WO2018081851A1 - Visualisation system and software architecture therefor - Google Patents

Visualisation system and software architecture therefor Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2018081851A1
WO2018081851A1 PCT/AU2017/000233 AU2017000233W WO2018081851A1 WO 2018081851 A1 WO2018081851 A1 WO 2018081851A1 AU 2017000233 W AU2017000233 W AU 2017000233W WO 2018081851 A1 WO2018081851 A1 WO 2018081851A1
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WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
method
data
scene
objects
architecture
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/AU2017/000233
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Nicholas Griffiths
Gareth Rose
Geoff MORTIMER
Original Assignee
Buy Somewhere Pty Ltd
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Publication date
Priority to AU2016904498A priority Critical patent/AU2016904498A0/en
Priority to AU2016904498 priority
Application filed by Buy Somewhere Pty Ltd filed Critical Buy Somewhere Pty Ltd
Publication of WO2018081851A1 publication Critical patent/WO2018081851A1/en

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/30Interconnection arrangements between game servers and game devices; Interconnection arrangements between game devices; Interconnection arrangements between game servers
    • A63F13/35Details of game servers
    • A63F13/352Details of game servers involving special game server arrangements, e.g. regional servers connected to a national server or a plurality of servers managing partitions of the game world
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/20Input arrangements for video game devices
    • A63F13/21Input arrangements for video game devices characterised by their sensors, purposes or types
    • A63F13/214Input arrangements for video game devices characterised by their sensors, purposes or types for locating contacts on a surface, e.g. floor mats or touch pads
    • A63F13/2145Input arrangements for video game devices characterised by their sensors, purposes or types for locating contacts on a surface, e.g. floor mats or touch pads the surface being also a display device, e.g. touch screens
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/20Input arrangements for video game devices
    • A63F13/21Input arrangements for video game devices characterised by their sensors, purposes or types
    • A63F13/216Input arrangements for video game devices characterised by their sensors, purposes or types using geographical information, e.g. location of the game device or player using GPS
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/90Constructional details or arrangements of video game devices not provided for in groups A63F13/20 or A63F13/25, e.g. housing, wiring, connections or cabinets
    • A63F13/92Video game devices specially adapted to be hand-held while playing
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06TIMAGE DATA PROCESSING OR GENERATION, IN GENERAL
    • G06T15/003D [Three Dimensional] image rendering
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06TIMAGE DATA PROCESSING OR GENERATION, IN GENERAL
    • G06T19/00Manipulating 3D models or images for computer graphics
    • G06T19/006Mixed reality

Abstract

Disclosed is a method of presenting a stylised visual approximation of a scene to a user located at the scene; said method comprising inputting data from at least a first source to a remote processor; curating the data; transmitting polygon constructs corresponding to the data to a local processor operable by the user; the local processor driving a display which displays to the user a stylised visual approximation of the scene in part derived from the polygon constructs. Also disclosed is, in an environment representative of a physical environment, a method of display of objects comprising displaying selected first objects as a visual approximation of the first objects in the physical environment whilst displaying other selected second objects as a stylised visual approximation of the second objects in the physical environment.

Description

Visualisation System and Software Architecture Therefor TECHNICAL FIELD

[0001] The present invention relates to a visualisation system and more particularly although not exclusively to a software architecture and structure which permits

realisation of embodiments of the system in substantially real time.

BACKGROUND

[0002] The issue of presentation of data particularly but not only in a geographic context has been addressed in the prior art including in PCT/AU2002/00531 assigned to THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA. This citation describes a methodology for viewing a three dimensional virtual

universe .

[0003] It has been observed that traditional mobile application multiplayer games are set in fictional or constructed environments with no correlation to any real- world geographic locations or the user locations.

Furthermore, such mobile application games typically use gameplay based on events and conditions generated by users or the game itself. These multiplayer games do not extract and analyse data in relation to how humans interact in a particular environment, and also how it describes its spatial locations and real-time events. User success or failure in such games is not tied to real-world geographic positions. These restricted gaming environments prevent integration of spatial knowledge, which shapes and controls the communication context between the game and the user. As such, there is a lack of context- awareness in many

existing location based games. [0004] Geolocation-based mobile application games are relatively new in the industry. These mobile application games are known for their unpredictability as the game relies upon the user's real location (or other location data) , as a means of input, or as a means of

generating/accessing game specific content. As such, these mobile application games provide players with distinct gaming experiences, not only from player-to-player but als from location-to-location, effectively increasing the game's longevity and its possibilities. Existing games lac the ability to provide context-awareness and are largely based on fictional or constructed environments with no correlation to any real-world geographic locations or the user's location. It would be advantageous to create a gaming experience wherein the real world is the game board and each player is a game token moving within the game. It would be advantageous to provide a new software

architecture to enable an interactive geolocation-based multiplayer mobile application where players interact to capture different kinds of properties that correspond to real world locations using their mobile devices.

Notes

[0005] The term "comprising" (and grammatical variations thereof) is used in this specification in the inclusive sense of "having" or "including", and not in the exclusive sense of "consisting only of".

[0006] The above discussion of the prior art in the Background of the invention, is not an admission that any information discussed therein is citable prior art or part of the common general knowledge of persons skilled in the art in any country. SUMMARY OF INVENTION

Definitions

[0007] Physical environment: in this specification physical environment denotes a "real world" environment. Examples of a physical environment include a road scape within a city; a road scape in the country. In all

instances the term physical environment denotes an actual, existing environment the features of which can be located using a coordinate reference system such as, for example, the global positioning system (GPS) .

[0008] Stylised visual approximation: in this

specification stylised visual approximation denotes a particular form of visual representation of a physical environment or portions of it. The approximation is stylised in the sense that there is not a one to one correspondence between all elements in the physical environment as compared with the representation of those elements in the approximation. By way of example a 60 storey office tower in a physical environment may be represented as a simple two storey office tower in the stylised visual approximation version of it. Similarly a built structure may be octagonal in shape in the physical environment but will be represented generically as a simple square structure in the visual representation of it.

Context awareness

[0009] In this specification, context-awareness is the ability of computing devices or applications to detect and sense, interpret and respond to aspects of a user's local environment and the computing devices . When the concept of context-awareness is applied to mobile gaming, the real and virtual world can dissolve in each other, providing an augmented reality to enhance and leverage the overall gaming experience.

