serial No. 716,626.

position which it was necessary to maintain tain.sound-collectors heretofore used there was very little concentration of sound energy, because oi. the fact that the mouth piece was small with relation to the diameter oi the conveying tube.

In another known form of sound-coltors. the mouthpiece and handle constituted a relatively long horn which was made exceptionally wide atits receiving end and gradually tapered down through the handle the dimension of the speaking-tube nroper. This co: struction produced a large ,acc between the lip of the mouthpiece d the speaking-tube proper the column air of which was set into vibration and t 'ed as a resonator for the sound passing through the horn. The resonating action of such sound-collectors produced what is termed a tubby ellect. such as is particin larly noticeable in connection with megaphones. Further, the horn-chamber produced had the eltect of lowering the tunda mental vibratory characteristics of the re cording diaphragm which, consequently, had a tendency to blast under the influence of the higher pitch sounds.

The disadvantages of both types of sound collectors. above referred to, so far as they relate to the quality and volume of the sound collected and transmitted, are overcome by the present invention, the one by making the receiving end of the device larger so that more of the sound is collected, and the other, by making the sound-collector so that its sound-passage i relatively short and rapidly lecreasing in cross-sectional area from the mouthpiece to the handle 11. This idea is embodied in the sound-collectors shown in Figs. 1 and 4-.

In the term shown in Fig. 1, the handle 11 has connected to it a horn-shaped tube hereinafter called the horn 14;, between. it and the mouthpiece 15, which rapidly decreases in crosssectional area as it approaches the handle 11. llhe mouthpiece 15 flares out wardl v 'irom its point of connection to the horn 14- so as to present relatively large opening and collect a substantial portion of the sound emitted by the dictator.

Since the total axial length of the mouthpiece 15 and the horn 14 is equal to only about twice the diameter of the mouthpiece piece across the lip 16*.

at its lip 16, producing a sound-oollector which is relatively short in proportion to the diameter of its receiving end, there is no extensive chamber to act as a resonator of the incoming sound and change its natural. characteristics.

In the -form of device shown in Fig. 4, the mouthpiece 15 has a horn part 14 formed integral with it to avoid obstructive overlapping joints and to reduce the initial production costs. Since the part is usually mace of glass, however, it is more liable to breakage than the device shown in Fig. 1 in which the mouthpiece l5 alone is made of glass. As shown in Fig. 4 the mouthpiece lip 16 has substantially the same diameter as the lip 16 shown in Fig. 1, but the axial length from the lip to the handle 11 is about equal to the diameter of the month- In this case the sound-collector is shorter so that any tendency of the column of air in the mouthpiece to resonate is reduced to a minimum, while the efficiency of the sound-collector is still relatively high.

In addition to providing the novel and advantageous shapes of sound-collectors above referred to, the present invention pro vides means whereby the sound-receiving part of the collector may be adjusted to suit the convenience of thedictator. This is a very desirable I and advantageous feature since it permits the angularly disposed lip of the mouthpiece to be shifted so as to be directly in front of the dictator when the handle with its guard 14 and control button 13 is held in a position most convenient to the dictator.

In the form shown in Fig. 1, the soundcollector is mounted to swivel on the handle 1 so that the lip 16 of the mouthpiece may be moved by rotating the horn 14 about the axis of the handle 11. The horn 14 is provided with a neck 17 which preferably telescopes with the end 18 of the handle 11, and it is about this end 18 that the horn 14 may be rotated. To hold the neck 17 of the horn to the end 18 of the handle against accidental separation and yet allow free rotation of the horn 14 upon the handle 11, a self-locking detent is provided between the two parts. This is preferably in the form of a split spring-ring 19 (see Fig. 3), which fits within a circumferential groove 20 provided in the end 18 and a similar groove 21 provided in the neck 17, the arrangement being such that the springarinr 19 normally assumes a position where it simultaneously engages both grooves. In assembling the device, the spring-ring 19 is placed within the groove 20- and then the end 18 is slid into the neck 17. At the time the end 18 engages a shoulder 22 provided on the neck 17, the spring-ring; is opposite groove 21 and because of its resiliency,

springs outwardly into the position shown in Fig. 3. In this; position, the sprii'ig -ring engages the wall :23 of the groove 20 and an abrupt canrsurface 24 of the groove 21 and thus holds the parts against separating movements. To witlulraw the end 18 from the neck 17, it is necessary to ram the springring 19 back into the groove and to do so, a great deal of force is i'iecded because oi the abruptness of the cam suriface 24 which produces much friction between it and the spring. and the latter and the abrupt surface 28 of the groove 20. Thus, the end 18 is held in the neck 17 against accidental displacement.

In order to secure the sourul-collector in its adjusted position against accidental or undesired rotation upon the handle 11. there is provided a clamping nut 25 threaded in the neck 17 and one in the end 18. When it is desired to change the position of the sound-collectm'. the screw is released and the collector rotated about the tube.

