US1595351A - Lamp - Google Patents

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Publication number
US1595351A
US1595351A US667780A US66778023A US1595351A US 1595351 A US1595351 A US 1595351A US 667780 A US667780 A US 667780A US 66778023 A US66778023 A US 66778023A US 1595351 A US1595351 A US 1595351A
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Prior art keywords
burner
air
wicks
receptacle
wick
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Expired - Lifetime
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US667780A
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Martin Bruno
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D3/00Burners using capillary action
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D2900/00Special features of, or arrangements for burners using fluid fuels or solid fuels suspended in a carrier gas
    • F23D2900/31Air supply for wick burners

Definitions

  • This invention relates to kerosene lamps and pertains more particularly to that type of lamp which is commonly provided with two fiat wicks, arranged in the usual wick tubes that project upward from the burner side by side and spaced apart. 7
  • One object of my improvement is to provide means for securing more thorough combustion and for preventing the formation of soot when the burner is turned high.
  • T o attain this object I provide means for automatically delivering a thin film of air upward from the body of the burner between the two wick tubes, for the two-fold purpose of cooling the lower parts of the wick tubes and to provide an additional supply of oxygen between the two parallel burner flames.
  • a further object of the invention is to supply the air to the space between the burners as above mentioned in such manner that the additional air will come into contact with the oil-saturated wicks before the air passes into the burner and thence up between the wick tubes, thereby somewhat preheating the air before it reaches the burner and also partly saturating it with kerosene vapor from the wet wick surfaces. Supplied in that manner, this air cools the lower part of the burner and the part of the wicks hanging immediately below the bottoms of the wick tubes.
  • My invention further includes an im proved means for cooling the top of the oil receptacle.
  • This I accomplish by ciroula tion of air upward through the receptacle and by providing radiating and conducting surfaces for the dissipation of heat from the top of the receptacle.
  • the lamp is thus made safer because the liability of overheating the oil vapor in the chamber by contact with the top of the chamber is materially reduced.
  • Fig. l is a side view, partly broken away, of a lamp embodying my improvement.
  • Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the burner.
  • Fig. 3 is a bottom view.
  • Fig. 4 is a part sectional side view of the burner and its central air supply tube.
  • FIGs. 1 and 4 This device is shown in Figs. 1 and 4, where 9 is an air tube that communi cates at its lower end with the atmosphere and projects centrally up through the oil receptacle 1, the two wicks 8, 8 hanging at either side of the air tube 9.
  • the upper parts of the wicks 8, 8 where they pass through the threaded neck of the burner 2 nearly surround the upper end of tube 9.
  • air drawn upwardly by the draft of the flames passes up through the tube 9, flows along the saturated but not submerged surfaces of the wicks and thence upward through the burner and between the wick tubes above described.
  • the bottom end of air tube 9 may project into a depressed pocket 10 having space to receive the depending ends of the wicks so they han straight and consequently the wick can he run up intothe burner without liability of folding or crinkling,
  • a screen 11 is preferably provided at the lower end of air tube 9.
  • the air supplied through tube 9 cools the lower part of the burner 2 and the threaded nipple by which it is screwed to the oil receptacle and thereby tends to reduce the liability of overheating the top of the receptacle as might otherwise occur because of conduction from the burners.
  • I may provide an additional cooling means which consists in one or more air fines 12 extending through the oil receptacle and provided at their upper ends with screens a 13, these screens and the walls of the fines 12 comprising cooling surfaces to prevent overheating the receptacle 1.

