US1109319A - Musical instrument. - Google Patents

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US1109319A
US1109319A US74035113A US1913740351A US1109319A US 1109319 A US1109319 A US 1109319A US 74035113 A US74035113 A US 74035113A US 1913740351 A US1913740351 A US 1913740351A US 1109319 A US1109319 A US 1109319A
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valves
openings
accent
controlling
tension
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US74035113A
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Theodore P Brown
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SIMPLEX PLAYER ACTION Co
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SIMPLEX PLAYER ACTION Co
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10FAUTOMATIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10F1/00Automatic musical instruments
    • G10F1/02Pianofortes with keyboard

Description

T. P. BROWN.
MUSICAL INSTRUMENT.
APPLICATION FILED JAN.6,1913.
1,109,319, Patented Sept. 1. 1914.
T. P. BROWN.
MUSICAL INSTRUMENT.
1 APPLICATION FILED JAN. 6, 1913. Patented Sept. 1 4 SHEBTSSHEBT 3.
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Tam/6601'.-
T. P. BROWN. MUSICAL INSTRUMENT.
APPLICATION FILED JAILG, 1913.
Patented Sept. 1, 1914.
4 SHEETS SHEET 4.
9' M775. Mm
UNITED STATES OFFICE.
THEODORE P. naowmot WORCESTER, m ssacnvssrrassslemn so SIIPLEK PLAYER- ACTIfiN commas, A conronn'rxou or IASSACHUSETTS.
MUSICAL ms'rs-Untiirr.
Specification of Letters l'atenti.
Patented Sept. 1 1914.
7 '0 all whom it may concern Be it known that I, Tnuonoas P. BROWN, a citizen of the United States, residing at \Vorcester. in the county of Worcester and State of Massachusetts, have invented a new and useful Musical Instrument, of which the following is a specification.
The object of this invention is to arrange a musical instrument, particularly a player piano, so that it can be used for ordinary or unaccented playing, or so that it can be used for accented playing so that any desired note or notes can be played louder than the other notes, such for illustration, as playing the melody of a piece of music louder than the accompaniment.
Specifically speaking, the invention is designed as an improvement on Letters-Patent granted to myself and Peter \Velin, No. 701,535, June 3, 1902.
'The particular point of the present improvement is to design the instrument so that the ordinary or standard note-sheet can be employed therein for the'ordinary playing, and so that a note-sheet of substantially the same width can be employed for accented playing. so that the principal part of the notes can be played either loudly or softly. For example, the instrument, as shown, is designed so that the ordinary 88 note music sheet can be employed for ordinary playing anda note-sheet of the same width can be employed for accented play ing and 76 notes played either loudly or softly, as desired. To accomplish this result the instrument has the usual set of oper ating pneumatics, the usual set of controlling valves' therefor, means for inducing high and low tension, a set of accent or tension controllin valves, and a tracker having a series 0 speaking openings, connections therefrom to the controlling valves, additional connections from part of the openings to the accent valves, and a switching mechanism arranged so that said series of openings can be employed in connection with the controlling valves, or a part thereof, in connection with the controlling valves, and the other part in connection with the accent valves.
When the instrumentis adjusted for accented or solo playing, the middle part or section of the speaking o 'ings is prefer ably employed in connection with the controlling valves and the two end parts or sections in connection with the accent valves and it is usuall preferred, additionally, to provide a num er of accent openings beyond the speaking openings which can be easily donelwithin the limits of the width of the note-sheet. Each accent valve is arranged to control the tension for a number of operatin'gvalves, the ratio being substantially the same throughout a central section ofwthe tracker and increasing toward the ends thereof.
The invention also consists of certain controllin instrumentalities for the various pings which will be hereinafter particular- 12 By these arrangements, and by the use of simple controlling elements, the instrument can.be played either in the ordinary way from the standard or 88 note music sheet, or as an accenting or solo instrument-operating 76 notes "from substantially the same width of note sheet.
