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Indane dimers for use in the treatment of autoimmune inflammatory disease

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Publication number
WO2013014660A1
WO2013014660A1 PCT/IE2012/000038 IE2012000038W WO2013014660A1 WO 2013014660 A1 WO2013014660 A1 WO 2013014660A1 IE 2012000038 W IE2012000038 W IE 2012000038W WO 2013014660 A1 WO2013014660 A1 WO 2013014660A1
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compound
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PCT/IE2012/000038
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French (fr)
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Helen Sheridan
Neil Frankish
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Venantius Limited
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C07ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C07CACYCLIC OR CARBOCYCLIC COMPOUNDS
    • C07C235/00Carboxylic acid amides, the carbon skeleton of the acid part being further substituted by oxygen atoms
    • C07C235/42Carboxylic acid amides, the carbon skeleton of the acid part being further substituted by oxygen atoms having carbon atoms of carboxamide groups bound to carbon atoms of six-membered aromatic rings and singly-bound oxygen atoms bound to the same carbon skeleton
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C07ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C07CACYCLIC OR CARBOCYCLIC COMPOUNDS
    • C07C229/00Compounds containing amino and carboxyl groups bound to the same carbon skeleton
    • C07C229/02Compounds containing amino and carboxyl groups bound to the same carbon skeleton having amino and carboxyl groups bound to acyclic carbon atoms of the same carbon skeleton
    • C07C229/04Compounds containing amino and carboxyl groups bound to the same carbon skeleton having amino and carboxyl groups bound to acyclic carbon atoms of the same carbon skeleton the carbon skeleton being acyclic and saturated
    • C07C229/06Compounds containing amino and carboxyl groups bound to the same carbon skeleton having amino and carboxyl groups bound to acyclic carbon atoms of the same carbon skeleton the carbon skeleton being acyclic and saturated having only one amino and one carboxyl group bound to the carbon skeleton
    • C07C229/08Compounds containing amino and carboxyl groups bound to the same carbon skeleton having amino and carboxyl groups bound to acyclic carbon atoms of the same carbon skeleton the carbon skeleton being acyclic and saturated having only one amino and one carboxyl group bound to the carbon skeleton the nitrogen atom of the amino group being further bound to hydrogen atoms
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C07ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C07CACYCLIC OR CARBOCYCLIC COMPOUNDS
    • C07C65/00Compounds having carboxyl groups bound to carbon atoms of six—membered aromatic rings and containing any of the groups OH, O—metal, —CHO, keto, ether, groups, groups, or groups
    • C07C65/01Compounds having carboxyl groups bound to carbon atoms of six—membered aromatic rings and containing any of the groups OH, O—metal, —CHO, keto, ether, groups, groups, or groups containing hydroxy or O-metal groups
    • C07C65/19Compounds having carboxyl groups bound to carbon atoms of six—membered aromatic rings and containing any of the groups OH, O—metal, —CHO, keto, ether, groups, groups, or groups containing hydroxy or O-metal groups having unsaturation outside the aromatic ring
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C07ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C07CACYCLIC OR CARBOCYCLIC COMPOUNDS
    • C07C69/00Esters of carboxylic acids; Esters of carbonic or haloformic acids
    • C07C69/76Esters of carboxylic acids having a carboxyl group bound to a carbon atom of a six-membered aromatic ring
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C07ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C07BGENERAL METHODS OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY; APPARATUS THEREFOR
    • C07B2200/00Indexing scheme relating to specific properties of organic compounds
    • C07B2200/07Optical isomers
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C07ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C07CACYCLIC OR CARBOCYCLIC COMPOUNDS
    • C07C2602/00Systems containing two condensed rings
    • C07C2602/02Systems containing two condensed rings the rings having only two atoms in common
    • C07C2602/04One of the condensed rings being a six-membered aromatic ring
    • C07C2602/08One of the condensed rings being a six-membered aromatic ring the other ring being five-membered, e.g. indane

Abstract

Compounds particularly for use in an autoimmune inflammatory disease and especially the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease have the formula: wherein R is selected from one or more of the same or different of hydrogen, hydroxyl, optionally substituted alkyl, optionally substituted aryl, alkoxy, aryloxy, thiol, and optionally substituted amino, and wherein R1 is selected from one or more of the same or different of hydrogen, acetyl, optionally substituted alkyl, optionally substituted aryl, and an amino acid selected from leucine, valine, isoleucine, and glycine.

Description

INDANE DIMERS FOR USE IN THE TREATMENT OF AUTOIMMUNE

INFLAMMATORY DISEASE

This invention relates to compounds particularly for use in the autoimmune inflammatory disease and specifically the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

Introduction

Cytokines can be produced by various cell populations and have been shown to augment or limit immune responses to pathogens and influence the autoimmune response. One family of cytokines, which uses the common receptor gamma chain (cc), a component of receptors for interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15 and IL-21, has been classically defined as growth and survival factors.

IL-2 production can induce an immune response by promoting the proliferation and generation of CD4+ Thl, CD4+ Th2 and CD8+ CTL effector cells. Many of the immunosuppressive drugs used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases and organ transplant rejection, such as corticosteroids and immune suppressive drugs (ciclosporin, tacrolimus) work by inhibiting the production of IL-2 by antigen -activated T cells. Others (sirolimus) block IL-2R signalling, thereby preventing the clonal expansion and function of antigen-selected T cells [ref: Opposing functions of IL-2 and IL-7 in the regulation of immune responses Shoshana D. Katzman, Katrina . Hoyer, Hans Dooms, Iris K. Gratz, Michael D. Rosenblum, Jonathan S. Paw, Sara H. Isakson, Abul K. Abbas. Cytokine 56 (201 1) 1 16-121]

In contrast IL-2 can inhibit the immune response by promoting the survival and functionality of natural (thymic) regulatory T-cells (Tregs), promoting the generation of induced (peripheral) Tregs and inhibiting the generation of CD4+ Thl 7 effector cells [ref: IL-2 and autoimmune disease. Anneliese Schimpl , A., Berberich, I, Kneitz, B., Kramer, S., Santner-Nanan, B., Wagner, S., Wolf, M., Hunig, T. Cytokine & Growth Factor Reviews 13 (2002) 369-378]. Interleukin-2/IL-2R deficiency with time leads to multiorgan inflammation and the formation of autoantibodies of various specificities. Depending on the genetic background, death occurs within a few weeks to a few months, mostly from autoimmune hemolytic anemia or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) [ref. Sadlack B, Merz H, Schorle H, Schimpl A, Feller AC, Horak I. Ulcerative colitis-like disease in mice with a disrupted interleukin-2 gene. Cell 1993;75:253-61]. IL-2 signalling has been shown to be important in both the initiation and regulation of immune responses. In these dual and opposing roles, IL-2 acts to balance immune response, both driving immune cell activation and subsequent reduction. The potential clinical applicability of either augmenting or inhibiting signals mediated by IL-2 is significant and includes cancer, autoimmune inflammatory diseases, organ transplantation and HIV.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease that consists of two idiopathic inflammatory diseases, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). The greatest distinction between UC and CD is the range of inflamed bowel tissue. Inflammation in CD is discontinuously segmented, known as regional enteritis, while UC is superficial inflammation extending proximally and continuously from the rectum. At present, the exact cause of IBD is unknown. The disease seems to be related to an exaggerated mucosal immune response to infection of the intestinal epithelium because of an imbalance of pro- inflammatory and immune- regulatory molecules. The inheritance patterns of IBD suggest a complex genetic component of pathogenesis that may consist of several combined genetic mutations. Currently no specific diagnostic test exists for IBD, but as an understanding of pathogenesis is improved so will the corresponding testing methods. Treatment of IBD consists of inducing and maintaining remission. IBD patients may be maintained on remission by use of a 5-aminosalycilate. However, while the use of aminosalycilates in UC provides considerable benefit, both in inducing remission in mild to moderate disease and in preventing relapse, the usefulness of these drugs to maintain remission in CD is questionable and is no longer recommended. The mainstay of treatment of active disease is a corticosteroid, commonly used for limited periods to return both UC and CD patients to remission, though budesonide, designed for topical administration with limited systemic absorption, has no benefit in maintaining remission. Alternatives, such as the immunosuppressive drugs azathioprine and mercaptopurine, together with methotrexate and cyclosporine have limited efficacy and the capability of inducing grave adverse effects. Anti- TNFa antibodies, such as infliximab and adalimubab, may be used in those patients unresponsive to standard immunosuppressive therapy. However, many patients fail to respond to anti-TNFa therapy, either due to their particular phenotype or by the production of autoantibodies. Statements of invention

In accordance with the present invention there are provided compounds for use in the treatment of autoimmune inflammatory disease and specifically inflammatory bowel disease including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In one aspect the invention provides a compound of the relative stereochemistry and formula:

wherein R is selected from one or more of the same or different of

hydrogen,

hydroxyl,

optionally substituted alky],

optionally substituted aryl,

alkoxy,

aryloxy,

thiol, and

optionally substituted amino,

and wherein Ri is selected from one or more of the same or different of

hydrogen,

acetyl,

optionally substituted alkyl,

optionally substituted aryl, and an amino acid selected from leucine, valine, isoleucine, and glycine, In all cases the compounds herein include pharmacologically acceptable salts, esters, amides, solvates, and prodrugs thereof.

The invention also provides a compound of the absolute stereochemistry and formula:

wherein R is selected from one or more of the same or different of hydrogen,

hydroxyl,

optionally substituted alkyl,

optionally substituted aryl,

alkoxy,

aryloxy,

thiol, and

optionally substituted amino,

and wherein Ri is selected from one or more of the same or different of

hydrogen,

acetyl,

optionally substituted alkyl,

optionally substituted aryl, and an amino acid selected from leucine, valine, isoleucine, and glycine.

In one embodiment alkyl contains from 1 to 10 carbon atoms in a straight or branched chain and may be saturated or unsaturated, or cycloalkyl groups containing 3 to 8 carbon atoms which may be saturated or unsaturated.

In some embodiments alkyl is substituted with one or more of the same or different from alkyl, alkoxy, alkylamino, amido, amino, aryl, aralkyl, aryloxy, carboxy, halo, hydroxy, nitrile, nitro or oxo groups.

In one embodiment aryl is substituted with one or more of the same or different from alkyl, alkoxy, alkylamino, amido, amino, anhydride, aryl, aralkyl, aryloxy, carboxy, halo, hydroxy, nitrile, nitro, or oxo groups.

In one embodiment amino is substituted with one or more of the same of different from alkyl, hydroxyalkyl, aryl, and substituted aryl. In some cases amino is substituted with aryl substituted by one or more of OH, NH2, and COOH. In one embodiment R is OH.

In one embodiment Ri is H.

The invention also provides compounds of the following formula with the absolute stereochemistry and formula

wherein R is selected from: OH, OCH3, OCH2CH3, OCH2CH2CH3, NH2, NHCH2CH2OH, NHCH3, N(CH3)2, NH(4-OH-3-benzoic acid)

Also provided are compounds of the absolute stereochemistry and formula

wherein R1 is H or leucine and R is selected from: OH, OCH3, OCH2CH3, OCH2CH2CH3, NH2, NHCH2CH2OH, NHCH3, N(CH3)2, NH(4-OH-3-benzoic acid).

In some aspoects R may be selected from one or more of the same or different of: H, hydroxy, alkoxy, alkyl carbonyl, aryloxy, anhydride, substituted anhydride,amino, substituted amino, amide, alkylamino, nitro, nitrite, nitrile, mono and polybenzoid aryl groups, substituted aryl groups, thiol, thioureyl, phenylthiol groups, sulphonic acid groups, sulphoxide groups, sulphone groups, alkyl containing 1 to 10 carbon atoms or cycloalkyl groups containing 3 to 8 carbon atoms which may be saturated or unsaturated, and substituted alkyl or cycloalkyl which may be saturated or unsaturated.

In some aspects Ri may be selected from one or more of the same or different of: H, alkoxy, alkyl carbonyl, aryl, acetoxy, alkyl containing 1 to 10 carbon atoms or cycloalkyl groups containing 3 to 8 carbon atoms which may be saturated or unsaturated, substituted akyl, and an amino acid selected from leucine, valine, isoleucine, and glycine. Also provided are pharmacologically acceptable salts, esters, amides and solvates thereof.

In one embodiment alkyl or cycloalkyl are substituted with one or more of the same of different of halo, oxo, hydroxy, alkoxy, aryloxy, carboxy, amino, amide, alkylamino, nitro, nitrate, nitrite, nitroso groups, nitrile, heterocyclic groups, aryl, aralkyl groups, alkyl substituted by OH, COOH, and/or NH2. In one embodiment amino is substituted with one or more of the same of different of hydroxyl, alkylhydroxyl, aryl, and aryl substituted by one or more of OH, N¾, and COOH.

In one case anhydride is substituted with aryl or aryl substituted by one or more of OH, NH2, and

COOH.

In one embodiment R is OH and Ri is H.

In some cases R is not OH. In this instance, in some cases salts thereof are excluded.

In some cases Ri is not H. In this instance, in some cases salts thereof are excluded.

In some cases R is not OH and Ri is not H. In this instance, in some cases salts thereof are excluded.

The invention also provides compounds of the structural formula I:

I

Also provided are pharmacologically acceptable isomers and salts of the compound of formula (I) - compound 1.

In particular, the present invention provides compounds of relative stereochemistry as demonstrated in structural formula II:

(Π) AIso provided are pharmacologically acceptable salts of the compound of formula (II) - compound 2.

The active enantiomers have been characterised, spectroscopically, by their physical and chemical properties and by normal and chiral HPLC retention data:

A specific enantiomeric form has been found to be particularly useful for the treatment of IBD. The invention also provides the N-Methyl-(D)-Glucamine salt of the compound of formula III:

(III, compound 6)

The invention further provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of a compound of the invention and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier.

The invention also provides a method for the prophylaxis or treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, comprising administering to a subj ect an effective amount of a compound of the inventio.

The invention further provides a method for the prophylaxis or treatment of ulcerative colitis, comprising administering to a subject an effective amount of a compound of the invention.

Also provided is a method for the prophylaxis or treatment of Crohn's disease, comprising administering to a subject an effective amount of a compound of the invention. The compounds of the invention are also potentially useful in either augmenting or inhibiting signals mediated by IL-2. The clinical uses include the treatment of cancer, autoimmune inflammatory disorders, organ transplantation and HIV. In particular the invention provides a compound as exemplified below

Compound Chemical Name

No.

1 4-((( 1 S,2S)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- 1 H, 1 'H-2,2'-biinden-2-yl) methyl)benzoic acid

2 4-(((l S,2S)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l*H-2,2'-biinden-2-yl) methyl)benzoic acid

3 4-((( 1 R,2R)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- 1 H, 1 'H-2,2'-biinden-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid

4 4-((( 1 R,2S)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- 1 H, 1 'H-2,2'-biinden-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid

5 4-((( 1 S,2R)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- 1H, 1 'H-2,2'-biinden-2- yl)methyl)benzoic acid

6 6-(Methylamino)hexane- 1 ,2,3,4,5-pentanol 4-((( 1 S,2S)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- lH,l'H-2,2'-biinden-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

7 6-(Methylamino)hexane-l,2,3,4,5-pentanol 4-(((lS,2R)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- lH,l'H-2,2'-biinden-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

8 (S)- 1 -Phenylethylammonium 4-((( 1 S,2S)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3- dihydro- 1 H, 1 Ή-2,2'- biinden-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

9 (R)- 1 -Phenylethylammonium 4-((( 1 R,2S)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- 1 H, 1 Ή-2,2'- biinden-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

10 methyl 4-((( 1 R,2R)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3 -dihydro- 1 H, 1 'H-[2,2'-biinden] -2-y l)methy 1) benzoate

11 ethyl 4-(((l ?,2i?)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3 -dihydro- 1H, 1 'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl) benzoate

12 propyl 4-((( \R,2R)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- 1 H, 1 *H-[2,2'-biinden] -2-yl)methyl) benzoate

13 4- { [( 1 'R,2'R)- 1 '-hydroxy- 1 ',3'-dihydro- lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl }

Benzamide

14 4-{[(l'i?,2,i?)-r-hydroxy-l',3'-dihydro-lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl}-N-(2- hydroxyethyl)benzamide

15 4- { [( 1 'R,2'R)- 1 '-hydroxy- 1 ',3'-dihydro- lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl }-N- methylbenzamide

16 4-{[(ri?,2'i?)-l'-hydroxy-l',3*-dihydro-lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl}-N,N- dimethylbenzamide

17 methyl 4-(((15,25)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl) benzoate

18 ethyl 4-((( \S,2S)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- 1 H, 1 *H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)

benzoate

19 propyl 4-(((15,25 -l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl) benzoate

20 4- { [( 1 'S,2'S)- 1 '-hydroxy- 1 ',3 '-dihydro- lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl }

Benzamide 4-{[(l',S,2'5)-l,-hydroxy-l',3'-dihydro-lH,2,H-2,2,-biinden-2,-yl]methyl}-N-(2- hydroxyethyl)benzam ide

4-{[(l'1S,2'1S)-l'-hydroxy-l',3'-dihydro-lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl}-N- methylbenzamide

4-{[(l'5,2'S)-l'-hydroxy-l,,3,-dihydro-lH,2,H-2,2,-biinden-2,-yl]methyl}-N,N- dimethylbenzamide

4-{ [( 1 'R,2'R)- 1 '-(L-leucyloxy)- 1 ',3 '-dihydro- lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl } benzoic acid

4- { [( 1 'R,2'R)- 1 '-(L-valyloxy)- 1 ',3*-dihydro- lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl } benzoic acid

4-{ [( 1 2'R)- 1 '-(L-isoleucyloxy)- 1 ',3'-dihydro- lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'yl]methyl } benzoic acid

4-{ [(1 'R,2'R)- 1 '-(glycyloxy)- 1 ',3'-dihydro- lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl} benzoic acid

4-{[(YS,2'S)- 1 '-(L-leucyloxy)- 1 ',3'-dihydro- lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl} benzoic acid

4-{[(l'5,2,5)-l'-(L-valyloxy)-l,,3'-dihydro-lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl} benzoic acid

4-{ [( 1 'S,2'S)- 1 '-(L-isoleucyloxy)- 1 ',3 '-dihydro- 1 H,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl }benzoic acid

4-{ [( 1 'S,2'S)~ 1 '-(glycyloxy)- 1 ',3*-dihydro- lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2*- yl] methyl} benzoic acid

methyl 4-(((lR,2R)-l-(((S)-2-amino-4-methylpentanoyl)oxy)-2,3-dihydro-lH, l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

ethyl 4-((( 1 R,2R)- 1 -(((S)-2-amino-4-methylpentanoyl)oxy)-2,3-dihydro- 1 H, 1 Ή- [2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

propyl 4-((( 1 R,2R)- 1 -(((S)-2-amino-4-methylpentanoyl)oxy)-2,3-dihydro- 1 H, l'H-[2,2'-biindenl-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

( li?,2 )-2-(4-carbamoylbenzyl)-2,3-dihydro- 1H, 1 'H-2,2'-biinden- 1 -yl L-leucinate

(li?,2 ?)-2-{4-[(2-hydroxyethyl)carbamoyl]benzyl}-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-2,2'-bi inden-l-yl L-leucinate

(li?,2i?)-2-[4-(methylcarbamoyl)benzyl]-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-2,2'-biinden-l-yl L- leucinate

(li?,2i?)-2-[4-(dimethylcarbamoyl)benzyl]-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-2,2'-biinden-l-yl L-leucinate (38)

methyl 4-((( 1 S,2S)- 1 -(((S)-2-amino-4-methylpentanoyl)oxy)-2,3-dihydro- 1 Η, l'H-[2,2'-biindenl-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

ethyl 4-((( 1 S,2S)- 1 -(((S)-2-amino-4-methylpentanoyl)oxy)-2,3-dihydro- 1 H, 1 Ή- [2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

propyl 4-(((lS,2S)-l-(((S)-2-amino-4-methylpentanoyl)oxy)-2,3-dihydro-lH, l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

(15',2S)-2-(4-carbamoylbenzyl)-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-2,2'-biinden-l-yl L-leucinate

(15,25)-2-{4-[(2-Hydroxyethyl)carbamoyl]benzyl}-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-2,2'-bi inden-l-yl leucinate

(^^^^-^-(methylcarbamoy benzy^^^-dihydro-lHl'H^^'-biinden-l-yl L- leucinate 45 (15,2S)-2-[4-(dimethylcarbamoyl)benzyl]-2,3-dihydro-lH,rH-2,2'-biinden-l-yl L- leucinate

46 2-hydroxy-5-(4-((( 1 R,2R)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- 1 Η, 1 'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl) methyl)benzamido)benzoic acid

47 2-hydroxy-5-(4-((( 1 S,2S)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- 1 H, 1 'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl) methyl)benzamido)benzoic acid

The invention also provides a compound of the formula:

This compound compromises two diastereoisomers

The preferred isomer is

The invention further provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising any of the compounds described above.

The active compound may be present in the medicament for use in man at a suitable dose to achieve the desired effect. For example, the final dose may be between 0.1 and 10 mg/kg.

It may be possible to administer the compounds of the invention in the form of a bulk active chemical. It is however, preferred that the compounds be administered in the form of a pharmaceutical formulation or composition. Such formulations may comprise one or more pharmaceutically acceptable excipient, carrier or diluent.

The compounds of the invention may be administered in a number of different ways. The compounds may be administered orally. Preferred pharmaceutical formulations for oral administration include tablets, capsules, caplets, solutions, suspensions or syrups.

