GB2380346A - A traffic viewing system for drivers - Google Patents

A traffic viewing system for drivers Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2380346A
GB2380346A GB0123184A GB0123184A GB2380346A GB 2380346 A GB2380346 A GB 2380346A GB 0123184 A GB0123184 A GB 0123184A GB 0123184 A GB0123184 A GB 0123184A GB 2380346 A GB2380346 A GB 2380346A
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Prior art keywords
video
side
camera
housing
vehicle
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Granted
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GB0123184A
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GB0123184D0 (en )
GB2380346B (en )
Inventor
Oladiran Lawoye
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Oladiran Lawoye
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Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N7/00Television systems
    • H04N7/18Closed circuit television systems, i.e. systems in which the signal is not broadcast
    • H04N7/181Closed circuit television systems, i.e. systems in which the signal is not broadcast for receiving images from a plurality of remote sources
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N7/00Television systems
    • H04N7/18Closed circuit television systems, i.e. systems in which the signal is not broadcast

Abstract

Traffic Viewing System comprises essentially, three video cameras 1, 2, 3, and a partitioned rectangular video monitor 4, partitioned into three frames 5, 6, 7, arranged lengthwise, with frame 7 in the middle. Cameras 1, 2 are mounted in suitable areas on either side of the vehicle, to receive the view, right from the view abreast of, up to view along the side of the vehicle, straight through to the view rearwards of the vehicle. Camera 3 is mounted in a suitable place at the rear of the vehicle and is for the view exactly behind the vehicle. The three cameras 1, 2, 3 send their pictures to their respective frames 5, 6, 7 via leads 8, 9, 10 respectively. Since no frame must duplicate any part of picture from another frame, their three pictures harmonize into one unified view on the monitor.

Description

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A TRAFFIC VIEWING SYSTEM FOR DRIVERS This invention is a traffic-viewing video system for drivers, to serve during driving.

The now existing traffic viewing mirrors are well known and have been in existence now for several years and have gone through various stages of development and improvement. Most familiar are the electrically operated side front door mirrors.

These can be electrically adjusted to shift to the right or to the left, up or down-in order to get better view of the traffic. For the same reason some buses, coaches and lorries have to employ extra mirrors, extension-mirrors or some forms of mirror combination. Yet all these improvements and mirror combinations do not go anywhere near enough to removing the limitations of this method of traffic viewing.

Although a mirror may capture the full view of the traffic, yet it is only a limited portion of its useful view that is made visible to the driver-from the driver's seat, that is. The rest of the view is hidden away, so the driver has to try, in various ways to make up for the shortcomings, by making extra body or head movements to seek out the hidden rest of the traffic. By so doing he gets his attention to some extent distracted away from the traffic in front or from one of the sides. Also, to be able to see the views in the two side front door mirrors properly, different drivers, with different heights when coming into the vehicle, have to carry out the usual routine of mirror adjustments. Occasionally, too, the front passenger or other co-occupants, when changing into another lane to know if that lane is clear or free offer the driver extra help. Sometimes also the vehicle is packed full to the extent that the rear window is blocked, and therefore making it difficult to see the oncoming traffic directly behind.

The object of this invention is to have a traffic viewing device that could capture the three separate views of the traffic around the vehicle, namely from the near side, from the offside and from the rear of the vehicle exactly behind the rear window, and make these views to be seen together as a single picture on a wide-screen of a partitioned rectangular video monitor, simultaneously and unobstructed by any part of the vehicle, irrespective of how the driver, or even any other occupants may be sitting,

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and no view is missed out since no part of the vehicle is standing in the way of any of the cameras, and lastly, making this device be able to bring all the necessary view right inside the vehicle, and well in view of the driver.

Accordingly with this invention, the traffic is viewed during driving with the aid of a video system that comprises essentially three video cameras that are housed inside suitable housings and mounted in suitable areas of the vehicle, one on the near side, one on the off side and one at the rear of the vehicle, as well as a rectangular video monitor, which is partitioned into three frames, all lined up lengthways and the partitioned rectangular video monitor mounted anywhere suitable in front of the driver, possibly on the dashboard, with its two external frames connected via leads, one to the near side front video camera, the other to the off side front video camera, and the middle frame also connected via a lead to the rear-view video camera, so that in effect the three separate pictures of the traffic around the vehicle, captured by the three video cameras and transmitted into their respective frames are all brought together side by side and lengthways to be seen as one single picture on the widescreen of the partitioned rectangular video monitor.

The two side front video cameras are for the traffic on either side of the vehicle, namely the near side and the off side and are known respectively as the near side front video camera and the off side front video camera. These cameras are each connected, via leads to their respective external frames on the partitioned rectangular video monitor i. e. the video camera on the near side of the vehicle is connected to the left external frame while the video camera on the off side of the vehicle is connected to the right external frame. The near side and the off side front video cameras are housed in protective housings, which are then mounted in suitable areas on the near side and on the off side of the vehicle. They could be mounted close to where the now existing near and off side front door mirrors are situated, or exactly at the same places where these side front door mirrors themselves are situated, or they could even be attached to these side front door mirrors themselves.

The third video camera is known as the rear-view video camera it is for the oncoming traffic behind the rear window, and is connected to the middle frame via lead. The

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rear-view video camera also housed in suitable protective housing is mounted in suitable area at the rear of the vehicle and immediately behind the rear window (inside the vehicle). With the rear-view video camera mounted immediately behind the rear window, no one sits in its way, and so its view is in no way obstructed, even when the vehicle is fully packed. And the picture of the traffic behind the vehicle sent into its frame, i. e. the middle frame is therefore totally unobstructed.

Now with the three video cameras mounted on the vehicle at suitable areas, they will be able to capture pictures of the traffic and transmit these into their respective frames on the partitioned rectangular video monitor. And because the three frames of the partitioned rectangular video monitor are arranged side by side and lengthways, so are the three pictures transmitted into them-side by side and lengthways. In effect the three pictures of the whole traffic around the vehicle would automatically blend together and be seen as one single picture on the wide-screen of the partitioned rectangular video monitor. No view is missed out, since no part of the vehicle is standing in the way of any of the cameras. All the traffic around the vehicle would be seen unhindered (by parts of the vehicle). Even cyclists and overtaking motorcyclists are not missed out. This means 100% of the view of the traffic around the vehicle is perfectly visible. The partitioned rectangular video monitor is fitted to any suitable place in front of the driver where the pictures on it can properly and clearly be seen.

So just as the whole of the traffic in front of the vehicle is seen through the windscreen, not in three separate parts but as one single view, so also can the whole of the traffic moving on both sides of the vehicle, and the traffic directly behind the vehicle-all be seen as one single picture on the wide-screen of the partitioned rectangular video monitor, simultaneously and unobstructed. Further, the view of the traffic could, apart from the driver, be seen and even be watched by other cooccupants in the vehicle as well.

The video cameras used in this device must be able to take clear and sharp pictures and with little or no picture distortions. They must also have wide angle of vision of, at least 90 .

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Preferably the partitioned rectangular video monitor should be colour, of LCD type, and similar to those used for making camcorders, but it may also instead be black and white, and of any other suitable type of video monitor besides LCD. Likewise, the three video cameras should, preferably, be colour, <RTI>of CCD</RTI> type, miniature in size, and could be video camera-chips, but may instead be black and white, and of any other type besides CCD. The remotely connected video camera lenses referred to in one of the versions of the invention may be of the type of lens system using fibre optics, in which the picture of the traffic is picked up by the objective end of the fibre optic cable and is eventually transmitted to a video camera, in this case the technical part of a video camera, e. g. miniature video camera. The remotely connected video camera lenses may also be of any suitable type.

