TWI433588B - Led lighting device - Google Patents

Led lighting device Download PDF

Info

Publication number
TWI433588B
TWI433588B TW95146256A TW95146256A TWI433588B TW I433588 B TWI433588 B TW I433588B TW 95146256 A TW95146256 A TW 95146256A TW 95146256 A TW95146256 A TW 95146256A TW I433588 B TWI433588 B TW I433588B
Authority
TW
Taiwan
Prior art keywords
led
bypass switch
constant current
connected
leds
Prior art date
Application number
TW95146256A
Other languages
Chinese (zh)
Other versions
TW200731580A (en
Inventor
Erp Josephus Adrianus Maria Van
Original Assignee
Koninkl Philips Electronics Nv
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to EP05112040 priority Critical
Application filed by Koninkl Philips Electronics Nv filed Critical Koninkl Philips Electronics Nv
Publication of TW200731580A publication Critical patent/TW200731580A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of TWI433588B publication Critical patent/TWI433588B/en

Links

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B33/00Electroluminescent light sources
    • H05B33/02Details
    • H05B33/08Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application
    • H05B33/0803Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application for light emitting diodes [LEDs] comprising only inorganic semiconductor materials
    • H05B33/0806Structural details of the circuit
    • H05B33/0821Structural details of the circuit in the load stage
    • H05B33/0824Structural details of the circuit in the load stage with an active control inside the LED load configuration
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B33/00Electroluminescent light sources
    • H05B33/02Details
    • H05B33/08Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application
    • H05B33/0803Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application for light emitting diodes [LEDs] comprising only inorganic semiconductor materials
    • H05B33/0806Structural details of the circuit
    • H05B33/0809Structural details of the circuit in the conversion stage
    • H05B33/0815Structural details of the circuit in the conversion stage with a controlled switching regulator
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B33/00Electroluminescent light sources
    • H05B33/02Details
    • H05B33/08Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application
    • H05B33/0803Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application for light emitting diodes [LEDs] comprising only inorganic semiconductor materials
    • H05B33/0806Structural details of the circuit
    • H05B33/0821Structural details of the circuit in the load stage
    • H05B33/0824Structural details of the circuit in the load stage with an active control inside the LED load configuration
    • H05B33/083Structural details of the circuit in the load stage with an active control inside the LED load configuration organized essentially in string configuration with shunting switches
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B33/00Electroluminescent light sources
    • H05B33/02Details
    • H05B33/08Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application
    • H05B33/0803Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application for light emitting diodes [LEDs] comprising only inorganic semiconductor materials
    • H05B33/0842Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application for light emitting diodes [LEDs] comprising only inorganic semiconductor materials with control
    • H05B33/0857Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application for light emitting diodes [LEDs] comprising only inorganic semiconductor materials with control of the color point of the light
    • H05B33/086Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application for light emitting diodes [LEDs] comprising only inorganic semiconductor materials with control of the color point of the light involving set point control means
    • H05B33/0863Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application for light emitting diodes [LEDs] comprising only inorganic semiconductor materials with control of the color point of the light involving set point control means by user interfaces
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B20/00Energy efficient lighting technologies
    • Y02B20/30Semiconductor lamps, e.g. solid state lamps [SSL] light emitting diodes [LED] or organic LED [OLED]
    • Y02B20/34Inorganic LEDs
    • Y02B20/341Specially adapted circuits
    • Y02B20/346Switching regulators
    • Y02B20/347Switching regulators configured as a current source

Description

Light-emitting diode light-emitting device

The present invention relates to an LED (Light Emitting Diode) light emitting device comprising at least a first LED and a second LED powered by a switching power supply.

This device is disclosed, for example, in EP 0716485 A1.

In this arrangement, a switched mode power supply (SMPS) is controlled to supply a constant current to one or more LEDs. The LED light output can then be controlled via pulse width modulation by changing the duty cycle of a bypass switch connected in parallel with the / the LEDs.

In terms of energy efficiency, SMPS is superior to linear power supplies. However, the accuracy of the supplied current may be insufficient for all applications because the load changes, which induces transients in the current feedback system used.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a lighting device of the type mentioned in the opening paragraph in which current accuracy is improved while maintaining a relatively low power consumption.

This object is achieved by a lighting device as defined in claim 1.

More specifically, in the above device, the current through the first LED is controlled by a first bypass switch connected in parallel with the first LED, and the current through the second LED is connected in parallel with the second LED. Connected by a second bypass switch to control, the first LED and the second LED are connected in series to the switching power supply Between a first constant current source, and the switched mode power supply is configured to supply a plurality of different output voltages depending on the state of the first bypass switch and the second bypass switch such that the voltage is dependent on the number of LEDs that are illuminated.

Due to the constant current source, a very well defined current is drawn from the power supply. However, since the output voltage varies depending on the state of the LED, the dissipation in the constant current source can be maintained at a low level. No feedback of actual current is required, which prevents instability and transient problems.

In a preferred embodiment, the first LED and the second LED are configured to be controlled by pulse width modulation such that the first LED and the second LED are simultaneously turned on at the beginning of a pulse width modulation period, and The instantaneous disconnection determined by its respective duty cycle during the pulse width modulation period. The voltage of the switched mode power supply can then be configured to rise to a maximum voltage before the start of the pulse width modulation period. This ensures that a sufficient voltage is supplied at the beginning of the cycle.

The device may include means for driving the output voltage to zero or near zero when all LEDs are turned off. This saves extra power.

The first LED and the second LED can emit light of different colors.

The first LED and the second LED can emit light having green and blue colors and can be connected to the first constant current source via a third LED, the third LED being controlled by a third bypass switch. The first LED and the second LED are further connected to a second constant current source via a fourth LED, the fourth LED is controlled by a fourth bypass switch, and the third LED and the fourth LED emit red light. Or amber light. This allows for a complete, controllable RGBA (red-green-blue-amber) source implemented with a single SMPS.

The embodiments described below will be elucidated and will be readily appreciated by the present invention. And other aspects.

Figure 1 illustrates schematically the bypass control of an LED driven by a prior art constant current source. A constant current source (CCS) 1 is configured to feed a constant current I const to an LED 3 (light emitting diode). For example, if the LED is a blue emitting LED, the constant current is typically I const = 700 mA. A bypass switch 5 (typically a MOSFET) is connected in parallel with the LED 3. Using a pulse width modulation (PWM) circuit 7, the bypass switch is fully or fully blocked by PWM control. When the bypass switch 5 is fully conductive, it bypasses the LED 3 so that the LED stops emitting light. Therefore, it is possible to control the luminous flux from the LED by changing the duty cycle of the bypass switch 5. This is done at a switching frequency (eg, 150 Hz or higher) that is high enough to prevent any visible flicker.

