US1467497A - Charles w - Google Patents

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US1467497A
US1467497A US1467497DA US1467497A US 1467497 A US1467497 A US 1467497A US 1467497D A US1467497D A US 1467497DA US 1467497 A US1467497 A US 1467497A
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cylinder
fuel
piston
valve
space
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M31/00Apparatus for thermally treating combustion-air, fuel, or fuel-air mixture
    • F02M31/02Apparatus for thermally treating combustion-air, fuel, or fuel-air mixture for heating
    • F02M31/14Apparatus for thermally treating combustion-air, fuel, or fuel-air mixture for heating by using heat from working cylinders or cylinder heads
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T10/00Road transport of goods or passengers
    • Y02T10/10Internal combustion engine [ICE] based vehicles
    • Y02T10/12Improving ICE efficiencies

Description

Sept.'11, 1923. 1,467,497 I i c. w. PHILIP INTERNAL cbMBusTIoN ENGINE Fi ied ec. 16 1920 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 J4 l5 HAKLES k). Bump ATToRmEy Sept. 11, 1923,
1,467.49? C. W. PHILIP INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE Fi e c. 16. 1920 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.
ATTo'RNey' CHARLES W. PHILIP Y Patented Sept. 11, 1923.
CHARLES W. PHILIP, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA.
INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINE.
Application filed December 16, .1920. SerialNo. 431,282.
To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, Urn-mime lV. PHILIP, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of the city and county of San Francisco, State of California, have made a new and useful invention to wit, Improvements in Internal-Combustion Engines; and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, concise, and exact description of the same.
This invention relates particularly to systems for utilizing low grade fuels in internal combustion engines.
The use in internal combustion engines of the heavier hydro-carbon fuels of relatively low volatility such as crude oil, Diesel engine fuel, distillate, tops, and various other low grade petroleum products, necessitates the use of special vaporizing devices to insure the proper vaporization of the fuel and the proper mixing of the vapor thus formed with air, steam or other atomizing media in order to provide a homogeneous gasified mixture of the desired combustibility.
This invention relates particularly to a. new and novel engine construction wherein a vaporized fuel is confined within the intake chamber during a predetermined number of cycles of operation and thus preheated and expanded prior to its admission. into the cylinder, thereby providing highly volatile charge, clean combustion and efficient. operation. I
An object of this invention is to utilize liquid fuels of relatively low volatility for the purpose of cooling the engine during its operation, whereby said fuel will absorb the heat from the engine block, cooling the engine effectively and at the same time raising the temperature of the cooling medium, rendering it practicable for purposes of com bustion upon its admission into the cylinder. Thus by reason of the greater heat value per unity of weight and the low-er cost at which said fuels are sold in comparison with highergrade fuels, the engine can be made to operate at a greatly reduced cost. Other objects and advantages will appear as this description progresses.
In this specification and the annexed drawings, the invention is illustrated in the form considered to be the best, but it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to such form, because it may be embodied in other forms, and it is also to be understood that in and by the claims'following the description, it is desired to cover the invention in whatsoever form it may be embodied.
' In the accompanying two-sheets of drawingsz Figure 1 is a side elevation partly in cross-section of an internal combustion inotor constructed in accordance with my invention.
FigureQ is a sectional plan view through Figure 1- on the line IIII.
Figure 3 is an end elevation partly in crosssection taken through Figure 2 on the line IIIIII.
Figure 1 is a plan View of Figure 1.
In detail the construction illustrated in the drawings includes a crank case designated by the numeral 1 and having a crank shaft 2 mounted thereon in the usual manher. The connecting rods 3 are connected to the throws or crank pins of the said crank shaft in the usual manner and to the hollow wrist pins 4 of the pistons 5 reciprocatable in the cylinders 6 formed in the engine block 7 fixed to the. crank case in the usual manner. The description of the construction of one cylinder and the operation thereof applies to each of the cylinders of the motor, if it be of the multi-cylinder type, so that the following description of a single cylinder will suffice for each other cylinder.