'The instrument is illustrated in the accompanying four sheets of drawings, referring to whieh'arid indetail,
Figure 1 is a. front elevation partly in section, Fig. 2 a plan view of the spool box illustrating the switching mechanism,"Fig. 3 is a side elevation of the spool box illustrating the-- connections to the switching mechanism, Figs. 4 and 5* are details illustrating the construction of one of the switches, Fig.1 is a sectional elevation through the valve box, Figs. 7 and 8 are detail views illustrating'the connections of the switching l mechanism, Fig. 9 is a partial front elevation on an enlarged scale illustrating the controlling conneotions, the reversing switch being shown in end view, Fig. 10 is a sectional elevationv looking upwardly on the line 10-10 of Fig. 9, Fig. ll'is a section looking upwardly on the line 11-'11'of Fig. 9, Figs. 12 and 13 are details of the choker reversing mecha-' nism, Fig. 14 is a side elevation of the valve mechanism controlled by the fingerbutton, and Fig. 15 is a'diagrammatie view' illustrating the connections.
Referringto the drawings and in detail, A designates the frame or casing of the instrument.
B designates the spool bong inwhich is arranged thetraclier C andxwhiehi spool box carries the usual set of bearinlgs for receiving a music spool or roll and t a usual takeup spool for drawing the music sheet D forward over the tracker. The usual reversible gearing E is arranged at the right of the spool box so that the take-up roll can be rotated to draw the music sheet forward over the tracker, or the bearings canbe rotated to revolve the music roll and rewind the a music sheet. This is. operated from a pneumatic motor F.
G+G designate the usual bellows oritension-inducing feeders which are operated from pedals 'H-H. The. bellows are connected to a windtrunk. I sothattthe operation of the same will induce a tension or partial vacuum therein. A storagereservoir may be connected, to the-wind trunk if desired; The wind trunk oonnects'through a suitable governor or regulator and tempo valve to the pneumatic motor and the. opera-' tion ofthe motor and the gearing is con trolled by suitable tempo and IG-IOH'JGVQI'B which are connected to the valves and indicaters.
The .parts thus far described may be of any of the ordina or approved constructions and need no urther descri tion..
The Wind trunk I is divided 5 a partit1on 10 into right and left-hand sections, the bellows being connectedto the right-hand section, and the ri l t-hand section being connected to the le -hand section throng a choker, as hereinafter described, "so that in accent or solo playing, ahigh tension will be induced in the right-hand section of the wind trunk and a low tension will be in duced or derived therefrom in the left-hand section of the wind trunk.
K designates the valve box connected to the lower side of which is a set of operating pneumatics L which are usuallyarranged in three banks. The movable leaves of the operating pneumatics are connected to plungers whichare arranged in position to en age the piano action units;
designates the set of controlling valves for the operating neumatics. Each: of these valves is arranged as shown, so as normally to connect its pneumatictto the atmosphere. The .valve M is so'weighted and pro tioned that it requiresthe admission 0 atmospheric pressure 'into the channel 14 to raise it and operate the pneumatic L, no
matter whether the 12 is connected with the low tension orjthe hightension-eio hausters. ,p t
N designates the set of accent or tension controlling valves. Eaeb.,contlfolling valve M is connected, to a. diaphragm 11 and ,a passage 12 extends from between the controlling valve and diap v c to a chamber or compartment 13 in'yvhio' an at'cent valve is arranged. A- passage 14 is carried from underneath the top arranged in connection with-the diaphragms 7o 11 and 15,
p The right-hand end of the wind trunk in which the high tension is induced is connected by a pipe or tube 17 to a passage or chamber Is which runs substantially the 75 length of the valve chest and in which the diaphra s 15 are arranged. The lefthand end mt lwindetrunk in which .low tension is derived when playing with acoenting or solo effect, is connected by m pipe 19 to a 50 chamber 20 which extends substantially the length/of the valve chest. The accent valves are arranged to. cooperate with o gs formedrbetween the chamber-13 and 0 high tension chamber 18 and the low tension g5 chamber 20. Each accent valve is connected to control a plurality of pa 12. by means of holes or openings 21 bored in the partitions, as indicated.