Specific examples of the invention will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings (some of which are deliberately presented to be seen through, so that their interior parts or their contents may be better shown and explained), in which: FIGURE 1 shows the schematic drawing of the basic set-up of the invention with the three video cameras (without their housings), and the partitioned rectangular video monitor; FIGURE 2 shows the three frames of the partitioned rectangular video monitor and highlights the dimensions of the two external frames and of the middle frame ; FIGURE 3 explains the necessity for the relative difference between the size of the middle frame and the size of the two external frames ; FIGURE 4 stresses the requirements that must be met to avoid duplications of any parts of the pictures in the external frames by the middle frame; FIGURE 5 shows schematically a version of the housing for the side front video camera, mountable anywhere on the side of the vehicle, for example above or behind

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the side turn signal light, or on the very same place where the now existing side front door mirror is situated; FIGURE 6 shows the mounting of the housing mentioned under Figure 5 on a side front video camera, which is mounted on the side of a vehicle (vehicle itself not shown); FIGURE 7 shows the finished installation of the housing (under Figure 5), on a side front video camera that is mounted on the side of a vehicle; FIGURE 8 shows the schematic drawing of one of the two versions of the housing (for the side front video camera), which may be installed directly on top of a side <img class="EMIRef" id="024171165-00050001" />

front door mirror ; FIGURE 9 shows the assembling of the two components of the housing mentioned under Figure 8; FIGURE 10 shows the housing mentioned under Figure 8, with a side front video camera mounted inside it; FIGURE <RTI>11</RTI> shows the version of the housing in Figure 8, with a side front video camera inside it, mounted directly on top of a side front door mirror ; FIGURE 12 shows the schematic drawing, but upside-down of the second of the two versions of the housing for the side front video camera that may be installed also directly on a side front door mirror; FIGURE 13 shows the assembling of the two parts of the housing mentioned under FIGURE 12; FIGURE 14 shows the schematic drawing of the housing mentioned under figures 12 and 13, the right way up, as it would normally look like on top of a side front door mirror ;

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FIGURE 15 shows the schematic drawing of a housing-mirror combination, which is a combination of a housing for a side front video camera and a side front door mirror ; FIGURE 16 shows schematically a version of a housing for the rear-view video camera to be mounted on the finisher, i. e. that part of the roof bordering the Head Lining and the rear window; FIGURE 17 shows the mounting of the version of the housing mentioned above under Figure 16, in which the housing, together with the rear-view video camera inside it, is in the process of installation on the finisher ; FIGURE 18 shows how the completed installation of the housing according to Figures 16 and 17 looks like on the finisher ; FIGURE 19 shows schematically another version of a housing for the rear-view video camera that may be mounted, this time on the Head Lining behind the rear window of the vehicle; FIGURE 20 shows the mounting of the housing mentioned under Figure 19; FIGURE 21 shows how the housing according to Figures 19 and 20 looks like after it has finally been mounted on the Head Lining, immediately behind the rear window of the vehicle; FIGURE 22 shows the installed housing according to Figure 21 as seen from inside the vehicle; FIGURE 23 shows yet still, schematically another version of the housing that may be mounted on the Head Lining, immediately behind the rear window of the vehicle ;

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FIGURE 24 shows the installed housing according to Figure 23 with a rear-view video camera installed inside it; FIGURE 25 shows how any of the above-mentioned three housings in Figures 16 to 24, with the rear-view video camera mounted inside it, would look like at the rear of a vehicle, in this case a saloon; FIGURE 26 also shows how any of the above-mentioned three housings from Figures 16 to 24, with the rear-view video camera mounted inside it, would look like at the rear of a vehicle, this time a station wagon; FIGURE 27 shows possible area in front of the driver where the partitioned rectangular video monitor may be mounted; FIGURE 28 stresses the importance and the necessity of the angle of inclination that the lens of the side front video camera must have with the side door or the side of the vehicle, the side front video camera is installed on, and also stresses the necessity of the angle of vision of the lens of the side front video camera, as being at least 90 ; FIGURE 29 gives an example of how a traffic situation is presented on the widescreen of the partitioned rectangular video monitor, and illustrates how the whole traffic following behind and the traffic abreast on either side of the vehicle are all seen together on the three frames of the wide-screen of the partitioned rectangular video monitor; FIGURE 30 shows the schematic drawing of another version of the invention, in which remotely connected lenses of the video cameras (instead of the complete video cameras themselves), may be mounted on the vehicle in areas already mentioned above, while the main technical parts of the three video cameras are then kept safely in any suitable place inside the vehicle; FIGURE 31 shows the schematic drawing of yet another version of the invention, in which remotely connected lenses may be mounted on the vehicle instead of the

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complete video cameras themselves, but in this case the main body or main technical parts of the three video cameras are built together with the partitioned rectangular video monitor as one unit.

As shown in Figure 1 the traffic-viewing video system comprises essentially three video cameras 1, 2 and 3 and a partitioned rectangular video monitor 4, partitioned into three frames 5,6 and 7. These frames are arranged lengthwise, such that frame 7 is in the middle of both frames 5 and 6, with frame 5 on the left and frame 6 on the right of frame 7. The three video cameras 1,2 and 3 are housed in protective housings and mounted on the vehicle as will be explained later, and their output-terminals connected respectively via the leads 8,9 and 10, to the three sockets <RTI>11,</RTI> 12 and 13 of the frames 5,6 and 7 respectively.

The two video cameras <RTI>1</RTI> and 2 are known as the near side front video camera I and the offside front video camera 2. Both these cameras are for the views of the traffic on either side of the vehicle. The video camera 3 is known as the rear-view video camera 3 and this is for the view of the oncoming traffic exactly and directly behind the rear window of the vehicle. The near side front video camera 1 in its housing (not shown) is mounted in a suitable place on the near side of the vehicle and its outputterminal is connected, via lead 8 to the socket 11 for the frame 5. The off side front video camera 2 in its housing (not shown) is likewise mounted in a suitable place on the off side of the vehicle and its output-terminal is connected, via lead 9 to the socket 12 for the frame 6. And the rear-view video camera 3 is also housed (housing not shown) and mounted in a suitable place at the rear of the vehicle, e. g. on the roof inside the vehicle, and immediately behind the rear window as explained later, and its output-terminal connected via lead 10 to the socket 13 for the middle frame 7.

Having set up the system in this way the three video cameras would be able to transmit their pictures to their respective frames on the partitioned rectangular video monitor. The three frames 5,6 and 7 may each be equipped with built-in pictureenhancement facilities, for example for brightness and sharpness. These are represented in the drawing, for example by the knobs (or buttons) 14 for brightness and 15 for sharpness.

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The three video cameras 1,2 and 3 may all be similar or may all be different, but for the sake of uniformity in the quality and type of pictures they produce on the partitioned rectangular video monitor, such as in brightness and sharpness, similar cameras are a preference.

The drawings of different versions of the protective housings for the three video cameras will be shown later when the actual installations are described, namely from Figure 5 onwards.

The drawing in Figure I is schematic and is not to scale.

The partitioned rectangular video monitor 4 is again shown in Figure 2. It has three frames, with the two external frames 5 and 6 being essentially of equal dimensions and each being again essentially larger than the middle frame 7. Possible dimensions of the picture area for each of such external frames could be e. g. <RTI>10cm</RTI> x 8cm, and for the middle frame 6cm x 8cm. This gives a total dimension of the area for pictures in the three frames, as 26cm x <RTI>8cm.</RTI> But any other suitable dimensions may be chosen.

The sizes chosen for the frames must be suitable enough for the eyes to see the pictures in them properly and clearly.

Figure 3 explains the necessity for the difference between the size of the middle frame 7 and the size of the two external frames 5 and 6. The middle frame 7 is chosen to be narrower than each of the two external frames 5 and 6 because the width of the traffic exactly and directly behind the vehicle is less than the width of the traffic on either side of the vehicle. The picture in frame 7 is that of the traffic exactly and directly behind the vehicle and this picture must, for this reason, be narrower than the pictures in the external frames 5 and 6, which are the pictures of the traffic on both sides of the vehicle. The width of the picture required in the middle frame is only for the traffic that is exactly and directly behind the vehicle. The width 17 is the total width of the back of the vehicle. This width corresponds to and is the same as the width of the blank portion 16, which is bounded all along, endlessly, on both sides by the two parallel lines 19 and 20 in Figure 3. The traffic exactly and directly behind the vehicle is meant here to mean the traffic within the blank portion 16 bounded all along, and

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endlessly by the two parallel lines 19 and 20. And regardless of whichever way or direction the vehicle moves, the blank portion and the two parallel lines must always remain constant. The blank portion 16 is much narrower than that portion on either side of the vehicle depicted by the spotted portion 18 in Figure 3. Therefore the width of the picture of the traffic in the blank portion 16, which is to be transmitted into the middle frame 7, should be narrower than the width of the pictures of the traffic on either side of the vehicle and depicted by the spotted portions 18-transmitted into the external frames 5 and 6.