The pharmaceutical formulations may be provided in a form for modified release such as a time release capsule or tablet.

The medicament may be administered orally, parenterally, intranasally, transcutaneously or by inhalation.

The invention also provides a method for the prophylaxis or treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, comprising administering to a subject an effective amount of a compound of the invention.

The invention further provides a method for the prophylaxis or treatment of ulcerative colitis, comprising administering to a subject an effective amount of a compound of the invention.

Also provided is a method for the prophylaxis or treatment of Crohn's disease, comprising administering to a subject an effective amount of a compound of the invention.

As described herein, compounds of the invention may optionally be substituted with one or more substituents, such as are illustrated generally above, or as exemplified by particular classes, subclasses, and species of the invention. In general, the term substituted refers to the replacement of hydrogen atoms in a given structure with a specified substituent. Unless otherwise indicated, an optionally substituted group may have a substituent at each substitutable position of the group, and when more than one position in any given structure may be substituted with more than one substituent selected from a specified group, the substituent may be either the same or different at every position. Combinations of substituents envisioned by this invention are preferably those that result in the formation of stable or chemically feasible compounds. The term "stable", as used herein, refers to compounds that are not substantially altered when subjected to conditions to allow for their production, detection, and preferably their recovery, purification, and use for one or more of the purposes disclosed herein. In some embodiments, a stable compound or chemically feasible compound is one that is not substantially altered when kept at a temperature of 40°C or less, in the absence of moisture or other chemically reactive conditions, for at least a week.

The present invention is described in terms known and appreciated by those skilled in the art. For ease of reference certain terms hereinafter are defined to clarify, but not limit, the terms defined.

The term alkyl refers to a straight or branched chain hydrocarbon, preferably having from one to ten carbon atoms. Exemplary alkyl groups are methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, isobutyl, n-butyl, tert-butyl, isopentyl, n-pentyl, and the like. The term unsaturated means that a moiety has one or more units of unsaturation.

The term cycloalkyl refers to a non-aromatic cyclic hydrocarbon ring. Exemplary cycloalkyl groups include, but are not limited to, cyclopropyl, cyclobutyl, cyclopentyl, cyclohexyl, and cycloheptyl. The term "cycloalkyl" includes a fused ring system where, for example, a cycloalkyl ring is fused with an aromatic ring.

The term aryl used alone or as part of a larger moiety refers to monocyclic or polycyclic ring systems having a total of five to fourteen ring members, wherein at least one ring in the system is aromatic and wherein each ring in the system contains 3 to 7 ring members. In particular the term aryl refers to a benzene ring or to a fused benzene ring system, such as anthracene, phenanthrene, or naphthalene ring systems. Examples of aryl groups include phenyl, 2-naphthyl, 1-naphthyl, and the like. - -

The term alkoxy refers to a group --OX, where X is alkyl, as herein defined.

The term aryloxy alone or as part of another group includes any of the above aryl groups linked to an oxygen atom.

As used herein alkoxycarbonyl refers to a group— C(0)OX where X is alkyl as defined herein.

The term amino refers to a nitrogen radical substituted with hydrogen, alkyl, aryl, or combinations thereof. Examples of amino groups include— NHMethyl,— NH2, ~N(Methyl)2,— NPhenylMethyl, -NHPhenyl, -NEthylMethyl, and the like. An "alkylamino" refers to a nitrogen radical substituted with at least one alkyl group. Examples of alkylamino groups include— NHMethyl, -N(Methyl)2, -NPropylMethyl, -NHButyl, -NEthylMethyl, -NPhenylMethyl, and the like. An "arylamino" refers to a nitrogen atom substituted with at least one aryl group. The term "halogen" refers to fluorine, chlorine, bromine, or iodine. The term "hydroxyl" refers to a group—OH. The term "thiol" refers to a group— SH.

The compounds of the invention may crystallize in more than one form. This characteristic is referred to as polymorphism, and such polymorphic forms ("polymorphs") are within the scope of the invention.Polymorphism generally can occur as a response to changes in temperature, pressure, or both. Polymorphism can also result from variations in the crystallization process. Polymorphs can be distinguished by various physical characteristics known in the art such as x- ray diffraction patterns, solubility, and melting point.

Certain of the compounds described herein are capable of existing as stereoisomers. The scope of the present invention includes mixtures of stereoisomers as well as purified or enriched mixtures. Also included within the scope of the invention are the individual isomers of the compounds of the invention as well as any wholly or partially equilibrated mixtures thereof. Certain compounds of the invention contain one or more chiral centers. Therefore the present invention includes racemates, purified enantiomers, and enantiomerically enriched mixtures of the compounds of the invention. The compounds of the present invention include racemic and chiral indane dimers. - -

Preferably the salts of the present invention are pharmaceutically acceptable salts. Salts encompassed within the term pharmaceutically acceptable salts refer to non-toxic salts of the compounds of this invention. Salts of the compounds of the present invention may comprise acid addition salts.

Solvate refers to a complex of variable stoichiometry formed by a solute (in this invention, a compound of the invention, or a salt or physiologically functional derivative thereof) and a solvent. Such solvents, for the purpose of the invention, should not interfere with the biological activity of the solute. Non-limiting examples of suitable solvents include, but are not limited to water, methanol, ethanol, and acetic acid. Preferably the solvent used is a pharmaceutically acceptable solvent. Non-limiting examples of suitable pharmaceutically acceptable solvents include water, ethanol, and acetic acid. Most preferably the solvent used is water. Prodrug refers to any pharmaceutically acceptable derivative of a compound of the present invention that, upon administration to a mammal, is capable of providing (directly or indirectly) a compound of the present invention or an active metabolite thereof. Such derivatives, for example, esters and amides, will be clear to those skilled in the art. Pharmaceutical formulations may be adapted for administration by any appropriate route, for example by an oral (including buccal or sublingual), rectal, nasal, topical (including buccal, sublingual or transdermal), vaginal, or parenteral (including subcutaneous, intramuscular, intravenous or intradermal) route. Such formulations may be prepared by bringing into association the active ingredient with the carrier(s) or excipient(s).

Pharmaceutical formulations adapted for oral administration may be presented as discrete units such as capsules or tablets; powders or granules; solutions or suspensions, each with aqueous or non-aqueous liquids; edible foams or whips; or oil-in-water liquid emulsions or water-in-oil liquid emulsions. For oral administration in the form of a tablet or capsule, the active drug component can be combined with an oral, non-toxic pharmaceutically acceptable inert carrier such as ethanol, glycerol, water, and the like. Powders may be prepared by comminuting the compound to a suitable fine size and mixing with an appropriate pharmaceutical carrier such as - - an edible carbohydrate such as starch or mannitol. Flavorings, preservatives, dispersing agents, and coloring agents and the like may also be included.

Capsules may made by preparing a powder, liquid, or suspension mixture and encapsulating within gelatin or other suitable shell material. Lubricants such as colloidal silica, talc, magnesium stearate, calcium stearate, or solid polyethylene glycol may be added to the mixture. A disintegrating or solubilizing agent such as calcium carbonate or sodium carbonate can also be added to improve the availability of the medicament when the capsule is ingested. Other agents such as binders, lubricants, disintegrating agents, and coloring agents can also be incorporated into the mixture. Examples of suitable binders include starch, gelatin, natural sugars, corn sweeteners, natural and synthetic gums, tragacanth, or sodium alginate, carboxymethylcellulose, polyethylene glycol and the like. Suitable lubricants for these dosage forms include, for example, sodium oleate, sodium stearate, magnesium stearate, sodium benzoate, sodium acetate, sodium chloride, and the like. Suitabel disintegrators include, without limitation, starch, methyl cellulose, agar, bentonite, xanthan gum, and the like.

Tablets may be formulated by preparing a powder mixture, granulating the mixture, adding a lubricant and disintegrant, and pressing into tablets. A powder mixture may be prepared by mixing the compound, suitably comminuted, with a diluent or base as described above. Optional ingredients include binders such as carboxymethylcellulose, aliginates, gelatins, or polyvinyl pyrrolidone, solution retardants such as paraffin, resorption accelerators such as a quaternary salt, and/or absorption agents such as bentonite, kaolin, or the like. The powder mixture can be wet- granulated with a binder such as syrup, starch paste, or solutions of cellulosic or polymeric materials, and pressing through a screen.

The compounds of the present invention can also be combined with a free flowing inert carrier and compressed into tablets directly without going through other steps such as granulating. A clear or opaque protective coating consisting of a sealing coat of a suitable material such as shellac, sugar or polymeric material, and a polish coating for example of wax can be provided. If appropriate colourants be added to these coatings to distinguish different unit dosages.

Oral fluids such as solutions, syrups, and elixirs can be prepared in dosage unit form so that a given quantity contains a predetermined amount of the compound. Syrups can be prepared, for example, by dissolving the compound in a suitably flavored aqueous solution, while elixirs are prepared through the use of a non-toxic alcoholic vehicle. Suspensions can be formulated by dispersing the compound in a non-toxic vehicle. Solubilisers and emulsifiers such as ethoxylated isostearyl alcohols and polyoxy ethylene sorbitol ethers, preservatives; flavor additives such as peppermint oil, or natural sweeteners, saccharin, or other artificial sweeteners; and the like can also be added.

Where appropriate, dosage unit formulations for oral administration can be microencapsulated. The formulation can also be prepared to prolong or sustain the release as for example by coating or embedding particulate material in suitable polymers, wax, or the like.

The compounds of formula (I) and salts, solvates, and physiological functional derivatives thereof, can also be administered in the form of liposome delivery systems, such as small unilamellar vesicles, large unilamellar vesicles, and multilamellar vesicles. Liposomes can be formed from a variety of phospholipids, such as cholesterol, stearylamine, or phosphatidylcholines.

The compounds of the invention and salts, solvates, and physiologically functional derivatives thereof may also be delivered by the use of monoclonal antibodies as individual carriers to which the compound molecules are coupled.

The compounds may also be coupled with soluble polymers as targetable drug carriers. Such polymers can include, for example, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The compounds may also be coupled to a biodegradable polymer achieve controlled release of a drug. Such polymers include polylactic acid, polycyanoacrylates, and block copolymers of hydrogels.

Pharmaceutical formulations adapted for transdermal administration may be presented as discrete patches intended to remain in intimate contact with the skin/epidermis of a patient for a prolonged period of time. For example, the active ingredient may be delivered from the patch by iontophoresis. Pharmaceutical formulations adapted for topical administration may be formulated as ointments, creams, suspensions, lotions, powders, solutions, pastes, gels, sprays, aerosols, or oils. For treatments of external tissues the formulations may be applied as a topical ointment or cream. For topical administration in the mouth the formulation may include lozenges, pastilles, and mouthwashes.

For nasal administration, a powder having a particle size for example in the range 20 to 500 microns may be used. The powder may be administered by rapid inhalation through the nasal passage from a container of the powder held close up to the nose. Suitable formulations wherein the carrier is a liquid, for administration as a nasal spray or as nasal drops, include aqueous or oil solutions of the active ingredient.

Pharmaceutical formulations adapted for administration by inhalation include fine particle dusts or mists, which may be generated by means of of metered dose pressurized aerosols, nebulizers, or insufflators and the like.

For rectal administration the formulation may be presented as suppositories or as enemas. For vaginal administration the formulation may be in the form of pessaries, tampons, creams, gels, sprays or the like.

For parenteral administration the formulation may be aqueous and non-aqueous sterile injection solutions which may contain various additives such as anti-oxidants, buffers, bacteriostats, and solutes that render the formulation isotonic with the blood of the intended recipient; and aqueous and non-aqueous sterile suspensions which may include suspending agents and thickening agents. The formulations may be presented in unit-dose or multi-dose containers, for example sealed ampules and vials, and may be stored in a freeze-dried (lyophilized) condition requiring only the addition of the sterile liquid carrier, for example water for injections, immediately prior to use. Extemporaneous injection solutions and suspensions may be prepared from sterile powders, granules, and the like. The compounds of the present invention and their salts, solvates, and physiologically functional derivatives thereof, may be employed alone or in combination with other therapeutic agents. The compound of the invention and the other pharmaceutically active agent(s) may be administered together or separately. If administered separately, administration may occur simultaneously or sequentially, in any order. The amounts of the compound of the invention and the other pharmaceutically active agent(s) and the relative timings of administration will be selected in order to achieve the desired combined therapeutic effect. The administration in combination of a compound of the invention salts, solvates, or physiologically functional derivatives thereof with other treatment agents may be in combination by administration concomitantly in either a single pharmaceutical composition including both compound or in separate pharmaceutical compositions each including one of the compounds. In some cases the combination of drugs may be administered separately in a sequential manner in which one agent is administered first and a second agent is administered second or the other way around. Such administration may be in a similar time frame or over longer time.

Brief description of the drawings

The invention will be more clearly understood from the following description thereof given by way of example only, in which:- Fig. 1 : Is the X-ray crystal structure showing the absolute stereochemistry for the enantiomer compound 4 (R)-(+)-methylbenzylamine salt (compound 9);

Fig. 2: Is the X-ray crystal structure showing the absolute stereochemistry for the enantiomer compound 2 (S)-(-)-methylbenzylamine salt (compound 8);

Fig. 2A: Is a view of a molecule of compound 8 from the crystal structure showing the numbering scheme employed. Anisotropic atomic displacement ellipsoids for the non- hydrogen atoms are shown at the 50% probability level. Hydrogen atoms are displayed with an arbitrarily small radius. Only the major disorder component is shown;

Fig. 3: Is a graph of the effect of compounds 2, 3, 4 and 5 at 30 mg/kg on disease activity index (DAI) over 7 days in 5% DSS colitis; Fig. 4: lis a bar chart of the effect of compounds 2, 3, 4 and 5 at 30 mg/kg on disease activity index (DAI) at day 7 in 5% DSS colitis;

Fig. 5: Is a graph of the effect of compounds 5, 7, 2 and 6 at 10 mg/kg on disease activity index (DAI) over 7 days in 5% DSS colitis;

Fig. 6: Is a bar chart of the effect of compounds 5, 7, 2 and 6 at 10 mg/kg on disease activity index (DAI) at day 7 in 5% DSS colitis. Asterisks indicate a significant (P<0.05) difference (1 way ANOVA) from the vehicle control group;

Fig. 7: Is a graph showing the effect of compound 6 on weight loss in 5% DSS-treated mice. Data are Mean ± SEM from 6-7 mice per group;

Fig. 8: Is a graph showing the effect of compound 6 on DAI in 5% DSS-treated mice. Data are Mean ± SEM from 6-7 mice per group;

Fig. 9: Is a bar chart showing the effect of compound 6 on DAI in 5% DSS-treated mice on day 7. Data are Mean ± SEM. Asterisks indicate a significant (P<0.05) difference (1 way ANOVA) from the vehicle control group;

Fig. 10: Is a bar chart showing the effect of compound 6 on colon length of 5 % DSS- treated mice on day 7. Asterisks indicate a significant (P<0.05) difference (1 way ANOVA) from the vehicle control group;

Fig. 11 : Shows representative haematoxylin and eosin-stained sections from distal colons of mice. Higher magnifications (X10) are shown;

Fig. 12: Is a bar chart showing the effect of compound 6 on histology scores of colons from DSS-treated mice. Data are Mean ± SEM from 5-6 mice. Asterisks indicate a significant (P<0.05) difference (1 way ANOVA) from the vehicle control group. Note, maximum score 10;

Fig. 13: Is a bar chart showing the effect of compound 6 on myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the colons of untreated or vehicle, prednisolone and compound 2 treated mice exposed to 5% DSS. Data are Mean ± SEM from 5-6 mice. Asterisks indicate a significant (P<0.05) difference (1 way ANOVA) from the vehicle control group;

Fig. 14(A) to (C): Are bar charts showing the effect of compound 6 on Levels of cytokines (ILlp (A), TNFa (B) and IL6 (C)) in mice treated with DSS. Data are Mean ± SEM from 5-6 mice. Asterisks indicate a significant (P<0.05) difference (1 way ANOVA) from the vehicle control group;

Fig. 15: Is a group showing weight loss in ILICT7"" mice treated with vehicle or compound 6. Mice were administered compound 6 (300 mg/kg/week) or vehicle orally on a Monday/Wednesday/Friday (MWF) dosing schedule. Mice were ~4 weeks of age at start of experiment and were treated for 9 weeks. Mice were weighed weekly and data are presented as Mean ± SEM from 9-12 mice per group. Mice were monitored for overt disease, rectal prolapse, and moribund animals were humanely killed;

Fig. 16: Is a scatter graph representing Serum Amyloid A (SAA) levels of individual mice, and Mean (bar), from surviving animals at week 9 (11 and 9 mice in compound 6 or vehicle-treated groups, respectively). Student's t-test was used to test for statistical differences between groups;

Fig. 17: Are representative hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections from distal colons from IL10 "'" mice treated for 9 weeks with vehicle or compound 6;

Fig. 18: Histology scores of distal colons of ILIO"'"" mice treated with vehicle or compound 6. Scatter graph representing histology score of individual mice, and Mean (bar), from surviving animals at week 9 (1 1 and 9 mice in compound 6 or vehicle-treated groups, respectively). Student's t-test was used to test for statistical differences between groups;

Fig. 19 is a scatter graph showing weight loss in 5% DSS-treated mice at day 7. Data are Mean ± SEM from 6-7 mice per group; for compound 31 and 47, in DSS murine colitis (Method 2); Fig. 20 is a scatter graph showing DAI in 5% DSS-treated mice on day 7. Data are Mean ± SEM from 6-7 mice per group; for compound 31 and 47, in DSS murine colitis (Method

2);

Fig. 21 is a bar chart illustrating the effect of compounds 10-16 and 18-38 on IL2 release from Jurkat cells; and

Fig.22 is a bar chart illustrating the effect of compounds 2-5 and 39-47 on IL2 release from Jurkat cells

Detailed description of the invention

Compound 1 represents a pair of diastereoisomers that result from the reduction and demethylation of the ketone compound A which has a chiral centre at C-2, and is, as a result, a pair of enantiomers.

Compound A

Enantiomers of compound A Reduction of this compound with LiAlH4 yields a compound of the formula

This compound comprises two diastereoisomers:-

Diastereoisomer B Diastereoisomer C lysis of Diastereoisomer B gives rise to compounds 2 and 3

Compound 2 Compound 3

Hydrolysis of Diastereoisomer C gives rise to compounds 4 and 5.

Compound 4 Compound 5

The diastereoisomers can be resolved chemically or chromatographically into their constituent enantiomers. The absolute stereochemistry of compound 4 has been established by single crystal X-ray of compound 4 (R)-(+)-rnethylbenzylamine salt (compound 9) (Fig. 1).

The absolute stereochemistry of compound 2 was confirmed by single crystal X-ray of compound 2 (S)-(-)-methylbenzylamine salt (compound 8) (Fig. 2 and 2A).

The invention also relates to compounds of the formula:

These compounds compromises two diastereoisomers

The preferred diastereoisomer with the following relative stereochemistry is presented below

15

This diastereoisomer is composed of two enantiomers. The absolute stereochemistry of the preferred enantiomer is presented below

General reaction procedures

General synthetic procedures for the coupling of enantiomeric mixtures as exemplified below are described in WO9720806A, the entire contents of which are herein incorporated by reference.

General preparation of acid derivative compound A

To a stirred solution of the coupled product (4 mmol, 1.00 g) in ter/-butanol (5 mL) and diethyl ether (30 mL) under nitrogen was added methyl (4-bromomethyl)benzoate (6 mmol, 1.41 g). To this was added a solution of potassium rt-butoxide in fert-butanol (30 mL) and diethyl ether (5 mL), slowly dropwise. With each drop, the mixture turned a yellow colour and then it reverted its original grey colour. The mixture was stirred for a further 3 hours until the TLC (80:20, hexane:ethyl acetate) showed no more starting material. The reaction was quenched by the addition of sat. NH4C1. The layers were separated and the aqueous layer extracted with diethyl ether (2 x 120 mL). The combined organic layers were washed with water, brine, dried over MgS04 and evaporated. The solid product precipitated from the crude on removal of most of the solvent. This was filtered off and washed with cold diethyl ether to give 0.98 g (62%) of a cream solid.

Reduction of methyl benzoate compound

To a stirred solution of the methyl benzoate compound (1.27 mmol, 0.50 g) in THF (15 mL) was added lithium tri-teri-butoxyaluminohydride (1.9 mmol, 0.48 g), slowly portionwise. The reaction was monitored by TLC (80:20, hexane:ethyl acetate) and after 3h, all of the starting material had been consumed.

The reaction was quenched by pouring onto ice and the crude product extracted into ethyl acetate by stirring the aqueous mixture for 10-15 min with ethyl acetate then pouring into a separatory funnel and allowing it to separate. The combined organic layers were washed with water, brine, dried over MgS04 and evaporated to give 0.34 g (68%) of a cream-tart solid. The product was isolated as a mixture of two diastereoisomers in an approximately 2: 1 ratio.

Analytical results for the mixture of two diastereoisomers

Purity (HPLC): 94.9% (as a 2:1 ratio of diastereoisomers) δΗ(300 MHz, CDC ): 2.77-3.60 (6H, m, 3 x ¾), 3.85 (3H, s, CH3), [5.02 (1H, s, CH-

OH)] 5.18 (1H, s, CH-OH), [6.23 (lH, s, CH=C)] 6.43 (1H, s, CH=C ), 6.90-6.98 (2H, m, Ar-H), 7.1 1-7.21 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.22- 7.31 (5H, m, Ar-H), 7.36-7.42 (2H, m, Ar-H), 7.78-7.84 (2H, m, Ar-H). Where possible, the value for the minor diastereoisomer is given in brackets.