It is possible to have two LEDs (each with a bypass switch) sharing a common current source. The two LED/bypass switch combinations are then connected in series with each other. The requirements are: LEDs use the same drive current (for example, red-emitting LEDs and amber-emitting LEDs (350 mA) or blue-emitting LEDs and green-emitting LEDs (700 mA)).

Figure 2 illustrates the available color gamut of an RGB LED configuration with a chromaticity diagram in which the LEDs are controlled by a bypass switch. By using a combination of a red-emitting (R) LED, a green-emitting (G)-emitting LED, and a blue-emitting (B)-emitting LED in combination, a color triangle covering a larger portion of the entire color gamut 11 can be achieved. 9. In order to emit light having a desired color 13, a PWM circuit of each LED is given a predetermined duty cycle such that the correct amount of light is emitted from each LED to produce Want color.

Figure 3a schematically illustrates an LED lighting device in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention. It should be noted that since a switched mode power supply (SMPS) typically has a much better energy efficiency than a linear power supply, it is considered advantageous to use a switched mode power supply (SMPS).

It is possible to use an SMPS as a constant current source by placing a shunt resistor in series with the supplied LED and to adjust the SMPS based on the voltage across the shunt resistor to supply the correct current. This method is described, for example, in EP 0716485 A1. However, in practice, this can be quite complicated due to high current accuracy requirements.

Thus, in one embodiment of the invention, a different scheme is used to control an SMPS. The embodiment shown in Figure 3a has a first LED 15 and a second LED 17, which are connected in series and require the same constant current (e.g., a red-emitting LED and an amber-emitting LED). The first LED 15 is controlled by a first bypass switch 19 that receives a first control signal sw 1 . The second LED 17 is controlled by a second bypass switch 21 that receives a second control signal sw 2 . The bypass switches are connected in parallel with the respective LEDs to PWM control the current through the LEDs as described above. LED15,17 by having a system output voltage V out of the switching mode power supply (SMPS) 8 powered. The SMPS is also PWM controlled but at a much higher frequency (eg, a few hundred kHz). However, the output voltage V out not by measuring the current through the LED is controlled. Rather, the LEDs are connected in series between the SMPS 8 and a constant current source (CCS) 25.

As long as the output voltage V out is sufficiently high, i.e., to ensure that the constant current source 25 via a bypass switch LED 15,17 or 19, 21 (when open) to draw a current of a constant and predetermined.

Figure 3b shows an example of one of the constant current sources 25 used in Figure 3a in more detail. The constant current source is known per se and includes a first bipolar transistor T1 and a second bipolar transistor T2 whose base is connected to the base. The first transistor T1 is a diode-coupled (collector-base) and its collector is connected to a reference voltage V ref via a first resistor R1. The emitter of the first bipolar transistor T1 is connected to ground via a second resistor R2. The emitter of the second bipolar transistor T2 is connected to ground via a third resistor R3. This circuit will draw the constant current I const at the collector of the second bipolar transistor T2. The constant current is through the first resistor R1, the second resistor R2, the third resistor R3, the reference voltage Vref, and the base-emitter of the first bipolar transistor T1 and the second bipolar transistor T2. The voltage (which is all constant) is determined.

As is apparent from Figure 3a, as soon as a bypass switch 19, 21 is activated, the voltage drop across the third resistor R3 in Figure 3b will increase. Thus, when the output voltage V out remains constant, the constant current source to the relatively high power dissipation. Of course, there is a constant current source topology that is different from the topology illustrated in Figure 3b, but this problem remains.

Thus, the SMPS 8 in this embodiment of the invention is adapted to supply a number of different voltages depending on the state of the bypass switches 19,21. This means that the output voltage V out will depend on the number of the activated LED varies. Typically, the SMPS 8 receives the control signals sw 1 and sw 2 of the bypass switches 19, 21 as input signals. Therefore, when the bypass switches 19, 21 are not running and the two light emitting LED 15,17, the output voltage V out having a first high voltage. If one of the bypass switches 19, 21 is activated, the output voltage is forced to drop to a second, lower value. If both bypass switches are activated, the output voltage V out can be changed to 0V or close to 0V, thereby constituting a third value. Therefore, the power dissipation in the constant current source 25 can be maintained at a low level. The SMPS 8 is preferably any type of step down or step down converter.

Figure 4 illustrates an embodiment of the invention in which an RGBA illumination configuration is implemented. In this embodiment, four LEDs (red 29, green 31, blue 33, amber 35) are used, each having a bypass switch 37, 39, 41, and 43, respectively. Each of the bypass switches 37, 39, 41, 43 receives a PWM control signal R, Gr, Bl, A to control the luminous flux of the respective LED.

The red-emitting LED 29 is coupled to a first constant current source 45, which includes a resistor R4 in series with a transistor T3. The LED 35 that emits amber light is coupled to a first constant current source 47 that includes a resistor R5 in series with a transistor T4. The bases of transistors T3 and T4 can be connected to a common voltage reference Vref . The first constant current source 45 and the second constant current source 47 are preferably identical such that they draw the same current, which may be 350 mA for red and amber LEDs.

The red-emitting LED 29 and its bypass switch 37 and a series connected constant current source 45 are connected in parallel with the amber-emitting LED 35 and its bypass switch 43 and a series connected constant current source 47. Therefore, these circuits can draw a total current of 700 mA, which is a suitable driving current for the LED 31 emitting green light and the LED 33 emitting blue light. Therefore, the green-emitting LED 31 and the blue-emitting LED 33 together with its bypass switches 39, 41 can be combined with the red-emitting LED 29 and the amber-emitting LED 35. The parallel configuration is connected in series. Therefore, it is possible to supply all of the LEDs from one common SMPS 49. In this embodiment, the red-emitting LED and the amber-emitting LED should be controlled in a synchronized manner. However, this requirement is compatible with most color control schemes.

