JP2012252135A - Optical communication device - Google Patents

Optical communication device Download PDF

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Publication number
JP2012252135A
JP2012252135A JP2011124232A JP2011124232A JP2012252135A JP 2012252135 A JP2012252135 A JP 2012252135A JP 2011124232 A JP2011124232 A JP 2011124232A JP 2011124232 A JP2011124232 A JP 2011124232A JP 2012252135 A JP2012252135 A JP 2012252135A
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Japan
Prior art keywords
optical
housing
fiber
fiber tray
main body
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Pending
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JP2011124232A
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Japanese (ja)
Inventor
Kazue Oki
和重 沖
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Sumitomo Electric Ind Ltd
住友電気工業株式会社
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Application filed by Sumitomo Electric Ind Ltd, 住友電気工業株式会社 filed Critical Sumitomo Electric Ind Ltd
Priority to JP2011124232A priority Critical patent/JP2012252135A/en
Priority claimed from US13/486,723 external-priority patent/US9052477B2/en
Publication of JP2012252135A publication Critical patent/JP2012252135A/en
Application status is Pending legal-status Critical

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Abstract

PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide an optical communication device capable of radiating heat without limiting the wiring space of optical fiber.SOLUTION: In an optical transceiver 1, a fiber tray 50 demarcates the wiring space S of optical fiber F and thermally connects an IC 41 of a circuit board 40 with an upper housing 12. The fiber tray 50 includes a body part 50b that is apart from a bottom face 12c and extends along the circuit board 40. The body part 50b includes a counter area A opposing to the IC 41. The wiring space S is demarcated between the body part 50b and the bottom face 12c. While providing the space between the bottom face 12c and the IC 41 as the wiring space S, the fiber tray 50 provides a heat radiation path for radiating heat generated in the IC 41 to the upper housing 12. With the optical transceiver 1, the heat generated in the IC 41 can be radiated without limiting the wiring space S.

Description

  The present invention relates to an optical communication apparatus for optical communication.

  As a conventional optical communication apparatus in the above technical field, for example, an optical transceiver including a multiplexer / demultiplexer and a transmitter / receiver module is known (see Non-Patent Document 1). In the optical transceiver described in Non-Patent Document 1, a transmission capacity of 40 Gbit / s is realized by multiplexing / demultiplexing four 10 Gbit / s optical signals. Alternatively, in the optical transceiver described in Non-Patent Document 1, a transmission capacity of 100 Gbit / s is realized by multiplexing / demultiplexing four 25 Gbit / s optical signals.

  In the optical transceiver as described above, there are known a case where the multiplexer / demultiplexer and the transmission / reception module are used in an integrated manner (integrated type) and a case where they are used separately (separated type). . In the integrated type, space in the optical transceiver housing can be saved as compared with the separated type in which the multiplexer / demultiplexer and the transmission / reception module are connected by an optical fiber. However, the integrated type is not desirable from the viewpoint of cost reduction, because the yield of the transmission / reception module works by the number power. On the other hand, since the separation type can easily replace the transmission / reception module having a low yield, the cost can be reduced as compared with the integral type.

"CFP MSA Hardware Specification Revision 1.4", [online], [searched June 1, 2011], Internet <http://www.cfp-msa.org/Documents/CFP-MSA-HW-Spec-rev1- 40.pdf>

  By the way, in general, in a terminal processing such as attaching an optical connector of an optical fiber, a predetermined processing tolerance occurs in the length of the optical fiber after processing. In the separation type described above, it is necessary to take into account such processing tolerances and accommodate a plurality of optical fibers in the housing of the optical transceiver while ensuring a specified minimum bending radius. For this reason, it is necessary to widen the wiring space of the optical fiber in the housing. For example, the space between the circuit board on which electronic components for the transmission / reception module and the like are mounted may be used as the optical fiber wiring space.

