US1288363A - Exhaust-nozzle-testing device. - Google Patents

Exhaust-nozzle-testing device. Download PDF

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US1288363A
US1288363A US79006313A US1913790063A US1288363A US 1288363 A US1288363 A US 1288363A US 79006313 A US79006313 A US 79006313A US 1913790063 A US1913790063 A US 1913790063A US 1288363 A US1288363 A US 1288363A
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stack
ring
pipe
pressure
exhaust
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US79006313A
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Charles D Young
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Charles D Young
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16KVALVES; TAPS; COCKS; ACTUATING-FLOATS; DEVICES FOR VENTING OR AERATING
    • F16K37/00Special means in or on valves or other cut-off apparatus for indicating or recording operation thereof, or for enabling an alarm to be given
    • F16K37/0075For recording or indicating the functioning of a valve in combination with test equipment

Description

C. D. YOUNG.

EXHAUST NOZZLE TESTING DEVJCE.

. APPLICATION FILED SEPT. 16, 1913.

1,288 363 Patented Dec. 17, 1918.

2 SHEETS-SHEET I.

Ff I2 WITNESSES 0. D. YOUNG,

EXHAUST NOZZLE TESTING DEVICE.

. APPLICATIQN FILED SEPT- !6, 1913- 7 1,288,363, Patented Dec. 17, 1918.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

fie $1.4

WITNESSES Mad UNITED STATES CHARLES D. YOUNG, OF ALTOONA, PENNSYLVANIA.

EXHAUST-NOZZLE-TESTIN'G DEVICE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Dec. 1'7, 1918.

Application filed September 16,1913. Serial No. 790,063.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I; CHARLES D. YOUNG, a citizen of the United States, residin -at Altoona, in the county of Blair and tate of Pennsylvania, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Exhaust-Nozzle-Testing Devices, of which the following is a specification.

The invention relates to apparatus for testing the exhaust through the stack f a locomotive. I have found that the dra in the. smoke box is directly dependent upon (1') the upward velocity of the steam and gas at the-exit of the stack, and upon (2) the completeness with which the upwardly moving body of steam and gas fills the stack. My improved apparatus enables me to test both of these conditions and 'to secure a chart showing the pressure of the upcoming gases at every unit area of the cross section of the stack outlet. These data enable me to adjust the design of the exhaust nozzle to secure the best possible results. The objects of my invention are, the provision of an im-.

proved apparatus vwhereby the foregoing data. can be secured without difficulty and whereby the pressures of the entire stack cross sections can be easily chartered; and the-provision of an apparatus of the character specified which is simple in construction, cheap, and easily manipulated to get the upward pressure at any point in the stack One embodiment of the invention is shown in theaccompanying-drawing, wherein of apparatus applied thereto, and Fig. 5 is a side elevation of a stack with the construction of Fig. 4 applied thereto.

As indicated in Figs. 1, 2, and 3, which show the simpler embodiment of my inven-.

tion and which will therefore be described first, 1 is the exhaust nozzle in the smoke box of a locomotive; 2 is the stack; 3 is a supporting arm; 4 is a pressure receiving pipe having a downwardly turned end opening into the stack area; 5 is a flexible pipe,

and 6 is a manometer or pressure indicating devlce.

The end of the pipe 4 is provided with acap? (Fig. 3) having the hole 8 therein communicating wlth the passage upon the interior of the pipe 4. The edges of the supporting member 3 are outturned as indicated at 9 (Fig. 2), providing therebetween recesses for receiving the pipe 4. Bythis arrangement the pi e 4can be adjusted radially with respect to the stack. The sup porting member 3 is provided at its inner end with a hook end 10 fitting the rim of the stack, such arrangement permitting of the adjustment of the member 3 circumferentially of the stack.