Each cylinder is provided with inlet and outlet valves 9 and 10 preferably placed in the head of the cylinder. These valves are operated by rocker arms 13 and 14 pivoted at 18 to the cylinder head, the ends of the rocker arms resting upon the valve stems of their respective valves. The opposite ends of the rocker arms are pivoted at 19 to the respective push rods 20, guided in the sleeves 21, and provided with rollers on the I lower ends thereof engaging suitable cams 22 fixed on the cam shaft 23. The cam shaft 23 is rotated in half time synchronism with crank shaft 2 by the pinion 24L fixed on said cam shaft and enmeshed with the gear 25 fixed on the crank shaft, whereby the inlet I and outlet valves 9 and 10 are operated in unison withthe rotation of the crank shaft in accordance with the timing arrangement.
The construction of the cylinder block departsfrom the usual practice in that the vaporized fuel. is drawn into and retained within an auxiliary chamber provided between the cylinder combustion chamber 6 and the exterior wall 26 of the block. The aid chamber is partitioned and divided into the segmental spaces 27, 28 and 29 respectively so that the fuel vapor contained therein is pre-heated and made to expand by the conducted heat generated from the combustion within the cylinder. For aiding fur ther in the pro-heating of the fuel vapor. each of the respective divisions 27, 28 and 29 are further divided into a plurality of bypass chambers 30, cast in the engine block, each of which are formed so as to present a wavy or corrugated cross-section. Thus a large surface is provided, against which. the fuel vapor contacts and is heated. The initial chamber 27 communicates through a conduit 31 with a manifold 32 connected with a conventional carburetor 83. The conduit 31 is provided with a valve 34 provided. with a stem guided in the bearing sleeve 36' and having a roller on the lower end thereof engaging suitable cams 22 fixed onthe cam shaft 23 as previously described, for the purpose of controlling the amount of fuel permitted tobe drawn into the auxiliary fuel space 27. I
The chambers27, 2S and 29 are primarily provided for the purpose of retaining the fuel in contact with the hot cylinder walls for the longest period possible conducive to the best combustibility. The fuel is made to enter at the upper part of space 27 and pass downwardly'to the lower end thereof from whence it passes into the space 28. Communication is made between the space 28 and the annular space 41 through the aperture 45 through which the fuel passes after which it enters the space 29 communi eating with the pocket 42 in the head of the cylinder contiguous to the intake port. This manner of forcing the fuel ;to follow the tortuous path in contact with the heated walls of the cylinder raises its combustibility to a high point and permits its being in troduced into the cylinder without the aid of atomizing mediums such as air or steam.
The piston 5 is of the dual-diameter or stepped type having the respective surfaces 36 and 37 of different diameters, each of which are adapted to bear against and snugly lit the cylinder walls 6 and 6 in the usual manner. Thus an interior annular space 41 is formed between the smaller piston wall 37 and the cylinder wall- 6 which space is sealed from the combustion chamher by the larger diameter 36 of the piston bearing against the cylinder wall 6 and is sealed from the crank case'by the smaller diameter cylinder wall 6. The' pistonis provided with the usual expanding packing rings 38'and39 around the head. 36 thereof andthc packing ring'40 is provided in the cylinder. wall 6 to contact with the smaller diameter 37 of the piston and effectively seal gases from esca'ping from the space 41 into the crank case. "I:
'Tliesuctioncreated by the up-stroke of the piston is timed synchronously with the opening of the by-pass valve 34, the suction.
wherein it is retained during the combustion down-stroke of the piston, being drawn on the upstroke from the segmental chamber 28 into the annular space 41 and thence into the remaining segmental chamber 29 surrounding the cylinder. The next downward stroke of the piston represents the suction cycle, during which period the intake valve 9 is mechanically opened, permitting the mixture to be sucked into the cylinder 7 from the pocket 42 communicating with the chamber 9. Previous to the inlet valve 9 opening to the cylinder the auxiliary air valve is opened by the valve rocker arm, admitting atmospheric air from the manifold 44 to the pocket 42, wherein it mixes with the fuel vapor combining therewith to form a combustible mixture within the combustion chamber of the cylinder.