  On the other hand, electronic components for the transmission / reception module include those that are relatively hot. For this reason, in the optical transceiver, it is necessary to provide a heat dissipation path for radiating heat generated in the electronic component to the housing. As such a heat dissipation path, for example, a case in which the housing and the electronic component are thermally connected immediately below the electronic component can be considered. In the case where such a heat dissipation path is provided, it is desirable to avoid wiring the optical fiber in the space immediately below the electronic component that becomes the heat dissipation path. For this purpose, since the degree of freedom of the installation position of the electronic component is small, it is necessary to limit the wiring space of the optical fiber so as to avoid the space immediately below the electronic component. In order to limit the wiring space, it is conceivable to reduce the processing tolerance of the optical fiber. However, reducing the processing tolerance of the optical fiber is accompanied by a decrease in the processing yield of the optical fiber, resulting in high cost Problem arises.

  This invention is made | formed in view of such a situation, and makes it a subject to provide the optical communication apparatus which can heat-radiate, without adding the restriction | limiting to the wiring space of an optical fiber.

  In order to solve the above-described problems, an optical communication device of the present invention has a housing having an inner surface including first and second sections arranged in a predetermined direction, and is disposed in the first section for optical communication. An optical component that outputs or inputs the light, an optical fiber optically connected to the optical component, a circuit board that is disposed in the second section and on which an electronic component for the optical component is mounted, And a fiber tray that is disposed between the inner surface of the housing and the circuit board in the section of the housing and defines a wiring space for the optical fiber and thermally connects the housing and the electronic component. A main body portion that is spaced apart from the inner surface of the housing and extends along the circuit board. The main body portion includes a facing area that faces the electronic component, and a wiring space is defined between the inner surface of the housing and the main body portion. Be special To.

  In this optical communication apparatus, the fiber tray defines an optical fiber wiring space and thermally connects the electronic component mounted on the circuit board and the housing. In particular, the fiber tray has a main body portion that is separated from the inner surface of the housing and extends along the circuit board, and the main body portion includes a facing region that faces an electronic component mounted on the circuit board. And the wiring space of an optical fiber is defined between the main-body part and the inner surface of a housing. That is, the fiber tray provides a heat dissipation path for radiating heat generated in the electronic component to the housing while providing a space between the inner surface of the housing and the electronic component as a wiring space for the optical fiber. For this reason, according to this optical communication device, heat generated in the electronic component can be radiated without limiting the wiring space of the optical fiber.

  In the optical communication apparatus of the present invention, the fiber tray can be thermally connected to the electronic component via the heat dissipation sheet. According to this configuration, the thermal resistance between the fiber tray and the electronic component can be reduced, and as a result, the heat generated in the electronic component can be radiated more effectively.

  In the optical communication apparatus of the present invention, the fiber tray has a main body, a housing contact portion that contacts the inner surface of the housing and extends along the inner surface, and a connection portion that connects the main body portion and the housing contact portion. It can be arranged in such a state that an elastic force is generated in the connecting portion so that the main body portion is separated from the housing contact portion. According to this configuration, since the thermal connection between the fiber tray and the electronic component can be reliably maintained by the elastic force of the fiber tray, the thermal resistance between the fiber tray and the electronic component is reliably reduced. be able to.

  In the optical communication apparatus of the present invention, the wiring space can be filled with a heat radiation agent. According to this configuration, the thermal resistance from the electronic component to the housing via the fiber tray can be further reduced.

  Furthermore, in the optical communication apparatus of the present invention, the fiber tray can be formed integrally with the housing. According to this configuration, the thermal resistance between the fiber tray and the housing can be reduced.

  Here, in the optical communication apparatus of the present invention, the optical component includes a plurality of optical transmission subassemblies that convert electrical signals into optical signals and outputs, and a plurality of optical receivers that receive optical signals and convert them into electrical signals. And a subassembly. In other words, the present invention can be applied to an optical transceiver including a plurality of optical transmission subassemblies and a plurality of optical reception subassemblies.

  ADVANTAGE OF THE INVENTION According to this invention, the optical communication apparatus which can thermally radiate without adding the restriction | limiting to the wiring space of an optical fiber can be provided.