Description

Adz: 10,1926.
B. MARTIN LAMP Filed Oct. 10, 1923 C1302 mq Patented Aug. 10, 1926.
UNITED S S 1,595,351 PATENT" F Bnono MARTIN, or SAGINAW, MICHIGAN.
LAMP.
This invention relates to kerosene lamps and pertains more particularly to that type of lamp which is commonly provided with two fiat wicks, arranged in the usual wick tubes that project upward from the burner side by side and spaced apart. 7
One object of my improvement is to provide means for securing more thorough combustion and for preventing the formation of soot when the burner is turned high.
T o attain this object I provide means for automatically delivering a thin film of air upward from the body of the burner between the two wick tubes, for the two-fold purpose of cooling the lower parts of the wick tubes and to provide an additional supply of oxygen between the two parallel burner flames.
A further object of the invention is to supply the air to the space between the burners as above mentioned in such manner that the additional air will come into contact with the oil-saturated wicks before the air passes into the burner and thence up between the wick tubes, thereby somewhat preheating the air before it reaches the burner and also partly saturating it with kerosene vapor from the wet wick surfaces. Supplied in that manner, this air cools the lower part of the burner and the part of the wicks hanging immediately below the bottoms of the wick tubes.
My invention further includes an im proved means for cooling the top of the oil receptacle. This I accomplish by ciroula tion of air upward through the receptacle and by providing radiating and conducting surfaces for the dissipation of heat from the top of the receptacle. The lamp is thus made safer because the liability of overheating the oil vapor in the chamber by contact with the top of the chamber is materially reduced.
With the foregoing and certain other objects in View which will appear later in the specifications, my invention comprises the devices described and claimed and the equivalents thereof.
In the drawings Fig. l is a side view, partly broken away, of a lamp embodying my improvement.
Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the burner.
Fig. 3 is a bottom view.
Fig. 4 is a part sectional side view of the burner and its central air supply tube.
in the drawings which illustrate my im- Application filed October 10, 1923. Seriar No. 667,780.
provement as applied to a lamp having a metal oil receptacle 1 and a double wick burner 2 of the usual type, I have illustrated the improven'ients which constitute my present invention. j
In the rounded cover- 3 of burner 2 and between the flat wick tubes e, t, I providea narrow elongated slit 5 and in the bottom of he burner body. between the flat wick tubes 4;, 4, I form openings 7. Air entering at the bottom of the burner pass up through the openings 7 and be delivered from the long narrow slit 5 in the form of a thin film or sheet of air that passes upward be tween the wick tubes to the bases of the flames, supplying additional oxygen tothe flames.
When the burner 53 has been screwed into place on the oil receptacle 1, as shown in Fig. 1, and the wicks 8, 8 have been inserted, the lower parts of the wicks are submerged in oil but their upper parts near the bottom of the burner are usually not submerged, but they are saturated with oil. Heretofore it sometimes occurred that the conducted heat from the burner overheat-ed the wicks at this point and partly vaporized theoil on them, forming a combustible mixture that increased the liability of explosion. To reduce this risk I provide means for cooling the exposed parts of the saturated wick and at the same time supplying air to the interior of the burner as above described, also carrying away any oil vapor that may have been formed in the upper part of the oil receptacle 1. This device is shown in Figs. 1 and 4, where 9 is an air tube that communi cates at its lower end with the atmosphere and projects centrally up through the oil receptacle 1, the two wicks 8, 8 hanging at either side of the air tube 9. The upper parts of the wicks 8, 8 where they pass through the threaded neck of the burner 2 nearly surround the upper end of tube 9. Hence air drawn upwardly by the draft of the flames passes up through the tube 9, flows along the saturated but not submerged surfaces of the wicks and thence upward through the burner and between the wick tubes above described.
The bottom end of air tube 9 may project into a depressed pocket 10 having space to receive the depending ends of the wicks so they han straight and consequently the wick can he run up intothe burner without liability of folding or crinkling,
A screen 11 is preferably provided at the lower end of air tube 9.
It is obvious that the air supplied through tube 9 cools the lower part of the burner 2 and the threaded nipple by which it is screwed to the oil receptacle and thereby tends to reduce the liability of overheating the top of the receptacle as might otherwise occur because of conduction from the burners. I may provide an additional cooling means which consists in one or more air fines 12 extending through the oil receptacle and provided at their upper ends with screens a 13, these screens and the walls of the fines 12 comprising cooling surfaces to prevent overheating the receptacle 1. lfhe air that rises through lines 12 is somewhat preheated and since it flows directly up against the under side of the burner body it surrounds the bottom of the burner with an atmosphere of warm air which is drawn through the usual screen with which the base of the burner is provided and thence into the chimney.
By thus cooling the top of the receptacle and inducing an air circulation upward from it through the chimney I also avoid the development of the objectionable odor of tween said wick tubes, wicks depending freely from the wick tubes into said receptacle and a tube communicating at one end with the atmosphere and at its other end with the space between said wicks in the upper part of said receptacle, the upper end of said tube located beneath the burner body and spaced therefrom vertically so as to not overlap or contact with any part of said burner body, the spaces between the top of said tube and the said wick tubes being spanned by the wicks alone.
In testimony whereof, I affix my signature.
BRUNO MARTIN.
US667780A 1923-10-10 1923-10-10 Lamp Expired - Lifetime US1595351A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20070111149A1 (en) * 2004-07-13 2007-05-17 Susumu Matsuyama Lamp With Means For Controlling Air And Fuel Near The Flame
US20080044783A1 (en) * 2004-07-13 2008-02-21 Susumu Matsuyama Candle With Improved Combustion
US20170045222A1 (en) * 2008-02-28 2017-02-16 Lamplight Farms Incorporated Twin wick torch

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20070111149A1 (en) * 2004-07-13 2007-05-17 Susumu Matsuyama Lamp With Means For Controlling Air And Fuel Near The Flame
US20080044783A1 (en) * 2004-07-13 2008-02-21 Susumu Matsuyama Candle With Improved Combustion
US20170045222A1 (en) * 2008-02-28 2017-02-16 Lamplight Farms Incorporated Twin wick torch

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