6c(75.5 MHz, CDCI3): 38.3(CH2), 38.4(CH2), 38.6(CH2), 39.9(CH2), 40.3(CH2), 43.4

(CH2), 51.9 (COOCH3), 52.0 (COOCH3), 55.9 (quat. C), 56.3 (quat. C), 82.0 (CH-OH), 82.8 (CH-OH), 120.5 (tert. C), 120.7 (tert. C), 123.5 (tert. C), 123.6 (tert. C), 124.0 (tert. C), 124.2 (tert. C), 124.5 (tert. C), 124.6 (tert. C), 124.8 (tert. C), 124.9 (tert. C), 125.1 (tert. C), 125.2 (tert. C), 126.1 (tert. C), 126.4 (tert. C), 127.0 (quat. C), 127.1 (quat. C), 128.0 (tert. C), 128.2 (tert. C), 128.5 (tert. C), 128.8 (tert. C), 129.0 (tert. C), 129.2 (tert. C), 129.5 (tert. C), 2 X 130.0 (2 x tert. C), 2 x 130.2 (2 x tert. C), 130.7 (tert. C),

140.4 (quat. C), 141.5 (quat. C), 142.8 (quat. C), 143.2 (quat. C),

143.5 (quat. C), 143.6 (quat. C), 143.7 (quat. C), 144.2 (quat. C), 144.3 (quat. C), 144.5 (quat. C), 150.4 (quat. C), 152.6 (quat. C), 167.0 (C=0), 167.2 (C=0).

Hydrolysis of methyl benzoate moiety

The ester was placed in a round-bottomed flask and 10% aq. NaOH (1 mL) was added to it followed by sufficient methanol to form a solution (6 mL). The solution was heated at 40 °C and monitored by TLC (80:20, hexane:ethyl acetate). After ca. 4h, no further ester was seen.

The mixture was cooled and sat. NH4C1 added (solution at pH 12). Dilute HC1 was added to acidic pH (pH 2). The product was extracted from the cloudy solution into ethyl acetate (3 x 10 mL). The combined extracts were dried over MgSC and evaporated in vacuo to give 0.15 g (quantitative) of a cream solid. The product was isolated as a mixture of two diastereoisomers in an approximately 2: 1 ratio.

Analytical results for the mixture of two diastereoisomers

Purity (HPLC): 95.2% (as a 2:1 ratio of diastereoisomers)

δΗ(400 MHz, CDC13): 2.81-3.59 (6H, m, 3 x ¾), [5.05 (1H, s, CH-OH)], 5.23 (1H, s,

CH-OH), 6.46 (1H, s, CH=C), [6.66 (1H, s, CH=C)], 6.95-7.03 (2H, m, Ar-H), 7.12-7.17 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.21-7.29 (5H, m, Ar-H), 7.37-7.43 (2H, m, Ar-H), 7.85-7.91 (2H, m, Ar-H).

Where possible, the value for the minor diastereoisomer is given in brackets.

6c(100 MHz, CDCI3): 37.9 (CH2), 38.1 (CH2), 38.2 (CH2), 39.5 (CH2), 39.9 (CH2), 43.1

(CH2), 55.5 (quat. C), 55.9 (quat. C), 81.6 (CH-OH), 82.4 (CH- OH), 120.2 (tert. C), 120.3 (tert. C), 123.1 (tert. C), 123.2 (tert. C), 123.5 (tert. C), 123.9 (tert. C), 124.1 (tert. C), 124.4 (tert. C), 124.5 (tert. C), 124.7 (tert. C), 125.9 (tert. C), 126.0 (tert. C), 126.5 (tert. C), 2 x 126.7 (quat. C & tert. C), 126.9 (quat. C), 128.1 (tert. C), 128.2 (tert. C), 128.4 (tert. C), 2 x 129.2 (2 x tert. C), 2 x 129.4 (2 x tert. C), 2 x 129.8 (2 x tert. C), 2 x 129.9 (2 x tert. C), 130.4 (tert. C), 140.0 (quat. C), 141.0 (quat. C), 142.3 (quat. C), 142.7 (quat. C), 143.0 (quat. C), 143.2 (quat. C), 143.8 (quat. C), 144.0 (quat. C), 144.1 (quat. C), 144.7 (quat. C), 150.0 (quat. C), 152.0 (quat. C), 170.8 (C=0), 171.1 (C=0).

Chemical separation of enantiomers

Preparation of N-BOC D-phenylalanine derivative of methyl benzoate diastereoisomer and/or separation of subsequent diastereoisomers al and a2 (or βΐ and β2)

Note: procedure applicable to both diastereoisomers but the example given is for the first diastereoisomer.

Diastereoisomer A (2.5 mmol, 1.0 g) and N-BOC D-phenylalanine (3.1 mmol, 0.8 g) were placed in a round bottom flask fitted with a condenser and suspended in CH3CN (25 mL) under nitrogen. To this suspension was added pyridine (3.1 mmol, 0.3 mL) followed by a solution of DCC (3.1 mmol, 0.7 g) and DMAP (10% mol, 0.25 mmol, 0.05 g) in CH3CN (2 mL). The mixture was stirred for 20 h at 50°C, and then allowed to reach room temperature.

The white solid was filtered off and the solvent removed in vacuo. Ethyl acetate was added and the solution obtained was washed with 10% H2S04, sat. NaHC03, dried over MgS04 and evaporated to give 2.1 g of a yellow oil (83% pure by HPLC, yield: quantitative).

The diastereoisomers al and a2 were separated by flash chromatography (90 g of silica/g of product) using hexane/MTBE 90:10. From 4.17 g of mixture, 1.3 g of a2, derivative was obtained (as well as 1.71 g of the al derivative and 0.3 g as a mixture of both). Hydrolysis of N-BQC D-phenylalanine derivative of methyl benzoate compound (al, a2, βΐ or m

The diastereoisomer a2 (2.3 mmol, 1.45 g) was dissolved in methanol (25mL) and NaOH (1 1.5 mmol, 0.45 g) was added and the mixture stirred at reflux temperature and monitored by TLC. After 20h, the starting material was consumed. The reaction was cooled to room temperature and quenched by addition of sat. NH4C1. The methanol was removed in vacuo and the aqueous solution acidified to pH 1 with cone. HCl. The product was extracted with ethyl acetate, dried over MgS04 and evaporated to give 1.6 g of a yellow gum, which was purified by a short silica column with hexane:MTBE 80:20 as eluent. 0.44 g of acid derivative compound 5 (50% yield) was obtained which was 97.2% pure by HPLC. Note: An alternative hydrolysis was also carried out using 10% aqueous NaOH in methanol at 40-50 °C. This procedure took almost 5 days to go to completion.

Analytical results for enantiomers ocl, ct2, βΐ, 32

Enantiomer βΐ from diastereomer B - compound 3

Description: Cream amorphous solid

Melting point 195-196°C

[a] D: +98.51 (1.07%, MeOH)

Purity: 99.0% δΗ(400 MHz, CDC13): 2.87 (IH, d, J=13.28 Hz, CH2), 3.00-3.09 (2H, m, CH2), 3.29 (IH, d, J=13.36 Hz, CH2), 3.43-3.61 (2H, m, ¾), 5.27 (IH, s, CH- OH), 6.49 (IH, s, CH=C), 7.00 (2H, d, J=7.88 Hz, Ar-H), 7.16-7.32 (6H, m, Ar-H), 7.44 (2H, d, 1^7.24 Hz, Ar-H), 7.90 (2H, d, J-7.92 Hz, Ar-H). Enantiomer β2 from diastereoisomer B - compound 2

Description: Cream amorphous solid Melting point 184-185°C [a] D: -114.44 (0.18%, MeOH) Purity: 99.8%

δΗ(400 MHz, CDCI3): 2.87 (IH, d, J=13.32 Hz, ¾), 3.00-3.09 (2H, m, ¾), 3.29 (IH, d, J=13.28 Hz, CH2), 3.46 (IH, d, J=22.64 Hz, CU ), 3.58 (IH, d, J=22.56 Hz, CH2), 5.27 (IH, s, CH-OH), 6.49 (IH, s, CH=C), 7.00 (2H, d, J=8.04 Hz, Ar-H), 7.15-7.34 (6H, m, Ar-H), 7.44 (2H, d, J=7.20 Hz, Ar-H), 7.90 (2H, d, J=8.04 Hz, Ar-H). Enantiomer al from diastereoisomer C - compound 4

Description: Cream solid

136 -140°C

-39.3 (0.66%, MeOH)

94.0%

2.90-3.59 (6H, m, 3 x CHg), 5.08 (1H, s, CH-OH), 6.70 (1H, s, CH=C), 7.05 (2H, d, J=8.08 Hz, Ar-H), 7.19 (1H, t, J=7.34 Hz, Aril), 7.26-7.47 (7H, 2 x m, Ar-H), 7.93 (2H, d, J=8.08 Hz, Ar-H).

Enantiomer al from diastereoisomer C - compound 5

Description: Cream amorphous solid

Melting point 195-196°C

[a] D: +32.1 (1.18%, MeOH) Purity: 97.2% δΗ(400 MHz, CDCI3): 2.94-3.59 (6H, m, 3 x ¾), 5.08 (1H, s, CH-OH), 6.70 (1H, s,

CH=C), 7.05 (2H, d, J=8.12 Hz, Ar-H), 7.19 (1H, t, J=7.34 Hz, Aril), 7.26-7.47 (7H, 2 m, Ar-H), 7.93 (2H, d, J=8.12 Hz, Ar-H). HPLC method

Achiral and Chiral HPLC methods were established for the qualitative and quantitative separation of enantiomers compounds 2, 3, 4, 5.

HPLC resolution of enantiomers

Reverse phase method

Column Hypersil BDS CI 8, 5μ, 250 x 4.6 mm

Phenomenex Luna C18, 5μ, 250 x 4.6 mm, N.32

Wavelength 210 nm

Flow rate 1 mL/min (for ketone and esters)

0.6 mL/min (for acids and salts)

Mobile phase 70:30 CH3CN : 0.1% aq. Acetic acid

Sample 1 mg/mL, made up in mobile phase (or

CH3CN:dIW=50:50 for acids/salts)

Retention times Compound 1 - 20 min

Diastereoisomers C (compounds 4/5) 9 min

Diastereoisomers B (compounds 2/3) 10 min

Chiral method

Column ChiralPack IC, 5 μ, 250 x 4.6 mm

Wavelength 210 nm

Temperature 25 °C

Flow rate 0.35 mL/min

Mobile phase n-Heptane/IPA/HOAc (or TFA)=90/10/0.1

Sample 1 mg/mL, made up in mobile phase (or

nHeptane/IPA/MeOH = 81/9/10 for salts)

Retention times Compound A 54 min and >60 min Compound 4 - 30 min

Compound 5 - 37 min

Compound 3 - 18 min

Compound 2 - 19 min

Salt formation

Salts were prepared by dissolving the free acid of compounds 2, 3, 4 and 5 in aqueous or aqueous organic solvent in the presence of the appropriate base and isolating the salt by evaporation of solvent.

Compound 6: The N-Methyl-(D)-Glucamine salt (NMDG) of compound 2.

Compound 6 physiochemical properties:

Appearance: Off-white solid

Molecular Weight: 577 (free acid: 382)

Molecular Formula: C33H39O8N (free acid: C26H2203)

Melting Point: 165-167 °C

Compound 6: [a]D:-76.5 (sample concentration: 200 mg/10 ml in Water)

Mass (Da): ES+ only [NMDG+Na] was visible

Elemental analysis: Calc: C (68.61), H (6.80), N (2.42), O (22.16). Found: C (68.44), H

(6.80), N (2.50), 0 (21.98) δΗ(400 MHz, DMSO-d6): 2.48 (3H, apparent s, NCH3), 2.65 (1H, d, J=13.56 Hz, HCH), 2.84-

3.02 (4H, m), 3.16 (1H, d, J= 13.60 Hz, HCH), 3.40-3.70 (7H, m), 3.85-3.92 (l H, m), 5.06 (1H, s, CH-OH), 5.93 (1H, broad s, CH- OH), 6.41 (1H, f, .CH=C), 6.80 (2H, d, J=7.92 Hz, Ar-H), 7.06-7.41 (8H, m, Ar-H), 7.64 (2H, d, J=7.80 Hz, Ar-H).

6c(100 MHz, DMSO): 33.8 (CH3), 37.9 (CH2), 38.2 (CH2), 39.5 (CH2), 51.6 (CH2-N), 55.8

(quat. C), 63.5 (CH2-0), 69.0 (CH-O), 70.3 (CH-O), 70.6 (CH-O), 71.3 (CH-O), 81.1 (CH-OH), 120.1 (tert. C), 123.4 (tert. C), 123.7 (tert. C), 124.3 (tert. C), 124.4 (tert. C), 126.1 (tert. C), 126.3 (tert. C), 127.0 (tert. C), 127.5 (tert. C), 2 x 128.5 (2 x tert. C), 2 x 129.1 (2 x tert. C), 140,4 (quat. C), 141.1 (quat. C), 142.9 (quat. C), 144.5 (quat. C), 145.2 (quat. C), 154.3 (quat. C), 170.4 (C=0).

X -- ray studies

The absolute stereochemistry of compound 2 was established by single crystal X-ray analysis of its (S)-(-)-methylbenzylamine salt (compound 8). The results are given in Appendix 2. The results were in agreement with the stereochemistry shown in Fig. 2. The absolute stereochemistry of compounds 4 and 5 were established by conversion of the alcohols (compounds 2-5) to their ketones and by correlation of their optical rotations.

Synthesis of methyl 4-((riR,2R)-l-hvdroxy-2,3-dihvdro-lH,l,H-i2,2'-biindenl-2-vnmethvn benzoate (10):

To a solution of 4-(((li?,2i?)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (100 mg, 0.26 mmol) and K2C03 (72 mg, 0.52 mmol) in DMF (2.5 mL), was added Mel (148 mg, 1.04 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 4 h. The reaction mixture was diluted with 1.5 N HC1 (50 mL) and extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x 25 mL). The separated organic layer was washed with 10 % aq. NaHC03 (25 mL), brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by CombiFlash using 20 % ethyl acetate in chloroform as an eluent to yield 58 mg (56 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (-OH): observed 379.3 calculated 396.17, molecular formula C27H2403.

Purity (HPLC): 94 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 2.73 (1H, d, J = 13.48 Hz, CHb), 2.96 (2H, s, ¾), 3.20 (1H, d, J = 13.52 Hz, CH2), 3.44 (1H, d, J = 23.16 Hz, CFb), 3.58 (1H, d, J = 23.00 Hz, CH2), 3.78 (3H, s, OCH3), 5.06 (1H, d, J = 6.76 Hz, CHOH), 5.85 (1H, d, J = 6.88 Hz, OH), 6.40 (lH, s, CH=C), 6.98 (2H, d, J = 8.16 Hz, Ar-H), 7.08 (1H, t, J = 7.32 Hz, Ar-H), 7.16 (1H, t, J = 7.40 Hz, Ar-H), 7.20-7.23 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.34-7.36 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.39 (1H, d, J = 7.36 Hz, Ar-H), 7.71 (2H, d, J = 8.16 Hz, Ar-H).

Synthesis of ethyl 4- (lR,2R)-l-hvdroxy-2,3-dihvdro-lH,l,H-r2<2,-biindenl-2-vnmethyl) benzoa

To a solution of 4-(((li?,2i?)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (100 mg, 0.26 mmol) and K2C03 (72 mg, 0.52 mmol) in DMF (2.5 mL), was added Etl (82 mg, 0.52 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 4 h. The reaction mixture was diluted with 1.5 N HC1 (50 mL) and extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x 25 mL). The organic layer was washed with 10 % aq. NaHC03 (25 mL), brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by CombiFlash using 20 % ethyl acetate in chloroform as an eluent to yield 88 mg (82 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (-OH): observed 393.3, calculated 410.19, molecular formula C28H2603.

Purity (HPLC): 92 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 1.27 (3H, t, J = 7.08 Hz, CH3), 2.72 (1H, d, J = 13.52 Hz, CH2), 2.96 (2H, s, CH2), 3.20 (1H, d, J = 13.48 Hz, Ctb), 3.45 (1H, d, J = 23.08 Hz, CH2), 3.59 (lH, d, J = 22.84 Hz, CH2), 4.24 (2H, q, J = 7.08 Hz, OCH2), 5.05 (1H, d, J = 6.84 Hz, CHOH), 5.85 (1H, d, J = 6.92 Hz, OH), 6.40 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.97 (2H, d, J = 8.24 Hz, Ar-H), 7.08 (lH, td, J = 1.16, 7.30 Hz, Ar-H), 7.16 (1H, t, J = 6.84 Hz, Ar-H), 7.19-7.25 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.34-7.36 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.40 (1H, d, J = 7.36 Hz, Ar-H), 7.70 (2H, d, J = 8.20 Hz, Ar-H).

Synthesis of propyl 4-(((lR,2R)-l-hvdroxy-2,3-dihvdro-lH,l'H-r2,2'-biindenl-2-vnmethvn benzoate (12):

To a solution of 4-(((l ?,2i?)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (100 mg, 0.26 mmol) and K2C03 (72 mg, 0.52 mmol) in DMF (2.5 mL), was added «-PrI (90 mg, 0.52 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 4 h. The reaction mixture was diluted with 1.5 N HCl (50 mL) and extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x 25 mL). The organic layer was washed with 10 % aq. NaHC03 (25 mL), brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by CombiFlash using 20 % ethyl acetate in chloroform as an eluent to yield 82 mg (73 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (-OH): observed 407.3, calculated 424.20, molecular formula C29H2803

Purity (HPLC): 95 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 0.93 (3H, t, J = 7.40 Hz, CH3), 1.67 (2H, q, J = 6.92 Hz, OCH2CH2), 2.72 (1H, d, J = 13.56 Hz, CH2), 2.96 (2H, s, ¾), 3.20 (1H, d, J = 13.52 Hz, CL J, 3.46 (1H, d, J = 22.84 Hz, CH2), 3.59 (1H, d, J = 22.96 Hz, CH2), 4.16 (2H, t, J = 6.56 Hz, OCH2), 5.05 (1H, d, J = 6.88 Hz, CHOH), 5.85 (1H, d, J = 6.92 Hz, OH), 6.40 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.98 (2H, d, J = 8.16 Hz, Ar-H), 7.10 (1H, dt, J = 1.00 Hz, Ar-H), 7.16 (1H, t, J = 7.32 Hz, Ar-H), 7.21-7.25 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.35-7.36 (lH, m, Ar-H), 7.40 (1H, d, J = 7.28 Hz, Ar-H), 7.71 (2H, d, J = 8.16 Hz, Ar-H).

Synthesis of 4-iiri,R,2'R)-l,-hvdroxy-l,,3'-dihvdro-lH,2'H-2.2,-biinden-2,-yllmethyl} benzamide (1

To a solution of 4-(((li?,2^)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH, l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (100 mg, 0.26 mmol) in DMSO (5 mL) was added Boc anhydride (69 mg, 0.31 mmol) followed by pyridine (24 mg, 0.26 mmol) and stirred at room temperature for 5 min. Ammonium bicarbonate (62 mg, 0.78 mmol) was added and stirred for additional 1 h. Reaction mixture was poured into water (25 mL) and extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x 25 mL). The organic layer was washed with brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by CombiFlash using 20 % ethyl acetate in chloroform as an eluent to yield 59 mg (59 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 382.4, calculated 381.17, molecular formula C26H23N02

Purity (HPLC): 99 %.

1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 2.68 (1H, d, J = 13.60 Hz, CLb), 2.94 (1H, d J = 16.92 Hz, CH2), 2.99 (1H, d, J = 16.00 Hz, CH2), 3.19 (1H, d, J = 13.60 Hz, CH2), 3.47 (1H, d, J = 23.08 Hz, CH2), 3.61 (1H, d, J = 23.00 Hz, CLh), 5.05 (1H, d, J - 6.92 Hz, CHOH), 5.84 (1H, d, J = 6.96 Hz, OH), 6.41 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.89 (2H, d, J = 8.20 Hz, Ar-H), 7.09 (1H, td, J = 1.28, 7.28 Hz, Ar-H), 7.17 (1H, t, J = 7.32 Hz, Ar-H), 7.22-7.27 (5H, m, Ar-H and NH), 7.35-7.37 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.41 (1H, d, J = 7.32 Hz, Ar-H), 7.63 (2H, d, J = 8.24 Hz, Ar-H), 7.82 (1H, br s, NH).

Synthesis of 4-{rfl,R,2,R)-l,-hvdroxy-l\3'-dihvdro-lH ,Hr-2,2,-biinden-2'-yllmethvU-N-(2- hydroxyethvQbenzamide (14):

To a solution of 4-(((li?,2i?)-l -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (100 mg, 0.26 mmol), Et3N (157 mg, 1.56 mmol) and 2-amino ethanol (40 mg, 0.65 mmol) in DCM (5 mL), was added T3P (0.33 mL, 50 wt % solution in ethyl acetate, 0.52 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The reaction mixture was quenched with water (25 mL) and extracted with DCM (3 x 25 mL). The organic layer was washed with brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by CombiFlash using 20 % ethyl acetate in chloroform as an eluent to yield 80 mg (72 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 426.4, calculated 425.20, molecular formula C28H27N03.