It is a perspective view of the optical transceiver concerning an embodiment. It is a perspective view of the optical transceiver concerning an embodiment. FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing the inside of the optical transceiver shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view of the optical transceiver illustrated in FIG. 3. FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the upper housing shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. It is a figure which shows the inside of the conventional optical transceiver typically. It is a figure which shows the inside of the conventional optical transceiver typically. FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the fiber tray shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. It is sectional drawing along the IX-IX line of FIG. It is sectional drawing which shows the modification of the optical transceiver which concerns on embodiment. It is a perspective view which shows the modification of the fiber tray shown by FIG. It is a perspective view which shows the partial structure of the optical transceiver which concerns on a reference example. It is a disassembled perspective view of FIG.

  Hereinafter, an optical transceiver as an embodiment of an optical communication apparatus according to the present invention will be described in detail with reference to the drawings. In the description of the drawings, the same elements are denoted by the same reference numerals, and redundant description is omitted.

  FIG. 1 is a perspective view from one side of the optical transceiver according to the present embodiment, and FIG. 2 is a perspective view from the other side of the optical transceiver according to the present embodiment. The optical transceiver 1 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 is a so-called pluggable type optical transceiver, for example, an optical transceiver conforming to the CFP standard. The optical transceiver 1 includes a housing 10. The housing 10 includes a lower housing 11 and an upper housing 12. In the housing 10, the lower housing 11 and the upper housing 12 define an accommodation space for various components described later. Such a housing 10 can be comprised, for example from aluminum or zinc from heat dissipation or die-casting property.

  A front cover 13 is attached to the front end portion 10 a of the housing 10. A rectangular opening 13 a is provided at a substantially central portion in the width direction of the front cover 13. The optical receptacle 14 is exposed from the opening 13a. Further, knobs 16 of screws 15 protrude from both sides of the front cover 13. The screw 15 protrudes from the rear end portion 10 b of the housing 10 through the inside of the housing 10 from the front surface of the upper housing 12. The optical transceiver 1 is fixed to a host system (not shown) using the screw 15.

  Ribs 17 are provided on both sides of the housing 10. The rib 17 extends from the front end portion 10a of the housing 10 to the rear end portion 10b. The screw 15 is inserted into the rib 17. In addition, the rib 17 is configured along the rail of the host system, which makes it easy to mount the optical transceiver 1 on the host system. On the other hand, a card edge connector 18 that is fitted to a connector of the host system protrudes from the rear end portion 10b of the housing 10. The card edge connector 18 is provided with a plurality of signal pins for transmitting and receiving electrical signals to and from the host system.

  FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing the inside of the optical transceiver shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view of the optical transceiver shown in FIG. FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the upper housing shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. As shown in FIGS. 3 to 5, the optical transceiver 1 includes an optical receptacle 14, an optical demultiplexer 19, an optical multiplexer 20, two sets of connectors 21 and 22, two sets of holders 23 and 24, and four optical receiving subassemblies. An optical component such as (ROSA) 25 and four optical transmission subassemblies (TOSA) 26 and a circuit board 40 are provided. These optical components and the circuit board 40 are accommodated in the upper housing 12. More specifically, the upper housing 12 has a bottom surface (inner surface) 12c including a first section 31 and a second section 32 arranged in a direction (predetermined direction) from the front end portion 12a to the rear end portion 12b. The optical component and the like are disposed in the first section 31, and the circuit board 40 is disposed in the second section 32.

  The optical receptacle 14 is disposed in a substantially central region 33 at the front of the first section 31. The optical receptacle 14 receives an optical connector plug (not shown) from the outside, and transmits / receives multiplexed optical signals to / from the optical connector plug. From the rear end of the optical receptacle 14, the ends of the pair of sleeves 14a are exposed. An optical fiber F extends from each of the sleeves 14a. The optical fiber F extending from each of the sleeves 14a is connected to each of the optical demultiplexer 19 and the optical multiplexer 20 after passing through the second section 32 of the upper housing 12 as will be described later.