Figure 4 stresses the requirements that must be met if duplications of pictures from the external frames 5 and 6 by the middle frame 7 are to be avoided. It is absolutely essential that the picture from the rear-view video camera 3 to be transmitted into the middle frame 7 must under no circumstances include any part of those pictures that are meant to show up only in the external frames 5 and 6, which are the pictures from the side cameras 1 and 2. This means that the middle frame 7 must never duplicate any part of the pictures already shown and are only to be shown in the external frames 5 and 6. Such would then be the case for example in the two stripped patterns 21 and 22 shown in Figure 4, where the stripped patterns 21 and 22 represent duplications by the rear-view video camera 3 of parts of pictures of areas already covered by the side front video cameras <RTI>1</RTI> and 2 and already transmitted into their respective frames 5 and 6. These areas belong only to the spotted portions 18, and must be shown only inside the external frames 5 and 6, and must never be shown inside the middle frame 7.

These areas would certainly be in the wrong frame if they were inside the middle frame 7. The picture that must be shown in frame 7 is very strictly that of the traffic exactly and directly behind the vehicle i. e. the traffic within the blank portion 16 and bounded all along endlessly by the two parallel lines 19 and 20 in Figure 3. The two dashed parallel lines 19a and 20a in Figure 4 represent the optical rays emerging from the lenses of the two side front video cameras <RTI>1</RTI> and 2 respectively and they may exactly coincide with or be parallel with the lines 19 and 20, respectively.

So for these requirements to be met and thus avoiding these duplications, firstly the rear-view video camera 3, with its housing must be properly installed and firmly fixed, and secondly and most importantly, the width of the middle frame 7 must be so

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precisely pre determined such that the stripped patterns 21 and 22, are sort of cut off or sliced off along the parallel lines 19 and 20. In this way frame 7 would only show its picture up to, and not beyond the parallel lines 19 and 20 in Figure 3 or the dashed lines 19a and 20a in Figure 4.

Pictures from the side front video cameras I and 2, should be for the whole of the dotted portion 18 extending only as far as the dashed parallel lines 19a and 20a in Figure 4. And so frames 5 and 6 should also, for their part never show any pictures beyond these parallel lines, thereby duplicating parts of the picture meant for frame 7 alone. The two side front video cameras 1 and 2 must be so mounted that the optical rays represented by the two dashed parallel lines 19a and 20a emerging from their lenses coincide with or are parallel and remain permanently so with the sides of the vehicle, i. e. coinciding with or parallel with lines 19 and 20 in Figure 3. That means that the side front video cameras <RTI>1</RTI> and 2, with their housings must also be properly mounted and firmly fixed to their places of attachment.

In Figure 4 the dashed lines 23a and 24a on the underside of lines 23 and 24 are merely to indicate the optical paths of vision of the lenses of the two side front video cameras I and 2-just the same way the two dashed parallel lines 19a and 20a, which coincide with or are parallel with the two solid parallel lines 19 and 20 in Figure 3, respectively, are meant to indicate.

Finally, Figure 3 also shows the positions of the three video cameras 1,2 and 3 on vehicles in general. The two side front video cameras 1 and 2 must be inclined at the proper angle to the side of the vehicle in such a way that all the views within the spotted portion 18 which lie enclosed between the line 19 and line 23 on the near side of the vehicle and between the line 20 and line 24 on the off side of the vehicle, are received by the two video cameras 1 and 2 respectively, and transmitted into their respective frames 5 and 6. Except if the angle of vision of the lens of the side front video camera used is large enough e. g. around <RTI>180 ,</RTI> then the above-mentioned inclination of the side front video camera might be unnecessary. For a side front video camera having, for example a lens with the angle of vision of 90 , the angle at which the side front video camera should be inclined to the side of the vehicle is

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approximately 45 as shown in Figures 3 and 4 (and also later in Figure 28). The overall effect is, the three separate views-of the traffic within the spotted portion 18, on either side of the vehicle (received by the two side front video cameras <RTI>1</RTI> and 2), and of the traffic within the blank area 16 (from the rear-view video camera 3), would produce pictures on the three frames that would then blend together to be seen as one broad expanse of picture on the wide-screen of the partitioned rectangular video monitor 4, as later shown in Figure 29.

In order to be kept safe from effects of things like dust, weather, or accidental damage, all the three video cameras need to be housed in protective housings or similar, and then installed in suitable areas on the vehicle. Figures 5 to 26 relate to different versions of housing for the two side front video cameras, and also to different versions of housing for the rear-view video camera.

To install the housing with the side front video camera 1 (or 2) inside it, any suitable area on the side of the vehicle, but as far to the front as possible, should be chosen, where no object is blocking the camera's view. The chosen area may be an area close to the now existing side front door mirror, for example above or behind the side turn signal light. Alternatively the housing may be installed exactly where the now existing side front door mirror is situated. This housing is shown under Figures 5 to 7.

There are also two other versions of housing for the side front video camera, which may be attached to the side front door mirror itself, as explained under Figures 8 to 14. Further there is the so-called housing-mirror combination, which is the combination of a side front door mirror and a housing (with a side front video camera inside it), all as one unit, as shown later under Figure 15.

All the housings for the video cameras could also be of any length, breadth or height; in short they could be of any size. And as regards the housings for the two side front video cameras mentioned under Figure 5 to Figure 26, the roof and one of the sides of the housing act as covers from direct rain-showers-for the transparent window. So for this reason both the roof and the relevant side (to be mentioned later when the individual housings are described) may be made to extend well enough, as overhangs, over the transparent window of the housing.

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Figure 5 shows the schematic drawing of a version 25 of the housing for the side front video cameras I and 2 to be mounted anywhere on the side of the vehicle, for example above or behind the side turn signal lights or even exactly where the now existing two side front door mirrors are situated. The housing 25 has an almost cubical shape with the transparent window 26 as shown in Figure 5. It is through this window that the video camera, when inside the housing, views the traffic. With the camera sitting inclined at the proper angle, e. g. 45 to the side of the vehicle, the camera would be able to see all the area within the spotted portion 18, as mentioned under Figures 3 and 4-unobstructed. One of the sides of the housing 25 has an opening 28 cut inside it, such that when the housing is mounted on the camera as jacket, the camera would emerge out of this opening, behind the window 26, as later shown in Figure 7.

The opening 28 could be round, rectangular or of any other form, depending on the form of the video camera. The main body of the housing 25 may be made of plastic or any other suitable material. The transparent window 26 may be made of glass or plastic or any other suitable material, and may also be built together with the housing 25 as one unit.

Figures 6 and 7 show the mounting of the housing 25 with a side front video camera inside it, on a suitable site on the side of a vehicle (vehicle itself not shown). As shown the near side front video camera <RTI>1</RTI> is being mounted on the near side of the vehicle. And for this purpose a mounting hole may first have to be made on the site.

Then through the mounting hole, the output-terminal of the camera is wired and connected, via the lead 8 to the input-terminal of the external frame 5. And by the usual methods of installation the camera is secured to the chosen area on the side of the vehicle, for example with the set of screws 29 as shown in Figure 6, but in such a way that the lens of the camera protrudes out of the side of the vehicle sufficiently and is inclined to the side at suitable angle as was previously mentioned under Figure 3 above, and to be explained also later under Figure 28. After having attached the side front video camera 1 firmly to the chosen area on the side of the vehicle, the housing 25 is then brought onto the side front video camera, as indicated by the direction 30 of

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the set of arrows, to cover the camera. Then the housing 25 is finally attached, through the set of holes 31 for example with screws (not shown) to the place of attachment as shown in Figure 7. When the housing 25 is mounted on the vehicle to cover the camera 1, the camera appears out of the opening 28 of the housing 25, protruding out of this opening and inclined to the side of the vehicle at the appropriate angle, but still behind the transparent window 26.

The base 32 on the housing 25 with which the housing is in contact with the place of attachment to cover the side front video camera, as shown in Figures 5 and 6 should be equipped with some packing material, for example rubber, in order to make the housing watertight. And apart from protecting the side front video camera from dust, weather and accidental damage, the top 27a and the side 27b of the housing 25 also cover the transparent window 26 from direct rain showers and therefore from being fogged up. So for this extra purpose, the top 27a, which serves as roof over the housing, and the side 27b, may both be made to extend well enough over the transparent window 26.