In order to minimize dissipation in the constant current sources 45, 47, the SMPS 49 should be able to treat the red-emitting LED and the amber-emitting LED as one, depending on the number of LEDs that are turned on (0, 1, 2, or 3, Four different output voltages are output because of their synchronous switching. Therefore, the feedback network 51 of the SMPS 49 is adapted to receive the PWM control signals Gr, B1, A/R of the bypass switches 37, 39, 41, 43. Feedback network 51 receives the output voltage V out, which by a capacitor C1 and an output filter. A voltage divider comprising two resistors R6 and R7 is coupled between the SMPS output and ground and produces a divided feedback voltage Vf. In addition to resistor R6, three resistors R8, R9 and R10 are connected between the SMPS output and resistor R7. The resistor R8 is connected via a switch 53, which is controlled by the PWM control signal Gr of the bypass switch 39 of the green light emitting LED 31. Therefore, if the green LED 31 is turned off, the switch 53 is turned on. Similarly, the resistor R9 is connected via a switch 55 which is controlled by the PWM control signal B1 of the bypass switch 41 of the blue LED 33. The resistor R10 is connected via a switch 57 which is controlled by the PWM control signal A/R of the bypass switch 37 and 43 of the red light emitting LED 29 and the amber light emitting LED 35. Therefore, the voltage divider function of the voltage divider network will vary depending on the number of LEDs that are turned on. For example, if all LEDs are turned on:

If the blue light emitting LED 33 is subsequently turned off, the feedback partial voltage V f is increased to

In the SMPS 49, the feedback partial voltage Vf is compared to an internal reference, and the output voltage is increased or decreased according to this comparison. Thus, as described above, if the feedback voltage V f partial disconnected when the blue LED is increased, the output voltage V out decreases. This maintains the voltage across the constant current sources 45, 47 at a low level, thus preventing an increase in power dissipation therein. This means not only saving energy. The constant current sources 45, 47 can also have a lower heat dissipation performance than if the SMPS output voltage is not adjusted in this way.

Of course, this circuit can be adapted to other combinations of LEDs, for example, RRGB (two red-emitting LEDs, one green-emitting LED and one blue-emitting LED), RGB or CMY (green-emitting LED, emission purple) Light LEDs and LEDs that emit yellow light).

Figure 5 illustrates a timing diagram of the configuration of Figure 4. In the upper part, Figure 5 illustrates the output voltage V out during a PWM period 61, the period 61 may be (e.g.) 2ms in length. The lower portion shows the inversion of the LED PWM control signals Gr, Bl, R, A (as previously described, synchronously switching R and A). When these signals are at level 1, the corresponding LEDs therefore illuminate. In the illustrated example, light having a predetermined color should be emitted. In order to obtain this color, in each PWM cycle, the green-emitting LED emits light during a first time period 63, and the blue-emitting LED emits light during a second longer time period 65, and the red-emitting LED and The LED emitting amber light illuminates during a third longer period 67. For all LEDs, the emission of light starts at the same time, but ends at different points in time. The output voltage V out 61 with a first initial maximum voltage V max PWM period begins. When the green-emitting LED is turned off at the end of the first time period 63, the voltage drops to a second, lower voltage. Similarly, when the blue-emitting LED is turned off, the voltage is further dropped to a third level. Finally, when the red-emitting LED and the amber-emitting LED are turned off, the voltage drops to a fourth minimum voltage. At the beginning of the subsequent PWM cycle, all LEDs are turned "on" and the SMPS output voltage is again restored to the first initial maximum voltage Vmax (i.e., the voltage used when all LEDs are turned on).

Referring to Figures 4 and 5, the circuit shown in Figure 4 can be modified in two ways to improve its functionality.

First, optional components can be provided to ensure that the output voltage is zero or near zero when all LEDs are turned off. This can be, for example, a circuit 69 having a logic AND gate that has its output high when all of Gr, Bl, and A/R go high. This gate can then be used to drive a switch 71 that shorts the resistor R6, thus driving the output voltage to a very low value. This saves some energy consumption.

Second, the member may be provided to ensure that the output voltage has risen before the beginning of each PWM period, so that the output voltage V out when the initial turns the LED has reached the first maximum voltage V max. This can be accomplished by adding an optional switch 73 that is configured to disconnect resistors R8, R9, and R10 for a short period of time before the start of the PWM period. This ensures that the constant current source can already draw the correct current from the beginning, thus eliminating potential color errors. If the optional switch 73 is not used, the resistors R8, R9 and R10 are instead directly connected to the voltage dividers of the resistors R6 and R7.

In summary, the present invention is directed to a plurality of LED drive circuits in which each LED is controlled by a bypass switch. The LED is powered by a switched power supply and is coupled to a constant current source to capture a predetermined current through the LED. The switched mode power supply is configured to output different voltages depending on the number of LEDs that are turned on. This is done by supplying a control signal of the bypass switch to the switching power supply. In this way, the power dissipation of the constant current source can be maintained at a low level.

The invention is not limited to the embodiments described above. The invention may be varied in different ways within the scope of the appended claims.

1‧‧‧ Constant Current Source (CCS)

3‧‧‧Lighting diode (LED)

5‧‧‧ Bypass switch

7‧‧‧ Pulse width modulation (PWM) circuit

8‧‧‧Switching Power Supply/SMPS

9‧‧‧Color triangle

11‧‧‧ color gamut

13‧‧‧ desired color

15‧‧‧First LED/LED

17‧‧‧Second LED/LED

19‧‧‧First bypass switch/bypass switch

21‧‧‧Second bypass switch/bypass switch

25‧‧‧ Constant Current Source (CCS)

29‧‧‧Fourth LED/Red LED/Red LED

31‧‧‧Second LED/Green LED/Green LED

33‧‧‧First LED/Blue LED/Blue LED

35‧‧‧ Third LED/Amber emitting LED

37‧‧‧fourth bypass switch/bypass switch

39‧‧‧Second bypass switch/bypass switch

41‧‧‧First bypass switch/bypass switch

43‧‧‧ Third bypass switch/bypass switch

45‧‧‧Constant current source

47‧‧‧Constant current source

49‧‧‧Switched Power Supply/SMPS

51‧‧‧Reward network

53‧‧‧ switch

55‧‧‧Switch

57‧‧‧ switch

61‧‧‧PWM cycle

63‧‧‧First time period

65‧‧‧Second longer time period

67‧‧‧ third longer period

69‧‧‧ Circuitry

71‧‧‧ switch

73‧‧‧Optional switch

C1‧‧‧ output capacitor

I const ‧‧‧constant current

R, Gr, Bl, A, A/R‧‧‧ PWM control signals

R10‧‧‧Resistors

R1‧‧‧ first resistor

R2‧‧‧second resistor

R3‧‧‧ third resistor

R4‧‧‧Resistors

R5‧‧‧Resistors

R6‧‧‧Resistors

R7‧‧‧Resistors

R8‧‧‧Resistors

R9‧‧‧Resistors

SW1, SW2‧‧‧ control signals

T1‧‧‧First bipolar transistor/first transistor

T2‧‧‧Second bipolar transistor

T3‧‧‧O crystal

T4‧‧‧O crystal

V f ‧‧‧ feedback partial pressure

V max ‧‧‧first initial maximum voltage

V out ‧‧‧output voltage

V ref ‧‧‧reference voltage / common voltage reference

Figure 1 illustrates schematically the bypass control of an LED driven by a prior art constant current source.