  The optical demultiplexer 19 is disposed in one region 34 of the regions on both sides of the region 33 in the front of the first section 31. The optical demultiplexer 19 converts the multiplexed optical signal into a plurality (here, four) of optical signals having different wavelengths. The optical demultiplexer 19 outputs each of these optical signals to each ROSA 25. For this purpose, a plurality (four in this case) of optical fibers F extend from the optical demultiplexer 19.

  The optical multiplexer 20 is arranged in the other region 35 of the regions on both sides of the region 33 in the front of the first section 31. The optical multiplexer 20 inputs a plurality (here, four) of optical signals having different wavelengths from each of the TOSAs 26. For this purpose, a plurality (four in this case) of optical fibers F extend from the optical multiplexer 20. The optical multiplexer 20 converts the input optical signal into a multiplexed optical signal.

  The connector 21 is disposed downstream of the optical demultiplexer 19 in the downstream region 36 of the regions 33 to 35 of the first section 31. A plurality (four in this case) of the connectors 21 are arranged in the width direction of the upper housing 12. Each of the optical fibers F extending from the optical demultiplexer 19 passes through the second section 32 and is connected to each of the connectors 21 as will be described later.

  The ROSA 25 is disposed in the region 36. More specifically, the ROSA 25 is held by the holder 23 at the rear stage of the connector 21. The ROSA 25 is arranged in the width direction of the upper housing 12. Each of the optical fibers F extending from the optical demultiplexer 19 is optically connected to each of the ROSAs 25 via a connector 21. That is, each ROSA 25 is optically connected to the optical demultiplexer 19. Therefore, the optical signal output from the optical demultiplexer 19 is input to the ROSA 25. The ROSA 25 has a photoelectric conversion element such as a photodiode in order to convert the optical signal from the optical demultiplexer 19 into an electric signal.

  The connector 22 is disposed downstream of the optical multiplexer 20 in the region 36 subsequent to the regions 33 to 35 of the first section 31. A plurality of (here, four) connectors 22 are arranged in the width direction of the upper housing 12. As will be described later, each of the optical fibers F extended from the optical multiplexer 20 is connected to each of the connectors 22 after passing through the second section 32.

  The TOSA 26 is disposed in the region 36. More specifically, the TOSA 26 is held by the holder 24 at the rear stage of the connector 22. The TOSA 26 is arranged in the width direction of the upper housing 12. Each of the optical fibers F extending from the optical multiplexer 20 is optically connected to each of the TOSAs 26 via the connector 22. That is, each TOSA 26 is optically connected to the optical multiplexer 20. The TOSA 26 has a light emitting element such as a semiconductor laser, for example, and converts an input electric signal into an optical signal and outputs it. As described above, since the TOSA 26 is optically connected to the optical multiplexer 20, the optical signal output from the TOSA 26 is input to the optical multiplexer 20.

  The circuit board 40 has a rectangular flat plate shape and is disposed in the second section 32 so as to cover the entire second section 32 of the upper housing 12. The circuit board 40 has a first surface 40a on the upper housing 12 side and a second surface 40b on the lower housing 11 side. Various electronic components are mounted on the circuit board 40. The electronic components mounted on the circuit board 40 include, for example, an IC 41 such as a clock extraction circuit for the ROSA 25 and a light emitting element driving circuit for the TOSA 26. The IC 41 is mounted on the first surface 40a.

  The circuit board is positioned above the center in the thickness direction of the housing according to the standard of the optical transceiver. Therefore, also in the optical transceiver 1 according to the present embodiment, the distance between the circuit board 40 and the upper housing 12 is larger than the distance between the circuit board 40 and the lower housing 11. Therefore, in the optical transceiver 1, the optical fiber F can be wired between the circuit board 40 and the upper housing 12.

  As described above, in the optical transceiver 1, a plurality (here, a total of 10) of optical fibers F are accommodated in the housing 10. These optical fibers F are wired so as to return to the first section 31 after being guided to the second section 32. For such wiring, a plurality of groove portions 36 a are formed in the region 36 of the first section 31. More specifically, the region 36 is provided with a plurality of convex portions 36b for arranging the connectors 21, 22, the holders 23 and 24, the ROSA 25, and the TOSA 26, and the groove portions 36a are formed by the convex portions 36b. It is prescribed.