Purity (HPLC): 99 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 2.68 (1H, d, J - 13.56 Hz, Cfcb), 2.94 (1H, d, J = 15.64 Hz, CHj), 2.98 (1H, d, J = 15.84 Hz, CHs), 3.19 (1H, d, J = 13.56 Hz, CHa), 3.26-3.29 (2H, m, CONHCH2), 3.43-3.49 (3H, m, 2H of ¾ΟΗ and 1H of CHj), 3.61 (1H, d, J = 23.16 Hz, CH2), 4.68 (1H, t, J = 5.60 Hz, CH2OH), 5.05 (l H, d, J = 6.88 Hz, CHOH), 5.84 (1H, d, J = 6.96 Hz, CHOH), 6.40 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.89 (2H, d, J = 8.20 Hz, Ar-H), 7.09 (1H, dt, J = 1.20, 10.13 Hz, Ar-H), 7.17 (1H, t, J = 7.40 Hz, Ar-H), 7.21-7.28 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.35-7.37 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.41 (1H, d, J = 7.28 Hz, Ar-H), 7.61 (2H, d, J = 8.20 Hz, Ar-H), 8.28 (lH, t, J = 5.64 Hz, NH). Synthesis of 4-{fa 2,R)-l,-hvdroxy-l\3,-dihvdro-lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-vnmethyl}-7V- methylbenzamide (15):

To a solution of 4-(((li?,2i?)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (100 mg, 0.26 mmol), Et3N (157 mg, 1.56 mmol) and methyl amine (0.32 mL, 2.0 M solution in THF, 0.65 mmol) in DCM (5 mL), was added T3P (0.33 mL, 50 wt % solution in ethyl acetate, 0.52 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The reaction mixture was quenched with water (25 mL) and extracted with DCM (3 x 25 mL). The organic layer was washed with brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by CombiFlash using 20 % ethyl acetate in chloroform as an eluent to yield 89 mg (86 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 396.4, calculated 395.19, molecular formula zyFfe Oz

Purity (HPLC): 100 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 2.67 (1H, d, J = 13.60 Hz, CFb), 2.72 (3H, d, J = 4.48 Hz, CONHCHj), 2.93 (1H, d, J = 15.64 Hz, C b), 2.98 (1H, d, J = 15.68 Hz, CF ), 3.18 (1H, d, J = 13.60 Hz, CE .), 3.44 (1H, d, J = 23.12 Hz, Ctfc), 3.59 (1H, d, J = 23.04 Hz, CF J, 5.05 (1H, d, J = 6.88 Hz, CHOH), 5.83 (1H, d, J = 6.92 Hz, OH), 6.40 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.89 (2H, d, J = 8.12 Hz, Ar-H), 7.06-7.10 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.16 (1H, t, J = 7.32 Hz, Ar-H), 7.23-7.27 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.34- 7.36 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.40 (1H, d, J = 7.24 Hz, Ar-H), 7.57 (2H, d, J = 8.16 Hz, Ar-H), 8.26-8.28 (1H, m, NH).

Synthesis of 4 r(l'R,2,R)-l,-hvdroxy-l 3'-dihvdro-lH,2,H-2,2,-biinden-2'-yllmethvU-7VJV- dimethylbenzamide (16):

To a solution of 4-(((l^,2i?)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (100 mg, 0.26 mmol), Et3N (157 mg, 1.56 mmol) and dimethyl amine (0.33 mL, 2.0 M solution in THF, 0.65 mmol) in DCM (5 mL), was added T3P (0.33 mL, 50 wt % solution in ethyl acetate, 0.52 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The reaction mixture was quenched with water (25 mL) and extracted with DCM (3 x 25 mL). The organic layer was washed with brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by CombiFlash using 20 % ethyl acetate in chloroform as an eluent to yield 75 mg (70 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 410.4, calculated 409.20, molecular formula C28H27N02.

Purity (HPLC): 100 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 2.69 (1H, d, J = 13.60 Hz, CFb), 2.83 (3H, s, CONCH2), 2.93 (3H, s, CONCH3), 2.98 (2H, s, ¾), 3.16 (1H, d, J = 13.52 Hz, CH2), 3.45 (1H, d, J = 23.44 Hz, CH2), 3.59 (1H, d, J = 23.04 Hz, ¾), 5.06 (lH, d, J = 6.84 Hz, CHOH), 5.85 (1H, d, J = 6.96 Hz, OH), 6.45 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.89 (2H, d, J = 8.04 Hz, Ar-H), 7.07-7.24 (8H, m, Ar-H), 7.34- 7.36 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.40 (1H, d, J = 7.24 Hz, Ar-H).

Synthesis of methyl 4- (lS,2S)-l-hvdroxy-2,3-dihvdro-lHJ'H-f2,2'-biinden1-2-yl)methyl) benzoate (17):

To a solution of 4-(((15,25)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH, l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (100 mg, 0.26 mmol) and K2C03 (72 mg, 0.52 mmol) in DMF (2.5 mL), was added Mel (148 mg, 1.04 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 4 h. The reaction mixture was diluted with 1.5 N HCI (50 mL) and extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x 25 mL). The organic layer was washed with 10 % aq. NaHC03 (25 mL), brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by CombiFlash using 20 % ethyl acetate in chloroform as an eluent to yield 62 mg (59 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (-OH): observed 379.2, calculated 396.17, molecular formula C27H2403

Purity (HPLC): 97 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, CDC13): 6 2.84 (1H, d, J = 13.28 Hz, ¾), 3.00 (1H, d, J = 15.64 Hz, CH2), 3.05 (1H, d, J = 15.56 Hz, CPb), 3.27 (lH, d, J = 13.32 Hz, CH ), 3.45 (1H, d, J = 22.52 Hz, CH2), 3.57 (1H, d, J = 22.60 Hz, CH2), 3.89 (3H, s, OCH3), 5.25 (1H, s, CHQH), 6.47 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.96 (2H, d, J = 8.24 Hz, Ar-H), 7.17 (1H, dt, J = 2.04, 9.88 Hz, Ar-H), 7.24-7.33 (5H, m, Ar-H), 7.43 (2H, d, J = 7.60 Hz, Ar-H), 7.83 (2H, dd, J = 1.76, 6.60 Hz, Ar-H).

Synthesis of ethyl 4-(((lS,2S)-l-hvdroxy-2,3-dihvdro-lH,l'H-[2,2'-biindenl-2-vnmethvn benzoate (18):

To a solution of 4-(((15,2S)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH, l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (100 mg, 0.26 mmol) and 2C03 (72 mg, 0.52 mmol) in DMF (2.5 mL), was added Etl (81 mg, 0.52 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 4 h. The reaction mixture was diluted with 1.5 N HCI (50 mL) and extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x 25 mL). The organic layer was washed with 10 % aq. NaHC03 (25 mL), brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by CombiFlash using 20 % ethyl acetate in chloroform as an eluent to yield 55 mg (50 %) of the title compound as an off white solid. LCMS (-OH): observed 393.4, calculated 410.19, molecular formula C28H2603.

Purity (HPLC): 92 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, CDC13): δ 1.38 (3H, t, J = 7.12 Hz, CH3), 2.84 (1H, d, J = 13.28 Hz, CH^), 3.00 (1H, d, J = 15.60 Hz, CHj), 3.05 (lH, d, J = 15.60 Hz, CLb), 3.27 (1H, d, J = 13.28 Hz, CHz), 3.45 (1H, d, J = 22.52 Hz, Ctb), 3.58 (1H, d, J = 22.52 Hz, CH2), 4.35 (2H, q, J = 7.12 Hz, OCH2), 5.25 (1H, s, CHOH), 6.48 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.96 (2H, d, J = 8.28 Hz, Ar-H), 7.17 (1H, dt, J = 2.00, 9.92 Hz, Ar-H), 7.25-7.34 (5H, m, Ar-H), 7.44 (2H, d, J = 7.72 Hz, Ar-H), 7.85 (2H, dd, J = 1.72, 6.56 Hz, Ar-H). Synthesis of propyl 4-(((lS,2S)-l-hvdroxy-2,3-dihvdro-lH,l'H-r2,2,-biindenl-2-yl)methvn benzoate (19):

To a solution of 4-(((lS',2S)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH, rH-[2,2,-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (100 mg, 0.26 mmol) and K2C03 (72 mg, 0.52 mmol) in DMF (2.5 mL), was added »-PrI (89 mg, 0.52 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 4 h. The reaction mixture was diluted with 1.5 N HCl (50 mL) and extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x 25 mL). The organic layer was washed with 10 % aq. NaHC03 (25 mL), brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by CombiFlash using 20 % ethyl acetate in chloroform as an eluent to yield 54 mg (50 %) of the title compound as a pale yellow solid.

LCMS (-OH): observed 407.2, calculated 424.20, molecular formula C29H2803.

Purity (HPLC): 90 %.

1H NMR (400 MHz, CDC13): δ 1.03 (3H, t, J = 7.48 Hz, CH3), 1.73-1.82 (2H, m, ¾), 2.84 (1H, d, J = 13.32 Hz, CH2), 3.00 (1H, d, J = 15.04 Hz, CU2), 3.06 (1H, d, J = 15.52 Hz, CLb), 3.27 (1H, d, J = 13.32 Hz, CH2), 3.46 (1H, d, J = 22.56 Hz, CH2), 3.58 (1H, d, J = 22.68 Hz, CH2), 4.26 (2H, t, J = 6.64 Hz, OCH2), 5.25 (1H, s, CHOH), 6.48 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.96 (2H, d, J = 8.24 Hz, Ar-H), 7.18 (1H, dt, J = 1.96, 9.96 Hz, Ar-H), 7.24-7.33 (5H, m, Ar-H), 7.44 (2H, d, J = 7.60 Hz, Ar-H), 7.85 (2H, dd, J = 1.68, 6.60 Hz, Ar-H).

Synthesis of ^(fd'S^'Sj-l'-hydroxy-l'^'-dihvdro-lH 'H- ^'-biinden-l'-yllmethvU benzamide (2

To a solution of 4-(((15,25)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (100 mg, 0.26 mmol) in DMSO (5 mL) was added Boc anhydride (69 mg, 0.31 mmol) followed by pyridine (24 mg, 0.26 mmol) and stirred at room temperature for 5 min. Ammonium bicarbonate (62 mg, 0.78 mmol) was added and stirred for additional 1 h. Reaction mixture was poured into water (25 mL) and extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x 25 mL). The organic layer was washed with brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by CombiFlash using 20 % ethyl acetate in chloroform as an eluent to yield 57 mg (57 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (-OH): observed 364.2, calculated 381.17, molecular formula C26H23NO2

Purity (HPLC): 98 %.

'H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3): δ 2.84 (1H, d, J = 13.32 Hz, CH2), 3.00 (1H, d, J = 15.68 Hz, CLb), 3.05 (1H, d, J = 15.56 Hz, Cfcb), 3.26 (1H, d, J = 13.32 Hz, CLLJ, 3.46 (1H, d, J = 22.60 Hz, CH2), 3.58 (1H, d, J = 22.68 Hz, CH2), 5.25 (IH, s, CHOH), 5.65 and 6.07 (2H, 2 x br s, NH and CHOH), 6.48 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.97 (2H, d, J = 8.16 Hz, Ar-H), 7.17 (1H, dt, J = 2.00, 9.95 Hz, Ar-H), 7.24-7.33 (5H, m, Ar-H), 7.44 (2H, d, J = 7.56 Hz, Ar-H), 7.60 (2H, d, J = 8.24 Hz, Aril).

Synthesis of ^([(l'S^'^-l'-hydroxy-l'^'-dihydro-lH^'H- ^'-biinden- '-yllmethyll-N-r - hydroxyethvDbenzamide (21):

To a solution of ^(((lS'^-l -hydroxy^^-dihydro-lH 'H-P^'-biindenJ^-y methyl^enzoic acid (100 mg, 0.26 mmol), Et3N (157 mg, 1.56 mmol) and 2-amino ethanol (40 mg, 0.65 mmol) in DCM (5 mL), was added T3P (0.33 mL, 50 wt % solution in ethyl acetate, 0.52 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The reaction mixture was quenched with water (25 mL) and extracted with DCM (3 x 25 mL). The organic layer was washed with brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by CombiFlash using 20 % ethyl acetate in chloroform as an eluent to yield 76 mg (68 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 426.5, calculated 425.20, molecular formula C28H27N03

Purity (HPLC): 99 %.

lH NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 2.68 (1H, d, J = 13.44 Hz, CHV), 2.94 (1H, d, J = 15.04 Hz, CH ), 2.98 (1H, d, J = 16.28 Hz, CH2), 3.19 (1H, d, J = 13.32 Hz, CH2), 3.25-3.30 (2H, m, ¾), 3.44-3.49 (3H, m, 3H of 2 x CH2), 3.61 (1H, d, J = 23.16 Hz, CH^), 4.68 (1H, t, J = 5.48 Hz, CH2OH), 5.05 (1H, d, J = 6.84 Hz, CH-OH), 5.84 (1H, d, J = 6.88 Hz, CH-OH), 6.40 ( 1H, s, CH=C), 6.89 (2H, d, J = 8.20 Hz, Ar-H), 7.09 (lH, dt, J = 1.16, 10.12 Hz, Ar-H), 7.17 (1H, t, J = 7.32 Hz, Ar-H), 7.22-7.28 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.36 (1H, t, J = 3.48 Hz, Ar-H), 7.41 (1H, d, J = 7.20 Hz, Ar-H), 7.61 (2H, d, J = 8.20 Hz, Ar-H), 8.28 (1H, t, J = 5.52 Hz, NH). Synthesis of 4-{Kl'S,2,S)-l,-hvdroxy-l',3'-dihvdro-lH,2'H-2,2,-biinden-2,-yllmethyl}-N- methylbenzamide (22):

To a solution of 4-(((15,2S)-l -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (100 mg, 0,26 mmol), Et3N (157 mg, 1.56 mmol) and methyl amine (0.32 mL, 2.0 M solution in THF, 0.65 mmol) in DCM (5 mL), was added T3P (0.33 mL, 50 wt % solution in ethyl acetate, 0.52 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The reaction mixture was quenched with water (25 mL) and extracted with DCM (3 x 25 mL). The organic layer was washed with brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by CombiFlash using 20 % ethyl acetate in chloroform as an eluent to yield 80 mg (78 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 396.4, calculated 395.19, molecular formula C27H25N02.

Purity (HPLC): 93 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 2.68 (1H, d, J = 13.64 Hz, Cfch), 2.72 (3H, d, J = 4.48 Hz, CH3), 2.94 (1H, d, J = 16.28 Hz, CHj), 2.99 (IH, d, J = 15.84 Hz, CH2), 3.19 (1H, d, J = 13.56 Hz, CH2), 3.45 (1H, d, J = 22.92 Hz, CH2), 3.60 (1H, d, J = 23.40 Hz, CH2), 5.05 (1H, d, J = 6.88 Hz, CHOH), 5.84 (1H, d, J = 6.92 Hz, CHOH), 6.40 (IH, s, CH=C), 6.90 (2H, d, J = 8.12 Hz, Ar- H), 7.09 (IH, t, J = 7.24 Hz, Ar-H), 7.15-7.26 (5H, m, Ar-H), 7.35-7.37 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.41 (1H, d, J = 7.24 Hz, Ar-H), 7.58 (2H, d, J = 8.16 Hz, Ar-H), 8.27 (I H, d, J = 4.36 Hz, NH).

Synthesis of 4-(fa,5,2,S -l'-hvdroxy-l',3'-dihvdro-lH,2,H-2,2'-biiiiden-2'-vntnethvU-7VJV- dimethylbenzamide (23):

To a solution of 4-(((15,25 -l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH, rH-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (100 mg, 0.26 mmol), Et3N (157 mg, 1.56 mmol) and dimethyl amine (0.33 mL, 2.0 M solution in THF, 0.65 mmol) in DCM (5 mL), was added T3P (0.33 mL, 50 wt % solution in ethyl acetate, 0.52 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The reaction mixture was quenched with water (25 mL) and extracted with DCM (3 x 25 mL). The organic layer was washed with brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 , and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by CombiFlash using 20 % ethyl acetate in chloroform as an eluent to yield 80 mg (75 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 410.4, calculated 409.20, molecular formula C28H27N02.

Purity (HPLC): 97 %.

'H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 2.70 (1H, d, J = 13.64 Hz, CH^), 2.83-2.98 (8H, m, 2H of CHg and 6H of 2 x CRJ3 , 3.16 (l H, d, J = 13.60 Hz, CH2), 3.45 (1H, d, J = 22.92 Hz, Qfc), 3.59 (1H, d, J = 23.20 Hz, CH2), 5.06 (1H, s, CHOH), 6.45 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.89 (2H, d, J = 8.08 Hz, Ar-H), 7.09 (1H, dt, J = 1.20, 10.12 Hz, Ar-H), 7.13-7.17 (3H, m, Ar-H), 7.19-7.25 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.34- 7.36 (l H, m, Ar-H), 7.40 ( 1H, d, J = 7.36 Hz, Ar-H).

Synthesis of 4-{f(l'R,2,R)-l,-(L-leucyloxy)-l,,3'-dihvdro-lH,2,H-2,2,-biinden-2,-yllmethvU benzoic acid (24):

To a solution of 4-(((li?,2i?)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,rH-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (200 mg, 0.52 mmol), DCC (129 mg, 0.62 mmol) and DMAP (6 mg, 0.052 mmol) in ethyl acetate (10 mL), was added N-[(9H-fluoren-9-ylmethoxy)carbonyl]-L- leucine ( 183 mg, 0.52 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HQ (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S0 The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (210 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (5 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (5 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise at N2 atmosphere and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 10 % methanol in chloroform as an eluent to yield 125 mg (49 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 496.4, calculated 495.24, molecular formula C32H33N04.

Purity (HPLC): 93 %.

1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 0.90 (3H, d, J = 8.00 Hz, CH3), 0.93 (3H, d, J = 8.00 Hz, CH3), 1.58-1.66 (IH, m, CH), 1.68-1.76 (2H, m, CHg), 3.13-3.37 (5H, m, 5H of 3 x CH ), 3.49 (1H, d, J = 24.00 Hz, CH,), 4.05 (1H, t, J = 4.00 Hz, CH-N), 6.39 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.53 (1H, s, CH=C), 7.06-7.1 1 (3H, m, Ar-H), 7.16-7.23 (3H, m, Ar-H), 7.29-7.39 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.73 (2H, d, J = 8.00 Hz, Ar-H).

13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 22.36 (CH3), 22.75 (CH3), 24.36-25.80 (CH), 39.36-40.61 (4 x CH2), 51.59 and 54.71 (quat. C and CH-N), 84.38 (CH-O), 120.93, 123.92, 124.72, 125.27, 126.24, 126.72, 127.13, 129.20, 2 x 129.29, 129.51 , 129.77, 2 x 130.35 (13 x tert. C and 1 x quat. C), 139.90 (quat. C), 142.99 (quat. C), 143.23 (quat. C), 143.90 (quat. C), 144.36 (quat. C), 151.55 (quat. C), 167.65 (0-C=0), 170.70 (C=0). Synthesis of ^{ffl'R^'RVl'-fL-valyloxyM'.S'-dihvdro-lHq'H-i '-biinden^'-yllmethvU benzoic acid (25):

To a solution of 4-(((li?,2i?)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH, H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (230 mg, 0.60 mmol), DCC (148 mg, 0.72 mmol) and DMAP (7 mg, 0.059 mmol) in ethyl acetate (12 mL), was added N-[(9H-fluoren-9-ylmethoxy)carbonyl]-L-valine (193 mg, 0.60 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HC1 (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S0 The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (250 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (7 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (7 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise at N2 atmosphere and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 10 % methanol in chloroform as an eluent to yield 105 mg (36 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 482.6, calculated 481.23, molecular formula C31H31NO4.

Purity (HPLC): 95 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 0.97-1.05 (6H, m, (CH3)2), 2.30-2.35 (1H, m, CH), 3.12 (1H, d, J = 12.84 Hz, CE2), 3.16 (1H, d, J = 5.48 Hz, CLb), 3.21-3.24 (2H, m, CLb), 3.41-3.49 (2H, m, CH2), 4.05 ( 1 H, d, J = 4.28 Hz, CH-N), 6.40 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.56 (1H, s, CH=C), 7.08 (1H, dt, J = 1.24, 10.15 Hz, Ar-H), 7.10-7.21 (5H, m, Ar-H), 7.28-7.40 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.73 (2H, d, J = 4.48 Hz, Ar-H).

13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 18.14 (CH3), 18.43 (CH3), 29.89 (CH), 39.36-40.61 (3 x CH2), 54.76 and 58.16 (quant. C and CH-N), 84.73 (CH-O), 120.91, 123.89, 124.72, 125.27, 126.39, 126.71, 127.08, 129.15, 2 x 129.26, 129.69, 129.83, 2 x 130.42 (13 x tert. C and 1 x quat. C), 139.93 (quat. C), 142.97 (quat. C), 143.53 (quat. -C), 143.97 (quat. C), 144.36 (quat. C), 151.42 (quat. C), 167.66 (0-C=0), 169.09 (C=0).