Figure 2 illustrates the available color gamut of an RGB LED configuration.

Figure 3a schematically illustrates an LED lighting device in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

Figure 3b shows an example of one of the constant current sources used in Figure 3a in more detail.

Figure 4 illustrates an embodiment of the invention in which an RGBA illumination configuration is implemented.

Figure 5 illustrates a timing diagram of the configuration of Figure 4.

8‧‧‧Switching Power Supply/SMPS

15‧‧‧First LED/LED

17‧‧‧Second LED/LED

19‧‧‧First bypass switch/bypass switch

21‧‧‧Second bypass switch/bypass switch

25‧‧‧ Constant Current Source (CCS)

I const ‧‧‧constant current

R1‧‧‧ first resistor

R2‧‧‧second resistor

R3‧‧‧ third resistor

SW 1 , SW 2 ‧‧‧ control signals

T1‧‧‧First bipolar transistor/first transistor

T2‧‧‧Second bipolar transistor

V out ‧‧‧output voltage

V ref ‧‧‧reference voltage / common voltage reference

Claims (6)

  1. A light emitting diode (LED) light emitting device comprising at least a first LED and a second LED (15, 17; 33, 31) powered by a switched mode power supply (8; 49) The current through the first LED (15; 33) is controlled by a first bypass switch (19; 41) connected in parallel with the first LED, through the second LED (17; 31) The current is controlled by a second bypass switch (21; 39) connected in parallel with the second LED, the first LED and the second LED being connected in series to the switched power supply and a first constant current source ( 25; between 47), and wherein the switching power supply is configured to pass depending on the state of the first switch and the second bypass switch of a number of different output voltages supplied (V out), so that the voltage depends The number of LEDs that are illuminated.
  2. The LED lighting device of claim 1, wherein the first LED and the second LED are configured to be controlled by pulse width modulation such that the first LED and the second LED begin in a pulse width modulation period The time is simultaneously turned on, and during the pulse width modulation period, the instantaneous disconnection determined by its respective duty cycle.
  3. The LED lighting device of claim 2, wherein the switching power supply is configured to rise to a maximum voltage before the beginning of the pulse width modulation period.
  4. The LED lighting device of any one of claims 1 to 3, comprising means for driving the output voltage to zero or near zero when all LEDs are turned off.
  5. The LED lighting device of any one of claims 1 to 3, wherein the first LED and the second LED emit light of a different color.
  6. The LED lighting device of claim 5, wherein the first LED and the second LED (33, 31) respectively emit a green and a blue light, and the LEDs are connected to the third LED (35) via a third LED (35) The first constant current source (47) is controlled by a third bypass switch (43), wherein the first LED and the second LED are via a fourth LED (29) And connected to a second constant current source (45), the fourth LED (29) is controlled by a fourth bypass switch (37), and wherein the third LED and the fourth LED emit red light or Amber light.
TW95146256A 2005-12-13 2006-12-08 Led lighting device TWI433588B (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
EP05112040 2005-12-13

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
TW200731580A TW200731580A (en) 2007-08-16
TWI433588B true TWI433588B (en) 2014-04-01

Family

ID=37945009

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
TW95146256A TWI433588B (en) 2005-12-13 2006-12-08 Led lighting device

Country Status (8)

Country Link
US (3) US8004211B2 (en)
EP (1) EP1964449B1 (en)
JP (2) JP5543109B2 (en)
KR (1) KR101315078B1 (en)
CN (1) CN101331796B (en)
ES (1) ES2509347T3 (en)
TW (1) TWI433588B (en)
WO (1) WO2007069200A1 (en)