The next upstroke of the piston compresses the gases within the combustion chamber and synchronously opens the port to the by-pass 34, again charging the annu lar space surrounding the cylinder and ad mitting gas within the annular area 41 and the chambers 29 and pocket 42 with an additional volume of fuel vapor. At a predetermined point in the compression cycle, the mixtureis ignited by a spark plug 47, resulting in, the combustion and expansion of the mixture, driving the piston down through the combustion cycle, rotating the crank shaft and synchronizing the operation of. the various incidental elements connect ed therewith. The down stroke of the piston likewise compresses the retained gases within the segmental chambers 27, 28 and 29, saic gases incidentally absorbing the heat from the cylinder walls and piston. The exhaust cycle represented by the next succeeding upstroke of the piston causes the waste products of combustion to be exhausted through the valve 10 mechanically opened by the rocker arm 16 and passes said exhaust gases .into the manifold 48 from whence they are conveyed away in the usual manner.
FA. combustible charge, of substantially the same volume, is drawn into the cylinder jackets upon each suction operation, but the amount of fuel permitted to pass into the combustion chamber is controlled by the throttle valve 49' that regulates the amount and quantity of fuel vapor admitted to the pocket 42 from the segmental space 29. The pre-heating jacket acts as a reservoir for collecting any fuel condensation that may occur while the motor is cold but which would later be vaporized as the heat of the engine increased. The auxiliary air valve l?) is provided with a hollow stem to receive and surround the stem of the fuel inlet valve 9, which is closed against this seat by the expansion of the spring 50 extending between a head on the end of the valve 9 and the head of the auxiliary valve 43. Said valve 43 is closed by the expansion of the spring 51 expanding between the head on the auxiliary valve stem and the top of the cylinder head. The construction is such that the downward movement of the rocker arm 15 first opens the auxiliary valve 43, peri'nitting the manifold 42 to receive air, and continues downward opening the fuel inlet valve synchronously with the down stroke of the piston, to suck in the combined air and vapor fuel from the preheated jacket into the cylinder. The quantity of atmospheric air admitted is controlled by the manual throttle valve 49. It is to be understood that the proportions of air and gas admitted into the cylinder is to be consistent with the best operation of the engine.
The auxiliary cooling system differs from the usual practice of water-jacketing the cylinders in that the liquid fuel, of a relatively low volatility is substituted in place of water, thus the heat of combustion is not lost but is transmitted to the walls of the cylinder block and absorbed by the cooling medium, cooling the engine more efficiently and effectively than by water, and eliminating any possibilities of boiling and a consequent. evaporation loss of the cooling medium. At the same time, the temperature of the cooling medium is raised to a point ranging anywhere from 150 to 220 degrees Fahrenheit rendering it practicable for purposes of combustion. Opposite each intake conduit 31 communication is made between the oil cooling jackets 60 and the fuel bowl of the carburetor 33. The amount of fuel delivered from said carburetor is controlled in the usual manner. The heated fuel delivered to the carburetor can be drawn as a fuel vapor into the engine at the proper intervals in a highly heated condition and in readiness for combustion. The use of an oil fuel for cooling purposes, such as described. with the later use of the same pro-heated fuel for the purposes of combustion, is very advantageous in that fuels of a very low natural volatility can be utilized for fuel purposes and by reason of the lesser cost can operate an engine at a greatly reduced price, in contrast with those engines operated on more volatile and costly fuels introduced directly into the carburetor.
Having thus described this invention,
what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:
1. An internal combustion engine comprising a cylinder of dual diameter having an oil cooling system therearound, a piston of dual diameter reciprocatable within said cylinder; a plurality of intercommunicating chambers interposed between said oil cooling system and cylinder into which a fuel vapor is adapted to be introduced; means for utilizing said cooling medium to absorb the heat of combustion generated within said cylinder; a carburetor on said engine for controlling the admission of fuel into said chambers; a conduit connecting said oil cooling system with said carburetor and means for compressing the fuel vapor contained within said chambers between said iston and cylinder by the difference in diameters therebetween before introducing it into the cylinder.