Synthesis of 4-{r(l 2,R)-l,-(L-isoleucyloxy)-l\3,-dihvdro-lH,2,H-2,2,-biinden-2'yllmethyl )benzoic acid (26):

To a solution of 4-(((li?,2i?)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH, l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (250 mg, 0.65 mmol), DCC (160 mg, 0.78 mmol) and DMAP (8 mg, 0.06 mmol) in ethyl acetate (15 mL), was added N-[(9H-fluoren-9-ylmethoxy)carbonyl]-L-isoleucine (228 mg, 0.65 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 Ν HC1 (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (275 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (10 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (10 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise at N2 atmosphere and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 10 % methanol in chloroform as an eluent to yield 1 10 mg (31 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 496.6, calculated 495.24, molecular formula C32H33N04

Purity (HPLC): 91 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 0.90 (3H, t, J = 7.40 Hz, CH3), 0.93 (3H, d, J = 6.96 Hz, CH3), 1.26-1.36 (1H, m, CH2-CH3), 1.44-1.52 (1H, m, CH2-CH3), 2.02-2.08 (1H, m, CH-CH3), 3.09-3.25 (4H, m, 2 x ¾), 3.35-3.48 (2H, m, ¾), 4.11 (1H, d, J = 7.12 Hz, CH-N), 6.40 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.54 (1H, s, CH=C), 7.05-7.21 (6H, m, Ar-H), 7.27-7.38 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.72 (2H, d, J = 8.24 Hz, Ar-H), 8.58 (2H, br s, NFL;). 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 1 1.98 (CH3), 14.95 (CH3), 25.20 (CH2), 36.42 (CH), 36.35- 40.60 (3 x CH2), 54.77 (CH-N or quat. C), 57.26 (quat. C or CH-N). 84.77 (CH-O), 120.91, 123.89, 124.72, 125.23, 126.39, 126.72, 127.05, 129.15, 2 x 129.24, 129.65 129.78, 2 x 130.45 (13 x tert. C and 1 x quat. C), 139.91 (quat. C), 142.97 (quat. C), 143.43 (quat. C), 143.99 (quat. C), 144.36 (quat. C), 151.46 (quat. C), 167.66 (C=0), 168.83 (C=0).

Synthesis of ^ifd'R^'R l'-rglvcyloxy l' '-dihydro-lH^'H-l^'-biinden-l'-yllmethvU benzoic acid (27):

To a solution of 4-(((li?,2 ?)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (220 mg, 0.57 mmol), DCC (142 mg, 0.69 mmol) and DMAP (7 mg, 0.059 mmol) in ethyl acetate (10 mL), was added N-[(9H-fluoren-9-ylmethoxy)carbonyl]glycine (171 mg, 0.57 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HC1 (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (250 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (8 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (8 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise at N2 atmosphere and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 10 % methanol in chloroform as an eluent to yield 130 mg (56 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (-H+): observed 438.2, calculated 439.18, molecular formula C28H25N04.

Purity (HPLC): 97 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 3.05-3.28 (5H, m, 5H of 3 x CHa), 3.45-3.50 (1H, m, ¾), 3.60-3.76 (2H, m, Μ¾), 6.32 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.48 (1H, s, CH=C), 7.02 (2H, d, J = 8.12 Hz, Ar- H), 7.05-7.09 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.15-7.22 (3H, m, Ar-H), 7.28-7.36 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.70 (2H, d, J = 8.08 Hz, Ar-H). 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): 6 39.36-40.61 (4 x CH2), 54.86 (quat. C), 82.96 (CH-O), 120.91, 123.94, 124.65, 125.24, 125.87, 126.69, 127.14, 2 x 129.21, 129.32, 129.52, 129.76, 2 x 130.33 (13 x tert. C and 1 x quat. C), 140.42 (quat. C), 142.96 (quat. C), 143.04 (quat. C), 143.61 (quat. C), 144.43 (quat. C), 151.89 (quat. C), 167.89 (C=0).

Synthesis of 4-irfl'S,2,S -l,-(L-leucyloxy)-l,,3,-dihvdro-lH,2,H-2,2,-biinden-2'-yllmethv benzoic acid (28):

To a solution of 4-(((15',25)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (200 mg, 0.52 mmol), DCC (129 mg, 0.62 mmol) and DMAP (6 mg, 0.052 mmol) in ethyl acetate (10 mL), was added N-[(9H-fluoren-9-ylmethoxy)carbonyl]-L-leucine (183 mg, 0.52 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HC1 (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (210 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (5 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (5 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise at N2 atmosphere and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 10 % methanol in chloroform as an eluent to yield 120 mg (47 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 496.5, calculated 495.24, molecular formula C32H33N04.

Purity (HPLC): 98 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 0.84 (3H, d, J = 6.24 Hz, CH3), 0.86 (3H, d, J = 6.28 Hz, CH3), 1.37-1.71 (3H, 2 x m, 1H of CH- and 2H of CFb), 3.04-3.53 (7H, m, 6H of 3 x CHg and 1H of CH-N), 6.26 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.48 (1H, s, CH=C), 7.01 (2H, d, J = 8.04 Hz, Ar-H), 7.08 (1H, dt, J = 1.04, 10.12 Hz, Ar-H), 7.14-7.24 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.25-7.36 (3H, m, Ar-H), 7.69 (2H, d, J = 8.12 Hz, Ar-H).

Synthesis of ^{ra'S^'^-l'-fL-valyloxyM'^'-dihvdro-lH^'H- ^'-biinden^'-yllmethyll benzoic acid (29):

To a solution of 4-(((15,21S)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2,-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (230 mg, 0.60 mmol), DCC (148 mg, 0.72 mmol) and DMAP (7 mg, 0.06 mmol) in ethyl acetate (12 mL), was added N-[(9H-fluoren-9-ylmethoxy)carbonyl]-L-valine (193 mg, 0.60 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HC1 (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04. The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (250 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (8 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (8 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise at N2 atmosphere and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 10 % methanol in chloroform as an eluent to yield 105 mg (36 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 482.5, calculated 481.23, molecular formula C3iH3iN04.

Purity (HPLC): 96 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 0.80 (3H, d, J = 6.80 Hz, CHj), 0.87 (3H, d, J = 6.80 Hz, CH3), 1.88-1.90 (1H, m, CH), 3.05-3.47 (7H, m, 3 x ¾ and 1H of CH-N), 6.27 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.49 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.95 (2H, d, J = 8.00 Hz, Ar-H), 7.07 (1H, t, J - 14.40 Hz, Ar-H), 7.14-7.22 (3H, m, Ar-H), 7.25-7.29 (2H, m, Ar-H), 7.32-7.35 (2H, m, Ar-H), 7.67 (2H, d, J = 8.00 Hz, Ar- H). Svnthesis of 4-(f(l'S,2'S)-l'-(L-isoleucyloxy)-l,,3'-dihydro-lH 2,H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yllmethvI } benzoic acid (PH30):

To a solution of ^(((li'^^-l-hydroxy^^-dihydro-lHJ'H-P^'-biindenl^-y methy benzoic acid (250 mg, 0.65 mmol), DCC (160 mg, 0.78 mmol) and DMAP (8 mg, 0:06 mmol) in ethyl acetate (10 mL), was added N-[(9H-fluoren-9-ylmethoxy)carbonyl]-L-isoleucine (228 mg, 0.65 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HCl (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2SC>4 The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (275 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (8 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (8 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise at N2 atmosphere and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 10 % methanol in chloroform as an eluent to yield 1 10 mg (31 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 496.4, calculated 495.24, molecular formula C32H33 04.

Purity (HPLC): 95 %.

1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 0.77 (3H, t, J = 8.00 Hz, CHs), 0.82 (3H, d, J = 4.00 Hz, CH3), 1.02-1.12 (1H, m, CL -CH^, 1.28-1.38 (1H, m, CH2-CH3), 1.62-1.68 (1H, m, CH-CH3), 3.10-3.50 (7H, m, 6H of 3 x ¾ and 1H of CH-N), 6.26 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.49 (1H, s, CH=C), 7.01 (2H, d, J = 8.00 Hz, Ar-H), 7.07 (lH, t, J = 8.00 Hz, Ar-H), 7.13-7.21 (3H, m, Ar-H), 7.25- 7.29 (2H, m, Ar-H), 7.33 (2H, t, J = 8.00 Hz, Ar-H), 7.70 (2H, d, J = 8.00 Hz, Ar-H).

13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 1 1.94 (CH3), 15.88 (CH3), 24.90 (CH2CH3), 39.35-40.60 (3 x CH2 and 1 x CH), 54.77 (quat. C or CH-N), 58.69 (CH-N or quat. C), 82.53 (CH-O), 120.86, 123.91, 124.60, 125.22, 125.84, 126.66, 127.02, 2 x 129.21, 2 x 129.32, 129.44, 2 x 130.05 (13 x tert. C and 1 x quat. C), 140.79 (quat. C), 2 x 143.01 (2 x quat. C), 143.1 1 (quat. C), 144.45 (quat. C), 15 1.95 (quat. C), 175.25 (C=0).

Synthesis of 4-{i(l'5,2'S)-l'-(glvcyloxy)-l',3'-dihvdro-lH,2'H-2,2,-biinden-2'- yll methyl} benzoic acid (31):

To a solution of 4-(((lS,2,S)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH, l,H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid (220 mg, 0.57 mmol), DCC (142 mg, 0.69 mmol) and DMAP (7 mg, 0.057 mmol) in ethyl acetate (10 mL), was added N-[(9H-fluoren-9-ylmethoxy)carbonyl]gIycine (171 mg, 0.57 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HC1 (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (250 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (8 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (8 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise at N2 atmosphere and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 10 % methanol in chloroform as an eluent to yield 130 mg (56 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (-H+): observed 438.4, calculated 439.18, molecular formula C28H25N04.

Purity (HPLC): 95 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): 6 2.84-3.57 (8H, 2 x m, 4 x CU ), 6.30 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.48 (1 H, s, CH=C), 7.00 (2H, d, J = 8.00 Hz, Ar-H), 7.09 (1H, t, J = 7.20 Hz, Ar-H), 7.14-7.22 (3H, m, Ar- H), 7.28-7.37 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.69 (2H, d, J = 8.00 Hz, Ar-H).

Synthesis of methyl 4-(((lR,2R)-l-(((S)-2-atnino-4-methylpentanoyl)oxy)-2,3-dihydro-lH, l'H-[2,2'-biindenl-2-yl)methvnbenzoate (32):

To a solution of methyl 4-(((lR,2R)- l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- l H,l 'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2- yl)methyl)benzoate (10, 180 mg, 0.45 mmol), DCC (1 12 mg, 0.54 mmol) and DMAP (6 mg, 0.045 mmol) in ethyl acetate (10 mL), was added Fmoc leucine (158 mg, 0.45 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HC1 (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04. The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (250 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (5 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (5 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 30 % ethyl acetate in petroleum ether as an eluent to yield 150 mg (66 %) of the title compound as a colorless semi solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 510.0, calculated 509.26, molecular formula C33H35N04

Purity (HPLC): 94 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, CDC13): δ 0.98 (3H, d, J = 6.56 Hz, CH3), 1.01 (3H, d, J = 6.64 Hz, CH2), 1.56-1.96 (3H, 3 x m, 2H of CH2-CH and 1H of -CH-), 3.06-3.37 (6H, m, 6H of 3 x CH ), 3.64 (1H, dd, J = 5.40, 8.90 Hz, CH-N), 3.89 (3H, s, OCH3), 6.45 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.54 (l H, s, CH=C), 7.03 (2H, d, J = 8.28 Hz, Ar-H), 7.12-7.16 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.19-7.30 (5H, m, Ar-H), 7.32-7.35 (2H, m, Ar-H), 7.85 (2H, d, J = 8.28 Hz, Ar-H).

13C NMR (100 MHz, CDC13): δ 21.74 (CH3), 23.15 (CH3), 24.85 (CH), 39.67 (CH2), 40.45 (CH2), 40.81 (CH2), 43.77 (CH2), 52.03 (OCH3 or CH-N), 53.19 (quat C), 54.38 (CH-N or OCH3), 83.48 (CH-O), 120.70, 123.50, 124.49, 124.62, 125.76, 126.46, 127.07, 128.30, 3 x 129.25, 129.79, 2 x 129.94 (13 x tert. C and 1 x quat. C), 140.21 (quat. C), 142.16 (quat. C), 142.54 (quat. C), 143.65 (quat. C), 144.22 (quat. C), 150.99 (quat. C), 167.03 (C=0), 175.90 (C=0). Synthesis of ethyl 4-(f(lR,2R)-l-(frS)-2-amino-4-methylpentanovnoxy)-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H- i2,2'-biindenl-2-yl)methvnbenzoate (33):

To a solution of ethyl 4-(((lR,2R)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH, l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2- yl)methyl)benzoate (11, 200 mg, 0.48 mmol), DCC (120 mg, 0.58 mmol) and DMAP (6 mg, 0.048 mmol) in ethyl acetate (10 mL), was added Fmoc leucine (168 mg, 0.48 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HC1 (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (250 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (5 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (5 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 30 % ethyl acetate in petroleum ether as an eluent to yield 150 mg (60 %) of the title compound as a colorless semi solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 524.2, calculated 523.27, molecular formula C34H37N04

Purity (HPLC): 98 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, CDC13): δ 0.97 (3H, d, J = 6.56 Hz, CH3), 1.01 (3H, d, J = 6.64 Hz, CH3), 1.37 (3H, t, J = 7.08 Hz, CH3), 1.56-1.60 (1H, m, CHs-CH), 1.66-1.73 ( 1H, m, CH^-CH), 1.88- 1.93 (1H, m,-CH-(CH3) ), 3.06-3.36 (6H, m, 4H of CHz and 2H of allylic CH2), 3.62 (1H, dd, J = 5.36, 8.92 Hz, CH-N), 4.35 (2H, q, J = 7.12 Hz, OCHa), 6.44 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.53 (1H, s, CH=C), 7.02 (2H, d, J = 8.20 Hz, Ar-H), 7.10-7.15 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.18-7.29 (5H, m, Ar-H), 7.31-7.35 (2H, m, Ar-H), 7.85 (2H, d, J = 8.20 Hz, Ar-H).

13C NMR (100 MHz, CDC13): δ 14.32 (CH3), 21.74 (CH3), 23.16 (CH3), 24.85 (CH), 39.67 (CH2), 40.47 (CH2), 40.79 (CH2), 43.85 (CH2), 53.22 (quat C), 54.38 (CH-N), 60.86 (OCH2), 83.45 (CH-O), 120.70 (tert. C), 123.50 (tert. C), 124.48 (tert. C), 124.62 (tert. C), 125.75 (tert. C), 126.45 (tert. C), 127.06 (tert. C), 128.65 (quat. C), 3 x 129.23 (3 x tert. C), 129.77 (tert. C), 2 x 129.88 (2 x tert. C), 140.25 (quat. C), 142.17 (quat. C), 142.55 (quat. C), 143.51 (quat. C), 144.24 (quat. C), 151.03 (quat. C), 166.55 (C=0), 176.02 (C=0).

Synthesis of propyl 4-(((lR,2R)-l-(((S)-2-amino-4-methylpentanovnoxy)-2,3-dihydro-lH, l'H-[2.2'-biindenl-2-vnmethvnbenzoate (34):

To a solution of propyl 4-(((lR,2R)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-l H,l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2- yl)methyl)benzoate (12, 190 mg, 0.44 mmol), DCC (1 11 mg, 0.54 mmol) and DMAP (6 mg, 0.045 mmol) in ethyl acetate (10 niL), was added Fmoc leucine (158 mg, 0.45 mmol) and then stirred, at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HC1 (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (250 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (6 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (6 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by Combi Flash using 30 % ethyl acetate in petroleum ether as an eluent to yield 122 mg (51 %) of the title compound as a colorless semi solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 538.2, calculated 537.29, molecular formula C35H39NO4.

Purity (HPLC): 89 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3): δ 0.97-1.04 (9H, m, 3 x CH3), 1.56-1.96 (5H, 3 x m, 4H of 2 x CH2 and 1H of CH), 3.07-3.38 (6H, m, 6H of 3 x ¾), 3.62-3.68 (1H, m, CH-N), 4.26 (2H, t, J = 6.60 Hz, OC b), 6.45 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.54 (1H, s, CH=C), 7.03 (2H, d, J = 8.28 Hz, Ar-H), 7.12-7.16 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.18-7.32 (5H, m, Ar-H), 7.34 (2H, dd, J = 3.32, 7.34 Hz, Ar-H), 7.86 (2H, d, J = 8.24 Hz, Ar-H).

13C NMR (100 MHz, CDC13): 10.52 (CH3), 21.74, 22.10, 23.13 (2 x CH3 and 1 x CH), 24.84 (CH2), 39.66 (C¾), 40.46 (CH2), 40.77 (CH2), 43.67 (CH2), 53.15 (quat. C), 54.36 (CH-N), 66.46 (CH2-0), 83.56 (CH-O), 120.70 (tert. C), 123.51 (tert. C), 124.48 (tert. C), 124.61 (tert. C),

125.78 (tert. C), 126.45 (tert. C), 127.07 (tert. C), 128.67 (quat. C), 3 x 129.23 (3 x tert. C),

129.79 (tert. C), 2 x 129.89 (2 x tert. C), 140.18 (quat. C), 142.19 (quat. C), 142.56 (quat. C), 143.50 (quat. C), 144.24 (quat. C), 151.02 (quat. C), 166.60 (C=0), 175.69 (C=0). Synthesis of (lR,2R)-2-(4-carbamoylbenzvn-2.3-dihvdro-lH,l'H-2,2'-biinden-l-yl L- leucinate (35):

To a solution of 4-{[(l 'i?,2'i?)-l,-hydroxy-l ',3'-dihydro-lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'- yl]methyl}benzamide (13, 140 mg, 0.36 mmol), DCC (90 mg, 0.44 mmol) and DMAP (4.3 mg, 0.036 mmol) in ethyl acetate ( 10 mL), was added Fmoc leucine (126 mg, 0.36 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HC1 (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (250 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (5 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (5 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 10 % methanol in chloroform as an eluent to yield 1 10 mg (63 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 495.5, calculated 494.26, molecular formula C32H34N203.

Purity (HPLC): 91 %. Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 0.87 (3H, d, J - 6.56 Hz, CH3), 0.91 (3H, d, J = 6.64 Hz, CH3), 1.42-1.48 (IH, m, CH2-CH), 1.52-1.58 (IH, m, CHz-CH), 1.72-1.82 (IH, m, CH), 3.04- 3.56 (7H, 3 x m, 6H of 3 x Cl^ and IH of CH-N), 6.30 (IH, s, CH-O), 6.49 (IH, s, CH=C), 7.00 (2H, d, J = 8.20 Hz, Ar-H), 7.08 (IH, dt, J - 1.16, 10.15 Hz, Ar-H), 7.16 (IH, t, J = 7.28 Hz, Ar- H), 7.21 (2H, t, J = 6.48 Hz, Ar-H), 7.25-7.30 (2H, m, Ar-H), 7.34 (2H, t, J = 7.80 Hz, Ar-H), 7.65 (2H, d, J = 8.20 Hz, Ar-H), 7.84 (IH, br s, NH^).

13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 22.33 (CH3), 23.27 (CH3), 24.66 (CH), 39.36-40.62 (3 x CH2), 43.51 (CH2), 53.27 (quat. C), 54.75 (CH-N), 82.79 (CH-O), 120.89 (tert. C), 123.93 (tert. C), 124.65 (tert. C), 125.23 (tert. C), 125.81 (tert. C), 126.70 (tert. C), 127.14 (tert. C), 2 x 127.45 (2 x tert. C), 129.21 (tert. C), 129.44 (tert. C), 2 x 129.98 (2 x tert. C), 132.49 (quat. C), 140.62 (quat. C), 142.08 (quat. C), 142.86 (quat. C), 143.03 (quat. C), 144.44 (quat. C), 152.06 (quat. C), 168.04 (0-C=0), 175.44 (CO).

Synthesis of (lR,2R)-2- (4- f (2-hyd roxyethvDcar bamoyll benzyl} -2,3-dihydro-lHJ 'H-2,2' -bi inden-l-yl L-leucinate (36):

To a solution of 4-{[(l'i?,2^)-l'-(L-leucyloxy)-l*,3'-dihydro-lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'- yljmethyl} benzoic acid (24, 130 mg, 0.26 mmol), Et3N (78 mg, 0.78 mmol) and 2-amino ethanol (24 mg, 0.39 mmol) in DCM (5 mL), was added T3P (0.33 mL, 50 wt % solution in ethyl acetate, 0.52 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The reaction mixture was quenched with water (25 mL) and extracted with DCM (3 x 25 mL). The separated organic layer was washed with brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by CombiFlash using 10 % methanol in chloroform as an eluent to yield 70 mg (54 %) of the title compound as an off white solid. LCMS (+H+): observed 539.6, calculated 538.28, molecular formula C34H38N204.

Purity (HPLC): 92 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 0.87 (3H, d, J = 6.52 Hz, CH3), 0.92 (3H, d, J = 6.64 Hz, CH3), 1.38-1.46 (1H, m, CH2-CH-), 1.50-1.56 (1H, m, CH2-CH-), 1.74-1.82 (1H, m, CH2-CH-), 3.03-3.56 (11H, 10H of 5 x CH2 and 1H of CH-N), 4.70 (1 H, br s, CH2-OH), 6.29 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.49 (1H, s, CH=C), 7.00 (2H, d, J = 8.24 Hz, Ar-H), 7.09 (1H, dt, J = 1.20, 10.16 Hz, Ar-H), 7.15-7.23 (3H, m, Ar-H), 7.27-7.37 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.64 (2H, d, J = 8.24 Hz, Ar-H), 8.31 (1H, t, J = 5.64 Hz, NH).

