GB2333964A - Intravenous coagulation catheter for treatment of varicose veins - Google Patents

Intravenous coagulation catheter for treatment of varicose veins Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2333964A
GB2333964A GB9904976A GB9904976A GB2333964A GB 2333964 A GB2333964 A GB 2333964A GB 9904976 A GB9904976 A GB 9904976A GB 9904976 A GB9904976 A GB 9904976A GB 2333964 A GB2333964 A GB 2333964A
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
catheter
coagulation
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lt
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Granted
Application number
GB9904976A
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GB2333964B (en )
GB9904976D0 (en )
Inventor
Falah Hasan Ali
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Falah Hasan Ali
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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating
    • A61B18/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating by passing a current through the tissue to be heated, e.g. high-frequency current
    • A61B18/14Probes or electrodes therefor

Abstract

A long catheter has a metallic head 1 connected by a glass tube 2 to a plastics insulating cover 4. A spiral wire 3 couples the head 1 to a tail 5 for connection to a high frequency electrosurgical supply. The catheter is introduced into a vein using a cannula. In operation, coagulation of the vein is produced by electrocautery.

Description

INTRAVENOUS COAGULATION CATHETER FOR TREATMENT OF VARICOSE VEINS This invention relates to I.V. coagulation catheter for treatment of primary (simple) varicose Veins.

Primary varicose veins are usually treated either surgically by stripping of the saphenous vein and the connected varicosities, or by sclerotherapy inducing thrombophlebitis through the use of irritant chemical compound.

Electrocautery is used to coagulate and eventually obliterate the vein, in this new method, avoiding the use of the knife and the drawbacks of the chemical method.

High voltage radio frequency current initiates electrical spark which heats the tissues rapidly.

On - off control is instantaneous. This sort of current is carried on surfaces of conductors, rather than passing through them i.e. there is no risk of causing cardiac arrhythmias or thermal damage to the internal organs. The generated heat by an electrical current is proportional to the current density, The use of small ( active) electrode at the site of surgical field will allow current density and heat production to be maximised. In contrast, by using a large (return) electrode i.e. the pad,the current is dispersed over a wide area. Indeed we can apply the active electrode at almost any point in the body to cauterise it.

The idea behind the application of this catheter is to use the intravenous route to treat the varicose veins by coagulation of high fiequency current electrocautery. This method may be helpful to treat other vascular disorders. A specific embodiment of the invention will now be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawing in which, Figure 1 in perspective, is the intravenous coagulation catheter.

Figure 2 illustrates the intravenous cannula which is used to introduce the catheter intravenously.

Referring to the drawing, fig 1 shows the i.v. coagulation catheter which comprises a metal head 1 that conveys the current from the spiral wire 3 to the points of coagulation. It is 1 cm in length, apart from its narrow base which is fitted firmly insidethe glass tube 2. This head is conical in shape for easy introduction into the vein and its circumference is equal to that of the catheter. The heat resistant glass (or porcelain) tube 2 is <RTI>lcm</RTI> in length and serves to prevent the near end of the plastic insulator 4 from being damaged by direct effect of heat . The spiral flexible metal wire 3 connects the catheter head 1 to its tail <RTI>5</RTI> It has a suitable electrical resistance. The plastic cover 4 (current insulator) covers the spiral wire 3 right from the beginning of the tail 5 to to the end of the glass tube 2 and it is completely adherent to the latter, to prevent current leakage. It has <RTI>o.5</RTI> - 1 mm thickness. The glass tube 2 is of the same thickness and size of that of the plastic insulator 4.

The metal tail 5 is used to connect the catheter to the <RTI>electro</RTI> surgical unit as it is touched by the clamp of electrocautery. It is narrower than the catheter to allow easy removal <RTI>ofthe cannula after</RTI> i.v. introduction of the catheter. It is about 2cm in length.

Fig 2 shows the i.v. coagulation catheter 6 introduced into the metal tube 7 of the cannula which is attached to its plastic wings 8.

This catheter is disposable and sterilised by gamma radiation. It is about Imeter in length and <RTI>of3</RTI> sizes, French Gauge 8, 10 & 12.