[00010] Accordingly, in one broad form of the invention, there is provided a method of presenting a stylised visual approximation of a scene to a user located at the scene; said method comprising:

inputting data from at least a first source to a remote processor; curating the data; transmitting polygon

constructs corresponding to the data to a local processor operable by the user;

the local processor driving a display which displays to the user a stylised visual approximation of the scene in part derived from the polygon constructs.

In a further broad form of the invention in an environment representative of a physical environment there is provided a method of display of objects comprising causing the local processor to display on the display selected first objects as a visual approximation of the first objects in the physical environment whilst displaying other selected second objects as a stylised visual approximation of the second objects in the physical environment.

[00011] Preferably the method further includes the step of determining displacement of alignment and orientation of ones of the second objects from an initial position; the initial position determined from actual geographic location of the second objects relative to the first objects in the physical environment.

[00012] Preferably displacement and orientation is determined by selecting one of a displacement and

orientation from a plurality of possible displacements and orientations . [00013] Preferably the step of determining the plurality of possible displacements and orientations is determined by a heuristic algorithm.

[00014] Preferably the displacement and orientation is selected from the plurality of possible displacements and orientations by applying a weighting algorithm.

[00015] Preferably the first objects represent roads.

[00016] Preferably the second objects represent

buildings .

[00017] Preferably the buildings are colour-coded

according to a specified criteria.

[00018] Preferably the criteria relates to the use to which the building is put in the physical environment.

[00019] Preferably inferences are drawn from a scenario.

[00020] Preferably a consequential action is instigated arising from the inference.

[00021] Preferably the consequential action is originated by the local processor.

[00022] Preferably the consequential action is originated by the remote processor.

[00023] In yet a further broad form of the invention there is provided a scene displayed on a display wherein the scene is generated by the method described above. [00024] In yet a further broad form of the invention there is provided a software architecture which gives effect to the method described above and which thereby creates a gaming experience wherein the real world is the game board and each player is a game token moving within the game .

[00025] Preferably the game is designed to be an

adaptable gaming tool, based on complex rule-sets of a number of strategic game mechanics.

[00026] Preferably the game uses the players' global positioning system (GPS) coordinates on the map and allows them to purchase the virtual property cards of the places they visit, with an overall aim to expand their empire, gain achievements and earn rent.

[00027] Preferably players will need to strategically decide what kind of property player they want to be, choosing between a predetermined number of different property types .

[00028] Preferably the gaming tool takes into

consideration a player's daily travel habits, their hobbies and surroundings which will significantly impact their choices in the game.

[00029] In yet a further broad form of the invention there is provided a software architecture which gives effect to the method described above thereby to enable an interactive geolocation-based multiplayer mobile

application where players interact to capture different kinds of properties that correspond to real world locations using their mobile devices.

[00030] Preferably the architecture incorporates a frontend development framework to support 3 dimensional (3D) objects on geo-located 3D space.

[00031] Preferably the architecture incorporates a frontend development framework to support animations and multiple screen sizes.

[00032] Preferably the architecture incorporates a frontend development framework to support asynchronous requests .

[00033] Preferably the architecture incorporates a frontend development framework to support bypass of gaming requests limitations during periods of high data throughput demand .

[00034] Preferably the architecture is utilised to produce a highly stylised mapping framework to represent users, locations and properties as interactive 3D objects.

[00035] Preferably the architecture incorporates a backend development framework using Python to support realtime player interactions.

[00036] Preferably the architecture incorporates a backend development framework using Python to support player gameplay load distribution.

[00037] In yet a further broad form of the invention there is provided a Geolocation database with high

throughput capability to capture real-time location data. [00038] Preferably the architecture incorporates a

Geolocation database with high throughput capability to capture real-time location data.

[00039] Preferably the architecture incorporates an algorithm which enables game logic and representation of virtual cells using GPS coordinates thereby to enable a geolocation based game merged with virtual reality.

[00040] In yet a further broad form of the invention there is provided a non-transitory computer-readable medium coded to implement the method described above.

[00041] In yet a further broad form of the invention there is provided a digital communications device hosting an application implementing the method described above.

[00042] In yet a further broad form, there is provided a software architecture which creates a gaming experience wherein the real world is the game board and each player is a game token moving within the game.

[00043] In preferred forms, the game is designed to be an adaptable gaming tool, based on complex rule-sets of a number of strategic game mechanics.

[00044] In preferred forms, the game uses the players' global positioning system (GPS) coordinates on the map and allows them to purchase the virtual property cards of the places they visit, with an overall aim to expand their empire, gain achievements and earn rent. [00045] In preferred forms, players will need to

strategically decide what kind of property mogul they want to be, choosing between nine different property types.

[00046] In preferred forms, the gaming tool takes into consideration a player's daily travel habits, their hobbies and surroundings which will significantly impact their choices in the game.

[00047] In further broad form of the invention, there is provided a software architecture to enable an interactive geolocation-based multiplayer mobile application where players interact to capture different kinds of properties that correspond to real world locations using their mobile devices .

[00048] In a further broad form, there is provided a Frontend development framework to support:

o 3 dimensional (3D) objects on geo-located 3D

space;

o Animations and multiple screen sizes;

o Asynchronous requests; and

o Bypass of gaming requests limitations during

heavy times

[00049] In a further broad form, there is provided a Highly stylised mapping framework to represent users, locations and properties as interactive 3D objects

[00050] In a further broad form, there is provided a Backend development framework using Python to support:

o Real-time player interactions; and

o Player gameplay load distribution [00051] In a further broad form, there is provided a Geolocation database with high throughput capability to capture real-time location data

[00052] In a further broad form, there is provided a processor which executes mathematical algorithms to enable game logic and representation of virtual cells using GPS coordinates to enable a seamless geolocation based game merged with virtual reality with increased accuracy of location positioning, complex game logic, bandwidth efficiency, enhanced visualisation, and security.

[00053] Accordingly in a further broad form of the invention there is provided a method to enhance the speed and effectiveness of map based search and communication when viewing a map or digital mapping product that

represents a real world physical environment; said method comprising simplification, categorization, and organisation of large amounts of unorganised information and concepts that exist in the real physical environment into a simple colour and iconography based grouping method that exists on the map representing the real world environment.

[00054] Preferably, the method involves the

categorization of residential property, government

buildings, commercial buildings and non-commercial

buildings that exist in the complexity of the real world physical environment into simple colours and iconography that allow a user viewing a map representing this real world physical environment, to quickly and effectively comprehend and understand the map. Said method is a novel innovation allowing vastly increased speed and

effectiveness in search and communication of a map

representing a real world physical environment. [00055] Preferably, all buildings, shops and stores

(residential property, government buildings, commercial buildings, stores and businesses and non-commercial

buildings, stores) are categorised in the real world physical environment into 12 or less primary categories each corresponding to a colour.