13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): 22.33 (CH3), 23.38 (CH3), 24.72 (CH), 39.36-40.62 (3 x CH2), 42.55 (CH2), 44.19 (CH2), 53.63 (CH-N or quat. C), 54.79 (quat. C or CH-N), 60.20 (CH2OH), 82.46 (CH-O), 120.88 (tert. C), 123.94 (tert. C), 124.63 (tert. C), 125.21 (tert. C), 125.72 (tert. C), 126.69 (tert. C), 3 x 127.12 (3 x tert. C), 129.17, 129.37, 2 x 130.01, 132.77 (4 x tert. C and 1 x quat. C), 140.78 (quat. C), 141.91 (quat. C), 142.76 (quat. C), 143.04 (quat. C), 144.45 (quat. C), 152.12 (quat. C), 166.44 (C=0), 176.37 (C=0).

Synthesis of aR,2R)-2-f4-(methylcarbamoyl)benzyll-2,3-dihvdro-lH,l'H-2,2'-biinden-l-yl L-leucinate (37):

To a solution of 4-{[(l,i?,2'/?)-l'-hydroxy-l',3'-dihydro-lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl}-N- methylbenzamide (15, 150 mg, 0.38 mmol), DCC (94 mg, 0.45 mmol) and DMAP (5 mg, 0.038 mmol) in ethyl acetate (10 mL), was added Fmoc leucine (133 mg, 0.38 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HC1 (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (250 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (5 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (5 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 10 % methanol in chloroform as an eluent to yield 100 mg (52 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 509.5, calculated 508.27, molecular formula C33H36N2O3.

Purity (HPLC): 99 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, CDC13): δ 0.95 (3H, d, J = 6.52 Hz, CH3), 0.98 (3H, d, J = 6.52 Hz, CHa), 1.60-1.76 (2H, m, CH2-CH), 1.86-1.96 (1H, m, CH), 2.97 (3H, d, J = 4.80 Hz, NH-CH3), 3.04- 3.36 (6H, m, 3 x CU£), 3.62-3.68 (1H, m, CH-N), 6.08-6.14 (1H, m, NH-CH3), 6.45 (1H, s, CH- O), 6.51 ( 1H, s, CH=C), 7.00 (2H, d, J = 8.20 Hz, Ar-H), 7.09-7.19 (2H, m, Ar-H), 7.21 -7.29 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.32 (2H, d, J = 6.84 Hz, Ar-H), 7.50-7.56 (2H, m, Ar-H).

I3C NMR (100 MHz, CDC13): δ 21.74 (CH3), 23.14 (CH3), 24.84 (CH3-N or CH), 26.80 (CH or CH3-N), 39.67 (CH2), 40.46 (CH2), 40.64 (CH2), 43.74 (CH2), 53.17 (quant. C), 54.38 (CH-N), 83.48 (CH-O), 120.68 (tert. C), 123.51 (tert. C), 124.47 (tert. C), 124.63 (tert. C), 125.75 (tert. C), 126.45 (tert. C), 2 x 126.52 (2 x tert. C), 127.06 (tert. C), 129.25 (tert. C), 129.75 (tert. C), 2 x 130.06 (2 x tert. C), 132.66 (quat. C), 140.22 (quat. C), 141.84 (quat. C), 142.21 (quat. C), 142.56 (quat. C), 144.25 (quat. C), 151.10 (quat. C), 168.03 (C=0). Synthesis of (lR,2R)-2-[4-(dimethylcarbamovnbenzvIl-2,3-dihvdro-lHa'H-2,2'-biinden-l-yl L-leucinate (38):

To a solution of 4-{[(l*/?,2*i?)- l '-hydroxy- l',3,-dihydro-lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2,-yl]methyl}-N,N- dimethylbenzamide (16, 185 mg, 0.45 mmol), DCC (1 12 mg, 0.54 mmol) and DMAP (6 mg, 0.045 mmol) in ethyl acetate (10 mL), was added Fmoc leucine (158 mg, 0.45 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HC1 (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (250 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (5 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (5 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 10 % methanol in chloroform as an eluent to yield 120 mg (5 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 523.2, calculated 522.29, molecular formula C34H38N203.

Purity (HPLC): 95 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, CDC13): δ 0.97 (3H, d, J = 6.52 Hz, CH3), 1.01 (3H, d, J = 6.56 Hz, CH3), 1.60-1.94 (3H, 3 x m, 1H of CH and 2H of CHj-CH), 2.92 (3H, s, N-CH3), 3.05-3.36 (9H, m, 6H of 3 x CH2 and 3H of N-CH3), 3.63-3.67 (1H, m, CH-N), 6.43 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.53 (1H, s, CH=C)5 6.97 (2H, d, J = 8.00 Hz, Ar-H), 7.10-7.14 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.18-7.28 (7H, m, Ar-H), 7.30-7.35 (2H, m, Ar-H).

,3C NMR (100 MHz, CDC13): δ 21.76 (CH3), 23.14 (CH3), 24.85 (CH), 39.70, 40.29 and 40.57 (2 x CH2 and 1 x N-CH3), 43.61 (CH2), 53.13 (quat. C), 54.42 (CH-N), 83.62 (CH-O), 120.66 (tert. C), 123.48 (tert. C), 124.42 (tert. C), 124.61 (tert. C), 125.72 (tert. C), 126.43 (tert. C), 2 x 126.89 (2 x tert. C), 127.01 (tert. C), 129.20 (tert. C), 129.72 (quat. C), 2 x 129.82 (2 x tert. C), 134.25 (quat. C), 139.75 (quat. C), 140.19 (quat. C), 142.26 (quat. C), 142.60 (quat. C), 144.31 (quat. C), 151.23 (quat. C), 171.54 (C=0).

Synthesis of methyl 4-(((lS,2S)-l-(((S -2-atnino-4-methylpentanovnoxy)-2 -dihvdro-lH, 1 ' H- [2,2' -biindenl -2-yl)methyl)benzoate (39) :

To a solution of methyl 4-(((lS,2S)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2*-biinden]-2- yl)methyl)benzoate (17, 200 mg, 0.50 mmol), DCC (125 mg, 0.60 mmol) and DMAP (6 mg, 0.045 mmol) in ethyl acetate (10 mL), was added Fmoc leucine (176 mg, 0.50 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HCl (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (220 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (5 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (5 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for I h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 30 % ethyl acetate in petroleum ether as an eluent to yield 150 mg (60 %) of the title compound as a colorless semi solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 510.2, calculated 509.26, molecular formula C33H35NC .

Purity (HPLC): 96 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3): 6 0.93 (3H, d, J = 6.44 Hz, CH3), 0.94 (3H, d, J = 5.20 Hz, CH3), 1.54-1.80 (3H, 2 x m, 2H of CH2-CH and 1H of C¾CH), 3.05-3.39 (6H, m, 3 x CH^), 3.70-3.74 (1H, m, CH-N), 3.89 (3H, s, OCH2), 6.42 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.51 (1H, s, CH=C), 7.01 (2H, d, J = 8.32 Hz, Ar-H), 7.1 1-7.16 (lH, m, Ar-H), 7.18-7.31 (6H, m, Ar-H), 7.36 (1H, d, J = 7.28 Hz, Ar- H), 7.84 (2H, d, J = 8.28 Hz, Ar-H).

13C NMR (100 MHz, CDC13): δ 21.95 (CH3), 22.78 (CH3), 24.77 (CH), 39.62 (CH2), 40.37 (CH2), 40.73 (CH2), 43.69 (CH2), 52.02, 52.96 and 54.40 (OCH3, quat C and CH-N), 83.54 (CH- O), 120.71, 123.54, 124.49, 124.64, 125.59, 126.45, 127.04, 128.28, 3 x 129.21, 129.77, 2 x 130.00 (13 x tert. C and 1 x quat. C), 140.06 (quat. C), 142.06 (quat. C), 142.56 (quat. C), 143.62 (quat. C), 144.22 (quat. C), 150.94 (quat. C), 167.04 (C=0), 175.51 (C=0). Synthesis of ethyl 4-Γ((18,28 -1-((Γ8)-2-3ΐηίηο-4-ιη6ί1ιν1ρ6ηί3ηον1 ο ν)-2,3-άΐ1ΐν(ίΓθ-1Η,1Ή- [2,2'-biindenl-2-vDmethyl)benzoate (40):

To a solution of ethyl 4-(((lS,2S)- l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2- yl)methyl)benzoate (18, 200 mg, 0.48 mmol), DCC (120 mg, 0.58 mmol) and DMAP (6 mg, 0.048 mmol) in ethyl acetate (10 mL), was added Fmoc leucine (161 mg, 0.48 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HC1 (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (250 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (6 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (6 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 30 % ethyl acetate in petroleum ether as an eluent to yield 140 mg (55 %) of the title compound as a colorless semi solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 524.2, calculated 523.27, molecular formula C34H37N04

Purity (HPLC): 98 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, CDC13): δ 0.89-0.94 (6H, m, (CH3)2), 1.37 (3H, t, J = 6.80 Hz, CH3), 1.64- 1.80 (3H, m, 1H of CH and 2H of CHg-CH), 3.02-3.16 (2H, m, ¾), 3.20-3.36 (4H, m, 2 x CHa), 3.82-3.86 (1H, m, CH-N), 4.34 (2H, q, J = 7.20 Hz, OCH2), 6.41 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.49 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.99 (2H, d, J = 8.00 Hz, Ar-H), 7.11-7.15 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.16-7.30 (6H, m, Ar-H), 7.36 (1H, d, J = 7.60 Hz, Ar-H), 7.83 (2H, d, J = 8.40 Hz, Ar-H).

13C NMR (100 MHz, CDCI3): δ 14.31 (CH3), 21.95 (CH3), 22.80 (CH3), 24.78 (CH), 39.62 (CH2), 40.39 (CH2), 40.70 (CH2), 43.86 (CH2), 52.99 (quat C), 54.40 (CH-N), 60.87 (CH2-0), 83.49 (CH-O), 120.71 (tert. C), 123.54 (tert. C), 124.48 (tert. C), 124.64 (tert. C), 125.57 (tert. C), 126.45 (tert. C), 127.03 (tert. C), 128.62 (quat. C), 3 x 129.18 (3 x tert. C), 129.74 (tert. C), 2 x 129.94 (2 x tert. C), 140.10 (quat. C), 142.06 (quat. C), 142.57 (quat. C), 143.49 (quat. C), 144.24 (quat. C), 150.99 (quat. C), 166.58 (C=0), 175.80 (C=0).

Synthesis of propyl 4-(((lS,2S)-l-(((S)-2-amino-4-methylpentanoyl)oxy)-2,3-dihvdro-lH, l'H-r2,2'-biindenl-2-yl)methyl)benzoate (41):

To a solution of propyl 4-(((l S,2S)-t-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2- yl)methyl)benzoate (19, 180 mg, 0.42 mmol), DCC (105 mg, 0.50 mmol) and DMAP (6 mg, 0.042 mmol) in ethyl acetate (10 mL), was added Fmoc leucine (148 mg, 0.42 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HO (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2SC>4 The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (210 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (5 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (5 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 30 % ethyl acetate in petroleum ether as an eluent to yield 120 mg (53 %) of the title compound as a colorless semi solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 538.5, calculated 537.29, molecular formula C35H39N04

Purity (HPLC): 95 %.

lR NMR (400 MHz, CDC13): δ 0.93 (3H, d, J = 4.12 Hz, CH3), 0.94 (3H, d, J = 4.12 Hz, (CH3), 1.03 (3H, t, J = 8.00 Hz, CH3), 1.49- 1.81 (5H, m, 1 H of CH and 4H of 2 x CH ), 3.07-3.41 (6H, m, 3 x CH2), 3.64-3.67 (1H, m, CH-N), 4.26 (2H, t, J = 8.00 Hz, OCFb), 6.42 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.53 (1H, s, CH=C), 7.01 (2H, d, J = 8.00 Hz, Ar-H), 7.13-7.17 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.20-7.32 (6H, m, Ar- H), 7.37 (1H, d, J = 4.00 Hz, Ar-H), 7.86 (2H, d, J = 8.00 Hz, Ar-H). 13C NMR (100 MHz, CDC13): δ 10.53 (CH3), 21.93 (CH3), 22.09 (CH3), 22.87 (CH), 24.80 (CH2), 39.61 (CH2), 40.43 (CH2), 40.68 (CH2), 44.24 (CH2), 53.12 (quat. C), 54.39 (CH-N), 66.47 (CH2-0), 83.31 (CH-O), 120.72 (tert. C), 123.53 (tert. C), 124.48 (tert. C), 124.64 (tert. C), 125.54 (tert. C), 126.46 (tert. C), 127.02 (tert. C), 128.65 (quat. C), 129.15 (tert. C), 2 x 129.19 (2 x tert. C), 129.71 (tert. C), 2 x 129.93 (2 x tert. C), 140.18 (quat. C), 142.01 (quat. C), 142.57 (quat. C), 143.51 (quat. C), 144.26 (quat. C), 151.05 (quat. C), 166.64 (0-C=0), 176.39 (C=0).

Synthesis of (lS<2S)-2-(4-carbamovIbenzyl)-2,3-dihvdro-lH,l'H-2,2,-biinden-l-yl L- leucinate (42):

To a solution of 4-{[(l'5',2'1S)-l'-hydroxy-l,,3'-dihydro-lH,2'H-2,2,-biinden-2'- yl]methyl}benzamide (20, 150 mg, 0.26 mmol), DCC (64 mg, 0.31 mmol) and DMAP (3 mg, 0.026 mmol) in ethyl acetate (10 mL), was added Fmoc leucine (91 mg, 0.26 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HC1 (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04. The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (180 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (5 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (5 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 10 % methanol in chloroform as an eluent to yield 1 10 mg (86 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 495.2, calculated 494.26, molecular formula C32H34N203.

Purity (HPLC): 97 %.

1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 0.85 (3H, d, J = 6.20 Hz, CHj), 0.87 (3H, d, J = 6.20 Hz, CH3), 1.40-1.74 (3H, 2 x m, 2H of CH2-CH and 1H of CH-CH2), 3.04 (1H, d, J = 13.44 Hz, CH2), 3.11-3.28 (4H, m, 2 x ¾), 3.48-3.56 (2H, m, 1H of CH2 and CH-N), 6.27 (1 H, s, CH-O), 6.49 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.99 (2H, d, J = 8.20 Hz, Ar-H), 7.09 (1H, dt, J = 1.20, 10.16 Hz, Ar-H), 7.15- 7.38 (8H, m, 7H x Ar-H and lH of NH2), 7.66 (2H, d, J = 8.24 Hz, Ar-H), 7.84 (1H, br s, Ntb). 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): 22.50 (CH3), 23.18 (CH3), 24.71 (CH), 39.35-40.60 (2 x CH2), 44.30 (CH2), 53.26 (quat. C), 54.80 (CH-N), 82.43 (CH-O), 120.89 (tert. C), 123.95 (tert. C), 124.62 (tert. C), 125.22 (tert. C), 125.57 (tert. C), 126.69 (tert. C), 127.14 (quat. C), 2 x 127.41 (2 x tert. C), 129.14 (tert. C), 129.34 (tert. C), 2 x 130.05 (2 x tert. C), 132.47 (tert. C), 140.70 (quat. C), 142.10 (quat. C), 142.73 (quat. C), 143.08 (quat. C), 144.47 (quat. C), 152.17 (quat. C), 168.06 (N-C=0), 176.56 (C=0).

Synthesis of (lS,2S -2-{4-i(2-Hvdroxyethvncarbamoyllbenzyl}-2,3-dihvdro-lH,l'H-2,2,-bi inden-l-yl leucinate (43):

To a solution of 4-{[(l , lS,2'1S)-r-Hydroxy-l ,,3'-dihydro- lH,2,H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl}-N-(2- hydroxyethyl)benzamide (21, 300 mg, 0.79 mmol) and 2,4,6-trimethyl pyridine (85 mg, 0.79 mmol) in DCM (10 mL) was added acetyl chloride (62 mg, 0.79 mmol) at -78°C and then slowly allowed to warm to room temperature over a period of 1 h. Reaction mixture was quenched with ice (25 mL) and extracted with DCM (3 x 25 mL). The organic layer was washed with brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by CombiFlash using 20 % ethyl acetate in chloroform as an eluent to yield 250 mg (68 %) of the intermediate 1 as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 468.4, calculated 467.56, molecular formula C30H29NO4.

Purity (UPLC): 99 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, CDC13): δ 2.10 (3H, s, CH3), 2.83 (1H, d, J = 13.20 Hz, CH2), 3.01-3.03 (2H, m CH2), 3.26 (l H, d, J = 13.20 Hz, CH^), 3.46 (1 H, d, J = 22.40 Hz, CH ), 3.58 (1H, d, J = 22.80 Hz, CH2), 3.69-3.73 (2H, m, CONHCH2), 4.28 (2H, t, J = 5.60 Hz, CH2OCH3), 5.25 (1H, d, J = 7.60 Hz, CH-OH), 6.44 (1 H, m, CH-OH or NH), 6.47 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.97 (2H, d, J = 8.00 Hz, Ar-H), 7.17 (1H, dt, J = 2.00, 9.87 Hz, Ar-H), 7.26-7.32 (5H, m, Ar-H), 7.44 (2H, d, J = 6.40 Hz, Ar-H), 7.57 (2H, d, J = 8.40 Hz, Ar-H).

To a solution of 2-[(4-{[(l'5,,2,5)-l'-Hydroxy-l,,3'-dihydro-lH,2,H-2,2'-biinden-2'- yl]methyl}benzoyl)amino]ethyl acetate (intermediate 1, 250 mg, 0.53 mmol), DCC (142 mg, 0.62 mmol) and DMAP (7 mg, 0.053 mmol) in ethyl acetate (10 mL), was added N-[(9H-fluoren-9- ylmethoxy)carbonyl]leucine (226 mg, 0.53 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 Ν HCJ (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04. The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 20 % ethy l acetate in chloroform as an eluent to yield 320 mg (76 %) of the intermediate 2 as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 803.4, calculated 802.95, molecular formula C51H50N2O7.

Purity (UPLC): 96 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, CDC13): δ 0.93 (6H, d, J = 5.53 Hz, CH(CH2)2), 1.46-1.78 (3H, 3 x m, CH2- CH-), 2.07 (3H, s, COCH3), 3.06-3.41 (6H, m, 3 x ¾), 3.66-3.70 (2H, m, CONHCH2), 4.22- 4.27 (3H, m, CHzOCOC^ and CH-CH O), 4.42-4.46 (2H, m, CH-CtbO), 4.49-4.54 (1H, m, CH-NH), 5.21 (1H, d, J = 8.92 Hz, CH-NH), 6.41-6.43 (2H, m, CH-0 and CH2NHCO), 6.51 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.98 (2H, d, J = 8.20 Hz, Ar-H), 7.1 1-7.14 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.19-7.25 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.30-7.34 (5H, m, Ar-H), 7.71 (2H, t, J = 7.68 Hz, Ar-H), 7.54 (2H, d, J = 8.32 Hz, Ar-H), 7.59- 7.63 (2H, m, Ar-H), 7.78 (2H, d, J = 7.24 Hz, Ar-H).

To a solution of (15,25)-2-(4-{[2-(Acetyloxy)ethyl]carbamoyl}benzyl)-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-2,2'- biinden-l-yl N-[(9H-fluoren-9-ylmethoxy)carbonyl]leucinate (intermediate 2, 320 mg, 0.40 mmol) was dissolved in dry THF (5 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (5 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 10 % methanol in chloroform as an eluent to yield 160 mg of the material [38 % product mass (581.5) in UPLC] as a solid. The solid was dissolved in THF: H20 (1 : 1, 10 mL) was added lithium hydroxide dihydrate (6 mg, 0.27 mmol) at 0°C and then stirred at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was neutralized with 1.5 N HC1 (PH 7.0) and then extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x 10 mL), washed with 10 % aqueous NaHC03 (10 mL) followed by brine (10 mL). Organic layer was dried over anhydrous Na2S04, evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 10 % methanol in chloroform as an eluent to yield 35 mg (21 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 540.3, calculated 538.68, molecular formula C34H38N204.

Purity (HPLC): 95 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, CDC13): δ 0.92-0.94 (6H, m, CH(CH.3)2), 1.46-1.78 (3H, 3 x m, CH2-CH-), 3.06-3.13 (2H, m, CH2), 3.18-3.27 (3H, m, 1H of CH2 and 2H of allylic ¾), 3.37 (1H, d, J = 22.40 Hz, CH2), 3.58-3.65 (3H, m, CONHCLb and CH-NH2), 3.82 (2H, t, J = 5.20 Hz, CHjOH), 6.41 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.52 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.61 (1H, t, J = 5.20 Hz, CONH or CH2OH), 7.00 (2H, d, J = 8.40 Hz, Ar-H), 7.12-7.19 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.15-7.31 (6H, m, Ar-H), 7.36 (1H, d, J = 7.20 Hz, Ar-H), 7.59 (2H, d, J = 8.40 Hz, Ar-H).