Figure 7 shows how the finished installation should look like on a vehicle when the housing 25 is mounted, like a jacket on a side front video camera. In this case the mounted video camera is the near side front video camera <RTI>1</RTI> and it is mounted on the near side of the vehicle.

Figures 8-14 relate to two versions 33 and 47 of housing for the side front video camera I (or 2), and these are to be mounted on the top of the now existing side front door mirror. Both housings have more or less the shape of a tall bread-bin that is resting on one of its sides, and having its curved top replaced with a transparent window 34, as shown in Figures 8 to 14. It is behind this transparent window that the video camera sits and views the traffic. Figure 8 shows the schematic drawing of one of the versions, namely 33. The schematic drawing of the other version 47 is given in Figure 12. The Prism-shaped board 37, to which the side front video camera is to be attached, is so shaped to make the camera attached to it sit inclined at the proper angle to the side of the vehicle. But any other suitable form of attachment that could make the side front video camera sit inclined at the proper angle, may also be used. With a

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housing having this form and the camera sitting inclined at the proper angle, say 45 to the side of the vehicle, the camera should be able to see both straight-ahead of it, and sideways-simultaneously, i. e. the whole spotted portions 18 in Figures 3 and 4.

Figure 9 shows the housing 33 being assembled with its rear side cover 36 to become one unit.

To mount a side front video camera in its housing 33 on the side front door mirror, both Figures 9 and 10 should be linked together. In Figure 10 the side front door mirror on which the housing 33 is to be installed is the off side front door mirror. The camera for this mirror is the off side front video camera 2. To mount the side front video camera inside its housing 33, any sequence from Figures 9 and 10 may be followed. For instance the side front video camera 2 may first be attached, for example with screws to the Prism-shaped board 37, which is on the interior side 38 of the rear side cover 36. The Prism-shaped board 37 is so shaped to make the camera sit inclined at the proper angle to the side of the vehicle. Then, as indicated by the direction 40 of the set of arrows, the rear side cover with the camera now attached to it, is attached to the housing 33 through the set of holes 39, for example also with screws. During the mounting, the output lead 9 and other necessary wiring for the side front video camera are let outside through the hole 42, which is situated inside the floor 43c of the housing 33.

Figure 10 shows the finished mounting, up to this stage with the side front video camera 2, installed inside the housing 33.

Then to finally mount the housing with the side front video camera 2 inside it on top of the off side front door mirror 44 as shown in Figure 11, the mirror must first be equipped with means of attachment, e. g. with bored holes or threaded pins in suitable areas on top of the mirror for example behind the mirror glass 45, to exactly match the positions of the set of holes 46 inside the floor 43c of the housing 33. An extra hole is also needed on top of the mirror to exactly match the position of the hole 42 through which the lead 9 and the rest of the wiring to the frame 6 can be passed from inside the mirror. Then the housing with the side front video camera 2 now inside it, can be

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attached to the off side front door mirror 44, from inside the mirror-behind the mirror glass 45, for example with screws through the set of holes 46. Such completed installation-on the top of the off side front door mirror, is shown in Figure <RTI>11.</RTI>

During the installation, the lead 9 from the video camera, and all other necessary wiring are passed through the hole 42 into the interior parts of the mirror 44, but behind the mirror-glass 45, and the rest of the wiring procedure carried out later, e. g. passing the lead via suitable routes, to their respective external frames on the partitioned rectangular video monitor 4.

To make the inside of the housing waterproof, the hole 42 and the set of holes 46 may be equipped with suitable packing materials, for example rubber-washers. The packing 41 on the rear side 36 also serves this purpose.

To act as cover from direct rain showers, the top 43a, which serves as roof over the housing, and the side 43b, both may be made to extend well enough over the transparent window 34.

Figure 12 shows the schematic drawing of the second of the two versions of the housing that can also be installed directly on the side front door mirror, namely housing 47. Figure 12 actually shows the housing upside down, for the sake of simplicity in showing the parts and highlighting the major difference between this housing 47 and housing 33. The drawing of the housing 47, the right way up, is shown in Figure 14. As has been mentioned above, the housing 47 is geometrically similar in form to the housing 33. But the difference is that, with the housing 33, the rear side cover 36 covers the main housing 33 at the rear, whereas with the housing 47, the lid 51 covers the underside of the main housing 47 (the underside, i. e. as later shown in Figure 14). Figures 8 to 11 for the housing 33 and Figures 12 to 14 for the housing 47 show this difference.

Figure 13 shows the housing 47 being assembled with its lid <RTI>51.</RTI> The two components are upside down as has already been mentioned under Figure 12. To install the housing 47 on the vehicle, with the video camera inside it, similar procedures as with

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the housing 33 are carried out. This time the video camera <RTI>1</RTI> (or 2), with all its necessary wiring, should first be attached to the prism-shaped board 50, which is on the interior side of the lid <RTI>51,</RTI> for example with screws. Then the lid with the video camera inside it, is brought in the direction 52 of the arrows on the top 53 of the housing, and is finally attached to the housing, for example with screws through the set of pairs of holes 54 (inside the lid 51) and 55 (inside the top 53 of the housing 47), making sure that the output lead 8 (or 9) and other necessary wiring for the video camera have been let out through the hole 57, which is situated inside the lid 51. And as with the housing 33, the housing 47 can likewise be finally attached to the side front door mirror, this time by means of the matching set of holes 56 inside the lid <RTI>51.</RTI>

And similar procedures as with the housing 33 are carried out, as regards the wiring.

With version 47, because the side front video camera I (or 2) is attached to the lid <RTI>51,</RTI> which in turn is attached from inside the side front door mirror, the side front video camera can only be removed from the housing from inside the mirror, i. e. by first dismantling some parts of the mirror. This is not the case with the housing 33.

To make the inside of the housing 47 waterproof as with the housing 33, the holes 54, 56 and 57 may also be equipped with suitable packing materials, for example rubberwashers. The packing 58 on the underside of the lid 51 also serves this purpose.

Figure 14 shows the schematic drawing of the housing 47 the right way up-as it should be, when it sits on top of a side front door mirror.

Housings 33 and 47 could be made to the same length as that of the side front door mirror or to any length desired. And both housings could also be of any size. It is also possible to attach any of the housings 33 and 47 on the underside of the side front door mirror, in which case the housing that was formerly for the off side front door mirror would have to be for the left side front door mirror, and vice versa.

In addition the holes through which the housing is attached to the mirror and the hole through which the leads and wirings are passed must all be equipped with means to make the housing watertight, for example with rubber washers.

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Also to act as cover from direct rain showers, the top 59a, which serves as roof over the housing, and the side 59b, both may be made to extend well enough over the transparent window 48.

Figure 15 shows the schematic drawing of the housing-mirror combination 60, to be made as one unit. This means a combination of a side front door mirror together with a housing (with a side front video camera inside it), all as one unit. The part 61 of this version corresponds to the now existing side front door mirror 44, as shown for example in Figure 11, and the housing part 62 corresponds to any of the last two housings 33 or 47, mentioned in Figure 8 to Figure 14 above.

To act as cover from direct rain showers, the top 63a, which serves as roof over the housing, and the side 63b, may both be made to extend well enough over the window of the housing part 62.

This housing-mirror combination should also be made to fulfil the conditions that have already been mentioned above under Figure 3 (and to be mentioned again later under Figure 28 below), namely, in this case that the side front video camera inside the housing part 62 must definitely be inclined at the appropriate angle with the side of the vehicle. The housing part 62, which houses the camera, may be of any reasonable size. Its size may also depend, for example on the size of the video camera used.

Figures 16 to 26 relate to three different versions of housing for the rear-view video camera 3 and their installations on the vehicle, namely the housing 64, the housing 77 and the housing <RTI>91.</RTI> The rear-view video camera 3 in any of these housings should be mounted as far to the rear of the vehicle as possible, i. e. the rear-view video camera should be nearest to the view of the traffic it is meant for, and where it can best capture the view of the traffic, clearly and unobstructed. A possible area where the rear-view video camera 3 in its housing may be installed, is the middle of the top of the boot close to where the lock is situated. But for this purpose a mounting hole has to be bored. Another suitable and probably the best area where the rear-view video camera with its housing may be mounted, is on the roof inside the vehicle, and

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immediately behind the rear window-attached either to the head lining or to the finisher, as illustrated in Figures 16 to 26, so that the housing, with the video camera inside it, is positioned midway along the length of the rear window. The three different versions of the housing, together with their means of attachment to the roof, take into consideration, the sloping of that part of the roof up to some 10 cm or so behind the rear window, as will later be seen especially in Figures 19 to 22.