  The groove portion 36a and the convex portion 36b extend in the direction from the front end portion 12a to the rear end portion 12b of the upper housing 12 (that is, the direction from the first section 31 to the second section 32). Arranged in the width direction. The optical fiber F is guided from the first section 31 to the second section 32 by the groove 36a formed as described above. The optical fiber F guided to the second section 32 is curved and wired so as to go to the first section 31 between the circuit board 40 and the upper housing 12.

  FIG. 6 is a diagram schematically showing the inside of a conventional optical transceiver. In this conventional optical transceiver 1A, the optical fiber F extending from the optical receptacle 14A is guided from the first section 31A of the upper housing 12A to the second section 32A, and then returns to the first section 31A. It is connected to the optical demultiplexer 19A. In the optical transceiver 1A, the optical fiber F extending from the optical demultiplexer 19A is guided from the first section 31A of the upper housing 12A to the second section 32A, and then returns to the first section 31A to return to the ROSA 25A. It is connected to the. In the optical transceiver 1A, a space between the upper housing 12A and the circuit board 40A is a wiring space for the optical fiber F in the second section 32A. Further, in this optical transceiver 1A, the electronic component 41A and the upper housing 12A are thermally connected immediately below the electronic component 41A mounted on the circuit board 40A, and the heat generated in the electronic component 41A is dissipated. A heat dissipation path is formed.

  In the optical transceiver 1A configured as described above, for example, as shown in FIG. 7, when the optical fiber F is processed to be short, the optical fiber F is wired on the heat radiation path immediately below the electronic component 41A. It will be. When the optical fiber F is wired on the heat dissipation path, the heat dissipation performance is deteriorated and the optical fiber F may be damaged. On the other hand, the position of the electronic component 41A is difficult to change in consideration of the high frequency characteristics. For this reason, in the optical transceiver 1A, it is necessary to limit the wiring space of the optical fiber F so as to avoid the space immediately below the electronic component 41A. However, when the wiring space of the optical fiber F is limited, an optical component (for example, an optical fiber) connected to an optical fiber F (for example, an optical fiber F that has been shortened as shown in FIG. 7) that does not conform to the limited wiring space. It is necessary to treat the demultiplexer 19A) as a defective product. Therefore, in an optical transceiver, it is desired to form a heat dissipation path without limiting the wiring space of the optical fiber F.

  The optical transceiver 1 according to the present embodiment further includes a fiber tray 50 in order to realize such a demand. As shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, the fiber tray 50 is disposed in the second section 32 of the upper housing 12. More specifically, the fiber tray 50 is disposed between the upper housing 12 and the circuit board 40 in the second section 32 of the upper housing 12. The fiber tray 50 can be made of sheet metal using a material such as a copper alloy or an aluminum alloy, for example.

  FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the fiber tray shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. 9 is a cross-sectional view taken along line IX-IX in FIG. As shown in FIGS. 3, 4, 8, and 9, the fiber tray 50 includes a housing contact portion 50a, a main body portion 50b, and a connection portion 50c, and has a J-shaped cross section. The housing contact portion 50a, the main body portion 50b, and the connection portion 50c are integrally formed with each other.

  The housing contact portion 50a contacts the bottom surface (the inner surface of the housing 10) 12c of the upper housing 12 and extends along the bottom surface 12c. The housing contact portion 50a has a trapezoidal flat plate shape. The housing contact portion 50a is connected to the connection portion 50c at the upper base of the trapezoid. The fiber tray 50 is fixed to the upper housing 12 with, for example, screws or the like in a state where the housing contact portion 50a is in contact with the bottom surface 12c of the upper housing 12.

  The main body 50 b is separated from the bottom surface 12 c of the upper housing 12 and extends along the circuit board 40. The main body 50 b faces the circuit board 40. The housing contact portion 50a and the main body portion 50b are substantially parallel to each other. The main body portion 50b includes a first portion 51b, a second portion 52b, and a third portion 53b that are sequentially arranged in a direction from the front end portion 12a to the rear end portion 12b of the upper housing 12. The first portion 51 b has a long rectangular flat plate shape extending in the width direction of the upper housing 12. The first portion 51 b extends across the entire second section 32 in the width direction of the upper housing 12. The first portion 51 b is disposed at the front end portion of the second section 32.