13C NMR (100 MHz, CDC13): 21.94 (CH3), 22.85 (CH3), 24.79 (CH), 29.27 (CH2), 39.61 (CH2), 40.59 (CH2), 42.82 (CH2), 44.19 (CH2), 53.08 (quat. C), 54.39 (CH-N), 62.44 (CH2OH), 83.26 (CH-O), 120.72 (tert. C), 123.54 (tert. C), 124.49 (tert. C), 124.65 (tert. C), 125.54 (tert. C), 126.47 (tert. C), 2 x 126.66 (2 x tert. C), 127.03 (tert. C), 129.18 (tert. C), 129.70 (tert. C), 2 x 130.13 (2 x tert. C), 132.18 (quat. C), 140.18 (quat. C), 142.01 (quat. C), 142.24 (quat. C), 142.55 (quat. C), 144.25 (quat. C), 151.07 (quat. C), 168.36 (C=0), 176.27 (C=0).

Synthesis of (lS,2S)-2-r4-(methvIcarbamovnbenzvn-2,3-dihvdro-lHJ'H-2,2'-biinden-l-yl

L-leucinate (44):

To a solution of 4-{[(r5,2,S)-l'-hydroxy-l',3'-dihydro-lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl}-N- methylbenzamide (22, 150 mg, 0.38 mmol), DCC (94 mg, 0.45 mmol) and DMAP (5 mg, 0.038 mmol) in ethyl acetate (10 mL), was added Fmoc leucine (134 mg, 0.38 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HC1 (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (180 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (5 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (5 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 10 % methanol in chloroform as an eluent to yield 75 mg (39 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 509.5, calculated 508.27, molecular formula C33H36N2O3

Purity (HPLC): 97 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 0.85 (3H, d, J = 6.00 Hz, CH2), 0.87 (3H, d, J = 6.40 Hz, CH3), 1.39-1.72 (3H, 2 x m, 2H of CH2-CH and 1H of CH-CH2), 2.73 (3H, d, J = 4.40 Hz, CH3), 3.04 (1H, d, J = 13.60 Hz, CH2), 3.15 (1H, t, J = 26.80 Hz, CH2), 3.23-3.27 (3H, m, 3H of 2 x CH2), 3.49-3.55 (2H, m, 1H of CH^ and 1H of CH-N), 6.27 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.48 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.99 (2H, d, J = 8.40 Hz, Ar-H), 7.09 (1H, dt, J = 1.20, 10.27 Hz, Ar-H), 7.15-7.25 (4H, m, Aril), 7.27-7.37 (3H, m, Ar-H), 7.61 (2H, d, J - 8.40 Hz, Ar-H), 8.31 (1H, d, J = 4.40 Hz, NH).

Synthesis of (15,2S -2-i4-(dimethylcarbamoyl)benzyll-2,3-dihvdro-lH,l'H-2,2'-biinden-l-yl L-leucinate (45):

To a solution of ^{[(r^'^-r-hydroxy-l'^'-dihydro-lH^'H^^'-biinden^'-ynmethyll-^N- dimethylbenzamide (23, 100 mg, 0.24 mmol), DCC (56 mg, 0.28 mmol) and DMAP (3 mg, 0.024 mmol) in ethyl acetate (5 mL), was added Fmoc leucine (84 mg, 0.24 mmol) and then stirred at room temperature for 12 h. The solids were filtered, washed with ethyl acetate (25 ml) and the combined filtrate was washed with 1.5 N HCl (25 mL), water (25 mL), brine (10 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 The organic layer was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue 1 (140 mg) was dissolved in dry THF (5 mL) and cooled to 0°C. Dimethylamine (5 mL, 20 % in THF) was added drop wise and the reaction mixture was slowly allowed to stir at room temperature for 1 h. The reaction mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the residue was purified by CombiFlash using 10 % methanol in chloroform as an eluent to yield 45 mg (36 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 523.5, calculated 522.29, molecular formula ¾4Η38Ν203

Purity (HPLC): 97 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): 5 0.82-0.87 (6H, m, 2 x CH3), 1.58-1.66 (3H, m, 2H of CHaCH and 1H of CH2CH), 2.83 (3H, s, N-CH3), 2.93 (3H, s, N-CH3), 3.1 1 (1H, d, J = 13.20 Hz, CH2), 3.18-3.30 (4H, m, 2 x CH2), 3.45 (1H, d, J = 22.80 Hz, CH2), 4.26-4.30 (1H, m, CH-N), 6.36 (1H, s, CH-O), 6.55 (1H, s, CH=C), 7.00 (2H, d, J = 8.00 Hz, Ar-H), 7.09 (IH, dt, J = 1.20, 10.00 Hz, Ar-H), 7.15-7.23 (5H, m, Ar-H), 7.27-7.37 (4H, m, Ar-H), 8.47 (2H, br s, NH2). Synthesis of 2-hvdroxy-5-(4-(((lR,2R)-l-hvdroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-r2,2'-biindenl-2-vn methyDbenzamido)benzoic acid (46):

To a mixture of ethyl 4-(((lR,2R)- l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2- yl)methyl)benzoate (11, 200 mg, 0.48 mmol), 5-amino-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (75 mg, 0.48 mmol) and THF (1.0 mL) in a 5 mL microwave vial, was added trimethylaluminium (0.5 mL, 20 % solution in toluene) and the mixture irradiated at 100°C for 5 min. The reaction mixture was quenched with slow addition of 1.5 N HC1 (2 mL) and extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x 15 mL). Organic layer was washed with water (25 mL), brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue purified by preparative HPLC [Kromasil C18 (250 x 50 mm), flow rate: 40 mL / min, 0.1% TFA in water / MeOH, run time: 40 min] to yield 75 mg (30 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (+H+): observed 518.4, calculated 517.19, molecular formula C33H27N05

Purity (HPLC): 90 %.

1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 2.72 (1H, d, J = 13.64 Hz, -¾-), 2.97 (1H, d, J = 17.20 Hz, - CH2), 3.01 (1H, d, J = 16.36 Hz, -CH2-), 3.23 (lH, d, J = 13.64 Hz, -¾), 3.50 (1H, d, J = 23.16 Hz, CH2), 3.65 (1H, d, J = 23.16 Hz, CH2), 5.07 (1H, s, CH-OH), 5.87 (1H, br s, CH-OH), 6.44 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.87 (1H, d, J = 8.88 Hz, Ar-H), 6.97 (2H, d, J = 8.20 Hz, Ar-H), 7.10 (1H, t, J = 7.28 Hz, Ar-H), 7.16-7.21 (1H, m, Ar-H), 7.23-7.29 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.37 (1H, t, J = 3.52 Hz, Ar- H), 7.42 (1H, d, J = 7.28 Hz, Ar-H), 7.73 (2H, d, J = 8.20 Hz, Ar-H), 7.77 (1H, dd, J = 2.68, 8.90 Hz, Ar-H), 8.18 (1H, d, J = 2.64 Hz, Ar-H), 10.05 (lH, s, Ar-OH or 0=C-OH).

13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 39.34-40.59 (3 x (¾), 56.23 (quat C), 81.49 (CH-OH), 117.10, 120.64, 122.41, 123.94, 124.27, 124.80, 124.92, 126.58, 126.81, 2 x 127.38, 127.67, 128.05, 128.30, 3 x 130.21, 130.81, 132.74 (16 x tert. C and 3 x quat. C), 140.77 (quat. C), 143.39 (quat. C), 143.42 (quat. C), 144.88 (quat. C), 145.53 (quat. C), 154.46 (quat. C), 158.14 (quat. C), 165.36 (N-C=0), 172.15 (0-C=0).

Synthesis of 2-hvdroxy-5-(4-(((lS,2S)-l-hvdroxy-2,3-dihvdro-lH,l,H-f2,2,-biindenl-2-yl) methvDbenzamido)b nzoic acid (47):

To a mixture of ethyl 4-(((lS,2S)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH, l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2- yl)methyl)benzoate (18, 200 mg, 0.48 mmol), 5-amino-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (75 mg, 0.48 mmol) and THF (1.0 mL) in a 5 mL microwave vial, was added trimethylaluminium (0.5 mL, 20 % solution in toluene) and the mixture irradiated at 100°C for 5 min. The reaction mixture was quenched with slow addition of 1.5 N HC1 (2 mL) and extracted with ethyl acetate (3 15 mL). Organic layer was washed with water (25 mL), brine (25 mL), dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue purified by preparative HPLC [Kromasil C 18 (250 x 50 mm), flow rate: 40 mL / min, 0.1% TFA in water / MeOH, run time: 40 min] to yield 90 mg (36 %) of the title compound as an off white solid.

LCMS (-H+): observed 516.0, calculated 517.19, molecular formula C33H27N05.

Purity (HPLC): 89 %.

Ή NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): 5 2.72 (1H, d, J = 13.64 Hz, ¾), 2.97 (1H, d, J = 16.92 Hz, Cfcb), 3.01 (1H, d, J = 16.24 Hz, -CH2-), 3.23 (1H, d, J = 13.60 Hz, CH^), 3.49 (1H, d, J = 23.12 Hz, CH2), 3.64 (1H, d, J = 23.12 Hz, CH2), 5.06 (1H, s, CH-OH), 5.85 (1H, br s, CH-OH), 6.43 (1H, s, CH=C), 6.93 (1Ή, d, J = 8.96 Hz, Ar-H), 6.97 (2H, d, J = 8.04 Hz, Ar-H), 7.07 (1H, t, J = 7.28 Hz, Ar-H), 7.17 (1H, t, J = 7.40 Hz, Ar-H), 7.22-7.28 (4H, m, Ar-H), 7.39 (1H, t, J = 3.44 Hz, Ar-H), 7.41 (1H, d, S = 7.28 Hz, Ar-H), 7.72 (2H, d, J = 8.20 Hz, Ar-H), 7.82 (1H, dd, J = 2.60, 8.94 Hz, Ar-H), 8.24 (1H, d, J = 2.48 Hz, Ar-H), 10.09 (1H, s, Ar-OH or 0=C-OH).

53C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 38.47-40.58 (3 x CH2), 56.23 (quat C), 81.48 (CH-OH), 112.82, 1 17.46, 120.64, 122.1 5, 123.94, 124.27, 124.81, 124.91, 126.58, 126.82, 2 x 127.39, 127.68, 128.06, 129.00, 2 x 130.23, 131.35, 132.64 (16 x tert. C and 3 x quat. C), 140.76 (quat. C), 14338 (quat. C), 143.53 (quat. C), 144.87 (quat. C), 145.52 (quat. C), 154.45 (quat. C), 157.77 (quat. C), 165.47 (N-C=0), 172.22 (0-C=0).

IL2 and Autoimmune inflammatory disease.

Cytokines can be produced by various cell populations and have been shown to augment or limit immune responses to pathogens and influence the autoimmune response. One family of cytokines, which uses the common receptor gamma chain (cc), a component of receptors for interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15 and IL-21, has been classically defined as growth and survival factors.

IL-2 production can induce an immune response by promoting the proliferation and generation of CD4+ Thl, CD4+ Th2 and CD8+ CTL effector cells. Many of the immunosuppressive drugs used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases and organ transplant rejection, such as corticosteroids and immune suppressive drugs (ciclosporin, tacrolimus) work by inhibiting the production of IL-2 by antigen-activated T cells. Others (sirolimus) block IL-2R signalling, thereby preventing the clonal expansion and function of antigen-selected T cells [ref: Opposing functions of IL-2 and IL-7 in the regulation of immune responses Shoshana D. Katzman, atrina K. Hoyer, Hans Dooms, Iris . Gratz, Michael D. Rosenblum, Jonathan S. Paw, Sara H. Isakson, Abul K. Abbas. Cytokine 56 (201 1) 1 16-121]

In contrast IL-2 can inhibit the immune response by promoting the survival and functionality of natural (thymic) regulatory T-cells (Tregs), promoting the generation of induced (peripheral) Tregs and inhibiting the generation of CD4+ Thl7 effector cells [ref: IL-2 and autoimmune disease. Anneliese Schimpl , A., Berberich, I, Kneitz, B., Kramer, S., Santner-Nanan, B., Wagner, S., Wolf, M., Hiinig, T. Cytokine & Growth Factor Reviews 13 (2002) 369-378]. Interleukin-2/IL-2R deficiency with time leads to multiorgan inflammation and the formation of autoantibodies of various specificities. Depending on the genetic background, death occurs within a few weeks to a fe months, mostly from autoimmune hemolytic anemia or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) [ref. Sadlack B, Merz H, Schorle H, Schimpl A, Feller AC, Horak I. Ulcerative colitis-like disease in mice with a disrupted interleukin-2 gene. Cell 1993;75:253-61].

IL-2 signalling has been shown to be important in both the initiation and regulation of immune responses. In these dual and opposing roles, IL-2 acts to balance immune response, both driving immune cell activation and subsequent reduction. The potential clinical applicability of either augmenting or inhibiting signals mediated by IL-2 is significant and includes cancer, autoimmune inflammatory diseases, organ transplantation and HIV.

Effect of compounds on IL-2 secretion in T lymphocytes

1. Methodology

The T cell line Jurkat 6.1 (ATCC) was used. Cells were pre-treated for 30min with Ι μΜ or

10μΜ of the respective compound and then stimulated with plate-bound anti-CD3 (BD Pharmingen) and anti-CD28 (AnCell). DMSO was used as vehicle control. The immunosuppressive agent Cyclosporine A was used as a control for inhibition of IL-2 production. After 24hs the supernatant was collected and IL-2 secretion was measured by ELISA.

2. Compound preparation (stock) Compounds were prepared by dissolution in DMSO to yield final concentrations of 1 and lOng/ml

3. Results

Absolute values for IL-2 production:

Compounds IL-2 pg/ml Plate ID

Unstimulated 2 -16.56 2

DMSO Control 2 320.67 2

Cyclos A 2 101.00 2

Unstimulated 2 -16.56 2

10 luM 185.56 2

10 lOuM 1 12.22 2

11 luM 272.22 2

11 lOuM 105.1 1 2

12 luM 240.22 2

12 lOuM 132.44 2

13 luM 276.78 2

13 lOuM 151.78 2

14 luM 214.44 2

14 lOuM 146.44 2

15 luM 207.78 2

15 lOuM 1 13.67 2

16 luM 243.00 2

16 lOuM 171.78 2

17 luM 168.44 2

10 lOuM 56.11 2

18 luM 190.78 2

18 lOuM 79.56 2

19 luM 174.44 2

19 lOuM 81.00 2

20 luM 174.1 1 2

20 lOuM 141.78 2

21 luM 210.89 2

21 lOuM 137.78 2

22 luM 198.56 2

22 lOuM 1 13.33 2

23 luM 191.44 2

23 lOuM 193.56 2

24 luM 202.13 2

24 lOuM 149.63 2

25 luM 208.38 2

25 lOuM 174.25 2

26 luM 202.25 2 26 lOuM 192.63 2

27 luM 350.13 2

27 lOuM 172.88 2

28 luM 214.75 2

28 lOuM 135.63 2

29 luM 220.50 2

29 lOuM 177.88 2

30 luM 191.63 2 .

30 lOuM 174.50 2

31 luM 233.38 2

31 lOuM 225.63 2

32 luM 215.25 2

32 lOuM 74.88 2

33 luM 186.25 2

33 lOuM 74.38 2

34 luM 173.25 2

34 lOuM 71.38 2

35 luM 238.88 2

35 lOuM 189.38 2

36 luM 207.38 2

36 lOuM 138.13 2

37 luM 275.50 2

37 lOuM 79.00 2

38 luM 226.75 2

38 lOuM 268.63 2

Compounds IL-2 pg/ml Plate ID

Unstimulated 3 15.38 3

DMSO Control 3 338.25 3

Cyclos A 3 90.75 3

Stauros 3 1 17.75 3

2 luM 98.71 3

2 lOuM 124.36 3

3 luM 150.07 3

3 lOuM 98.57 3

4 luM 97.21 3

4 lOuM 94.21 3

5 luM 127.29 3

5 lOuM 134.14 3

39 luM 105.94 3

39 lOuM 40.69 3

40 luM 84.86 3

40 lOuM 12.71 3

41 luM 99.50 3

41 lOuM 62.50 3 42 luM 77.71 3

42 lOuM 49.57 3

43 luM 97.57 3

43 lOuM 12.79 3

44 luM 72.50 3

44 lOuM 12.43 3 '

45 luM 56.07 3

45 lOuM 14.29 3

46 luM 92.21 3

46 lOuM 72.07 3

47 luM 99.64 3

47 lOuM 98.79 3

Results of incubation of compounds

The effect of synthetic compounds 2-5, 10-16, 18-38 and 39-47 on release of IL2 from Jurkat cells is demonstrated in Figs. 21 and 22. Compounds were evaluated at 1 and 10 μηι concentrations. Most compounds demonstrated an inhibition of release relative to the negative controls. However, compounds 40 (12.71 pg/ml), 43 (12.79 pg/ml), 44 (12.43 pg/ml), 45 (14.29 pg/ml) and 46 (72.07pg/ml) (Fig. 22) were among the most potent significantly reducing 112 release relative to the negative control (326.67 pg/ml) and approaching the efficacy of ciclosporin (101.00 pg/ml) at 1 μηι. In addition compounds 10 (122.22 pg/ml), 32 (74.88 pg/ml), 33 (74.38 pg/ml) and 34 (71.38 pg/ml) (Fig. 21) were also potent significantly reducing IL-2 release relative to the negative control (320.67 pg/ml) Conversely compound 27 potentiates release of IL2 ( 350.13 pg/ml) at 1 μπι greater than the negative control (338.25 pg/ml). IL-2 signalling has been shown to be important in both the initiation and regulation of immune responses. In these dual and opposing roles, IL-2 acts to balance immune response, both driving immune cell activation and subsequent reduction. The potential clinical applicability of either augmenting or inhibiting signals mediated by IL-2 is significant and includes cancer, autoimmune inflammatory diseases, organ transplantation and HIV.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is an antiinflammatory immune disease which consists of two idiopathic inflammatory diseases, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's Disease (CD). The greatest distinction between CD and UC is the range of inflamed bowel tissue. Inflammation in CD is discontinuously segmented, known as regional enteritis, while UC is superficial inflammation extending proximally and continuously from the rectum. At present the cause of IBD is unknown. The disease seems to be related to an exaggerated mucosal immune response to infection of the intestinal epithelium because of an imbalance of pro-inflammatory and immune- regulatory molecules. The inheritance of patterns of IBD, suggest a complex genetic component of pathogenesis that may consist of several combined genetic mutations. Currently no specific diagnosis exists for IBD, but as an understanding of pathogenesis improves so will testing methods. Treatment of IBD consists of inducing and maintaining remission. IBD patients may be maintained on remission by use of a 5-aminosalycilate. However, while the use of aminosalycilates in UC provides considerable benefit, both in inducing remission in mild to moderate disease and in preventing relapse, the usefulness of these drugs to maintain remission in CD is questionable and is no longer recommended. The mainstay of treatment of active disease is a corticosteroid, commonly used for limited periods to return both UC and CD patients to remission, though budesonide, designed for topical administration with limited systemic absorption, has no benefit in maintaining remission. Alternatives, such as the immunosuppressive drugs azathioprine and mercaptopurine, together with methotrexate and cyclosporine have limited efficacy and the capability of inducing grave adverse effects. Anti-TNFa antibodies such as infliximab and adalimubab may be used in those patients unresponsive to standard immunosuppressive therapy. However, many patients fail to respond to anti-TNFa therapy, either due to their particular phenotype or by the production of autoantibodies.

Acute murine DSS colitis model

The dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) colitis model is an experimental mouse model that exhibits many of the symptoms observed in human UC, such as diarrhoea, bloody faeces, mucosal ulceration, shortening of the colon, weight loss and alterations in certain colon cytokines. The study is widely used as a model for studying the pathogenesis of UC and also for screening new therapeutic interventions for the treatment of UC.

In these studies, an acute colitis model was used, with 5% DSS administered in the drinking water of BALB/c mice. This dosage regime induces severe acute colitis, by days 7-8 mice had overt rectal bleeding and marked weight loss; unless sacrificed beforehand, all mice would have died by days 10-12. Experiment 1: Relating to compounds 2-6

Mice

Specific Pathogen-Free BALB/c mice, 6-8 weeks of age, were obtained from a commercial supplier (Harlan UK). Mice were fed irradiated diet and housed in individually ventilated cages (Tecniplast UK) under positive pressure.

DSS treatment

DSS (5%) was dissolved in drinking water. Compounds were administered orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg or 30 mg/kg on days 0-7, and mice were culled on day 8 or day 9, depending on the severity of the disease. The mice were checked each day for morbidity and the weight of individual mice was recorded. Induction of colitis was determined upon autopsy, length of colon and histology. Colons were recovered and stored at -20°C for immunological analysis. All of the compounds and experimental groups are randomly alphabetically labelled. Throughout experiments all data recording was performed in a blind manner. The codes on boxes / groups were not broken until after the data was analysed i.e. boxes labelled A, B, C etc were identified as untreated, DSS-treated, or DSS + compound -treated.

To quantify the extent of colitis, a disease activity index (DAI) was determined based on weight loss, faecal blood and stool consistency. A score was given for each parameter, with the sum of the scores used as the DAI. For each treatment group n=8.

Definitions:

'Loose stool - stool not formed, but becomes a paste on handling. Diarrhea - no stool formation, fur stained around the anus.

¾ross bleeding- fresh blood on fur around the anus with excessive blood in the stool.

Administration of compounds

All compounds were prepared for oral gavage (0.1 mL per os (p.o.) per 10 g body weight) as a suspension in 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose/2% Tween 80, at a dose of 3-30 mg Kg. Compounds as free acid were initially dissolved in absolute alcohol and diluted with 14+1 with 0.5% carboxymethyl, cellulose/2% Tween 80; this resulted in a fine precipitate in suspension while N- Methyl-(D)-Glucamine salts were soluble in the vehicle alone.