Figure 16 shows the schematic drawing of the housing 64 being assembled with its rear-side lid 68. The housing 64 has basically more or less the form of a box with an open top 65, which should then fit snugly into an inverted basin-like attachment base 66 as shown in Figure 16. This inverted basin-like attachment is in turn fitted, with any suitable means of attachment, either to the head Lining 81 or to the finisher 67 of the roof of the vehicle. The rear side of this housing 64 may either be made together with the box-like housing as one unit, or may be made detachable from it. Should this rear side be made detachable then this rear side becomes known as the rear-side lid 68, as shown in Figure 16. And it is this lid that the rear-view video camera 3 is attached to.

To mount the housing 64 on the roof, any convenient sequence out of Figures 16 and 17 may be chosen and followed. For instance, the inverted basin-like attachment base 66 may first be fitted, e. g. to the finisher 67 by any means of attachment. The rearview video camera 3 is then attached to the inner face 69 of the rear-side lid 68, e. g. by screws (not shown) through the set of holes 70, and the lid is then brought to the main housing 64 in the direction 71 indicated by the set of arrows, and fitted securely to the main housing 64, also for example with screws through the set of holes 72, such that the camera appears behind its transparent window 73 as shown in Figure 17. The housing, with the camera inside it, is finally brought in the direction 74 indicated by the set of arrows and fitted, for example with screws or any other means of attachment, to the inverted basin-like attachment base 66 as shown in Figure 18.

In the case of the rear side that is rigidly made with the housing 64 as one unit, as has already been mentioned above, the video camera 3 could be attached directly to this rear side. Further it is also possible to attach the rear-view video camera 3 directly to

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the inverted basin-like attachment base 66. Then this attachment base 66 should be supplied with any suitable means of attachment, for example with a board similar to the board 79 in Figure 20.

During the installation, the lead 10 of the rear-view video camera 3 and other necessary wiring may be passed through the hole 75 inside the inverted basin-like attachment base 66 into the roof of the vehicle for subsequent wiring, in which, the output terminal of the rear-view video camera 3 is wired to the input terminal of the middle frame 7 (see Figure 1) via the lead 10 (see Figure 1) along any suitable routes, for example inside the roof and the dashboard.

Figure 19 shows the schematic drawing of the second version of housing for the rearview video camera 3. This is the trough-like housing 77 and its base of attachmentan inverted trough-like base 78. As shown in Figure 19, the housing 77 also has an open top but is much longer than the housing 64 and is more or less like a trough. The sloping form of the inverted trough-like base 78 to which the trough-like housing 77 is to be fitted is made to match with the sloping of that part of the roof near to the rear window. As such from its frontal part 84 the inverted trough-like base 78 slops downwards towards its rear end up to approximately midway. Then from about halfway to its rear end part 85 near to the rear window, the inverted trough-like base 78 is more or less horizontal when it then rests on the finisher 67 (please see the finished mounting in Figures 21 and 22 below). The inverted trough-like base 78 is attached to the head lining 81 through the set of holes 83. The trough-like housing 77 is so made that its open top or edge 88 fits in well with the edge 89 of the inverted trough-like base 78. As shown in Figure 19 the sloping of the edge 88 around the long trough-like housing 77 is made to match that of the edge 89 of the inverted troughlike base 78. That means, to conform to the form of the base 78, the edge 89 of the housing 77 should slop downwards up to approximately midway towards its rear end, and from about halfway to the rear end, the edge 89 of the trough-like housing 77 should become more or less horizontal. And in addition the rear end of the housing 77 gets deeper. This rear end is where the rear-view video camera 3 is housed.

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As has already been pointed out above, where or how the trough-like housing and the inverted trough-like base 78 may slop or be horizontal, depends on the degree of slope of the head lining 81, which the frontal part 84 is to be attached to, and of the finisher 67, which the rear part 85 is to rest on. This means that the housing 77 and the inverted trough-like base 78 may both be made to slant or be horizontal as much as possible depending on the gradient of the surface of the head lining 81 and also of the finisher 67, immediately behind the rear window.

To install the trough-like housing 77 (with the rear-view video camera 3 inside it) on the roof of the vehicle, any sequence from Figure 20 may be followed. For example, the rear-view video camera may first be attached to the board 79 on the inverted trough-like base 78 with any suitable method of attachment and, as shown in Figure 20, its lead 10 passed through the hole 80 of the inverted trough-like base, for subsequent wiring. The inverted trough-like base is then attached to the head lining 81 as indicated by the direction 82 of the set of arrows in Figure 20, for example with screws (not shown) through the set of holes 83. As shown in Figure 20 the frontal sloping part 84 of the inverted trough-like base is attached to the head lining, and the rear part 85 of it rests on the finisher 67, so that when the trough-like housing 77 is finally fitted to it (i. e. to the base 78), the transparent window 86 of the housing 77 would just be behind the rear window of the vehicle (please see Figures 21 and 22, also Figures 25 and 26). So having properly fitted the inverted trough-like base 78 to the head lining 81, the trough-like housing 77 may then be fitted to the inverted trough-like base 78 as indicated by the direction 87 of the set of arrows in Figure 20, for example with screws or any other suitable means, such that the edge 88 around the housing fits securely into the edge 89 of the inverted trough-like base. Figure 21 shows the completed installation, with the rear-view video camera 3 looking, behind the transparent window 86, straight across the rear window of the vehicle. This is also further illustrated in Figures 25 and 26. Figure 22 also shows the installed trough-like housing 77 as seen from inside the vehicle, and behind the rear view window 90.

Figure 23 shows the schematic drawing of the housing 91. Housing 91 is also for housing the rear-view video camera 3. As shown in Figure 23 this housing is box-like in form, and its rear side, which is detachable, is designated as the lid 92. It is the

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interior side 93 of this lid that the rear-view video camera 3 may be attached to, such that the rear-view video camera sits behind the transparent window 95, through which it views the traffic across the rear window of the vehicle. An attachment slab 96 is fitted either to the finisher 67 or to the head lining 81 of the roof, for example with the set of screws 97. Then a connecting bar 98 connects both the slab 96 and the housing 91.

To install the housing 91 with the video camera 3 inside it, any sequence from Figures 23 and 24 may be followed. For example the camera may first be secured to the interior side 93 of the lid 92, with the set of screws 94. Then the lid 92 with the camera now attached to it, is in turn fitted to the housing 91, also for example with screws such that the camera appears behind its transparent window 95 as shown in Figure 24. The housing 91, with the camera now inside it, is then mounted on the attachment slab 96 through the connecting bar 98, which is firmly fixed to the slab 96 at the point 98 as shown in Figure 23, and also in Figure 24. The other end of the bar 98 then connects with the exterior side of the lid 92 of the housing, or anywhere else suitable on the housing 91.

The slab 96 and the connecting-bar 98 may both be made together as one unit and they may be made of plastic or any other suitable material. Further, the rear-view video camera may also be attached to any other suitable place inside the housing, e. g. to the floor or to the ceiling of the housing 91.

During installation, the output-terminal of the rear-view video camera 3 may be wired to the input-terminal of the middle frame 7 via the lead 10 along any suitable routes, for example, first through any suitable side of the housing 77 and then through the hole 100 in the slab 96, then along routes inside the roof and the dashboard.

The packing 101 between the lid 92 and the main housing 91 is mainly for making the housing <RTI>shockproof and</RTI> to prevent cracks, and could be made of rubber or any other suitable material. It may also be ignored.

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Figures 25 and 26 both show how any of the above-mentioned three housings 64,77 and <RTI>91,</RTI> with the rear-view video camera 3 mounted inside it is seen from the rear of a vehicle, e. g. with a saloon as in Figure 25 or with a state wagon as in Figure 26.

Any of the housings 64,77 or 91 may be made of plastic or any other suitable material; and their respective transparent windows 73,86 and 93 may be made of glass or any other suitable material, for example plastic.