  The second part 52b has a rectangular flat plate shape shorter than the first part 51b. The 2nd part 52b is connected to the approximate center part of the longitudinal direction of the 1st part 51b. The second portion 52 b is disposed so as to cover the entire central portion of the second section 32 of the upper housing 12. The second portion 52b includes a facing area A that faces the IC 41. The third portion 53b has a trapezoidal flat plate shape substantially the same as the housing contact portion 50a. The third portion 53b is connected to the second portion 52b at the lower base of the trapezoid, and is connected to the connection portion 50c at the upper base. Therefore, the connection portion 50 c connects the housing contact portion 50 a and the main body portion 50 b and is disposed at the rear end portion of the second partition 32.

  The main body portion 50b configured as described above is separated from the bottom surface 12c of the upper housing 12 by the housing contact portion 50a and the connection portion 50c, and is maintained substantially parallel to the bottom surface 12c. Thereby, in the second section 32, a wiring space S of the optical fiber F is defined between the bottom surface 12c of the upper housing 12 and the main body portion 50b. In particular, the wiring space S includes a space between the bottom surface 12c of the upper housing 12 and the IC 41 (that is, a space immediately below the IC 41) because the main body portion 50b includes the facing area A that faces the IC 41. That is, according to the fiber tray 50, a wide wiring space S can be defined without being affected by the arrangement of the IC 41.

  Here, between the opposing area | region A and IC41, the thermal radiation sheet 60 is arrange | positioned so that both may be contacted. Therefore, the fiber tray 50 is thermally connected to the IC 41 via the heat dissipation sheet 60 in the facing region A. Further, as described above, the fiber tray 50 is in direct contact with the bottom surface 12c of the upper housing 12 at the housing contact portion 50a. Accordingly, the fiber tray 50 is also thermally connected to the upper housing 12. Therefore, the fiber tray 50 thermally connects the IC 41 mounted on the circuit board 40 and the upper housing 12. In other words, the fiber tray 50 provides a heat dissipation path that transfers heat generated in the IC 41 to the upper housing 12 to dissipate heat. In addition, as the heat-radiation sheet 60, the thing containing the metal filler with good heat conductivity in base materials, such as silicone and an acryl, can be used, for example.

  As described above, in this optical transceiver 1, the fiber tray 50 has the main body 50b that is separated from the bottom surface 12c of the upper housing 12 and extends along the circuit board 40. The main body 50b is a circuit. It includes a facing area A that faces the IC 41 mounted on the substrate 40. The wiring space S of the optical fiber F in the second section 32 is defined between the main body portion 50 b and the bottom surface 12 c of the upper housing 12. That is, in the fiber tray 50, the space between the bottom surface 12c of the upper housing 12 and the IC 41 (that is, the space immediately below the IC 41) can also be used as the wiring space S of the optical fiber F. Therefore, it is not necessary to limit the wiring space of the optical fiber F by affecting the arrangement of the IC 41. In addition, the fiber tray 50 thermally connects the IC 41 and the upper housing 12. That is, the fiber tray 50 provides a heat dissipation path for radiating heat generated in the IC 41 to the upper housing 12. Therefore, according to the optical transceiver 1, heat generated in the IC 41 can be radiated without limiting the wiring space of the optical fiber F.

  The above embodiment describes an embodiment of the optical transceiver of the present invention, and the optical communication apparatus of the present invention is not limited to the optical transceiver 1 described above. The optical communication device of the present invention can be obtained by arbitrarily modifying the optical transceiver 1 without departing from the scope of the claims.