[00056] Preferably, the method further includes the subgrouping of categories inside the primary categorisation and colours .

[00057] In a further broad form of the invention there is provided a method to achieve a stylised visual

approximation of the second objects (buildings) of a scene to a user physically located at the scene; said method derived from selective and differing use of data and polygon constructs.

[00058] In yet a further broad form of the invention there is provided any of the above described methods further including a method to achieve a stylised visual approximation of the second objects of a scene to a user physically located at the scene by communication of the scene to a visual display device; said method derived from selective and differing use of data and polygon constructs.

[00059] Preferably, the method of representing the second objects comprises of receiving and utilising data from at least a first source (base address listing) , combined with receiving and utilising data from further data sources (specialised data) , storing the data in memory which is in communication with a processor which executes a Scenario Based Algorithm to run rules for filtering, cleansing and selecting how and when to utilise the different combinations of the data sets (based address listing and/or Specialist data sets) to achieve and transmit to the visual display device the stylised visual approximation of the scene .

[00060] Preferably, the method further involves

importing, combining and cleansing multiple data sets including first sources of data and specialised data

[00061] Preferably, the method further involves running a Scenario Based Algorithm which allows for differing types of data, . inaccurate and conflicting data to be sorted and organised in order to achieve the stylised visual

approximation of the scene.

[00062] Preferably, the Scenario based algorithm allows for a scenario where Building Outline fits inside the Lot Outline and aligns with the first data source (base address), such that Building Outline can be used to achieve the stylised visual approximation of the scene

[00063] Preferably, the scenario based algorithm allows for a scenario of a missing data source (eg Building outline) to still achieve the stylised visual approximation of the scene.

[00064] Preferably, the scenario based algorithm allows for a scenario of multiple missing data sources (eg

Building outline or Lot Outline) to still achieve the stylised visual approximation of the scene.

[00065] Preferably, the scenario based algorithm allows for a scenario where the data sources conflict with each other (eg Building Outline overlaps Lot Outline) and the method involves slicing the Building Outline on the Lot Outlines to create multiple separate objects to achieve the stylised visual approximation of the scene.

[00066] Preferably, the scenario based algorithm allows for a scenario where multiple Building Outlines fit within a single Lot Outline. In this example the Scenario Based Algorithm determines the Building Outlines become the preferred data source to achieve the stylised visual approximation of the scene.

[00067] Preferably, the flow of the technical

architecture is first: to import, consolidate and cleanse the multiple sources of data and polygons.

[00068] Preferably, the flow of the technical

architecture is second: to run a Scenario Based Algorithm which determines based on the combined sources of data and polygons what is the appropriate scenario rules to achieve a stylised visual approximation of the scene.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

[00069] Embodiments of the present invention will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings wherein :

[00070] Figure 1 is a block diagram of a visualisation system in accordance with a first preferred embodiment.

[00071] Figure 2 illustrates a scene which can be generated by the system of Figure 1 incorporating both visual approximation data and stylised visual approximation data .

[00072] Figure 3 is a block diagram of a process for the preparation of data for supply to portable digital devices usable with the system of Figure 1.

[00073] Figure 4 illustrates a database construct from which polygonal constructs are derived for use with the system of Figure 1.

[00074] Figure 5 is a flowchart for the preparation of visual approximation data and stylised visual;

approximation data for use with the system of Figure 1.

[00075] Figure 6 illustrates a mechanism for "snapping selected items to other selected items or objects in a scene usable with the system of Figure 1.

[00076] Figure 7 illustrates a scene utilising colour coding to permit a user to visualise the nature of

businesses and other commercial offerings and the like in the physical environment in which they are located, usable with the system of Figure 1.

[00077] Figure 8A illustrates an overall high level representation of combining the first sources and

specialised sources of the data to create a visual

approximation and styled visual approximation of the scene

[00078] Figure 8B illustrates an overall high level representation of the flow of combining the first sources and some of the specialised sources of the data to create visual approximation and styled visual approximation of th scene . [00079] Figure 9 illustrates a visualisation of First Sources and Specialised Sources of Data combined in an example of Scenario "A" using the Scenario Based Algorithm where Building Outline fits inside the Lot Outline and aligns with the first data source (base address) .

[00080] Figure 10 illustrates a visualisation of First Sources and Specialised Sources of Data combined in an example of Scenario "B" using the Scenario Based Algorithm, where not all data sources are available or accurate (No building outline) .

[00081] Figure 11 illustrates a visualisation of First Sources and Specialised Sources of Data combined in an example of Scenario "C" using the Scenario Based Algorithm, where limited data sources are available or accurate (No Building Outline, No Lot Outline) .

[00082] Figures 12 and 13 illustrate a visualisation of First Sources and Specialised Sources of Data combined in an example of Scenario "D" using the Scenario Based

Algorithm where the data sources conflict with each other

(Building Outline overlaps Lot Outline) and the method involves slicing the Building Outline on the Lot Outlines to create multiple separate objects to achieve the most appropriate stylised visual approximation of the scene.

[00083]

[00084] Figure 14 and 15 illustrate a visualisation of First Sources (Base Address) and Specialised Sources of Data combined in an example of Scenario "E" using the

Scenario Based Algorithm where multiple Building Outlines fit within a single Lot Outline. In this example the

Scenario Based Algorithm determines the Building Outlines become the preferred data source to achieve the most appropriate stylised visual approximation of the scene.

[00085] Figure 16 illustrates the flow of the technical architecture to import, consolidate and cleanse the first sources of data and the specialised sources of data, which is the first step prior to running the Scenario Based

Algorithm.

[00086] Figure 17 illustrates the flow of the technical architecture of the method of the Scenario Based Algorithm which determines based on the combined first sources of data and specialised sources of data what is the

appropriate scenario rules to achieve the most appropriate stylised visual approximation of the scene.

[00087] Figure 18 illustrates the colour categorisation, iconography and decorations used in a second embodiment of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS

[00088] Embodiments of the present invention give effect to a visualisation system and more particularly although not exclusively to a software architecture and implementing structure which permits realisation of embodiments of the system in substantially real time. The system is arranged so that it is readily scalable.

[00089] Figure 1 is a block diagram of a visualisation system in accordance with a first preferred embodiment. Its topography also forms the basis for other embodiments of the system as described below. FIRST EMBODIMENT - RE- IMAGED WORLD

[00090] With reference to figure 1 there is illustrated a visualisation system 10 in accordance with a first

preferred embodiment.