In the'particular instrument shown, there are 88 controlli valves and 19 aeoentcontrolling valves w 'ch are oorrelat as hercinafter describedi Normally, ea accent valve stands in its lowest position, as indicated in Fig. 6 so that the=chamber 13 and passages 12 controlled thereby will .be connected to the low tension so thatif one of the controlling valves connected toany one of said passages 12 is operated, the operat mg pneumatic will be collapsed with the low tension. .On the other hand, if atmos pheric pressure is let in the passe 16 of an accent valve, the same will be 1i and the chamber 13 will be connected with the high tension chamber 18 so that if any con-' trolling valve connected to any of the passages 12controlled. by said accent valve is operated-,: the operating pneumatic thereof will be collapsed with a heavy tension.
Hence, whether the pneumatic is to be collapsed with a low or heavy tension, depends upon the position of its correlated accent valve, which .in turn is controlled by the condition of the tension in meet 16;
The arrangement of the openings in the tracker will now bedescribed, and reference 11:? follow this'descriptinn should be had to The tracker .is provided withthe ordinary 88 speakiag opemngs O, which in the illust tron chosemarespaced nine to the inch.
1 T e tracker. is also provided with an opening by which" the end pedals or position of ,the' hammers can be controlled in the ordinary manner. ingsQ are arranged at the left of the openings O and five extra accent openings R are arranged at the right of the openings 0. Inoperating with the ordinary standard '38 music sheet, the openings 0 are employed. 130
Two extra accent openin playing with solo or accenting effect, the
middle 76 openings S are employed as speaking openings and the seven upper openings T and the five lower openings U. together with the openings R and W are employed as accent controlling openings. Thus it will be seen that the openings T and U are employed in connection with the standard music sheet as speaking openings, and are also employed in connection with accenting or solo playing as accent controlling openings. Thus when playing with solo or accent efi'ect, there are 7 6 speaking openings and 19 accent controlling openings. The accent controlling openings are coupled to the controlling valves, as indicated in the diagram; that is, the first nine accent openings at the right of the openings S are connected so that each controls three controlling valves, the tenth opening four controlling valves, the eleventhopening five controlling valves, and the twelfth opening six controlling valves. The four openings I at the left of the openings S are connected so that each controls three controlling valves, the fifth U to control six controlling valves, the righthand opening Q, to control six controlling valves, and the left-hand opening Q to control ten controlling valves. This correlation of the parts is easily obtained by boring the holes 21 in the proper paititions between the proper passages 12. The T6 openings S are connected by suitable tubes 22 with their respective passages 14 in the valve chest. and the five extra accent openings R and the two extra openings Q are connected directly with their passages 16 by tubes 23. But as the seven openings T and the five openings U are employed in one instance as speaking openings, and in another instance as accent controlling openings, these passages are connected by tubes 24 with switch blocks 26-26 arranged at the rear of the spool box.
Arranged in the switchblocks are two rotary valves 27-27 which are formed by slots or ways out in a shaft 25, the left-hand one of which has five passages and the righthand member of which has seven passages to correspond to the tubes 24. Extending from the lower part of the right-hand switch block 26 are'seven, and extending from the lower part of the left-hand switch block 26 are five tubes 28, each of which is connected with a passage 16 in the valve chest. and also seven tubes and five tubes 29, respectively, each of which is connected with a passage It in the valve chest. Thus when the rotary valves are set to the position shown in Fig. 6, the openings T and U of the tracker will be connected through tubes 28 to operate as accent controlling openings, while when the rotary valves are set to the position shown in Fig. 7 the tracker openings T and U will be connected through tubes 29 to operate as speaking openings.