Figure 27 shows possible area in front of the driver where the partitioned rectangular video monitor 4 may be mounted. The partitioned rectangular video monitor must be mounted in a place where the driver can quite easily view it and see its pictures clearly. One possible place where the video monitor may be mounted is on top of the dashboard 102 as shown in Figure 27. It may sit fixed to the dashboard 102, and positioned lengthwise with the edge 103 of the dashboard. It may also sit fixed but in a slanting position to the edge of the dashboard to face the driver more, or can even be equipped with a sort of pivot-system so that it can be turned round on its axis.

Figure 28 stresses the necessity of having each of the two side front video cameras I and 2 installed with its lens to protrude sufficiently well enough out of the side of the vehicle so that no part of the vehicle stands in the way of the camera, and also with its lens inclined at a suitable angle to the side of the vehicle. The exception with the last requirement is if the angle of vision of its lens is large enough to make this inclination unnecessary, e. g. around <RTI>180 .</RTI> With these conditions fulfilled, the side front video camera should be able to view the whole traffic, right from areas 104 close to the side of the vehicle, up to the areas 105 abreast of the vehicle, i. e. areas within the spotted portion 18 under Figure 3-clearly and unobstructed. The areas 104 correspond to areas close to the line 20 in Figure 3 or line 20a in Figure 4, while areas 105 correspond to the areas close to the line 24, also in Figures 3 and 4. For example a camera with the angle of vision <RTI>of 90 should</RTI> have an angle of inclination of approximately <RTI>450 with</RTI> the side of the vehicle. In Figure 28, the number 106 depicts this angle. Then the side front video camera 1 (or 2) will be able to capture all the traffic from the side of the vehicle up to the traffic abreast of the vehicle, clearly and unobstructed, as shown in Frames 5 and 6 with pictures 107 and 108 respectively under Figure 29.

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Figure 29 is an example of how the pictures of a traffic situation are presented on the partitioned rectangular video monitor 4. Figure 29 illustrates how the whole traffic following behind and the traffic abreast on either side of the vehicle are all seen together on the three frames 5,6 and 7 of the partitioned rectangular video monitor 4.

The three pictures 107,108 and 109 from the three video cameras 1,2 and 3, respectively are brought together onto their respective frames 5,6 and 7 such that they all blend together on the wide-screen of the partitioned rectangular video monitor 4 into one broad expanse of the picture of the whole traffic, as shown in Figure 29. As shown, the three separate views-from the offside of the vehicle, right round to the back of the vehicle, and continuing right round to the near side of the vehicle, are all seen as one single picture on the wide-screen of the partitioned rectangular video monitor 4. No view is missed out, since no part of the vehicle stands in the way of the cameras. This is due to the fact that the two rear-view video cameras I and 2 protrude sufficiently out of the sides of the vehicle and are at a suitable angle to these sides, and further because the rear-view video camera 3 is also well placed properly firmly fixed where it is mounted-immediately behind the rear window, with no one (and no object) sitting in its way, and its view is in no way obstructed, even when the vehicle is fully packed. In this <RTI>180 angle</RTI> of vision, all the traffic around the vehicle-on both sides of the vehicle, and following behind i. e. exactly and directly behind the rear of the vehicle, could be seen, including the motorcyclists.

Figures 30 and 31 relate to two more versions of the invention, in which the video camera lens is not rigidly or directly attached to the main technical part of the video camera, but is remotely connected to the technical part of the video camera-via a lead. So it is only such lenses 114,115 and 116 that are mounted on the vehicle instead of the whole video cameras themselves, and the technical parts of the three video cameras are kept safely together in any suitable place inside the vehicle. The remotely connected video camera lenses 114,115 and 116 may also be of the type of lens system using fibre optics, in which the picture of the traffic is picked up by the objective end of the fibre optic cable and is eventually transmitted to a video camera, in this case the technical part of a video camera, e. g. a miniature video camera module

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These two versions of the invention serve mainly to avoid risking the whole video camera, in particular the two side front video cameras 1 and 2, to be directly open to unfortunate incidents like theft, damage through vandalism, weather extremes, or accidents. This means that the video cameras'lenses, or similar are housed and mounted on the vehicle, and their output terminals connected via leads to the main technical parts of the video cameras, which in turn may be kept secure anywhere suitable inside the vehicle. With these two versions, it is then only such remotely connected lenses or similar, and not the cameras themselves that are mounted in all the above-mentioned housings.

In one version, the main technical parts 110, 111 and 112 of the three video cameras may be put together, e. g. as a pack 113 and stored anywhere suitable inside the vehicle-for example any secure place inside the boot of a car. With the other version, the technical parts of the three video cameras can be built together with the partitioned rectangular video monitor, as one unit, and to be known as the cameravideo monitor unit 126. With this version, the output-terminals from the technical parts of the video cameras inside the camera-video monitor unit are internally integrated with the input-terminals of their respective frames on the partitioned rectangular video monitor part 127 of the camera-video monitor unit 126.

In both versions, the remote lenses are each equipped with output-terminals, which are wired, via leads, to the input-terminals of the technical parts of their respective cameras. The output-terminals of the video cameras are then wired to the inputterminals of their respective frames.

The remotely connected video camera lenses may be of the type of lens system using fibre optics, in which the picture of the traffic is picked up by the objective end of the fibre optic cable and is eventually transmitted to the technical part of a video camera.

With any of these two versions, since it is only the camera lens, or similar that is going to be mounted in the housing instead of the whole of the video camera itself, then the sizes of all the above-mentioned housings, including also the part 62 in the camera-mirror combination in Figure 15, may all therefore be considerably smaller.

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Figure 30 shows the schematic drawing of the whole set-up of one of these versionswith the first option with remotely connected lenses, in which the main technical parts 110, 111 and 112 of the three video cameras are packed together in a suitable common enclosure 113 and kept in a safe place somewhere inside the vehicle, for example in the boot of a car. So for this version the output-terminals of the remotely connected lenses 114,115 and 116 are connected via their respective leads 117,118 and 119 to the input-terminals of the technical parts 110, 111 and 112 of the three video cameras respectively, while the output-terminals of the technical parts 110, 111 and 112 of the three video cameras are connected with the input-terminals of their respective frames 5,6 and 7 on the partitioned rectangular video monitor 4 via another leads 120,121 and 122, as indicated by the arrows 123,124 and 125. This video monitor is the same video monitor 4 in Figures 1,2 and 29. The drawing in Figure 30 is schematic and is not to scale.

Figure 31 shows the schematic drawing of the set-up of the other version-with the second possibility with remotely connected lenses 114,115 and 116, in which main technical parts of the video cameras for these three lenses and the partitioned rectangular video monitor are combined and built together as one unit 126. So with this version the main technical parts (not shown) of the three video cameras are internally integrated with the partitioned rectangular video monitor 127. And the output terminals of these technical parts are also internally connected with the input terminals of their respective frames 129, 130 and 131 in the monitor 127. In Figure 31 the main technical parts (not shown) of the three video cameras are all encased together inside the back 128 of the video monitor 127 and their input sockets are the sockets 132,133 and 134. In Figure 31 the output-terminals from the remotely connected lenses 114,115 and 116 connect, via their respective leads 117,118 and 119, with the input sockets 132,133 and 134 of the technical parts of the cameras, as indicated by the arrows 138,139 and 140 at the ends of leads 117,118 and 119, respectively. Thus the captured pictures from the lenses, of the traffic, are transmitted into their respective frames 129,130 and <RTI>131.</RTI>

And in case the principles of fibre-optics are used regarding the remotely connected lenses, then in the description under Figures 30 and 31, the <RTI>expression"fibre-optic</RTI>

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cables 117,118 and 119"may replace the expression"leads 117,118 and <RTI>1 19" ;</RTI> and the <RTI>expression"objective</RTI> ends 114,115 and 116 of the fibre-optic cable" should replace the <RTI>expression"remotely</RTI> connected lenses 114,115 and 116".

The lengths of all the leads, dimensions of the video cameras and dimensions in the drawings in general, mentioned in the above descriptions are not always to scale.