[00091] Broadly, the system focuses on the visual

experience of a user 11 where the user 11 is moving through a physical environment 12. In this instance the physical environment comprises a first road 13 intersecting with a second road 14 with the user standing at the intersection 15 of the first road 13 and the second road 14.

[00092] In this particular instance the environment 12 is quite sparse with the only other physical feature being first building 16 located at an edge 17 of first road 13 as diagrammatically illustrated in figure 1 and second

building 29 located somewhat back from second road 14 with a car park area 30 interposed therebetween.

[00093] In this instance the user 11 interacts with the visualisation system 10 primarily by means of a portable digital device 18. In preferred forms the portable digital device 18 takes the form of a smart phone as commonly understood. All forms of the portable digital device 18 will include a processor 19 in communication with a memory 20, the memory containing code executable on a platform operable by the processor 19. The code allows interaction by means of input output system 21 with other devices and systems such as, for example, display 22 and communications system 23. In preferred forms the display 22 comprises a touchscreen display thereby permitting the user 11 to provide input commands to the processor 19 as well as receive visual information. Preferred forms of the communication system 23 may enable wireless communications including local communications in the form of Bluetooth or Wi-Fi and wider area communications in the form of GSM or like cellular telephone communications. In the majority of instances communication ultimately will include the passing of information by way of packets 24 of data from location to location and including over the Internet 25. The packets 24 typically comprise a header portion 26 containing address information as to the destination of the packet together with a data portion 27 which one might describe as the "payload" and being the data or a portion thereof which it is desired to communicate from location to location.

[00094] The visualisation system 10 in accordance with the first preferred embodiment seeks to present a stylised visual approximation 28 on display 22 of the physical environment 12 in which the user 11 is currently located.

[00095] In this instance the stylised visual

approximation 28 contains first road 13 A and second road 14 A depicted as a graphical rendering of first road 13 and second road 14 and wherein the route of the roads is plotted from point data 31 derived from Web server 32 as a function of the geographic location 33 of user 11. First building 16 is depicted as building 16 A being a stylised approximation of building 16. Similarly second building 29 is depicted as building 29A being a stylised approximation of second building 29. In this instance the building 29 being a multistorey octagonal building is represented as a generic double storey square building in the stylised visual approximation 28 shown on display 22 of the portable digital device 18 operated by user 11 at geographic

location 33. [00096] In this instance both building 16 A and 29A are "snapped" to a position adjacent the edge of respective roads 13 A, 16 A. The manner of locating the stylised visual approximations of the buildings relative to other features in the scene will be described in further detail below .

[00097] Figure 2 illustrates a representative scene displayable on the display 22 of portable digital device 1 wherein like components are numbered as for Figure 1. It will be observed that the scene comprises roads with buildings aligned to the edges of the road generally in accordance with the manner described in Figure 1.

[00098] The process by which this visualization is effected is as follows:

[00099] The data by which the scene is populated is prepared on web server 32 and derived from multiple independent sources 34 including 34(1), 34(2), 3 (n) as seen in Figure 1.

[000100] With reference to Figure 3 a flow chart for the preparation of the data is shown. In this instance a first independent data source 34(1) comprises a street map database, preferably an open source database. In this instance a second independent data source 34(2) comprises residential data. In this instance a third independent dat source 34(3) comprises a business data database. In this instance a fourth independent data source 34(4) comprises standardized address database.

[000101] In use the GPS location of a user 11 is

ascertained by communication of location data from a smart phone held by the user at a user location 35. The web server 32 then utilizes the process of Figure 3 to assemble point data 31 representative of the location of features in the physical environment 12 of the user location 35. The point data is transmitted to the portable digital

device/smart phone 18 for it to construct a visual

approximation 36 of selected features in the scene 37, in this instance the roads including roads 13, 14. Separately the web server 32 utilizes the process of Figure 3 to assemble stylized visual approximation data 38 for

transmission to the portable digital device/smart phone 18 for display as a stylized visual approximation 39 in the scene 37. In this instance the stylized visual

approximation 39 comprises the buildings including

buildings 16A, 29A shown in the scene 37 of Figure 3.

[000102] By this process a game board like scene is generated, but a scene anchored in the reality of the physical environment 12 of the user 11.

[000103] In one version the features shown in the scene 37 are built from polygonal constructs 40 as illustrated in Figure 4. The constructs may for example be generated by utilising the open source facility OpenStreetMap .

[000104] The process of obtaining and transmitting the data comprising both the stylized visual approximation data 38 and the visual approximation data 36 in the form

respectively of polygonal constructs 40 and point data 31 is illustrated in flowchart form in Figure 5 where like components are numbered as for previous embodiments.

With reference to Figure 6 the manner of associating the point data utilized for the generation of visual

approximations 36 with stylized visual approximation data in order to locate the stylized visual approximation data with reference to the point data is illustrated in Figure 6.

[000105] Specifically, heuristics can be applied to assist in determining appropriate displacement D of an icon 42, in this instance representing building from its original specified data location 43 20 point adjacent road 44. The heuristics may give scores to all possible locations to which the icon 42 could be moved by way of applying weights for individual scenarios. The final decision on movement in accordance with vector D may be made according to the sum of the weighting result. For example low weighting may be given where an icon 42 representing a building is caused to be placed on the opposite side of road 44 from where the building it represents is actually located in the physical environment. Conversely a high rating can be given where the vector D results in placement on the correct side of the road and maintaining the buildings aligned on the street in their correct order.

[000106] In one form the 3-D topography illustrated in Figure 3 may be based on the use of meshes. The meshes themselves may be formed from a basic graphical triangle structure. In preferred forms the total number of graphical triangle structures used for any one scene displayable on display 22 of a portable digital device 18 is limited to 500,000. This can be achieved by limiting the number of graphical triangle structures utilized in any one object.

[000107] Frame rate is defined as the frequency or the rate at which an imaging device displays consecutive images or "frames". As the temporal sensitivity and resolution of human vision varies depending on the type and

characteristics of visual stimulus, the ability to process images also varies between individuals. The human visual system can process 10 to 12 separate images per second and perceive them individually, and sequences at higher rates are perceived as motion. In order to enable a consistent yet superior gaming experience embodiments of the present invention render and display the game within 30 to 60 frames per second (FPS) to minimise or substantially reduce any interlace artefacts.

[000108] In preferred forms GPS data is accessed on an intermittent basis from the portable digital device to the Web server. In between transmissions the system calculates an estimate of location of the user thereby to adjust location of the user.