The patient is preferably put on non steroidal anti inflammatory drug if possible starting the day before coagulation and continued for few days.

The varicose veins are labelled during clinical examination. The catheter is being introduced intravenously through the cannula which is applied at the lower end of the vein e.g. long saphenous v. In general the catheter can be introduced at any point along the course of the vein . Venography is done to avoid accidental introduction of the catheter into the external iliac vein, if coagulation is to be applied at a high level a long the course of the vein.

The catheter head is better to be few cms away from the sapheno femoral junction to avoid thermal injury to the femoral vein. After the catheter is being adjusted it should be fixed firmly to the skin by adhesive tape to prevent its displacement . The catheter should be introduced under aseptic technique.

Normal saline solution which contains 0.2 % lignocaine is prepared in order to; a. provide local anaesthesia. b. push the skin apart from the site of coagulation c. protect the surrounding tissues from thermal injury.

The electro surgical unit is checked before being applied to the patient . The limb is raised so that the collapsed <RTI>(empty)</RTI> vein will be in an intimate contact with the head of the catheter for effective coagulation. A tourniquet can be used in this procedure The patient is connected perfectly to the return electrode (the pad) which is placed at the contra lateral side of the body The labelled points on the course of the vein are injected subcutaneously with the prepared normal saline solution before coagulation is being applied Up to 100 ml can be used in normal adult patient. Apiece of gauze soaked with cold saline can be applied on the skin at these points before and after coagulation to protect the skin from thermal injury. Coagulation should be started from upper part going downward a long the course of the vein with gradual pulling of the catheter.

After coagulation is being finished, what is left of the catheter is withdrawn to the outside. The limb is supported by elastic pressure bandage for few <RTI>days</RTI> The following points can help in the assessment of the integrity of the circuit & the intensity of <RTI>coagulation</RTI> a. Fast and short touch to the catheter tail by the electro cautery clamp produces a spark indicating the integrity of the circuit. Its size gives a clue for the intensity of coagulation. b. Palpation of the skin over the point of coagulation help in the same way by feeling the crepitation of coagulation. A stethoscope can be used as well Cutting <RTI>electro cautery</RTI> is better not to be used to avoid unnecessary extensive damage.

Claims (1)

  1. CLAIMS The intravenous coagulation catheter provides an alternative to the available methods of the treatment of primary varicose veins including sclerotherapy and surgery This is achieved by using coagulation of high frequency current electrocautery The tissue damage induced by coagulation and subsequent replacement with adhesion and fibrosis will obliterate the veins . <RTI>A long</RTI> catheter is used, to be introduced intravenously so that the active electrode is brought about in direct contact with the points needed to be coagulated along the course of the vein e.g long saphenous vein.
    These points are labelled previously during clinical examination The procedure is done with local anaesthesia under aseptic technique.
GB9904976A 1999-03-04 1999-03-04 Intravenous coagulation catheter for treatment of varicose veins Expired - Fee Related GB2333964B (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB9904976A GB2333964B (en) 1999-03-04 1999-03-04 Intravenous coagulation catheter for treatment of varicose veins

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB9904976A GB2333964B (en) 1999-03-04 1999-03-04 Intravenous coagulation catheter for treatment of varicose veins

Publications (3)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB9904976D0 GB9904976D0 (en) 1999-04-28
GB2333964A true true GB2333964A (en) 1999-08-11
GB2333964B GB2333964B (en) 1999-12-29

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Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB9904976A Expired - Fee Related GB2333964B (en) 1999-03-04 1999-03-04 Intravenous coagulation catheter for treatment of varicose veins

Country Status (1)

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GB (1) GB2333964B (en)

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6258084B1 (en) 1997-09-11 2001-07-10 Vnus Medical Technologies, Inc. Method for applying energy to biological tissue including the use of tumescent tissue compression
WO2006054170A1 (en) 2004-11-22 2006-05-26 Cardiodex Ltd. Techniques for heat-treating varicose veins
WO2010057934A1 (en) * 2008-11-18 2010-05-27 F Care Systems Flexible catheter
WO2010099207A1 (en) * 2009-02-24 2010-09-02 Sierra Surgical Technologies Methods and systems for controlled thermal tissue
US8849395B2 (en) 2008-05-30 2014-09-30 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Guide catheter having vasomodulating electrodes