2. An internal combustion motor comprising a cylinder; a piston reciprocable in said cylinder; a plurality of intercommunicated chambers surrounding said cylinder. into which a fuel vapor is adapted to be introduced and battle plates in said chambers to provide a tortuous path for said fuel vapor; means for utilizing said piston to compress the fuel vapor within said chambers before introducing it into the cylinder and means for admitting atmosheric air into said cylinder at the point of entrance of the fuel vapor. 4
An internal combustion motor including a cylinder of dual diameter; a piston reciprocatable in said cylinder and having a wall of a dual diameter; a fuel vaporizer communicating with the space between the walls of the piston and cylinder; a valve interposed between said intercommunicating space and the interior of the cylinder; means for synchronously reciprocating said piston and operating said valve and means operable immediately previous to the opening of the first valve for admitting air with said fuel into said cylinder through said valve.
4- An internal combustion motor including a cylinder of a dual diameter, a piston of a dual diameter registering with said cylinder and reciprocatable therein; a fuel vaporizing medium communicating with the space between the piston and cylinder walls; a valve interposed between said vaporizing medium and said space; an inlet valve interposed between said space and said cylinder; means for synchronously reciprocating said piston and operating said valves; a throttle interposed between said space and said inlet valve and an auxiliary air valve adapted to admit air with said fuel into said cylinder.
5. An internal combustion engine includ ing a cylinder of a dual diameter; a piston of dual diameter registering with said cylinder and reciprocatable therein; a vaporizmg medium communicating with the space between the piston and cylinder walls; a fuel inlet valve interposed between. said space and said cylinder;'a throttle interposed. between said space and said valve; an auxiliary air valve for admitting air into the cylinder, and means for operating said fuel inlet valve and said auxiliary air valve synchronously with the operation of said piston. 6. An internal combustion motor including a cylinder of a dual diameter; a piston of a dual diameter registering with said cylinder and reciprocable therein;a fuel vaporizing medium communicating with the space between the piston and cylinder walls; a valve interposed between said vaporizing medium-and said space; a jacket integrally formed about said. cylinder having a plurality of passages therein communicating with said space; an inlet valve interposed between said space and said cylinder; means for synchronously reciprocating said piston and operating said valves; a throttle interposed between said space and said inlet valve and an auxiliary air valve adapted to admit air with said fuel into said cylinder.
7. An internal combustion engineincluding a cylinder of dual diameter; a piston of a dual diameter registering with said cylinder and reciprocable therein; means for delivering a combustible charge into the space between the interspaced walls of said cylinder and piston; a valve, interposed between said intercommunicating space and the interior of the cylinder; means for synchronously reciprocating said piston and operating said valve; a throttle interposed between said space and said inlet valve and an auxiliary air valve adapted to admit air with said fuel into said cylinder.
In "testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand at San Francisco, California this 8th day of December 1920.
CHARLES W. PHILIP.
In presence of:
LINCOLN V. JOHNSON.
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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3802399A (en) * 1971-05-19 1974-04-09 Mitsui Shipbuilding Eng Air inlet arrangement in four-cycle engine
US5163410A (en) * 1991-02-20 1992-11-17 Mercedes-Benz Ag Fuel circuit with thermostat-controlled fuel preheating for preferably air-compressing injection-type internal combustion engines
US20030221657A1 (en) * 2002-04-26 2003-12-04 Ecologic Motor S.A. Internal combustion engine with a combustion chamber
US9403246B2 (en) 2010-02-04 2016-08-02 Kennametal Inc. Drill bit and method for manufacturing
US10661356B2 (en) 2010-02-04 2020-05-26 Kennametal Inc. Drilling tool

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3802399A (en) * 1971-05-19 1974-04-09 Mitsui Shipbuilding Eng Air inlet arrangement in four-cycle engine
US5163410A (en) * 1991-02-20 1992-11-17 Mercedes-Benz Ag Fuel circuit with thermostat-controlled fuel preheating for preferably air-compressing injection-type internal combustion engines
US20030221657A1 (en) * 2002-04-26 2003-12-04 Ecologic Motor S.A. Internal combustion engine with a combustion chamber
US9403246B2 (en) 2010-02-04 2016-08-02 Kennametal Inc. Drill bit and method for manufacturing
US10661356B2 (en) 2010-02-04 2020-05-26 Kennametal Inc. Drilling tool

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