SECOND EMBODIMENT - COLOUR- CODED VIEW

[000109] With reference to Figure 7, there is illustrated a 3-D topography which permits categorization by colour. The categorization is determined by superposition of land- use data. So, for example, all commercial premises

designated as shops can be coloured yellow (code Y in

Figure 7) . Large commercial buildings may be coloured violet (code V in Figure 7) .

[000110] This permits ready visualization by a user with reference to scene 37 as to the general nature of many premises and objects immediately around them or nearby in the physical environment 12. These categorisations and visualisations are generated from the independent sources 34 previously described.

[000111] With reference to Figure 18, When representing a real world physical environment in a map or digital map there exists a need to simplify the complexity of the real world into simplified concept and iconography to aid comprehension .

[000112] Existing methods of representing physical

elements (eg roads, parklands, rivers, businesses,

residential houses etc) on a map, are slow and inefficient. The traditional method is to reduce the amount of

information shown to the user and/or rely on user search to refine the visual information shown.

[000113] In contrast, this method aims to show as much data as possible and involves the use of colour and tone, size and shape, iconography and decoration to simplify communication and provide "search" capability. The outcome is an increased speed and effectiveness in communicating the physical environment to the user and without input, the user can easily find what they are after.

[000114] To illustrate this; Bill is looking for a bottle of soft drink, this as a search term is not an easy one to perform on a traditional digital map. However, Bill knows Yellow is a social category, and likely selling soft drink Bill can view the a map in the concepts described and quickly discern likely places of business to purchase his soft drink.

[000115] Figure 18 illustrates the colour categorisation, iconography and decorations used in this method:

Examples of stylised visual approximation:

1: Garden decoration example

2 : Table and chairs decoration example

3 : Flower bed as decoration example

4: Barrels as decoration example 5: Trees as decoration example

6: Iconified example based on category as a decoration 7 : Building generally colour based on category

[000116] As stated in more specific terms this novel method of colour categorisation and iconography in the context map based search and communication may be stated as follows :

[000117] There is described a method to enhance the speed and effectiveness of map based search and communication when viewing a map or digital mapping product that

represents a real world physical environment; said method derived from simplification, categorization, and

organisation of large amounts of unorganised information and concepts that exist in the real physical environment into a simple colour and iconography based grouping method that exists on the map representing this real world

environment .

[000118] In preferred forms the method involves the categorization of residential property, government

buildings, commercial buildings and non-commercial

buildings that exist in the complexity of the real world physical environment into simple colours and iconography that allow a user viewing a map representing this real world physical environment, to quickly and effectively comprehend and understand the map. Said method is a novel innovation allowing vastly increased speed and

effectiveness in search and communication of a map

representing a real world physical environment.

[000119] In a preferred form the method involves grouping all of the buildings, shops and stores (residential property, government buildings, commercial buildings, stores and businesses and non-commercial buildings, stores in the real world physical environment into 12 or less primary categories each corresponding to a colour.

[000120] In a preferred form the method of primary categorisation and colouring of groupings includes but is not limited to:

"Residential" [Colour: Green] for buildings and/or stores and/or property types like Houses and Apartments.

"Education" [Colour: Aqua] for buildings and/or stores and/or property types like Schools, Universities, Pre- schools and other educational institutions,

"Accommodation" [Colour: Red] buildings and/or stores and/or property types like Hotels, Motels, Bed &

Breakfasts ,

"Transport" [Colour: Grey] for buildings and/or stores and/or property types like Train stations, Ferry Wharves, Bus Stops and Petrol Stations,

"Community" [Colour: Cyan] for buildings and/or stores and/or property types like Government buildings, police stations, fire stations, hospitals and courts.

"Entertainment" for buildings and/or stores and/or propert types like Stadiums, Casinos, Cinemas, Amusement Parks "Social" [Colour: Yellow] for buildings and/or stores and/or property types like Pubs, Bars, Cafes, Fast Food, and Restaurants

"Retail" [Colour: Pink] for buildings and/or stores and/or property types like clothing shops, convenience store, liquor shop, pet store, hardware store, deli

"Business" [Colour: Blue] buildings and/or stores and/or property types like dentists, architects, travel agents, medical supplies, stock brokers "Skyscrapers" [Colour: Purple] for buildings and/or

property types which are >5 stories and do not fit into one of the other categorisations

"Landmarks" [Colour: Gold, Silver] for iconic building types like Sydney Harbour Bridge, Eiffel Tower, Statue of Liberty, Golden Gate Bridge,

[000121] The Method of categorisation and

iconography/decorations also includes a clear sub-grouping of categories inside the primary categorisation and

colours. For eg:

Inside the primary category of "Community" [Colour: Cyan], is additional subcategories of Police stations, Fire

Stations, Hospitals, Government Buildings and Courts. Each of these subcategories is given its own iconography that is representative of that subcategory (e.g. the Police

Stations represented by iconography of a shield and gun) but critically for this innovation, the subcategory still remains the colour of that primary category.

[000122] In preferred forms the method of categorisation and iconography allows for subcategories like Police

Stations and Hospitals on the map to be quickly and

effectively understood as Police Stations and Hospitals via different iconography that represents the subcategory (a unique Police station icon and a unique Hospital icon) , but critically still remain grouped together in the primary category by the Colour used for the primary category.

[000123] In summary, this innovation in speed and

effectiveness in search and communication of a map

representing a physical world is derived specifically on the combination of these 3 elements: [000124] (1) Grouping of all the buildings, shops and stores (residential property, government buildings, commercial buildings, stores and businesses and noncommercial buildings, stores) in the real world physical environment into 12 or less primary categories.

[000125] (2) Each primary category may be represented by a unique corresponding colour.

[000126] (3) In preferred forms the primary categories are divided up into subcategories which use unique iconography and decorations representative of those subcategories, but critically the subcategories still use the colour of the primary category.

[000127] A specific example of this innovation in use is a person viewing a map or digital map which represents a real world physical environment, and wanting to "search" for cafes on the map. The person can quickly and effectively look for only yellow "Social" category buildings on the map, and then specifically look for only the yellow

buildings represented by the unique Cafe related icon of the Cafe subcategory. This will allow the person to very quickly and effectively understand all the Cafes on the map by the combination of grouped colour and iconography.