Claims (30)

  1. CLAIMS 1. A traffic-viewing video system for drivers comprising, firstly, three video cameras that are housed inside suitable protective housings, two of the video cameras, inside their housings being mounted externally in suitable areas on either side of the car (or vehicle), and close to where, or exactly where, the present-day side front door mirrors are situated, or close to where the side turn signal lights are situated, one mounted on the near side, known as the near side front video camera, and the other on the off side, known as the off side front video camera, each of the two side front cameras being able to receive the view, right from the view abreast on the side of the vehicle, up to the view along the entire length of the side of the vehicle, straight through to the view rearwards of the vehicle-all enclosed within an angle of, at least, approximately 90 degrees, the third video camera, also inside its housing, and known as the rear-view video camera, is mounted in a suitable area at the rear of the vehicle and midway of the width of the rear of the vehicle, e. g. adjacent to the middle of the top of the rear window, and where the view of the rear-view video camera is under no circumstances obstructed by objects or occupants in the vehicle, so that the rear-view video camera could take the picture of the view exactly behind the vehicle, clearly and unobstructed; then secondly, the system comprising a rectangular video monitor, which is partitioned into three frames, all lined up, essentially lengthways, and the middle frame being essentially made, in such a way, that in showing picture taken by the rear- view video camera, the middle frame shows only a predetermined inner part of the overall view, this inner part being only the view enclosed within the rectangular area, which stretches from the back of the vehicle, through to infinity, and of which the overall length of the back of the vehicle i. e. from one end of the rear bumper to its other end, is one of the rectangle's two short sides, and the partitioned rectangular video monitor being positioned anywhere suitable in front of the driver, e. g. on the dashboard, and having the input of one external frame connected, via a lead, to the
    <Desc/Clms Page number 29>
    output of the near side front video camera, the input of the other external frame, via a lead, to the output of the off side front video camera, and the input of the middle frame connected, also via a lead, to the output of the rear-view video camera, so that the three separate views, transmitted by the three separate video cameras to their respective frames, are all brought together side by side and lengthways on the monitor, resulting in their three separate pictures blending and harmonizing together into a broad expanse of the view on both sides and at the rear, the three separate views being therefore seen on the wide-screen of the partitioned rectangular video monitor, as one single unified view.
  2. 2. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 1, in which the width of the middle frame of the partitioned rectangular video monitor is smaller than the width of each of the two external frames, the width of the middle frame corresponding to the width of the view exactly behind the back of the vehicle, and enclosed within the rectangular area, which stretches from the back of the vehicle, through to infinity, this width being relatively less than the width of the view on either side of the vehicle, which corresponds to the width of each of the two external frames.
  3. 3. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in <RTI>Claiml</RTI> or Claim 2, in which means is provided for the middle frame, so that the middle frame under no circumstances duplicates part or parts of the pictures that are already shown in the two external frames, the only picture allowed inside the middle frame being that part of the overall picture taken by the rear-view video camera, which is the view enclosed within the rectangular area, which stretches from the back of the vehicle itself, through to infinity, and of which the width of the back of the vehicle, i. e. from one end of the rear bumper to its other end, is one of its two short sides.
  4. 4. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 2 or Claim 3, in which the rear-view video camera, is firmly fixed to its place of attachment in such a way that the rear-view video camera does not, under
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    any circumstances, through e. g. wobbling, cause unwanted duplications inside the middle frame of pictures already fed into the two external frames by the two side front video cameras, the pictures taken by the two side front video cameras-of the view from the traffic abreast of the vehicle up to the view along the entire length of the side of the vehicle straight through to the view rearwards, as far as the cameras can see, being the only pictures allowed inside the two external frames.
  5. 5. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 3 or Claim 4, in which the two side front video cameras, in their housings are each firmly fixed to their places of attachment to prevent e. g. wobbling, and are each at a suitable angle to the side of the vehicle, in such a way that the camera receives the optimum view, which covers the view of the traffic abreast of the vehicle plus the view along the entire length of the side of the vehicle, straight through to the view rearwards, as far as the camera can see, but under no circumstances, to include part or parts of the view of the traffic that is exactly behind the back of the vehicle, which is the view enclosed within the rectangular area, that stretches from the back of the vehicle itself through to infinity, and of which the overall length of the back of the vehicle, i. e. from one end of the rear bumper to its other end, is one of its two short sides, then in this way, unwanted duplications inside the two external frames, of part or parts of the picture, that is already shown inside the middle frame, is avoided.
  6. 6. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 4 or Claim 5, in which the two side front video cameras that are mounted in suitable areas on either side of the vehicle, and close to where present-day side front door mirrors are situated, or close to where the side turn signal lights are situated, are each firmly covered up with a housing, which has approximately the shape of a right-angled triangular prism, with its longest side forming the transparent window, through which the video camera, inside the housing, receives the view of the traffic abreast of the vehicle plus the view along the entire length of the side of the vehicle through to
    <Desc/Clms Page number 31>
    the view rearwards-simultaneously, the back of the housing, with which the housing is mounted on to the side of the vehicle, to cover up the side front video camera, having an opening cut inside it for the camera, such that when the housing is mounted on the camera, like a jacket, the camera emerges out of this opening, behind the transparent window.
  7. 7. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 5 or Claim 6, in which each of the two right-angled triangular prism-like housings for the side front video cameras has, both its top, which serves as roof over the housing, and its side, made to extend well enough over the transparent window so as to cover the transparent window from direct rain showers, and also prevent the transparent window from being fogged up.
  8. 8. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 6 or Claim 7, in which in another version relating to housing for the side front video cameras, each of the two side front video cameras is provided with a housing, which is made mountable on top of the now existing side front door mirror, the base of the housing being provided with suitable means of attachment to the mirror, or alternatively the housing is made mountable on the underside of the now existing side front door mirror, the top of the housing, in this case, being provided with suitable means of attachment to the mirror.
  9. 9. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 7 or Claim 8, in which each of the two housings that are made mountable on the top or the underside of the now existing side front door mirrors, has a detachable side which may serve as lid or cover for safety of the camera, and through which the side front video camera and other necessary things, e. g. lead and other necessary wirings are brought into the housing.
    <RTI>
  10. 10.</RTI> A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 8 or Claim 9, in which the interior side of the detachable lid of the housing, that is made mountable on top or the underside of the now existing side front
    <Desc/Clms Page number 32>
    door mirror, is provided with a means of attachment for the side front video camera, so that the side front video camera is inclined at a suitable angle to the side of the vehicle.
  11. 11. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 9 or Claim 10, in which, in further version for the housings for the two side front video cameras, the housing that is made mountable on top or the underside of the now existing side front door mirror, is further modified to be built anew in combination with a side front door mirror as one unit, where the housing is on top or underside of the side front door mirror, the housing part of this unit being of suitable size.
  12. 12. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 10 or Claim 11, in which the versions of housing made mountable on top (or underside) of the now existing side front door mirror, and the housing built anew in combination with side front door mirror as one unit, have more or less the shape of a rectangular box, that is resting on one of its long sides, and having another of its long sides, plus a short side adjacent to it, both replaced with a diagonal or curved transparent window, behind which the video camera is situated and views the traffic across the rear window of the vehicle, the housing being provided with a prism-shaped board or any other suitable means of attachment that makes the side front video camera attached to it, to be inclined at a suitable angle, so that the camera is able to receive the view, right from the view abreast of the vehicle up to the view along the entire length of the side of the vehicle, through to the view rearwards-simultaneously.
  13. 13. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 11 or Claim 12, in which housing for the side front video camera, mountable on top or the underside of the now existing side front door mirror, or built anew in combination with a side front door mirror as one unit, has both its top, which serves as roof over the housing, and its side, made to extend well
    <Desc/Clms Page number 33>
    enough over the transparent window, so as to cover the transparent window from direct rain showers and also reduce fogging up.
  14. 14. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 12 or Claim 13, in which the housing for the side front video camera, mountable on top or the underside of the now existing side front door mirror, or built anew in combination with a side front door mirror as one unit, is provided with a hole in a suitable place, through which all necessary wirings from or to the side front video camera are made to pass.
  15. 15. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 13 or Claim 14, in which a housing for the rear view video camera has the form of a box with an open top, which fits snugly into the edge of an inverted basin- like attachment base, which is fitted either to the head lining, or to the finisher of the roof of the vehicle, immediately behind the rear window and adjacent to the middle of the top of the rear window, or is fitted to any other suitable place at the rear of the vehicle, and the rear-view video camera itself being attached to any suitable side inside the housing e. g. to the rear-side lid of the housing, such that the rear-view video camera is behind a transparent window, through which it views the traffic across the rear window of the vehicle.
  16. 16. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 14 or Claim 15, in which, in another variation of the box-shaped housing with an open top, the inverted basin-like attachment base is provided with any suitable means of attachment for the rear-view video camera, so that when the box shaped housing is brought on to cover the camera and fitted to the inverted basin-like attachment base, the camera fits in properly behind the transparent window of the box-shaped housing.
  17. 17. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 15 or Claim 16, in which the inverted basin-like attachment base is provided with
    <Desc/Clms Page number 34>
    suitable hole, through which all necessary wiring from or to the rear video camera is made possible.
  18. 18. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 16 or Claim 17, in which a further version of housing for the rear-view video camera is like a trough, with a sloping open top, which is fitted snugly into a sloping inverted trough-like attachment base, the frontal part of which is towards the fore part of the vehicle, and which, is attached, to the head lining of the roof of the vehicle immediately behind the rear window and adjacent to the middle of the top of the rear window, the attachment base being made to match the sloping of that part of the head-lining nearest to the finisher and close to the top of the rear window, so that the attachment base slops from its frontal part downwards towards its rear end, up to approximately midway, and from this midway to its rear end part, near to the rear window of the vehicle, the inverted trough-like attachment base becomes more or less horizontal when it then rests on the finisher of the roof of the vehicle, and in order that the trough-like housing fits in well into the inverted trough-like attachment base, the sloping open top of the housing is made to match that of the sloping edge of the inverted trough-like attachment base in every aspect, and in addition, from its midway to its rear end, where the housing becomes more or less horizontal, the housing gets deeper, this deeper part being where the rear-view video camera occupies, such that the camera is behind the housing's transparent window, through which the camera views the traffic across the rear window of the vehicle.
  19. 19. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 17 or Claim 18, in which the inverted trough-like attachment base is provided with an attachment means for the rear-view video camera, this attachment means being in any suitable place near its midway and where the attachment base becomes more or less horizontal, so that the camera fits in properly in the space provided for it inside the deep part of the trough-like housing, the inverted trough-like attachment base being also provided with a suitable
    <Desc/Clms Page number 35>
    hole in a suitable place, through which all necessary wiring from or to the rear-view video camera is passed.
  20. 20. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 18 or Claim 19, in which another version of housing for the rear-view video camera is box-like in form, one of its sides, which is detachable being the lid, and another side forming the transparent window, the rear-view video camera being attached to any suitable place inside the housing, such that the rear- view video camera is behind the transparent window, through which it views the traffic across the rear window of the car (or vehicle), the housing being fitted, via a connecting bar, to an attachment slab, which itself is fitted either to the finisher or the head lining of the roof immediately behind the rear window, and adjacent to the middle of the top of the rear window, or the alternative place of attachment for the box-like housing and the attachment slab being any other suitable place at the rear of the vehicle.
    <RTI>
  21. 21.</RTI> A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 19 or Claim 20, in which the attachment slab is provided with suitable hole, through which all necessary wiring from or to the rear-view video camera is made possible, this hole being made anywhere suitable on the slab.
  22. 22. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 20 or Claim 21, in which, in further versions, three video camera lenses, each remotely connected to its respective video camera's main technical part, via a lead (i. e. with the camera lens being detachable from its video camera's main technical part but only connected to the main technical part via a lead), are mounted inside their housings, with two of the video camera-lenses inside their housings, each mounted in suitable area on either side of the vehicle, close to where the now existing side front door mirror is situated or close to where the side turn signal light is situated, or is mountable on top or underside of the now existing side front door mirror, or is modified to be built anew in combination with a side front door mirror as one unit, and
    <Desc/Clms Page number 36>
    the third video camera-lens, also inside its housing, is mounted on the finisher or the head lining of the roof of the vehicle close to the rear window, and adjacent to the middle of the top of the rear window, or is mounted in a suitable area at the rear of the vehicle.
  23. 23. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 21 or Claim 22, in which, two housings, each housing a video camera lens, which is remotely connected to the main technical part of a video camera via a lead (i. e. with the camera lens being detachable from its video camera's main technical part but only connected to the main technical part via a lead), are mounted in suitable areas on either side of the vehicle close to where present-day side front door mirrors are situated, or close to where the side turn signal lights are situated, the housings being as small as possible, since the video camera lenses are also small.
  24. 24. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 22 or Claim 23, in which two housings, each of which houses a video camera lens, which is remotely connected to the main technical part of a video camera via a lead (i. e. with the camera lens being detachable from its video camera's main technical part but only connected to the main technical part via a lead), are each made mountable on top or underside of the now existing side front door mirror, the housings being as small as possible, since the video camera lenses are also small.
  25. 25. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 23 or Claim 24, in which two housings, each housing a video camera lens, which is remotely connected to the main technical part of a video camera via a lead (i. e. with the camera lens being detachable from its video camera's main technical part but only connected to the main technical part via a lead), are each built anew in combination with a side front door mirror, as one unit, the housings being as small as possible, since the video camera lenses are also small.
    <Desc/Clms Page number 37>
  26. 26. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 24 or Claim 25, in which a housing that houses a video camera lens, which is remotely connected to the video camera's main technical part via a lead, is mounted on the finisher or the head lining of the roof immediately behind the rear window, and adjacent to the middle of the top of the rear window, or is mounted in a suitable area at the rear of the vehicle, the housing being as small as possible, since the video camera lens is also small.
  27. 27. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 25 or Claim 26, in which only the main technical parts of the three video cameras are securely stored anywhere suitable in the vehicle, from where the main technical parts are then wired to outputs of their respective remotely connected lenses, and to the inputs of their respective frames on the partitioned rectangular video monitor.
  28. 28. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in Claim 26 or Claim 27, in which in another variation of a version, only the main technical parts of the three video cameras are further modified to be built anew in combination with a partitioned rectangular video monitor, as one unit, to which the outputs of their respective remotely connected lenses are then connected, via leads.
  29. 29. A traffic viewing video system for drivers as claimed in any preceding claim, in which the housings are made from plastic, or from any other suitable material or materials, or a combination of suitable materials.
  30. 30. A traffic viewing video system for drivers substantially as herein described and illustrated with reference to Figures 1 to 31 of the accompanying drawings.
GB0123184A 2001-09-26 2001-09-26 A traffic viewing system for drivers Expired - Fee Related GB2380346B (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB0123184A GB2380346B (en) 2001-09-26 2001-09-26 A traffic viewing system for drivers