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8636729B2 (en) 2005-07-21 2014-01-28 Covidien Lp Therapeutic system with energy application device and programmed power delivery

Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO1993020877A1 (en) * 1992-04-10 1993-10-28 Cardiorhythm Steerable electrode catheter
EP0633003A1 (en) * 1993-07-09 1995-01-11 Jean Parvulesco Medical instrument for electrocoagulation
WO1995019148A1 (en) * 1994-01-18 1995-07-20 Endovascular, Inc. Apparatus and method for venous ligation
WO1997018767A1 (en) * 1995-11-22 1997-05-29 The Johns-Hopkins University Bipolar electrocautery valvulotome
WO1997032532A1 (en) * 1996-03-05 1997-09-12 Vnus Medical Technologies, Inc. Vascular catheter-based system for heating tissue
US5695495A (en) * 1995-11-20 1997-12-09 Ellman; Alan G. Electrosurgical electrode for sclerotherapy
WO1999003413A1 (en) * 1997-07-17 1999-01-28 Vnus Medical Technologies, Inc. Expandable catheter having improved electrode design, and method for applying energy
WO1999011185A1 (en) * 1997-08-30 1999-03-11 Steffen Hoffmann Device for treating vascular defects, especially varicose veins

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO1993020877A1 (en) * 1992-04-10 1993-10-28 Cardiorhythm Steerable electrode catheter
EP0633003A1 (en) * 1993-07-09 1995-01-11 Jean Parvulesco Medical instrument for electrocoagulation
WO1995019148A1 (en) * 1994-01-18 1995-07-20 Endovascular, Inc. Apparatus and method for venous ligation
US5695495A (en) * 1995-11-20 1997-12-09 Ellman; Alan G. Electrosurgical electrode for sclerotherapy
WO1997018767A1 (en) * 1995-11-22 1997-05-29 The Johns-Hopkins University Bipolar electrocautery valvulotome
WO1997032532A1 (en) * 1996-03-05 1997-09-12 Vnus Medical Technologies, Inc. Vascular catheter-based system for heating tissue
WO1999003413A1 (en) * 1997-07-17 1999-01-28 Vnus Medical Technologies, Inc. Expandable catheter having improved electrode design, and method for applying energy
WO1999011185A1 (en) * 1997-08-30 1999-03-11 Steffen Hoffmann Device for treating vascular defects, especially varicose veins

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6258084B1 (en) 1997-09-11 2001-07-10 Vnus Medical Technologies, Inc. Method for applying energy to biological tissue including the use of tumescent tissue compression
US6752803B2 (en) 1997-09-11 2004-06-22 Vnus Medical Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for applying energy to biological tissue including the use of tumescent tissue compression
US6969388B2 (en) 1997-09-11 2005-11-29 Vnus Medical Technologies, Inc. Apparatus for applying energy to biological tissue including the use of tumescent tissue compression
WO2006054170A1 (en) 2004-11-22 2006-05-26 Cardiodex Ltd. Techniques for heat-treating varicose veins
EP1814478A1 (en) * 2004-11-22 2007-08-08 Cardiodex Ltd. Techniques for heat-treating varicose veins
EP1814478A4 (en) * 2004-11-22 2011-05-18 Cardiodex Ltd Techniques for heat-treating varicose veins
US8849395B2 (en) 2008-05-30 2014-09-30 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Guide catheter having vasomodulating electrodes
US9289597B2 (en) 2008-05-30 2016-03-22 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Guide catheter having vasomodulating electrodes
WO2010057934A1 (en) * 2008-11-18 2010-05-27 F Care Systems Flexible catheter
WO2010099207A1 (en) * 2009-02-24 2010-09-02 Sierra Surgical Technologies Methods and systems for controlled thermal tissue

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
GB2333964B (en) 1999-12-29 grant
GB9904976D0 (en) 1999-04-28 grant

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