[000128] This method of map based search and

categorisation is significantly quicker than existing methods of map search and communication where a user would only be able to view either the cafes names or a cafe related icon on the map but not the combination of the grouping of 12 or less primary categories into colours and simple iconography of the subcategories that also use the primary category colour. THIRD EMBODIMENT - USER GENERATED DATA CLEANSING

[000129] With reference to Figure 1, the system can use the "power of crowd" to update the game environment. In preferred forms, users are incentivized to provide update data from their portable digital device 18 to the web server 32 in order to supplement or update the data that the web server utilises derived from the independent sources 34.

FOURTH EMBODIMENT - LOCATION BASED PROMOTIONS BY INFERENCE

[000130] With reference for Figure 1, data elements can be combined to infer scenarios. For example, GPS coordinate information combined with time of day information combined with local location being of type "taxi stand" may create the inference that the user is waiting for a taxi. The inferences may be drawn locally by the on board processor 19 of the portable digital device 18 or, in alternative embodiments inferences can be drawn by the processor 41 on web server 32. Subsequent logical actions may then be instigated arising from the inference. For example in the example scenario above an advertisement for a ride sharing service may be caused to appear on the display 22 of the portable digital device 18 thereby to provide the user with an alternative. The provision of the advertisement may itself be the subject of a commercial transaction. In the addition or in the alternative if a "click through" occurs as a result of provision of the advertisement that may also be the subject of a commercial transaction.

EXAMPLE OF USE

[000131] In an example of the above described system applied to a gaming environment an arrangement and

architecture is described which creates a gaming experience wherein the real world is the game board and each player is a game token moving within the game. The game is designed to be an adaptable gaming tool, based on complex rule-sets of a number of strategic game mechanics. The game uses the players' global positioning system (GPS) coordinates on the map and allows them to purchase the virtual property cards of the places they visit, with an overall aim to expand their empire, gain achievements and earn rent. Players will need to strategically decide what kind of property mogul they want to be, choosing between a selected number of different property types . The gaming tool takes into consideration a player's daily travel habits, their hobbies and surroundings which will significantly impact their choices in the game.

[000132] The architecture to give effect to the system and thereby permit enablement of the gaming experience of the first embodiment includes at least the following modules:

• Real-time player interactions :

The gaming engine is being designed to enable

interaction with real-world properties through the virtual game world, but tied to actual GPS locations . This gives the mobile application the unique

opportunity to even further bring the game into the real world through augmented reality. Players may move to the same GPS coordinates in the real world that match the coordinates of the virtual structure created in the game world. The gaming engine may aggregate a user's context, based on location data, players daily travel habits, their hobbies and surroundings as part of the game content. This "spill over" from the game world into the real world may enhance the immersive effect for existing players as well as increase exposure for new potential players. The game not only employs real-world geographic location, but also enables categorisation and classification of different property types, for example, residential,

offices/commercial, retail/shopping, bars &

restaurants, entertainment (stadiums, theatres, zoos etc.), education, transport, hotels and landmarks. Properties that have a related location are matched to game experiences for players near that location in the physical world, while doing activities related to that location based on latitude and longitude. The GPS information and the positioning data of all the players will be sent to the engine and processed by a mapping technique, which compares it to information stored within the database and decides when the game engine should trigger each event. Hi- resolution rendering and visualisation techniques to represent objects on a 3D scale:

3D rendering techniques create 3D structures of buildings and users by using the map of the real world as a background. The structure is tied to a physical real-world geographic location based on the latitude and longitude of the building when placed on the map. The mobile device may determine the player's location in the real world, using the player's latitude and longitude provided by the mobile device. The mobile application may then render a three-dimensional drawing of the structure overlaying the real world images on the phone. In this manner, the player may view the virtual structure in the real world, as it was built and designed in the virtual world In preferred forms the game map has unique map tiles and animated gestures (for example, when using a touch screen smart phone, a user might touch and drag to move, pinch to zoom, etc.) . In this view, map tiles are overlaid with 3D tokens on every property zone that show which faction currently controls that zone (if any) and its location relative to the player.

Players can also re-center the map on their current location .

For instance, property zones (corresponding to nine different types of properties in various cities) are designed to have a geospatial polygon which defines the borders of that zone. Polygons or tiles are derived using mathematical algorithms to identify the boundary lines that delineate the collection of GPS coordinates that are closest to each zone's central GPS coordinate. Geospatial queries are then used to query the database to identify the zone in which the player is located. The rendering algorithms will enable building of virtual objects using GPS

coordinates, where the algorithm calculates the centre, and neighbours, of each virtual cell within the boundaries of a given square of GPS coordinates.

Highly available and scalable application servers, geolocation databases and positioning protocols :

In preferred forms the Datastore is scalable and may automatically keep track of game data. The database is designed to contain the following data:

o Type of event;

o Real object's latitude and longitude coordinates ; o Radius of property area; and

o Number and type of virtual objects located near the users GPS location

The mapping application and the server may store the mapping information between real world and the virtual world in the database. Geospatial queries are used to query the database to identify and store the type of property and location information, which will then be automatically fed to the mapping engine to render 3D objects in real-time as the game progresses.

Furthermore, the game server may run the database with all graphics and sounds, available on request. In order to enable this, it is a requirement for the data model to support several players, application servers, asynchronous requests, animations and associated data with increased speed, scalability and performance. Advanced mathematical algorithms to render game mechanics :

In preferred forms the game server runs all the game code, maintains the game logic and keeps track of all online players. The majority of the game logic may exist in cloud-based data centres with each interface (regardless of type) making common REST calls to the server, thus allowing everyone to play in the same single up-scale multiplayer game world. FIFTH EMBODIMENT -A METHOD OF COMBINING AND SELECTING

MULTIPLE DATA SOURCES TO REPRESENT A STYLISED VISUAL APPROXIMATION OF THE SECOND OBJECTS OF A SCENE TO A USER PHYSICALLY LOCATED AT THE SCENE.

[000133] Broadly, the aim of examples of this fifth embodiment is to provide a methodology to bring a range of datasets together and determine what rules to run based on differing data scenarios .

[000134] There is disclosed a method to achieve a stylised visual approximation of the second objects (buildings) of a scene to a user physically located at the scene; said method derived from selective and differing use of data and polygon constructs .

[000135] Particularly the method of representing the second objects, may comprise utilising data from at least a first source (base address listing) , combined with further data sources (specialised data) and using a Scenario Based Algorithm to run rules for filtering, cleansing and

selecting how and when to utilise the different

combinations of the data sets (based address listing and/or Specialist data sets) to achieve the stylised visual approximation of the scene.

[000136] The method may further involve importing, combining and cleansing multiple data sets including first sources of data and specialised data.