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB0123184A GB2380346B (en) 2001-09-26 2001-09-26 A traffic viewing system for drivers

Publications (3)

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GB0123184D0 GB0123184D0 (en) 2001-11-21
GB2380346A true true GB2380346A (en) 2003-04-02
GB2380346B GB2380346B (en) 2006-04-26

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Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPH01257482A (en) * 1988-04-08 1989-10-13 Hitachi Chem Co Ltd Dna having synthetic gene for producing human epidermal growth factor and plasmid recombinant thereof
GB2327823A (en) * 1997-07-30 1999-02-03 Nigel Geoffrey Ley Rear-view viewing system
GB2338363A (en) * 1998-06-09 1999-12-15 Graham Hodgson System for providing vehicle driver with rear-view video image
GB2341028A (en) * 1998-08-19 2000-03-01 Tseng Chun Jung Vehicle mounted camera array and monitor for driver blind-spot imaging
US6078355A (en) * 1996-10-25 2000-06-20 Zengel; John A. Vehicle periphery monitoring system

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPH01257482A (en) * 1988-04-08 1989-10-13 Hitachi Chem Co Ltd Dna having synthetic gene for producing human epidermal growth factor and plasmid recombinant thereof
US6078355A (en) * 1996-10-25 2000-06-20 Zengel; John A. Vehicle periphery monitoring system
GB2327823A (en) * 1997-07-30 1999-02-03 Nigel Geoffrey Ley Rear-view viewing system
GB2338363A (en) * 1998-06-09 1999-12-15 Graham Hodgson System for providing vehicle driver with rear-view video image
GB2341028A (en) * 1998-08-19 2000-03-01 Tseng Chun Jung Vehicle mounted camera array and monitor for driver blind-spot imaging

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GB0123184D0 (en) 2001-11-21 grant
GB2380346B (en) 2006-04-26 grant

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Effective date: 20080926