The switches are operated from a lever 30 inside the spool box. whichv connects by shaft 31. lever 32. link 33, lever 34 to the shaft 25. The shaft is also prefernblv provided with screws 35-35 to limit its travel. The switches are set by lever 30 to the position shown in Fig. 7. for playing with the standard 88 note-sheet and are set in the position indicated in Fig. 6 for playing with the accent or solo effect music sheet. By. the arrangements thus described. the instrument can be played with the standard width 88 note music sheet or by operating the lever 30. a music sheet can be employed which is cut to cooperate with seventy-six speaking openings and with nineteen accent openings. By arranging or correlating these openings. as previously described, I have found that I can get practically all the accenting efiects needed to render any musical composition, and as practically all musical compositions come withinthe range of seventy-six notes, I can change a standard music sheet to an accentor solo etiect music sheet by simply adding the accent controlling perforations thereto.
As shown in Fig. 1.). the accent openings Y are preferably cut slightly in advance of the speaking openings for the notes which are to be accented so as to give the accent valves time to work.
The details of the choker pneumatic will now be described and reference should be had to the third sheet of the drawings.
The left-hand part of the wind trunk is connected by an opening 36 to the inside of a choker pneumatic 37 which is arranged on the-outside of the wind trunk and which is connected to the right-hand section of the same by a pipe 38 and an opening 39 controlled by a valve 40 which is ordinarily held seated by a spring 41. The choker pneumatic is kept normally distended by a spring 42 which 18 loosely arranged on pivots or screws and engaging the end of which is a lever 44 formed on the end of a pivoted rod 45 which has a lever 46 which connects by. link 47 to a controlling lever 48 coacting with which is a spring 49 which tends normally to pull the upper end of the same to the left and thus to leave the spring 42 of the choker pneumatic under a. certain tension. By moving the upper end of the lever to the right, the tension on the spring 42 on the choker pneumatic can be increased and hence the difi'erence between the high and low tension can be made less, or the difference between the tensions can be adjusted by this controlling lever 48, as the choker pneumatic when in operation will only permit such tension in the left-hand part of the wind trunk as is determined by the setting of the spring 42.
A stop 50 is arranged inside of the choker pneumatic to prevent the same from entirely collapsing. The choker has to be tive when playing with accenting or so efi'ect because it is then 11 to have diiferonce in tension in the two sections ofthe wind trunk. When playing with ordinary or standard music, it is not to use the choker and the same -is rendered inoperative by opening the valve 40. -This valve 40 is controlled by an arm 51 extending from n a shaft 52 which has an arm 53 extending therefrom which is set in position to cooperate with the movable leaf of an auxiliary choker pneumatic 54. This auxiliary choker pneumatic is controlled by a valve 55 and 15 connected diaphragm 56 and tube 57 which extends to a switch block 58. Sliding in this block is a reversing valve 59 which has an upwardly extending right-angled passage 60 and a downwardly extending right-angled lo p 61 arranged so that when said valve 1s in its right-hand position, the tube 57 will be connected to an upwardly extending pas- 62 in the block, and so that when it is in 1ts left-hand position, it will be connected to a downwardly extending passage 63.
The valve is controlled by a finger lever 64. Springs 65 and 66 are arranged to control the outlets of the passages 62 and 63, the spring 65 normally standing away from 3 the opening 62 and the spring 66 normally engaging t e passage 63. The spring 65 is he d away from the passage 62 by means of a nut 67 arranged on the shaft 68 of a finger button 69, and also arranged on the end of 5 the shaft 68 is a head 70 which engages the spring 66. Thus in normal position the passage 62 is uncovered and the passage 63 is covered, while by pressing down on the fin r button 69, passage 62 will be closed 40 an passage 63 will be opened. In accent playing, the finger lever 64 is set in the lefthand position. This connects the tube 57 with the passage 63 which is closed, hence the valve 55 stands in the position shown in 45. Fig. 11 and the auxiliary choker pneumatic 54 is connected to the atmosphere, whereby the valve 40 remains closed and the choker becomesoperative to cause the difference in tension between the right and left-hand porlo tions of the wind trunk.
As previously stated, the tension in the left-hand section of the wind trunk can be increased by operating the controlling lever 48. Hence in accent laying, the accented 55 notes are controlled directl by the pedals and the relative loudness o the accompaniment notes is controlled by the lever 48 which, as it is pushed farther to the right, increases the force of the accompaniment 60 notes as the tension of the spring 42 is increased by this action.