In the form shown in Fig. 4, the mouthpiece 15" including the hoiinportion 14" is mounted for turning movement on the handle to be adjusted to a coi'iv-eniei'it position for the dictator, and for this purpose, the mouthpiece is provided with a head 26 adapted to frictionally engage a socket 27 on the handle 11 and comprising a plurality of resilient tongues 28 adapted to engage over the bead. The soclzet 27 has a neck 29 fixed in the handle 11. lVith this form of device. it is merely necessary to rotate the mouthpiece in its socket 27 to the desired position. the friction between the tongues 28 and the bead 26 being sufficient to hold the mouthpiece in adjusted position.

In Fig. 5. there is shown a modification of the present invention. In this form the mouthpiece is not only capable of swiveling movements upon the handle to adjust it angularly about the axis of the handle with relation to the guard 12 and the button 13, but is also capable of pivotal movement to change its angular position with relation to the axis of the handle.

For the former purpose. the mouthpiece is supported by a tube 80 which is adapted to telescope over the end 18 of the handle 11*. which is provided with a hollow head 31 adapted to receive the round-head of a screw 32 threaded in the end 18 of the handle. The screw acts as a key to hold the end 18 and the tube together. In assemblingthis device. the screw 32 is passed through an opening 38 in the hollow head 31 and is fastened in place in the end 18". The clearance between the head of the screw 32 and the walls of the groove 31 is sutlicient to allow free rotation of the tube while the screw-head prevents the tube 30 "from bein1 drawn off the end 18 A For the purpose of allowing the mouthill) ii t) piece 15 to be adjusted angularly with relation to the axis of the handle 11", a tube 34 which carries the mouthpiece, is pivotally mounted on a rod 35 carried by the tube 30 at right angles to the axis or", the handle 11 The tube 34 has arcuate portions 36 adapted to extend inside oi' and contact with a curved apron 37 carried by the tube so that in all positions of the tube 3%, the soinidpassage will be maintained closed by the arcuate portion 36 and the apron 37.

The mouthpiece l5" provided with a bead 38 engaging a plurality oi? resilienttongues integrally connected tiiigether and secured in a socket 40 forming part oi the tube 3-1. In applying the mouthpiece to the tube 3%, the head 38 is forced undn: the tongues 39 and is yieldingly held by too tongues against accidental displacement.

While in the terms shown in l igs. el and 5, the mouthpieces 15" and 15 are resiliently held in placeby springmcans, it is usually preferable that the mouthpiece be more see curely attached to the other parts. One advantageous form oi such connect-ion is shown in Figs. 1. and in which the glass mouthpiece 15 is positively held in position on the horn 1-1 by a cylindrical clampingring 41. The mouthpiece 15 engages the end 4-2 of the horn 14 while the cylindrical clamping member -11, which is threaded in the mouthpiece, has flange 4:3 engaging a shoulder 44 on the mouthpiece. lVhen the clamp 41. is screwed into the end of the horn let, it securely holds the mouthpiece in the position shown in Fig. 1.

For the purpose of facilitating the adjustment of the clamping-ring l1, it is provided with notches 45 adapted to be engaged by lugs -l-6 provided on the mouthpiece. In applying the mouthpiece 15 to the horn 1d, the clamp All is first dropped into the mouthpiece 15 so that its notches 4:! are engaged by the lugs 46 of the mouthpiece, and then the latter is rotated until the end of the clamp 41 is screwed tightly in place on the horn l4.

Variations and modifications may be made within the scope of this invention, and portions of the in'iprovements may be used withoutothers.

lVhile all of the en'lbodin'ients of the present invention shown herein are covered generically by the appended claims, the species claims for the en'ibodiments oi the invention shown in Figs. 4t and 5 are not contained in this application, but are presented respectively in my co-pending application, 9. N. 150,578, filed November 24, 1926, and S. N. 185.570, filed April 21, 1927, both divisions of this application.

Having now described the invention, what is claimed as new and for which it is desired to obtain Letters Patent, is:

1. A sound-receiving device comprising a tion thereto:

handle portion and an outwardly flaring mouthpiece portion, and means for adjustably connecting the handle portion and the mouthpiece portion to allow rotary movement oi one relative to the other.

.i sonin -rccciring device comprising a liainllc per i z a sonnd-rccciring portion flaring oinwardlv 'il'fl il the handle portion and connected to the handle portion, and adapted to be angnlarly ad 'insted with rclaand a mouthpiece portion do taciiabl connected to the outwardly [hiring soinio-rccciving port. n and coe:-;tensive therewith.

In combination. a hand-held soundconveyor: a SOlIlHl-(flill(tt0l having its mouth disposed in a p ane at an angle to the plane of the a xis in which the souiul-conveyor lies when connected to the latter: a swivel c n ncction between the sonnd-conveyor and thc soniwl-collcctor; ano moans tor holding said SOHRMl-(OHYQYfiL and sinnnl-collector against relative niovcnicnt abo: i said swivel connection.

in combination. a handheld sound-con- \cyor: a mouthpiece: a horn-shaped part hetweon the icontlhpiecc and the sound-conveyor: means tor connecting the nionth 'iiecc to the horn-shaped part: and a self locking connection for coi'inecting the horn-shaped part to the sound-conveyor.