[000137] The method may then further involve running a Scenario Based Algorithm which allows for differing types of data, inaccurate and conflicting data to be sorted and organised in order to achieve the stylised visual

approximation of the scene.

[000138] The Scenario based algorithm allows for a

scenario where Building Outline fits inside the Lot Outline and aligns with the first data source (base address) , such that Building Outline can be used to achieve the stylised visual approximation of the scene

[000139] The scenario based algorithm allows for a scenario of a missing data source (eg Building outline) to still achieve the stylised visual approximation of the scene .

[000140] The scenario based algorithm allows for a scenario of multiple missing data sources (eg Building outline or Lot Outline) to still achieve the stylised visual approximation of the scene.

[000141] The scenario based algorithm allows for a scenario where the data sources conflict with each other

(eg Building Outline overlaps Lot Outline) and the method involves slicing the Building Outline on the Lot Outlines to create multiple separate objects to achieve the stylised visual approximation of the scene.

[000142] The scenario based algorithm allows for a scenario where multiple Building Outlines fit within a single Lot Outline. In this example the Scenario Based Algorithm determines the Building Outlines become the preferred data source to achieve the stylised visual approximation of the scene. [000143] In preferred forms the flow of the technical architecture used to run the method referred to above is first: to import, consolidate and cleanse the multiple sources of data and polygons. The flow of the technical architecture is second: to run a Scenario Based Algorithm which determines based on the combined sources of data and polygons what is the appropriate scenario rules to achieve a stylised visual approximation of the scene.

[000144] With reference to Figs 8A to 17 there is

described a methodology of combining and selecting multiple data sources to represent a stylized visual approximation of the second objects of a scene to a user physically located at the scene.

[000145] Figure 8A illustrates an overall high level representation of combining the first sources and

specialised sources of the data to create a visual

approximation and styled visual approximation of the scene.

[000146] Figure 8B illustrates an overall high level representation of the flow of combining the first sources and some of the specialised sources of the data to create a visual approximation and styled visual approximation of the scene .

[000147] Figure 9 illustrates a visualisation of First Sources and Specialised Sources of Data combined in an example of Scenario "A" using the Scenario Based Algorithm where Building Outline fits inside the Lot Outline and aligns with the first data source (base address)

1: Building outline

2 : Lot outline 3: Decoration

4 : Location of Base Address

[000148] Figure 10 illustrates a visualisation of First Sources and Specialised Sources of Data combined in an example of Scenario "B" using the Scenario Based Algorithm, where not all data sources are available or accurate (No building outline)

1 : No building outline, failover

Size is instead applied based on categorisation

2 : Lot outline

3: Decoration

4 : Location of Base Address

[000149] Figure 11 illustrates a visualisation of First Sources and Specialised Sources of Data combined in an example of Scenario "C" using the Scenario Based Algorithm, where limited data sources are available or accurate (No Building Outline, No Lot Outline)

- 1: No building outline, failover

- Size is instead applied based on categori

- 2 : No lot outline, failover snap to road

- Size is instead applied based on categori

- 3: Decoration

- 4 : Original location of Base Address

- 5: Snapped to road

[000150] Figures 12 and 13 illustrates a visualisation of First Sources and Specialised Sources of Data combined in an example of Scenario "D" using the Scenario Based

Algorithm, where the data sources conflict with each other

(Building Outline overlaps Lot Outline) and the method involves slicing the Building Outline on the Lot Outlines to create multiple separate objects to achieve the most appropriate stylised visual approximation of the scene.

Figure 12 illustrates :

1: Building outline, over multiple lots

2 : Lot outlines

3: Location of Base Addresses

[000151] Figure 13 illustrates:

1: Building outline, over multiple lots, producing a

3d building as a stylised visual approximation

2: Height based on Building outline data

3: Example of window and door as decorations on the building

4: Slicing the building on the lot boundaries, the three resulting portions of a building can be styled, coloured and decorated based on the First Sources and Specialised Sources of data available including category, height, business contents.

[000152] Figure 14 and 15 illustrates a visualisation of First Sources (Base Address) and Specialised Sources of Data combined in an example of Scenario Έ" using the Scenario Based Algorithm, where multiple Building Outlines fit within a single Lot Outline. In this example the

Scenario Based Algorithm determines the Building Outlines become the preferred data source to achieve the most appropriate stylised visual approximation of the scene.

Figure 14 illustrates:

1: Lot outline

2 : Buildings [000153] Figure 15 illustrates:

1 : 3d generated buildings located in one Lot outline from building outlines

[000154] Figure 16 illustrates the flow of the technical architecture to import, consolidate and cleanse the first sources of data and the specialised sources of data, which is the first step prior to running the Scenario Based

Algorithm

[000155] Figure 17 illustrates the flow of the technical architecture of the method of the Scenario Based Algorithm which determines based on the combined first sources of data and specialised sources of data what is the

appropriate scenario rules to achieve the most appropriate stylised visual approximation of the scene.

INDUSTRIAL APPLICABILITY

[000156] Embodiments of the system and architecture may be applied with benefit to the enablement of computer based games and more particularly enablement of visualisation of computer based games implemented on digital devices such as mobile phones, tablets and personal computers.