Families Citing this family (58)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
TWI433588B (en) * 2005-12-13 2014-04-01 Koninkl Philips Electronics Nv Led lighting device
US8791645B2 (en) * 2006-02-10 2014-07-29 Honeywell International Inc. Systems and methods for controlling light sources
AT504949B1 (en) * 2007-02-20 2008-11-15 Zizala Lichtsysteme Gmbh Circuit arrangement for detecting a short-circuit of luminous diodes
EP2177080B1 (en) * 2007-07-23 2019-05-29 Nxp B.V. Led arrangement with bypass driving
US8373346B2 (en) 2007-08-06 2013-02-12 Nxp B.V. Solid state lighting system and a driver integrated circuit for driving light emitting semiconductor devices
DE102007047847B4 (en) * 2007-11-22 2018-02-22 Swarco Traffic Systems Gmbh Traffic signal system with signal transmitters and a control device for controlling lights in the signalers
WO2009093895A1 (en) * 2008-01-21 2009-07-30 Eldolab Holding B.V. A method for producing a led assembly and led assembly produced by the method
TW200934294A (en) * 2008-01-24 2009-08-01 Everbright Optech Inc Apparatus for controlling light emitting devices
US8851356B1 (en) 2008-02-14 2014-10-07 Metrospec Technology, L.L.C. Flexible circuit board interconnection and methods
US10334735B2 (en) 2008-02-14 2019-06-25 Metrospec Technology, L.L.C. LED lighting systems and methods
US8143631B2 (en) 2008-03-06 2012-03-27 Metrospec Technology Llc Layered structure for use with high power light emitting diode systems
US8007286B1 (en) 2008-03-18 2011-08-30 Metrospec Technology, Llc Circuit boards interconnected by overlapping plated through holes portions
US8508204B2 (en) 2008-03-19 2013-08-13 Nxp B.V. Controller and method of operating a controller
US8410720B2 (en) 2008-04-07 2013-04-02 Metrospec Technology, LLC. Solid state lighting circuit and controls
CN102090145B (en) 2008-07-09 2013-09-25 Nxp股份有限公司 A switched mode power converter and method of operating the same
EP2302706A4 (en) * 2008-07-15 2012-02-15 Sharp Kk Light emitting element driving circuit
US8643284B2 (en) 2008-08-15 2014-02-04 Eldolab Holdings B.V. LED assembly driving circuit
US8552658B2 (en) * 2008-08-28 2013-10-08 Marvell World Trade Ltd. Light-emitting diode (LED) driver and controller
DE102008047731A1 (en) 2008-09-18 2010-03-25 Hella Kgaa Hueck & Co. Lighting device i.e. headlight, failure detecting method for motor vehicle, involves detecting failure of LEDs by determining or evaluating voltage drop of LEDs, where evaluation takes place by comparing voltage drop with reference value
US7986107B2 (en) * 2008-11-06 2011-07-26 Lumenetix, Inc. Electrical circuit for driving LEDs in dissimilar color string lengths
EP2364059A3 (en) 2008-12-08 2011-11-16 Delphi Technologies, Inc. Device with several lamps switched in series
JP5289084B2 (en) * 2009-02-05 2013-09-11 三菱電機株式会社 Power supply circuit and lighting device
JP5225135B2 (en) * 2009-02-10 2013-07-03 三菱電機株式会社 Power supply circuit and lighting device
JP2010257026A (en) * 2009-04-22 2010-11-11 Mitsubishi Electric Corp Power supply circuit and illuminator
DE102009025752B4 (en) * 2009-05-06 2011-06-16 Lear Corp. Method and circuit arrangement for controlling a load
JP2010272410A (en) * 2009-05-22 2010-12-02 Hitachi Displays Ltd Backlight device, and display apparatus
KR101637345B1 (en) * 2009-08-17 2016-07-07 엘지전자 주식회사 Method for driving a light-emitting diode circuit and a light-emitting diode circuit of the method
CN101674693B (en) * 2009-10-01 2012-07-18 英飞特电子(杭州)有限公司 Multichannel constant-current control circuit applicable to LED driver
CN102102814B (en) * 2009-12-17 2012-09-05 宇威光电股份有限公司 Luminous device
CN102480824B (en) * 2010-11-30 2014-05-14 数能科技股份有限公司 Cascading LED driving circuit
KR101043533B1 (en) * 2011-01-10 2011-06-23 이동원 Led lighting device with high effiency power supply
US8890435B2 (en) 2011-03-11 2014-11-18 Ilumi Solutions, Inc. Wireless lighting control system
US10321541B2 (en) 2011-03-11 2019-06-11 Ilumi Solutions, Inc. LED lighting device
TWI441560B (en) * 2011-06-30 2014-06-11 Interlight Optotech Corp Light-emitting diode module and method for operating the same
EP2734014B1 (en) * 2011-07-15 2017-08-30 Citizen Watch Co., Ltd. Led illumination device
US9572234B2 (en) * 2011-07-29 2017-02-14 Dana D. Stefanoff LED control module
CN103052201A (en) * 2011-10-13 2013-04-17 欧司朗股份有限公司 LED control circuit, LED illuminating device and short circuit protection method
US9706610B2 (en) 2011-10-18 2017-07-11 Atmel Corporation Driving circuits for light emitting elements
US8917026B2 (en) 2011-12-20 2014-12-23 Lumenetix, Inc. Linear bypass electrical circuit for driving LED strings
WO2013137597A1 (en) * 2012-03-13 2013-09-19 Lee Dong Won Led lighting device for reusing load current
KR101264192B1 (en) * 2012-04-27 2013-05-15 구한일 An air signboard equipped with led module
CN103458551A (en) * 2012-05-28 2013-12-18 冯向光 Switch LED drive circuit and LED lighting system
JP6145927B2 (en) * 2012-06-01 2017-06-14 パナソニックIpマネジメント株式会社 Lighting device and vehicle headlamp
CN203072200U (en) * 2012-12-12 2013-07-17 欧司朗股份有限公司 Current compensation device and illumination equipment having the same
EP2757861B1 (en) * 2013-01-16 2019-03-06 Lightcube S.r.l. Led lighting module with variable colour temperature.
US9844113B2 (en) * 2013-01-25 2017-12-12 Dialog Semiconductor Inc. Adjusting color temperature in a dimmable LED lighting system
US9743473B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-08-22 Lumenetix, Inc. Cascade LED driver and control methods
JP6259649B2 (en) * 2013-12-06 2018-01-10 株式会社小糸製作所 Vehicle lighting
US9913331B2 (en) 2014-05-30 2018-03-06 Philips Lighting Holding B.V. LED lighting circuit fed by current source
CN104009798B (en) * 2014-06-13 2016-09-14 中国人民解放军信息工程大学 A kind of visible light communication equipment and system
AT516175B1 (en) * 2014-10-13 2016-03-15 Fachhochschule Technikum Wien Device for radiating data via a lighting system
CN104540291B (en) * 2014-12-30 2017-12-29 广州市珠江灯光科技有限公司 Light-emitting device and control method
US10339796B2 (en) 2015-07-07 2019-07-02 Ilumi Sulutions, Inc. Wireless control device and methods thereof
EP3145277A1 (en) 2015-09-17 2017-03-22 Nxp B.V. Circuits, controllers and methods for controlling led strings or circuits
US10251225B2 (en) 2015-12-28 2019-04-02 Eaton Intelligent Power Limited Multi-mode power supply for an LED illumination device
WO2017209345A1 (en) * 2016-06-03 2017-12-07 강해일 Led lamp using power separation relay
KR101665296B1 (en) * 2016-06-10 2016-10-13 강해일 LED lamp used power separate relay
JP2018106049A (en) * 2016-12-27 2018-07-05 ソニー株式会社 Light source device, light-emitting device, and display device