The circumferential adjustment of the member 3, taken in connection with the radial adjustment of the pipe 4 on the member 3 permits of the pipe 4 being adjusted so that its downturned end comesover substantially any desired point in the cross sectional area of the stack. The upcoming gases in the stack create a pressure in the pipes 4 and 5, and this pressure is registered in the manometer 6 which is the usualv bent tube partially filled with mercury and having the interposed scale as indicated in Fig. 1. By utilizing all of the possible adjustments the pressure at every point of the stack area can be determined, and if desired, the results may be indicated in the form of curves, and utilized in the modification of the nozzle design.

Figs. 4 and 5 illustrate a modified structure, such structure constituting the preferred form of my invention. In this strucrture' a plurality of indicating pipes are used instead of a single pipe, so that a number of readings-can be taken simultaneously, and the pipes are so arranged that they can be swung with their ends over the stack, which is the operative position, or swung to one side of the stack opening, such arrangementbeing desirable'in order to prevent the cutting away of the pipe by the upcoming gases: and cinders.

Referring to Fig. 4, 11 is a fixgd ring which fits over the top of the stack and is supported by means of a-plurality of hook shaped members 12 (Fig.v 5). The ring is held against movement when in this position, by means ofa plurality of set screws 13 which extend through a flange 14 of the ring 11 and bear against the exterior surface of the stack. This fixed rm is in two parts hinged together-at 15 (F 1g. 4), the

other ends of the ring being secured detachably together as hereafter indicated. Mounted r'otatably upon the fixed ring 11 is the ring 16, such ring having a tongue 17 (Fig. 5) which dovetails into a groove in the exterior of the ring 11. The rin'g lfi is also made in two parts, the parts being hinged together as indicated at 18, while the other ends of the two parts of the ring are secured together by the bolt 19 (Fig. 5) extending through the angle clips 20. The means for securing together the ends of the fixed ring 11 is similar to the means just described.

Mounted fixedly upon the ring 11 are four posts 21. These posts carry upon their upper ends the bell cranks 22 slotted at their outer ends as indicated at 23 in Fig. l, and carrying at their other ends brackets 24 having perforated upstanding flanges 25. Extending through the flanges 25 are the indicating pipes 26, such pipes having their inner ends 27 turned downwardly and corresponding to'the ends of the pipe 4: in the construction of Figs. 1, 2, and 3. The pipes 26 are'held against movement in the flanges 5 by means of the thumb screws 27.

Upstanding from the movable ring 16 are the posts 28 Whose upper ends engage the slots 23, thus providing lost motion connection betweenjthe bell cranks and the rotatable ring. It will be seen that when the ring 16 is rotated the bell cranks 22 will be swung. When the parts are in the position illustrated in Fig. 4 the ends 27 of the indicating pipes lie over the stack opening, but when the ring 16 is rotated in a' clockwise di rection the ends 27 are swung back so that they lie outside of thestack area and over the top edge of the stack where they are protectedfrom the upcoming gases and cinders. The ring 16 is rotated by means of the connecting rod 29 extending to the cab of the engine, and secured at its end to the post 30 extending downwardly fi'om the lower side of the ring. 16 (Fig. 5).

In order to secure the pressure at the center of the stack a fifth indicating pipe 31 is employed, such indicating pipe having a downturned end 32 corresponding to the ends of the other pipes. This pipe is carried by a bracket 33 having upstanding perforated flanges through which the pipe extends, such pipe being, held in position by 7 means of the thumb screws 35. The bracket 33 is pivotally supported from the fixed ring 11 by means of the upstanding post 36. Another post 37 is mounted upon the ring 16 adjacent the post 36,- and has at its upper end a portionwhich projects through a slot 38 in the bracket 33. It. will be seen that when the ring 16 is rotated, the pipe 31 will 1,2es,see

When in use the parts occupy the position indicated in Fig. 4, and each of the indicating pipes is provided with a flexible tube 39 which preferably leads to the cab of the engine and is connected with an indicating device 40 corresponding to the device 6 of- Fig. l. i It will be seen that by the use of this apparatus a plurality of readingsv may be simultaneously taken, and that by the use of this apparatus the procedure incident to securing the total back pressure is rendered much shorter and more convenient than where the apparatus ofFig. l is employed. The apparatus also has the advantage that all of the readings are taken at one time, and the life of the apparatus is "materially increased, due to the fact the pipes are not exposed to wear when the apparatus is not being operated. Other advantages incident to the structure will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art.