  For example, as shown in FIG. 10, a heat radiation gel (heat radiation agent) 70 may be disposed in the wiring space S. The heat dissipating gel 70 may be filled in the entire wiring space S or may be disposed only in a region immediately below the IC 41 in the wiring space S. If the heat dissipation gel 70 in the wiring space S is filled in this way, the thermal resistance from the IC 41 to the upper housing 12 via the fiber tray 50 can be reduced. In addition, as a thermal radiation gel, what contained the metal filler with favorable heat conductivity to base materials, such as silicone and an acryl, can be used, for example.

  In the optical transceiver 1, a fiber tray 50 </ b> A shown in FIG. 11 can be used instead of the fiber tray 50. The fiber tray 50 </ b> A is different from the fiber tray 50 in that a plate spring portion 55 is provided in a facing area A facing the IC 41. The other configuration of the fiber tray 50A is the same as that of the fiber tray 50. The leaf spring portion 55 is produced by forming a U-shaped cut in the facing area A and then bending the portion surrounded by the cut upward (in the direction toward the IC 41). The leaf spring portion 55 maintains thermal contact between the IC 41 and the fiber tray 50A by its elastic force. By providing the leaf spring portion 55 in this way, the thermal connection with the IC 41 is reliably maintained, so that the thermal resistance with the IC 41 can be reliably reduced. In addition, also when using such a fiber tray 50A, the heat dissipation sheet 60 and the heat dissipation gel 70 mentioned above can be used together.

  On the other hand, in the optical transceiver 1, the fiber tray 50 and the fiber tray 50 </ b> A may be directly brought into contact with the IC 41 without using the heat dissipation sheet 60. Since the fiber tray 50 and the fiber tray 50A are made of sheet metal, the thermal contact with the IC 41 can be suitably maintained by their elastic force without using the heat dissipation sheet 60. In particular, in the optical transceiver 1, if the fiber tray 50 and the fiber tray 50 </ b> A are arranged on the upper housing 12 in a state where an elastic force is generated in the connection portion 50 c so that the main body portion 50 b is separated from the housing contact portion 50 a, the elasticity The thermal contact with the IC 41 can be more suitably maintained by the force.

  Further, the fiber tray 50 and the fiber tray 50 </ b> A may be configured separately from the upper housing 12, or may be configured integrally with the upper housing 12.

  Further, the optical transceiver has been described as an embodiment of the present invention. However, the present invention is not limited to the optical transceiver, and is optically connected to an optical component for inputting or outputting light for optical communication and to the optical component. The present invention can be applied to any optical communication device including an optical fiber and an electronic component for the optical component. Examples of the optical communication apparatus to which the present invention is applied include an optical amplifier and an optical modem.

  Subsequently, a reference example of the optical transceiver will be described. FIG. 12 is a perspective view of an upper housing and the like of an optical transceiver according to a reference example. 13 is an exploded perspective view of FIG. As shown in FIGS. 12 and 13, the optical transceiver according to the reference example includes an upper housing 12 </ b> B instead of the upper housing 12, a point including a fiber tray 50 </ b> B instead of the fiber tray 50, and a contact plate 80. Is different from the optical transceiver 1 in that it is further provided. Other configurations of the optical transceiver according to the reference example are the same as those of the optical transceiver 1.

  The upper housing 12B is different from the upper housing 12 in that it has raised portions 12d and 12e. The raised portions 12d and 12e are provided so as to protrude from the bottom surface 12c of the upper housing 12B in the second section 32 of the upper housing 12B. The raised portions 12d and 12e are formed at positions corresponding to electronic components such as a clock extraction circuit for the ROSA 25 and a light emitting element driving circuit for the TOSA 26 on the circuit board 40. Therefore, the raised portions 12d and 12e provide a heat dissipation path between those electronic components and the upper housing 12B. For example, a raised portion 12f is further formed on the upper surface of the raised portion 12d. A rectangular flat contact plate 80 is placed on the raised portion 12f. Therefore, one heat radiation path from the electronic component to the upper housing 12B is formed by the contact plate 80, the raised portion 12f, and the raised portion 12d.