Sometimes in accent playing it may be desirable to strike all the notes with high tension or the full degree of force, as in ac- 65 centing a chord. This can be done by pressing down on the finger button 69 which will close passage 62, open passage the valve 55 to operate, the auxiliary: choker pneumatic 54 to collapse, and open the valve 40, and hence allow the same tension in both' sides of the wind trunk.
The usual operation in pla with the standard music is to shift the ger lever 64. to the right, :which will connect the tube 57 with the open passage 62, cause the auxiliary choker pneumatic 54 to collapse, and open the valve 40, so that the choker is inoperative and theplaying is done directly from the bellows or feeders. With this POSI- tion of the parts, if the finger button 69 should be operated, the choker will be brought into 0 ration and all of the playing will be so tened, depending on the adjustment of the choker spring, as all the playing with the standard music sheet is done through the pipe 19. It is also pomible when playing with the standard music sheet, to keep the finger lever 64 at the left and thus normally to play through the choker with whatever effect is obtained by the ad- ?)ustment of the spring thereof, and to accent y pressing down on the finger button 69 Thus by the arrangements described, pleasing and striking effects can be obtained when playing either with the standard music sheet or with the accent or solo music sheet.
The details and arrangements herein shown and described may be greatly varied by a skilled mechanic without departin from the scope of my invention as expressed in the claims.
Having thus fully described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters- Patent is 1. A musical instrument, having a set of operatin pneumatics, a set of controlling valves therefor, means for inducing high tension and low tension, a set of valves for controlling the connection of the neumatics with said means, a tracker having a series of speaking o enings, connections therefrom to the firs valves, additional connections from part of the openings to the second named valves, and a switching mechanism arranged so that said series of openings can be employed in connection with the first named controlling valves, or a art thereof in connection with the controlling valves, and the other part in connection with the second named valves.
2. A musical instrument having a set of operating pneumatics, a set of controlling valves therefor, means for inducing high tension and low tension, a set of accent controlling valves, a tracker having a series of speaking openings, connections therefrom to the controlling valves, additional connections from part of the openings to the ee- 63, cause named controlling centvalves', and a switchin mechanism arranged so that said series 0 openings can be employed in connection with the controlling valves, or a middle part or section thereon in connection with the controlling. valves, and the two end parts or sections in connectioh with the accent valves.
3. A musical instrument having a set of operating neumatics, a set of controllin valves therefor, means for inducing'hig and low tension, a set of accent controlling valves, a tracker having a series of speaking openings, connections from the speaking openings to the controlling valves, additional connections from part of the speaking openings and from the accent openings to the accent valves, and a switching mechanism arranged so that said series of speaking openings can be em loyed in COXlIleCtlOfl with the controlling va ves, or a part thereof, and the accent openings in connection with the accent valves, and the remainder of the speaking openings in connection with the operating valves.
4. A musical instrument having a set of operating pneumatics, a set of controlling valves therefor, means for inducing high and low tension, a set of accent controlling valves, a tracker having a series of speaking openings and accent openings arranged outside the speaking openings, connections from the speaking openings to the controlling va lves, additional connections from part of the speaking openings and from the accent openings to the accent valves, and a switching mechanism arranged so that said series of speaking openings can be employed in connection with the controlling valves, or the end sections thereof and the accent openings in connection with the accent valves, and the remainder of the speaking openings in connection with the operating valves.
5. A musical instrument having a set of operating neumatics, a set of controlling valves therefor, means for inducing high and low tension, a set of accent controlling valves, a tracker having a series of speaking openings and accentopenings arranged outside each end of the speaking openings, connections. from the speakin openings to the controlling valves, additional connections. from part of the speaking openings and from the accent" openings to the accent valves, and a switching mechanism arranged so that said series of speaking openings can be employed in connection with the controlling valves, or the end sections thereof and the accent openings in connection'with the accent valves and the remainder of the speaking openings in connection with the operating valves.