Family Cites Families (145)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4017847A (en) 1975-11-14 1977-04-12 Bell Telephone Laboratories, Incorporated Luminous indicator with zero standby power
US4198629A (en) * 1977-06-06 1980-04-15 General Electric Company Numerical display using plural light sources and having a reduced and substantially constant current requirement
DE3832109A1 (en) * 1988-09-21 1990-03-22 Juergen Munz Luminaire
KR950015992A (en) * 1993-11-17 1995-06-17 이동우 A light emitting element control circuit
JP3224948B2 (en) * 1994-08-30 2001-11-05 株式会社小糸製作所 Lighting circuit of the discharge lamp
CA2159842A1 (en) 1994-12-05 1996-06-06 Joe A. Ortiz Diode drive current source
US5688042A (en) 1995-11-17 1997-11-18 Lumacell, Inc. LED lamp
US6150771A (en) 1997-06-11 2000-11-21 Precision Solar Controls Inc. Circuit for interfacing between a conventional traffic signal conflict monitor and light emitting diodes replacing a conventional incandescent bulb in the signal
US20050099824A1 (en) 2000-08-04 2005-05-12 Color Kinetics, Inc. Methods and systems for medical lighting
US7352339B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2008-04-01 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions Diffuse illumination systems and methods
US6975079B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2005-12-13 Color Kinetics Incorporated Systems and methods for controlling illumination sources
US6781329B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2004-08-24 Color Kinetics Incorporated Methods and apparatus for illumination of liquids
US20050275626A1 (en) 2000-06-21 2005-12-15 Color Kinetics Incorporated Entertainment lighting system
US7113541B1 (en) 1997-08-26 2006-09-26 Color Kinetics Incorporated Method for software driven generation of multiple simultaneous high speed pulse width modulated signals
US7064498B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2006-06-20 Color Kinetics Incorporated Light-emitting diode based products
US6774584B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2004-08-10 Color Kinetics, Incorporated Methods and apparatus for sensor responsive illumination of liquids
US6720745B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2004-04-13 Color Kinetics, Incorporated Data delivery track
US7482764B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2009-01-27 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Light sources for illumination of liquids
US7427840B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2008-09-23 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Methods and apparatus for controlling illumination
US7042172B2 (en) 2000-09-01 2006-05-09 Color Kinetics Incorporated Systems and methods for providing illumination in machine vision systems
US6608453B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2003-08-19 Color Kinetics Incorporated Methods and apparatus for controlling devices in a networked lighting system
US6717376B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2004-04-06 Color Kinetics, Incorporated Automotive information systems
US6211626B1 (en) 1997-08-26 2001-04-03 Color Kinetics, Incorporated Illumination components
US6936978B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2005-08-30 Color Kinetics Incorporated Methods and apparatus for remotely controlled illumination of liquids
US7242152B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2007-07-10 Color Kinetics Incorporated Systems and methods of controlling light systems
US6624597B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2003-09-23 Color Kinetics, Inc. Systems and methods for providing illumination in machine vision systems
US6801003B2 (en) 2001-03-13 2004-10-05 Color Kinetics, Incorporated Systems and methods for synchronizing lighting effects
US7300192B2 (en) 2002-10-03 2007-11-27 Color Kinetics Incorporated Methods and apparatus for illuminating environments
US6888322B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2005-05-03 Color Kinetics Incorporated Systems and methods for color changing device and enclosure
US6897624B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2005-05-24 Color Kinetics, Incorporated Packaged information systems
US20020074559A1 (en) 1997-08-26 2002-06-20 Dowling Kevin J. Ultraviolet light emitting diode systems and methods
US20020113555A1 (en) 1997-08-26 2002-08-22 Color Kinetics, Inc. Lighting entertainment system
US7231060B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2007-06-12 Color Kinetics Incorporated Systems and methods of generating control signals
US7187141B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2007-03-06 Color Kinetics Incorporated Methods and apparatus for illumination of liquids
US7550935B2 (en) 2000-04-24 2009-06-23 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc Methods and apparatus for downloading lighting programs
US6967448B2 (en) 1997-12-17 2005-11-22 Color Kinetics, Incorporated Methods and apparatus for controlling illumination
US7186003B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2007-03-06 Color Kinetics Incorporated Light-emitting diode based products
US6016038A (en) 1997-08-26 2000-01-18 Color Kinetics, Inc. Multicolored LED lighting method and apparatus
US7202613B2 (en) 2001-05-30 2007-04-10 Color Kinetics Incorporated Controlled lighting methods and apparatus
US6528954B1 (en) 1997-08-26 2003-03-04 Color Kinetics Incorporated Smart light bulb
US20070086912A1 (en) 1997-08-26 2007-04-19 Color Kinetics Incorporated Ultraviolet light emitting diode systems and methods
US7598686B2 (en) 1997-12-17 2009-10-06 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Organic light emitting diode methods and apparatus
PT1422975E (en) 2000-04-24 2010-07-09 Philips Solid State Lighting Light-emitting diode based product
US6869204B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2005-03-22 Color Kinetics Incorporated Light fixtures for illumination of liquids
US6806659B1 (en) 1997-08-26 2004-10-19 Color Kinetics, Incorporated Multicolored LED lighting method and apparatus
US7031920B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2006-04-18 Color Kinetics Incorporated Lighting control using speech recognition
US7598681B2 (en) 2001-05-30 2009-10-06 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Methods and apparatus for controlling devices in a networked lighting system
US6459919B1 (en) 1997-08-26 2002-10-01 Color Kinetics, Incorporated Precision illumination methods and systems
US7038399B2 (en) 2001-03-13 2006-05-02 Color Kinetics Incorporated Methods and apparatus for providing power to lighting devices
US6292901B1 (en) 1997-08-26 2001-09-18 Color Kinetics Incorporated Power/data protocol
US6965205B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2005-11-15 Color Kinetics Incorporated Light emitting diode based products
US7132804B2 (en) 1997-12-17 2006-11-07 Color Kinetics Incorporated Data delivery track
US6548967B1 (en) 1997-08-26 2003-04-15 Color Kinetics, Inc. Universal lighting network methods and systems
US6777891B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2004-08-17 Color Kinetics, Incorporated Methods and apparatus for controlling devices in a networked lighting system
US7385359B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2008-06-10 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Information systems
US7038398B1 (en) 1997-08-26 2006-05-02 Color Kinetics, Incorporated Kinetic illumination system and methods
US7358929B2 (en) 2001-09-17 2008-04-15 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Tile lighting methods and systems
US20050174473A1 (en) 1999-11-18 2005-08-11 Color Kinetics, Inc. Photography methods and systems
US7764026B2 (en) 1997-12-17 2010-07-27 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Systems and methods for digital entertainment
US20040052076A1 (en) 1997-08-26 2004-03-18 Mueller George G. Controlled lighting methods and apparatus
US7161313B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2007-01-09 Color Kinetics Incorporated Light emitting diode based products
US7303300B2 (en) 2000-09-27 2007-12-04 Color Kinetics Incorporated Methods and systems for illuminating household products
US6570505B1 (en) 1997-12-30 2003-05-27 Gelcore Llc LED lamp with a fault-indicating impedance-changing circuit
EP0967590A1 (en) 1998-06-25 1999-12-29 Hewlett-Packard Company Optical display device using LEDs and its operating method
US6461019B1 (en) 1998-08-28 2002-10-08 Fiber Optic Designs, Inc. Preferred embodiment to LED light string
US6072280A (en) 1998-08-28 2000-06-06 Fiber Optic Designs, Inc. Led light string employing series-parallel block coupling
GB9821343D0 (en) 1998-10-02 1998-11-25 Tec Electrical Components Limi Dimmer circuit for a led
EP1006506A1 (en) * 1998-12-03 2000-06-07 Hewlett-Packard Company Optical vehicle display
US7353071B2 (en) 1999-07-14 2008-04-01 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Method and apparatus for authoring and playing back lighting sequences
US7139617B1 (en) 1999-07-14 2006-11-21 Color Kinetics Incorporated Systems and methods for authoring lighting sequences
US7233831B2 (en) 1999-07-14 2007-06-19 Color Kinetics Incorporated Systems and methods for controlling programmable lighting systems