What I claim is:

1. In combination in apparatus for measuring the discharge pressure of a locomotive stack, a member having a downwardly directed passage opening toward the upcoming gases, and adapted for movement over the passage for indicating the pressure therein.

2. In combination in apparatus for measuring the discharge pressure of a locomotive stack, a member having a downwardly directed passage opening toward the upcoming gases, a pivotal support for the said member whereby it may be swung from its operative position over the stack to an inoperative position at one side of said opening, and means connected to the passage for indicating the pressure therein.

3. In combination in apparatus for measuring the discharge pressure of a locomotive stack, a plurality ofmembers each with a downwardly directed passage opening toward the upcoming gases and with the said openings opening into different .portions of the stack area, means whereby the members are mounted for movement so that in one position they lie over the stack opening and .in another position lie to one side thereof, means for simultaneously moving the passage members, and means for indicating the pressures in the passages.

4. In combination in apparatus for measuring the discharge ot a locomotive stack, a fixed member secured detachably upon the exterior of the stack at its upper end, a ring mounted for rotation on the said 1,2ee,eee

member, a plurality of hollow members having downwardly directed ends and sup ported for movement on the said fixed member, connections from the ring to the hollow members whereby they may be moved by the rotation of the ring either to positions with their ends lying over the stack opening or to positions with their ends at one side of said opening, a connection for operating the ring, and means connected to the hollow members for registering the pressures therein.

'5. In combination in apparatus for measuring the discharge of a locomotive stack, a

' fixed member secured detachably upon the exterior of the stack at itsupper end, a ring mounted for rotation on the said member, a plurality of hollow members having downwardly directed ends, bell cranks fulcrumed on the fixed member and carrying such hollow members, connections between the cranks and the ring, a connection for operating the ring, and means connected to the hollow members for registering the pressures therein. y

In testimony whereof I have hereunto signed my name in the presence of the two subscribed witnesses.

CHARLES D. YOUNG. Witnesses:

B. C. MCCORMICK, J. T. HANLON.

US79006313A 1913-09-16 1913-09-16 Exhaust-nozzle-testing device. Expired - Lifetime US1288363A (en)

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Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2436429A (en) * 1948-02-24 hanners
US2483637A (en) * 1941-08-29 1949-10-04 Power Jets Res & Dev Ltd Means for testing spraying devices
US2494781A (en) * 1944-09-29 1950-01-17 Stover Emory Frank Fluid meter
US2756591A (en) * 1953-08-20 1956-07-31 William W Hagerty Spray analyzer
US3038335A (en) * 1959-10-07 1962-06-12 William D Scoates Pitot tubes
US4430886A (en) * 1982-01-15 1984-02-14 Nordson Corporation Method and apparatus for sensing clogged nozzle
US5010224A (en) * 1989-06-12 1991-04-23 Lucas Industries, Plc Very small orifice manufacturing system

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2436429A (en) * 1948-02-24 hanners
US2483637A (en) * 1941-08-29 1949-10-04 Power Jets Res & Dev Ltd Means for testing spraying devices
US2494781A (en) * 1944-09-29 1950-01-17 Stover Emory Frank Fluid meter
US2756591A (en) * 1953-08-20 1956-07-31 William W Hagerty Spray analyzer
US3038335A (en) * 1959-10-07 1962-06-12 William D Scoates Pitot tubes
US4430886A (en) * 1982-01-15 1984-02-14 Nordson Corporation Method and apparatus for sensing clogged nozzle
US5010224A (en) * 1989-06-12 1991-04-23 Lucas Industries, Plc Very small orifice manufacturing system

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