6. A musical instrument having a set of operating pneumatics, a set of controlling valves therefor, means for inducing high an low tension, a set of accent controlling nection wit valves, each accent valve controlling the ten sion for a plurality of the operating valves, a tracker havin a series of speaking openings, connections t erefrom to the controllin valves, additional connections from part 0 the openings to the accent valves, and a switching mechanism arranged so that said series of o nings can be employed in conh the controlling v lves, or a rt thereof in connection with the controlllii valves and the other part in connectionwit the accent valves.
7. A musical instrument having a set of operating pneumatics, a set of controlling valves therefor, means for inducing high and low tension, a set of accent controlling valves. each accent valve controllingthe tension for a numoer of the operating valves, these numbers mcreasm from thecenter of the tracker toward t 1e ends thereof. a tracker having la series of speaking openings, connections t erefrom to the controlling valves, additional connections from part of the openings to the accent' valves, and a switchin mechanism arranged so that Said series 0 o enings'can be employed in connection wit the controlling valves, or a art thereof in connection with the control in valves and the other part in connection wit 1 the accent valves.
8. A musical instrument having a set of operating'pneumatics, a set of controlling valves therefor, means for inducing high and low tension, controlling valves for said means, each last named valve controlling the tension for a number of the operatin valves, these numbers bein substantially t 0' same throughout the entire central section of the tracker and increasing toward the ends thereof, additional connections from part of the openings to the second named va ves, and a switching mechanism arranged so that said series of openings can be employed in connection with the controllin valves, or a part thereof in connection with the controlling valves and the other part in connection with the second named valves.
9. A musical instrument having a' set of operating neumatics, a set of controlling valves therefor, means for inducing high ten-i sion and low tension, aset of accent controlling valves, a tracker having a series of speaking openings, connections therefrom to the controlling valves, additional connections from part of the'openings to the accent valves, and a switchin mechanism arranged so that said series'o openings can be employed in connection with the controlling valves, or a part thereof in connection with the controlling valves and the other partin connection with the accent valves, said switching mechanism comprising two-way valves and connections for setting the same.
v10. A musical instrument having a of operating neumatics, a. set 02 :ontrolhng iiiig valves, a tracker having a series of speaking 0 enings, connections therefrom to te .contro ling yalves, additional connecf t ons spa: partof. he p ngs to the accent valves-and a switching mechanism arranged so thatsaid serismf openings can be employed; in connection ith the controllin valves, or -a part. thereof "n connection wit thercontrolling valves, and-the other part in e ct en 1. 1m I the. ;en I e Said sw t h ng. meh pis m .wmp g two Way v vesla nd connetions fior setting the same.' k musical in11ment-havinga set of operating pneumatics,a set of controlling a ves th r r,- meansienin h and lowztensioh, m ans wherebmh di r n in te anibeiadiu sted a-. set of accent conlves -a; ,tracker. -having a series of speaking openings, connections therefrom tqthe-cgntrolling valves, additional conneci .5 Am pants thei p nings to the acce ivalres, ndi sfw qhmg m ni m rthat said serie -9 wings can be employed in egnneetion-vvith the controlli al e '0 a part;thereofimconnection wit the controlling valves and the other part in connection with the accent valves.
12. A musical instrument having a set of operating neumatics, a set of controlling valves therefor, means for inducing a high tension, 11 spring-actuated choker and passages for deriving a low tension from the high tension, means whereby the tension of th spring can be adjusted, a set of accent controlling valves, a tracker havin a series of speaking openings, connections t erefrom to the controlling valves, additional connections from part of the openings to the accent'valves, anda switching mechanism ar ranged sothat said series of openings can be employed in connection with the control lin valves, or a art thereof in connection wit the controlling valves, and the other part in connectionwith. the accent valves.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my-hand, in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.
THEODORE P. BROWN.
Witnesses:
ALBERT E. FAY, O. FORREST WESSON.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE924355C (en) * 1949-01-31 1955-02-28 Ncr Co Calculating machine with a mobile paper cart

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE924355C (en) * 1949-01-31 1955-02-28 Ncr Co Calculating machine with a mobile paper cart

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