WO2001024584A1 (en) 1999-09-29 2001-04-05 Color Kinetics, Inc. Systems and methods for calibrating light output by light-emitting diodes
US6153980A (en) 1999-11-04 2000-11-28 Philips Electronics North America Corporation LED array having an active shunt arrangement
US7014336B1 (en) 1999-11-18 2006-03-21 Color Kinetics Incorporated Systems and methods for generating and modulating illumination conditions
US20030133292A1 (en) 1999-11-18 2003-07-17 Mueller George G. Methods and apparatus for generating and modulating white light illumination conditions
US20020176259A1 (en) 1999-11-18 2002-11-28 Ducharme Alfred D. Systems and methods for converting illumination
US6762563B2 (en) * 1999-11-19 2004-07-13 Gelcore Llc Module for powering and monitoring light-emitting diodes
AU7001801A (en) 2000-06-21 2002-01-02 Color Kinetics Inc Method and apparatus for controlling a lighting system in response to an audio input
US7161556B2 (en) 2000-08-07 2007-01-09 Color Kinetics Incorporated Systems and methods for programming illumination devices
AU8540801A (en) 2000-08-07 2002-02-18 Color Kinetics Inc Automatic configuration systems and methods for lighting and other applications
US6580228B1 (en) 2000-08-22 2003-06-17 Light Sciences Corporation Flexible substrate mounted solid-state light sources for use in line current lamp sockets
US6636003B2 (en) 2000-09-06 2003-10-21 Spectrum Kinetics Apparatus and method for adjusting the color temperature of white semiconduct or light emitters
US6431719B1 (en) 2000-09-22 2002-08-13 Sharper Image Corporation Dynamic display night light
USD463610S1 (en) 2001-03-13 2002-09-24 Color Kinetics, Inc. Lighting fixture
US7358679B2 (en) 2002-05-09 2008-04-15 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Dimmable LED-based MR16 lighting apparatus and methods
USD468035S1 (en) 2001-03-14 2002-12-31 Color Kinetics, Inc. Lighting fixture
USD457667S1 (en) 2001-03-21 2002-05-21 Color Kinetics, Inc. Accent light
USD458395S1 (en) 2001-03-22 2002-06-04 Color Kinetics, Inc. Accent light
USD457974S1 (en) 2001-03-23 2002-05-28 Color Kinetics, Inc. Accent light
US6883929B2 (en) 2001-04-04 2005-04-26 Color Kinetics, Inc. Indication systems and methods
JP4527316B2 (en) * 2001-05-18 2010-08-18 ティーオーエー株式会社 Light emitting diode lighting circuit and light emitting diode lighting method
USD457669S1 (en) 2001-08-01 2002-05-21 Color Kinetics, Inc. Novelty light
US6621235B2 (en) 2001-08-03 2003-09-16 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Integrated LED driving device with current sharing for multiple LED strings
US6680579B2 (en) 2001-12-14 2004-01-20 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Method and apparatus for image and video display
US7364488B2 (en) 2002-04-26 2008-04-29 Philips Solid State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Methods and apparatus for enhancing inflatable devices
DE10225670A1 (en) 2002-06-10 2003-12-24 Patent Treuhand Ges Fuer Elektrische Gluehlampen Mbh Drive circuit for at least one LED strand
JP2004022929A (en) * 2002-06-19 2004-01-22 Matsushita Electric Ind Co Ltd Dc-dc step-up method
JP2004051014A (en) * 2002-07-22 2004-02-19 Toyoda Gosei Co Ltd Led headlamp device for vehicle
US7204622B2 (en) 2002-08-28 2007-04-17 Color Kinetics Incorporated Methods and systems for illuminating environments
US20040041620A1 (en) 2002-09-03 2004-03-04 D'angelo Kevin P. LED driver with increased efficiency
US20040141321A1 (en) 2002-11-20 2004-07-22 Color Kinetics, Incorporated Lighting and other perceivable effects for toys and other consumer products
US7148632B2 (en) 2003-01-15 2006-12-12 Luminator Holding, L.P. LED lighting system
JP4228277B2 (en) * 2003-01-31 2009-02-25 富士フイルム株式会社 LED lighting device
USD492042S1 (en) 2003-02-06 2004-06-22 Color Kinetics, Inc. Lighting system
USD491678S1 (en) 2003-02-06 2004-06-15 Color Kinetics, Inc. Lighting system
US6864641B2 (en) 2003-02-20 2005-03-08 Visteon Global Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for controlling light emitting diodes
EP1620676A4 (en) 2003-05-05 2011-03-23 Philips Solid State Lighting Lighting methods and systems
CN100531486C (en) 2003-05-07 2009-08-19 皇家飞利浦电子股份有限公司 Current control method and circuit for light emitting diodes
JP4959324B2 (en) * 2003-05-07 2012-06-20 コーニンクレッカ フィリップス エレクトロニクス エヌ ヴィ Single driver for multiple light emitting diodes
AT493865T (en) 2003-07-16 2011-01-15 Dsp Group Switzerland Ag Method and device for energy supplying luminaire diodes
GB0325731D0 (en) 2003-09-09 2003-12-10 Sentec Ltd Controller circuit
WO2005052751A2 (en) 2003-11-20 2005-06-09 Color Kinetics Incorporated Light system manager
WO2005060309A2 (en) 2003-12-11 2005-06-30 Color Kinetics Incorporated Thermal management methods and apparatus for lighting devices
JP4236602B2 (en) * 2004-03-09 2009-03-11 シャープ株式会社 Switching power supply circuit and electronic device using the same
EP1754121A4 (en) 2004-03-15 2014-02-12 Philips Solid State Lighting Methods and systems for providing lighting systems
US7358706B2 (en) 2004-03-15 2008-04-15 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Power factor correction control methods and apparatus
US20060221606A1 (en) 2004-03-15 2006-10-05 Color Kinetics Incorporated Led-based lighting retrofit subassembly apparatus
US7515128B2 (en) 2004-03-15 2009-04-07 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Methods and apparatus for providing luminance compensation
US7354172B2 (en) 2004-03-15 2008-04-08 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Methods and apparatus for controlled lighting based on a reference gamut
JP4241487B2 (en) 2004-04-20 2009-03-18 ソニー株式会社 LED driving device, backlight light source device, and color liquid crystal display device
US7633463B2 (en) * 2004-04-30 2009-12-15 Analog Devices, Inc. Method and IC driver for series connected R, G, B LEDs
USD548868S1 (en) 2004-05-05 2007-08-14 Color Kinetics Incorporated Lighting assembly
USD518218S1 (en) 2004-05-05 2006-03-28 Color Kinetics Incorporated Lighting assembly
US7646029B2 (en) 2004-07-08 2010-01-12 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. LED package methods and systems
WO2006031810A2 (en) 2004-09-10 2006-03-23 Color Kinetics Incorporated Power control methods and apparatus for variable loads
EP1800054A2 (en) 2004-09-10 2007-06-27 Color Kinetics Incorporated Lighting zone control methods and apparatus
CA2589207C (en) 2004-11-23 2014-01-28 Tir Systems Ltd. Apparatus and method for controlling colour and colour temperature of light generated by a digitally controlled luminaire
EP1849152A4 (en) 2004-12-20 2012-05-02 Philips Solid State Lighting Color management methods and apparatus for lighting
US7348736B2 (en) 2005-01-24 2008-03-25 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions Methods and apparatus for providing workspace lighting and facilitating workspace customization
WO2006093889A2 (en) 2005-02-28 2006-09-08 Color Kinetics Incorporated Configurations and methods for embedding electronics or light emitters in manufactured materials
US7339323B2 (en) 2005-04-29 2008-03-04 02Micro International Limited Serial powering of an LED string
US8061865B2 (en) 2005-05-23 2011-11-22 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Methods and apparatus for providing lighting via a grid system of a suspended ceiling
US7766518B2 (en) 2005-05-23 2010-08-03 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. LED-based light-generating modules for socket engagement, and methods of assembling, installing and removing same
USD562494S1 (en) 2005-05-23 2008-02-19 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions Optical component
US7703951B2 (en) 2005-05-23 2010-04-27 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Modular LED-based lighting fixtures having socket engagement features
EP1894075A4 (en) 2005-06-06 2008-06-25 Color Kinetics Inc Methods and apparatus for implementing power cycle control of lighting devices based on network protocols
US7317403B2 (en) * 2005-08-26 2008-01-08 Philips Lumileds Lighting Company, Llc LED light source for backlighting with integrated electronics
KR100678561B1 (en) * 2005-09-13 2007-02-06 송창호 Lighting apparatus of lanterns to be illuminated by the LED
DE102005055800B4 (en) * 2005-11-21 2008-01-03 Carl Freudenberg Kg Device for damping torsional vibrations and arrangement
TWI433588B (en) * 2005-12-13 2014-04-01 Koninkl Philips Electronics Nv Led lighting device
US7619370B2 (en) 2006-01-03 2009-11-17 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Power allocation methods for lighting devices having multiple source spectrums, and apparatus employing same
CA2642028C (en) 2006-02-10 2013-12-10 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Methods and apparatus for high power factor controlled power delivery using a single switching stage per load
US7543951B2 (en) 2006-05-03 2009-06-09 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Methods and apparatus for providing a luminous writing surface
US7658506B2 (en) 2006-05-12 2010-02-09 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Recessed cove lighting apparatus for architectural surfaces
US8525774B2 (en) * 2009-10-28 2013-09-03 Top Victory Investments Ltd. Light-emitting diode (LED) driving circuit