  The fiber tray 50B is disposed between the bottom surface 12c of the upper housing 12B and the circuit board 40 in the second section 32 of the upper housing 12B. The fiber tray 50B is for guiding the optical fiber F from the first section 31 of the upper housing 12B in the second section 32. The fiber tray 50B includes a main body portion 50B1 and a pair of splash stoppers 50B2. Each of the main body portion 50B1 and the splash stop portion 50B2 is configured separately from each other.

  The main body 50 </ b> B <b> 1 has a C-shaped flat plate shape and is disposed so as to cover substantially the entire rear end portion of the second partition 32. The main body 50B1 is separated from the bottom surface 12c of the upper housing 12B. Accordingly, a wiring space is defined between the main body portion 50B1 and the bottom surface 12c in substantially the entire rear end portion of the second section 32. The suspending portion 50B2 is disposed at the front end portion of the second section 32 so as to face each other. The hook stop 50B2 is formed by bending a flat plate member so as to have a J-shape. The main body portion 50B1 and the splash stop portion 50B2 are portions for restricting the movement of the optical fiber F, and prevent the optical fiber F from being lifted.

  As described above, in the optical transceiver according to the reference example, when the optical fiber F extended from the optical component is wired to the second section 32, the optical fiber F is prevented from being lifted by the main body portion 50B1 and the suspending portion 50B2. can do. In particular, since each of the main body 50B1 and the splash stopper 50B2 is configured separately from each other, it is easier to manufacture compared to a case where they are configured integrally.

  DESCRIPTION OF SYMBOLS 1 ... Optical transceiver, 10 ... Housing, 11 ... Lower housing, 12 ... Upper housing, 12c ... Bottom surface, 14 ... Optical receptacle, 19 ... Optical demultiplexer, 20 ... Optical multiplexer, 21,22 ... Connector, 25 ... ROSA, 26 ... TOSA, 31 ... first compartment, 32 ... second compartment, 40 ... circuit board, 41 ... IC, 50, 50A ... fiber tray, 50a ... housing contact portion, 50b ... main body portion, 50c ... connecting portion, A ... opposing area, F ... optical fiber, S ... wiring space.

Claims (6)

  1. A housing having an inner surface including first and second compartments arranged in a predetermined direction;
    An optical component disposed in the first section for outputting or inputting light for optical communication;
    An optical fiber optically connected to the optical component;
    A circuit board disposed in the second section and mounted with an electronic component for the optical component;
    A fiber tray disposed between the inner surface of the housing and the circuit board in the second section, defining a wiring space for the optical fiber, and thermally connecting the housing and the electronic component; With
    The fiber tray has a body portion that is spaced apart from the inner surface of the housing and extends along the circuit board;
    The main body includes a facing region facing the electronic component,
    The optical communication device, wherein the wiring space is defined between the inner surface of the housing and the main body.
  2.   The optical communication device according to claim 1, wherein the fiber tray is thermally connected to the electronic component via a heat dissipation sheet.
  3.   The fiber tray includes the main body, a housing contact portion that contacts the inner surface of the housing and extends along the inner surface, and a connection portion that connects the main body portion and the housing contact portion. 3. The optical communication device according to claim 1, wherein the optical communication device is arranged in a state in which an elastic force is generated in the connection portion so that the main body portion is separated from the housing contact portion.
  4.   The optical communication apparatus according to claim 1, wherein the wiring space is filled with a heat radiation agent.
  5.   The optical communication apparatus according to claim 1, wherein the fiber tray is formed integrally with the housing.
  6.   The optical component includes a plurality of optical transmission subassemblies that convert electrical signals into optical signals and output, and a plurality of optical reception subassemblies that input optical signals and convert them into electrical signals. The optical communication device according to any one of claims 1 to 5.
JP2011124232A 2011-06-02 2011-06-02 Optical communication device Pending JP2012252135A (en)

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JP2011124232A JP2012252135A (en) 2011-06-02 2011-06-02 Optical communication device
US13/486,723 US9052477B2 (en) 2009-10-29 2012-06-01 Optical transceiver with inner fiber set within tray securing thermal path from electronic device to housing
CN201210179436.2A CN102811099B (en) 2011-06-02 2012-06-01 The optical transceiver

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