Claims

1. A method of presenting a stylised visual approximation of a scene to a user located at the scene; said method comprising
inputting data from at least a first source to a remote processor; curating the data; transmitting polygon constructs corresponding to the data to a local processor operable by the user;
the local processor driving a display which displays to the user a stylised visual approximation of the scene in part derived from the polygon constructs.
2. In an environment representative of a physical
environment a method of display of objects comprising displaying selected first objects as a visual
approximation of the first objects in the physical environment whilst displaying other selected second objects as a stylised visual approximation of the second objects in the physical environment.
3. The method of claim 2 wherein the method further
includes the step of determining displacement of alignment and orientation of ones of the second objects from an initial position; the initial position determined from actual geographic location of the second objects relative to the first objects in the physical environment.
4. The method of claim 3 wherein displacement and
orientation is determined by selecting one of a displacement and orientation from a plurality of possible displacements and orientations.
5. The method of claim 4 wherein the step of determining the plurality of possible displacements and
orientations is determined by a heuristic algorithm.
6. The method of claim 4 or 5 wherein the displacement and orientation is selected from the plurality of possible displacements and orientations by applying a weighting algorithm.
7. The method of any one of claims 1 to 6 wherein the
first objects represent roads.
8. The method of any one of claims 1 to 6 wherein the
second objects represent buildings.
9. The method of claim 8 wherein the buildings are
colour-coded according to a specified criteria.
10. The method of claim 9 wherein the criteria
relates to the use to which the building is put in the physical environment.
11. The method of any previous claim wherein
inferences are drawn from a scenario.
12. The method of claim 11 wherein a consequential action is instigated arising from the inference.
13. The method of claim 12 wherein the consequential action is originated by the local processor.
14. The method of claim 12 wherein the consequential action is originated by the remote processor.
15. A scene displayed on a display wherein the scene is generated by the method of any previous claim.
16. A software architecture which gives effect to the method of any one of claims 1 to 14 and which thereby creates a gaming experience wherein the real world is the game board and each player is a game token moving within the game .
17. The architecture of claim 16 wherein the game is designed to be an adaptable gaming tool, based on complex rule-sets of a number of strategic game mechanics .
18. The architecture of claim 16 wherein the game
uses the players' global positioning system (GPS) coordinates on the map and allows them to purchase the virtual property cards of the places they visit, with an overall aim to expand their empire, gain
achievements and earn rent.
19. The architecture of claim 16 wherein players will need to strategically decide what kind of property player they want to be, choosing between a
predetermined number of different property types.
20. The architecture of claim 16 wherein the gaming tool takes into consideration a player' s daily travel habits, their hobbies and surroundings which will significantly impact their choices in the game.
21. A software architecture which gives effect to the method of any one of claims 1 to 15 thereby to enable an interactive geolocation-based multiplayer mobile application where players interact to capture
different kinds of properties that correspond to real world locations using their mobile devices.
22. The architecture of any one of claims 16 to 21 incorporating a frontend development framework to support 3 dimensional (3D) objects on geo-located 3D space .
23. The architecture of any one of claims 16 to 21 incorporating a frontend development framework to support animations and multiple screen sizes.
24. The architecture of any one of claims 16 to 21 incorporating a frontend development framework to support asynchronous requests.
25. The architecture of any one of claims 16 to 21 incorporating a frontend development framework to support bypass of gaming requests limitations during periods of high data throughput demand.
26. The architecture of any one of claims 16 to 21 utilised to produce a highly stylised mapping
framework to represent users, locations and properties as interactive 3D objects.
27. The architecture of any one of claims 16 to 21 incorporating a backend development framework using Python to support real-time player interactions
28. The architecture of any one of claims 16 to 21 incorporating a backend development framework using Python to support player gameplay load distribution.
29. A Geolocation database with high throughput
capability to capture real-time location data.
30. The architecture of any one of claims 16 to 21 incorporating a Geolocation database with high
throughput capability to capture real-time location data .
31. The architecture of any one of claims 16 to 21 incorporating an algorithm which enables game logic and representation of virtual cells using GPS
coordinates thereby to enable a geolocation based game merged with virtual reality.
32. A non-transitory computer-readable medium coded to implement the method of any one of claims 1 to 15 or 34 to 49.
33. A digital communications device hosting an
application implementing the method of any one of claims 1 to 15 or 34 to 49.
34. A method to enhance the speed and effectiveness of map based search and communication when viewing a map or digital mapping product that represents a real world physical environment; said method comprising simplification, categorization, and organisation of large amounts of unorganised information and concepts that exist in the real physical environment into a simple colour and iconography based grouping method that exists on the map representing the real world environment .
35. The method of Claim 34 wherein the method
involves the categorization of residential property, government buildings, commercial buildings and noncommercial buildings that exist in the complexity of the real world physical environment into simple colours and iconography that allow a user viewing a map representing this real world physical environment, to quickly and effectively comprehend and understand the map. Said method is a novel innovation allowing vastly increased speed and effectiveness in search and communication of a map representing a real world physical environment.
36. The method of Claim 35 wherein all buildings,
shops and stores (residential property, government buildings, commercial buildings, stores and businesses and non-commercial buildings, stores) are categorised in the real world physical environment into 12 or less primary categories each corresponding to a colour.
37. The method of Claim 36 further including the
subgrouping of categories inside the primary
categorisation and colours.
38. A method to achieve a stylised visual
approximation of the second objects (buildings) of a scene to a user physically located at the scene; said method derived from selective and differing use of data and polygon constructs.
39. The method of any previous Claim including a
method to achieve a stylised visual approximation of the second objects of a scene to a user physically located at the scene; said method derived from
selective and differing use of data and polygon constructs .
40. The method of Claim 38 or 39, said method of
representing the second objects, comprising of utilising data from at least a first source (base address listing) , combined with further data sources (specialised data) and using a Scenario Based
Algorithm to run rules for filtering, cleansing and selecting how and when to utilise the different combinations of the data sets (based address listing and/or Specialist data sets) to achieve the stylised visual approximation of the scene.
The method of Claim 38, 39 or 40 wherein the method further involves importing, combining and cleansing multiple data sets including first sources of data and specialised data
The method of Claim 41 wherein the method further involves running a Scenario Based Algorithm which allows for differing types of data, inaccurate and conflicting data to be sorted and organised in order to achieve the stylised visual approximation of the scene .
The method of Claim 42 wherein the Scenario based algorithm allows for a scenario where Building Outline fits inside the Lot Outline and aligns with the first data source (base address), such that Building Outline can be used to achieve the stylised visual
approximation of the scene
The method of Claim 42 wherein the scenario based algorithm allows for a scenario of a missing data source (eg Building outline) to still achieve the stylised visual approximation of the scene.
The method of Claim 42 wherein the scenario based algorithm allows for a scenario of multiple missing data sources (eg Building outline or Lot Outline) to still achieve the stylised visual approximation of the scene . The method of Claim 42 wherein the scenario based algorithm allows for a scenario where the data sources conflict with each other (eg Building Outline overlaps Lot Outline) and the method involves slicing the
Building Outline on the Lot Outlines to create
multiple separate objects to achieve the stylised visual approximation of the scene.
The method of Claim 42 wherein the scenario based algorithm allows for a scenario where multiple
Building Outlines fit within a single Lot Outline. In this example the Scenario Based Algorithm determines the Building Outlines become the preferred data source to achieve the stylised visual approximation of the scene .
The method of Claim 1 or Claim 2 wherein the flow of the technical architecture is first: to import, consolidate and cleanse the multiple sources of data and polygons .
The method of Claim 48 wherein the flow of the technical architecture is second: to run a Scenario Based Algorithm which determines based on the combined sources of data and polygons what is the appropriate scenario rules to achieve a stylised visual
approximation of the scene.
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