In combination, a hand-held seundconveyor; a. curved sound-collector; and means for interconnecting the sound-collector and the souniihconveyor, said means allowing rotation of the one part relative to the other and preventing longitudinal movement of the one part relative to the other.

6.111 combination, a cylindrical, handheld, sound-conveyor; an outwardly flaring horn detachahly connected to the sound-conveyor; and a flaring n'iouthpiece detachably connected to the flaring horn.

7. In combination, a. hand-held sound-conveyor; a sound-collector, said sound-collector and sound-conveyor having an overlapping connection with each other and each having circumferential grooves substantially aligned with each other, when in predetermined overlagped condition, and yieldablc means adapted to simultaneously engage both grooves to removably hold the sound collector and the sound-conveyor together.

8. In combination, a pair of sound-passages having a telescoping connection with each other at their adjacent ends and having cooperating circumferential grooves which are substantially aligned. when the two parts are in predetermined positions; and yieldable means adapted to simultaneously engage both grooves to removably hold the parts together.

9. In combination, a pair of sound-passages having a telescoping connection at their adjacent ends; and means entirely ill) concealed within the telescoping connection, for rotatably holding the two parts together.

10. In combination, a pair oil sound-passages having a telescoping connection with each other at their adjacent ends, and hav ing on the contacting walls of the telescoping connection, aligi'iing grooves; and yield able means adapted to simultaneously' engage said grooves to hold the parts removably connected together.

11. In con'il'iination, a somid-conveyor ha ving a sulist-antially v uniform diameter throughout its length; a sound-collecting horn removably attached to the receiving end oi the conveyor; and a mouthpiece removahly attached to the horn, the horn and mouthpiece being tapered and having coextensive internal surfaces.

12. In combination, a hand-held scum.- conveyor; a sound-collector having its mouthdisposed in a plane at an angle to the plane of the axis of the sound-conveyor; hand-engaging parts on the handheld sound-conveyor; and a swivel connection between the sound-conveyor and the soundcollector whereby adjustment of the angularly disposed mouth of the se-uml-collector may be effected relative to the hand-engaging parts on the sound-conveyor and about the axis of the latter.

13. A sound-receiving device comprising a handle portion; a mouthpiece portion; means for adjustably connecting the handle portion and the mouthpiece portion to allow moven'ient'of the one relative to the other; and means for holding said mouthpiece portion against unintentional movement.

It. A sound-receiving device comprising a nindle portion; a n'iouthpieee portion; means tor adjustably connecting the handle portion and the mouthpiece portion to allow movmnent of the one relative to the other; and means -tor positively locking said monthpiece portion agaiz'ist movement relative to said handle portion.

15. A souml-receiving device con'iprising a tubular handle portion; a tubular monthpieec portion telescoping with the handle portion; and a set-screw in one of said portions and engaging the other of said portion to prevent movement of the one portion relative to the other portion.

16. In combination, a hand-held soundcenveyer; a sound-collector having its mouth disposed in a plane at an angle to the plane (it the axis in which the soundconveyor lies; manually operable means on the hand-held sound-conveyor; and a swivel connection between the sound-conveyor and the sound-collector whereby adjustment of the angular-1y disposed mouth of the soundcollector may be effected relative to the manually operable means on the sound-conveyor and about the axis of the latter.

Signed at Bridgeport, in the county of l airlield, and State of Connecticut, this 26th day of May, 1924.

CHARLES K. IVOODBRIDGE.

US716626A 1924-05-29 1924-05-29 Sound collecting and transmitting Expired - Lifetime US1630367A (en)

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US716626A US1630367A (en) 1924-05-29 1924-05-29 Sound collecting and transmitting
US15057826 US1804485A (en) 1924-05-29 1926-11-24 Sound collecting and transmitting means
US18557027 US1827719A (en) 1924-05-29 1927-04-21 Sound collecting and transmitting

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2926033A (en) * 1955-09-19 1960-02-23 Clarostat Mfg Company Inc Hub coupling for electrical controls
US3079188A (en) * 1961-02-23 1963-02-26 Bausch & Lomb Demountable coupling
US3865499A (en) * 1972-04-05 1975-02-11 Metallurg De Saint Urban Atel Means for securing a circular part in the form of a disc in the interior of a cylindrical part
US4941369A (en) * 1989-04-06 1990-07-17 Cycle Products Company Bicycle handle grip assembly

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2926033A (en) * 1955-09-19 1960-02-23 Clarostat Mfg Company Inc Hub coupling for electrical controls
US3079188A (en) * 1961-02-23 1963-02-26 Bausch & Lomb Demountable coupling
US3865499A (en) * 1972-04-05 1975-02-11 Metallurg De Saint Urban Atel Means for securing a circular part in the form of a disc in the interior of a cylindrical part
US4941369A (en) * 1989-04-06 1990-07-17 Cycle Products Company Bicycle handle grip assembly

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