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
JP5543109B2 (en) 2014-07-09
US8823274B2 (en) 2014-09-02
EP1964449A1 (en) 2008-09-03
CN101331796A (en) 2008-12-24
US20080303452A1 (en) 2008-12-11
EP1964449B1 (en) 2014-07-23
JP2009519580A (en) 2009-05-14
JP2013229350A (en) 2013-11-07
US8004211B2 (en) 2011-08-23
KR20080083313A (en) 2008-09-17
US20110304274A1 (en) 2011-12-15
CN101331796B (en) 2012-04-11
WO2007069200A1 (en) 2007-06-21
JP5757981B2 (en) 2015-08-05
KR101315078B1 (en) 2013-10-08
TW200731580A (en) 2007-08-16
US20140125237A1 (en) 2014-05-08
ES2509347T3 (en) 2014-10-17
US8773042B2 (en) 2014-07-08

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US10264637B2 (en) Solid state lighting apparatus with compensation bypass circuits and methods of operation thereof
KR101588044B1 (en) Method and apparatus for controlling current supplied to electronic devices
US8471495B2 (en) Light-emitting diode driving apparatus and light-emitting diode lighting controlling method
US7800316B2 (en) Stacked LED controllers
CN104025716B (en) For drive circuit of solid-state lighting device with high-voltage LED component and associated method
TWI410171B (en) Current-balance circuit and backlight module having the same
US8810144B2 (en) Driver circuits for dimmable solid state lighting apparatus
US7439945B1 (en) Light emitting diode driver circuit with high-speed pulse width modulated current control
JP5175034B2 (en) Controller circuit for light emitting diode
US9844113B2 (en) Adjusting color temperature in a dimmable LED lighting system
US9246403B2 (en) Lighting systems with uniform LED brightness
KR20090058026A (en) Light emitting element control system and lighting system comprising same
US8217587B2 (en) LED driver circuit
JP4430084B2 (en) LED light emitting device, and device and lamp using the LED light emitting device
CN102077692B (en) Led driver with multiple feedback loops
ES2427280T3 (en) LED lighting with incandescent lamp color temperature behavior
EP2084941B1 (en) Light element array with controllable current sources and method of operation
JP5409399B2 (en) Drive circuit for loads such as LED, OLED or laser diode
JP5198456B2 (en) Switching optical element and operation method thereof
EP1860922A1 (en) Method and apparatus to power light emitting diode arrays
US8680787B2 (en) Load control device for a light-emitting diode light source
JP2010527154A (en) Color adjustable light source
EP2964000A2 (en) Led driver
US9526139B2 (en) Load driving device, and lighting apparatus and liquid crystal display device using the same
JP2013503426A (en) Method and apparatus for controlling the dimming level of an LED