Effect of individual enantiomers compounds 2, 3, 4 and 5 in 5% DSS murine colitis

BALB/c given 5% DSS in drinking water were administered compounds 2, 3, 4 and 5 at 30 mg/kg p.o. as a suspension in 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose/ 2% Tween 80 daily for 7 days. DAI measures the extent of the disease in this model. Compound 4 was without activity on this variable, there not being any significant (P>0.05) difference in DAI at any timepoint (Fig. 3). At day 7, both compound 2 and compound 5 significantly (P<0.5) reduced DAI by a considerable margin, from 9.0 ± 0.53 for vehicle controls to 3.2 ± 0.73 for compound 5 and 2.5 ± 0.71 for compound 2, there being no significant difference between the two (Fig.4). In comparison, compound 3 reduced DAI to only 5.3 ± 0.6. This was significantly (P>0.05) less potent than either compound 2 or compound 5. Further, while the DAI in compound 3-treated mice was statistically (P<0.05) less than vehicle controls at day 7 (Fig. 4), at day 6 there was no statistical (P>0.05) difference between compound 3 and vehicle (Fig. 3). In conclusion, of the four enantiomers, compounds 2, 3, 4 and 5, both compounds 2 and 5 are highly active in this model at 30 mg/kg. Compound 3 has minimal activity which is significantly (P<0.05) less than compound 2 and compound 5. Compound 4 is almost devoid of activity in this 5% DSS murine colitis model.

Selection of a salt of compounds 2 and 5

As a consequence of the limited aqueous solubility of the enantiomers compound 2 and compound 5, we attempted the synthesis of five salts of compound 5. The sodium salt, potassium salt, calcium salt, a-methylbenzylamine salt and N-Methyl-(D)-Glucamine salt were synthesised. The sodium and calcium salt were unsuccessful. The three salts of compound 5, named potassium salt, α-methylbenzylamine salt and N-Methyl-(D)-Glucamine salt were used for solubility and partition coefficient (logP) studies.

The solubility of the four compounds were determined:

*Estimated value

Compound 5 N-Methyl-(D)-Glucamine salt (compound 7) was determined, surprisingly, to be the most soluble compound from this group of analogous compounds by a considerable margin, with a solubility of >60,000 μg/mL in Milli-RO water, 0.14 μg/mL in pH 4 buffer, >60,000 μg/mL in pH 7.0 and >3,000 μg/mL in pH 9.0 buffer. Almost identical values were obtained with compound 2 N-Methyl-(D)-Glucamine (compound 6) with a solubility of >60,000 μg/mL in Milli-RO water, 0.5 μg/mL in pH4 buffer, >60,000 μg/mL in pH 7.0 and >3,000 μg/mL in pH 9.0 and buffer. The partition coefficient of compound 5 and related analogous compounds was investigated using the HPLC method (reverse phase C18 HPLC column) at neutral, acidic and alkaline pH.

The partition coefficient of the four compounds were determined:

Neutral Basic Acid

Compound

LoglO POW LoglO POW LoglO POW

Compound 5 3.7 3.7 3.9 Compound 5 Potassium salt 3.7 3.7 3.9

Compound 5 Methyl-benzylamine

3.6 3.6 3.9

salt

Compound 5 N-Methyl-D-Glucamine

3.5 3.5 3.8

salt

The partition coefficient of each salt of compound 5 was found to be similar. It is suggested that this is happening because when the salt is in solution the compound dissociates into the parent compound 5 and the associated salt ion. As a result of this the measured partition coefficient was from the parent ion rather than the salt molecules.

The partition coefficient (LoglO POW) of compound 2 N-Methyl-D-Glucamine salt (compound 6) was successfully determined in neutral, basic and acidic conditions as 3.5, 4.3 and 2.6 respectively.

N-Methyl-(D)-Glucamine was chosen as the salt candidate for both compound 2 and compound 5. Effect of enantiomers compound 2 and compound 5 and their N-Methyl-(D)-Glucamine salts (compounds 6 and 7) at 10 mg/kg in 5% DSS murine colitis

Given that both compounds 2 and 5 show considerable activity in the 5% DSS model at 30 mg/kg, we then re-examined their activity, together with their N-Methyl-(D)-Glucamine salts at the lower dose of 10 mg/kg, given daily for 7 days as a suspension or solution in 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose/2% Tween 80. No adjustment was made in the dosages of the salts to compensate for their increased molecular weight. Both compounds 5 and 7, at 10 mg/kg, had no significant (P>0.05) effect on DAI in the 5% DSS murine colitis model when compared to vehicle control (see Fig. 5). In contrast, at day 7, both compound 2 and compound 6, the N- Methyl-(D)-Glucamine salt, at 10 mg/kg significantly (PO.05) and potently reduced DAI from 9.3 ± 0.51 (vehicle) to 2.1 ± 0.7 and 3.3 ± 0.52 respectively (Fig. 6). In conclusion, compound 2 (and its N-Methyl-(D)-Glucamine salt, compound 6) is the most potent of the four enantiomers by a considerable margin, and the only enantiomer to retain activity at the lower dose level of 10 mg/kg. Effect of a range of doses of compound 6 and a comparison with Prednisolone on 5% DSS murine colitis

Compound 6 was selected as the most favoured enantiomer. The activity of compound 6 in the 5% DSS murine model of colitis at varying dose levels was tested to acertain if there was a dose/response relationship and to make a comparison with a potent oral steroid, Prednisolone, commonly used to return patients suffering from acute exacerbations of IBD to remission.

Mice were administered compound 6 at dose levels 3, 10 and 30 mg/Kg (equivalent to 6.6-20 mg Kg of the compound 2). A group of DSS-treated mice was also treated with prednisolone, 5 mg/Kg. Prednisolone is a corticosteroid in clinical use in the treatment of human IBD and the quantity used in this study is the optimal dose of prednisolone for this model. After 3 days of treatment of BALB/c mice with 5% DSS in the drinking water signs of colitis were apparent. This was manifested as weight loss (Fig. 7) and an increase in the disease DAI (Fig. 8). However, following oral administration daily for 7 days, compound 6 at three doses (3, 10 and 30 mg/Kg) caused no overt reactions in mice. Compound 6 ameliorated the severity of colitis following acute DSS treatment in multiple parameters of disease examined. The capacity of compound 6 to ameliorate disease in the DSS model was dose-dependent. Compound 6 at 30 mg/Kg was therapeutic in the DSS model at a comparable, or better, efficacy relative to prednisolone at 5 mg/Kg. The severity of these symptoms are progressive; by day 7 the DSS-treated mice have lost up to 15% of their body weight and all mice have perfuse rectal bleeding. The DAI values on the day of autopsy showed that mice treated with compound 6 3-30 mg/kg had at each dose level, a significantly (PO.05 - P<0.01) lower DAI than vehicle controls. Prednisolone (5 mg/kg) also significantly (P<0.01 ; ANOVA; Dunnett Multiple Comparison Test) reduced DAI scores (Fig. 9).

At autopsy on day 7, there was significant shortening of colon length ( P<0.05 - P<0.01 ; ANOVA; Dunnett Multiple Comparison Test ) in all DSS treated groups compared to colons from mice not treated with DSS (Fig. 10). The lowest dose of 3 mg/kg of compound 6 did not have a significant effect in inhibiting colon shortening when compared to vehicle controls whereas the 10 and 30 mg/kg groups and the Prednisolone group did have a significant effect. Compound 6 at 30 mg/kg was significantly better than Prednisolone (P<0.05; ANOVA; Dunnett Multiple Comparison Test) (Fig. 10).

Histology sections of the distal colon showed extensive crypt damage and cell infiltration following DSS treatment (Fig. 1 1).

The extent of colon damage was quantified using an arbitrary scoring system. Compound 6 at both 10 and 30 mg/Kg, caused a dose-dependent and highly statistically significant reduction (P<0.01 ; Kruksal-Wallis ANOVA; Dunnett Multiple Comparison Test) in colon pathology relative to the vehicle group. In contrast, there was no significant improvement in histology scores with the prednisolone (5 mg/Kg) treated group relative to vehicle-treated mice (Fig. 12). Consistent with the histology results showing inflammation in the colons of mice, there was a significant (P<0.001 ; Kruksal-Wallis ANOVA; Dunnett Multiple Comparison Test) elevation in colon myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in DSS-treated mice administered vehicle only. Colonic myeloperoxidase activity (MPO), representing the level of inflammatory neutrophil cell infiltration into the gut wall which was increased by almost 8-fold by DSS treatment but was significantly (P<0.05) reduced by both compound 6 at 30 mg/kg and Prednisolone, at 63% and 54% respectively by day 7 (Fig. 13).

Quantification of levels of colon cytokines showed that DSS-treatment induces elevated IL 1β (Fig. 14(a)), TNFa (Fig. 14(b)) and 1L6 (Fig. 14(c))., to 0.744 ± 0.076 ng/mg, 1.478 ± 0.378 ng/mg and 1.057 ± 0.1784 ng/mg respectively. In each case, compound 6 caused a significant (P<0.05, 30 mg/kg) and dose-dependant reduction in these cytokine levels. Prednisolone (5 mg/kg) also reduced (p<0.05) these increases in cytokine levels; for each cytokine there was no significant difference between the effect of prednisolone 5 mg/kg and compound 6 at the higher dose level of 30 mg/kg at day 7

To summarise, following oral administration daily for 7 days, compound 6 at three doses (3, 10 and 30 mg/Kg) caused no overt reactions in mice. Compound 6 ameliorated the severity of colitis following acute 5% DSS treatment by multiple parameters of disease examined and the capacity to ameliorate the disease is dose-dependent. Further, compound 6 at 30 mg/ g was therapeutic in the DSS model at a comparable or better efficacy, relative to prednisolone (5 mg/Kg).

Chronic IL 10" 7 " Model

Mice with a deletion in the IL10""A" gene spontaneously develop chronic colitis, with the age of onset and the severity of the disease being dependent on background mouse strain and the conditions in which the animals are housed. The onset of colitis in IL10" _ ~ mice housed under the conditions used in this study was also strain dependent, with an earlier onset and greater severity, in terms of mortality, in BALB/c strain mice relative to C57BL/6 strain animals. In this experiment, animals received oral treatment on a MWF regime over 9 weeks. Initially, both groups of mice progressively gain weight (Fig. 15). Vehicle treated mice stopped gaining weight from week 5 of treatment, whereas compound 6-treated mice maintained weight gain until week 8. By week 9 animals had marked weight loss, with one moribund animal humanely killed on day 60 in each group. As other mice were losing weight and developing clinical symptoms of disease, both groups were culled at week 9 (day 63) and analysed. While there were greater mortalities in the vehicle-treated group (25%) relative to compound 6 treated mice (9.2%) by Kaplan-Meier analysis, there was no statistical difference in survival of IL10_ " mice over the 9 weeks.

Serum was recovered from mice and Serum Amyloid A (SAA) analysed as a marker for severity of colitis. There were significantly (P<0.05; Student's t-test) reduced SAA levels in compound 6 treated mice relative to vehicle treated ILIO""7 ' mice (Fig. 16).

Histology sections of colons from ILI O""'" mice treated with vehicle or compound 6 are shown in Fig. 17.

Histology sections of colons from ILIO"7"" mice treated with vehicle or compound 6 were scored. The extent of colon pathology was significantly reduced (P<0.05; Student's t-test) in ILIO"7"" mice receiving compound relative to mice treated with vehicle (Fig. 18). To summarise, oral treatment with compound 6 (300 mg/kg/week) in ILIO"7"" BALB/c strain mice, using a MWF regime over 9 weeks, delayed weight loss and reduced deaths from colitis relative to vehicle-treated mice. In this model of chronic colitis, compound 6 significantly reduced disease indices with respect to a serum marker of colon inflammation and the degree of inflammation and damage to the colon. This is particularly noteworthy in view of the fact that the plasma half-life (ti/2) for compound 6 is 3 hours in the rat. With the standard MWF dosing schedule, mice will have been unexposed to compound 6 for substantial periods during the experiment.

Experiment 2: relating to compounds 31 and 47.

1. Procedures 2.1 Animals and caging

A total of 90 BDF1 (H Pylori-ires, murine norovirus-free) male mice (Harlan Laboratories, UK) were used in the study. Animals were 8-10 weeks old on supply and used at 10-12 weeks of age. All mice were held in individually ventilated cages (IVCs) in an SPF (Specific Pathogen Free) barrier unit. The animals were identified by numbered cages and by ear punches.

2.2 Diet and animal welfare

The animals were fed Rat and Mouse Expanded diet from B & K. Both feed and water (from drinking bottles) were available ad libitum. There was a constant room temperature of 21 ± 2°C and a mean relative humidity of 55 ± 10%. The day-night cycle was constant, with light and dark phases of 12 hours each. Animal health was monitored daily and cages were cleaned at regular intervals.

2.3 Groups, dosages, administration and formulations

Mice were randomised into study groups. All the mice in any one cage received the same treatment and were ear punched for identification purposes. Daily body weight measurements were used to calculate the volume of test item or vehicle administered in the applicable groups.

2.4 Preparation and administration of DSS and test items

DSS DSS (MP Biomedicals 021601 1090, lot# M2709) was prepared as a 5% (w/v) solution in the drinking water and made fresh daily on days 0 to 6 inclusive. DSS was administered from day 0 to day 7.

Compounds 31 and 47 Test items were were stored at -20°C until the initiation of the study. Each test item was formulated as a homogenous suspension in 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC, Sigma C4888) in sterile water (Sigma W3500, lot# RNBC 1419), using an Ultraturax homogeniser, on study day -1. Compound 31 was formulated at 2mg/ml and 47 was formulated at 4mg/ml. After formulation the test item and the vehicle stocks anonymised with a letter code. All solutions were stored at 4°C during the study, with 3.8ml of each suspension being dispensed daily. Test items were administered by oral gavage, daily at 09.00hrs, at lOml/kg, from study day 0 to study day 6.

5-ASA

5-ASA (5-Aminosalicylic acid, Sigma A3537, Iot# 05 1M1878V) was aliquoted into preweighed amounts between 71 and 84mg. Like test item suspensions, these aliquots were anonymised by a letter code. Individual aliquots were formulated as a lOmg/ml suspension in 0.5% CMC (Sigma C4888) in sterile water (Sigma W3500, lot# RNBC 1419) on each day of dosing. 5-ASA was administered by oral gavage, daily at 09.00hrs, at lOml/kg to give a dose of lOOmg/kg, from study day 0 to study day 6. 2.5 Clinical examinations Any animal demonstrating more than 15% weight loss was considered unwell and treatment may have been withheld. Any animal was culled if the weight loss was greater than 20%. Animal well-being was monitored daily. Once daily from day 0 until the end of the study, all mice were weighed and assessed for stool consistency, and the presence of overt blood in the stool or around the anus according to the criteria in 2.1

Weight Loss Overt blood

Score Stool consistency

(% day 0 weight) (in stool/around anus) 0 < 1 % Normal None

1 > 1% <5% Slight diarrhoea Slight

2 >5% < 10% Moderate diarrhoea Moderate

3 > 10% <15% Heavy diarrhoea Severe

4 > 15%

Table 0.1 Scoring criteria for in-life disease parameters.

At necropsy, observation of stool in the large bowel was used to supplement in-life observation. If the large bowel was empty and no in-life observation was made, then a default score of 1 was given for stool consistency, in addition to the standard observations detailed above, mice were housed individually for a period of up to 30 minutes, in order to enhance the probability of make a stool observation; this was only performed for mice in the main study groups. Faecal occult blood tests were also performed on observed stools for the main study group, using Hemoccult cards (Becton Coulter), according to the manufacturer's instructions.

Effect of single doses of compounds 47 and 31 and in murine DSS (model 2) at day 7.

Initial results show , that in comparison with vehicle control, compound 47 does not result in an increase in loss of body weight in the DSS murine colitis model and is comparable with 5ASA (Fig.19). In addition both compound 47 and compound 31 reduced DAI comparable or equal to 5ASA in comparison with vehicle (Fig.20). This shows that these compounds have comparable activity to 5 ASA on these parameters of the disease model and may have use in treatment of IBD.

Fig. 21 is a bar chart illustrating the effect of compounds on IL2 release from Jurkat cells. Fig. 22 is a bar chart illustrating the effect of compounds on IL2 release from Jurkat cells.

The invention is not limited to the embodiments hereinbefore described which may be varied in detail. Appendix 1

List of chemical abbreviations used

aq aqueous

b.p. boiling point

CDCI3 chloroform-d

CH(OCH3)3 trimethylsilyl orthoformate

C02 carbon dioxide

DCM dichloromethane dlW distilled ionized water

DMSO dimethyl sulphoxide

Et20 ether

EtOH ethanol

H20 water

HC1 hydrochloric acid

IR infra red

IPA isopropyl alcohol

KC1 potassium chloride

M molar

min minutes

μΐ microlitres

mM milli-molar

m.p. melting point

N2 nitrogen

NaBH4 sodium borohydride

NaOH sodium hydroxide

Na2S04 sodium sulphate

NMR nuclear magnetic resonance o2 oxygen

RT room temperature

¾uOH tert butanol ¾uO potassium tert butoxide

S.E.M. standard error of mean

THF tetrahydrofuran

TLC thin layer chromatography

μΐ microliters

Triflic Acid trifluoromethanesulfonic acid

TMS Triflate trimethyl silyl trifluoromethanesulfonate v/v volume per volume

w/v weight per volume

emission wavelength

λ-exc excitation wavelength

List of biological abbreviations used

5-ASA 5-aminosalicylic acid

DAI Disease Activity Index

DSS Dextran Sulphate Sodium

IBD Inflammatory Bowel Disease

IVC Individually ventilated cages

PO Myeloperoxidase

PBS Phosphate buffered saline

PEG Polyethylene glycol

p.o. per-os

p.r. per-rectum

q.d. quaq e-die

SD Standard deviation

SPF Specific pathogen free

v/v Volume/volume

w/v Weight/volume Appendix 2

X-ray studies

A single crystal X-ray analysis was carried out on compound 2 (S)-(-)-methylbenzylamine salt (compound 8), using a SuperNova, Dual, Cu at zero, Atlas Diffractometer and the parameters outlined in Table 1.

Table 1. Data collection and structure refinement for compound 8, the (S)-(-)- methylbenzylamine salt of compound 2.

Diffractometer SuperNova, Dual, Cu at zero, Atlas

Radiation source SuperNova (Cu) X-ray Source, Cu Ka

Data collection method Omega scans

Theta range for data collection 3.74 to 76.22°

Index ranges -13 < h≤ 13, - 1 1 < k≤ 12, -14 < l < 14

Reflections collected 12753

Independent reflections 5263 [R(int) = 0.0196]

Coverage of independent reflections 99.4 %

Variation in check reflections N/A

Absorption correction Semi-empirical from equivalents

Max. and min. transmission 1.00000 and 0.90238

Structure solution technique direct

Structure solution program Bruker SHELXTL

Refinement technique Full-matrix least-squares on

Refinement program Bruker SHELXTL

Function minimized ∑w(F0 2-Fc 2

Data / restraints / parameters 5263 / 1 / 363

Goodness-of-fit on F2 1.007

0.001

Final R indices

5161 data; Ι>2σ(Ι) Rl = 0.0321 , wR2 = 0.0857

all data Rl = 0.0327, wR2 = 0.0865

Weighting scheme w=l / [σ2 (Fo 2)+(0.0600P)2+0.2200P]

where P=(F0 2+2Fc 2)/3

Absolute structure parameter 0.04(14) Extinction coefficient 0.0035(5)

Largest diff. peak and hole 0.214 and -0.154 eA"3

Refinement summary:

Ordered Non-H atoms, XYZ Freely refining

Ordered Non-H atoms, U Anisotropic

H atoms (on carbon), XYZ Idealized positions riding on attached atoms

H atoms (on carbon), U Appropriate multiple of U(eq) for bonded atom

H atoms (on heteroatoms), XYZ Freely refining

H atoms (on heteroatoms), U Isotropic

Disordered atoms, OCC Refined with a two part model constrained to a total of unity

Disordered atoms, XYZ freely refining

Disordered atoms, U freely refining

The single crystal X-ray data establishes that the structure of compound 8 is monoclinic, space group P2\, with one molecule of compound 8 in the asymmetric unit (Table 2).

Table 2. Sample and crystal data for compound 8

Crystallization solvents Diethyl ether, MeOH, THF

Crystallization method Slow evaporation

Empirical formula C34H33N.03

Formula weight 503.61

Temperature 100(1) K

Wavelength 1.54178 A

Crystal size 0.50 x 0.50 0.50 mm

Crystal habit Colourless Block

Crystal system Monoclinic

Space group P2i

Unit cell dimensions a = 11.0344(2) A <x= 90°

b = 10.1727(2) A β= 93.682(2)°

c = 1 1.8532(2) A Y 90°

Volume 1327.77(4) A3 Z > 2

Density (calculated) 1.260 Mg/m3

Absorption coefficient 0.627 mm-1

F(000) 536

• The absolute stereochemistry was determined as S, S at C9 and CI O for compound 2 and S at C33 for the methylbenzylamine cation. The assignment was made from consideration of both the Flack parameter which was determined to be 0.04(14) and from the a priori knowledge of the stereochemistry of the salt former.

• The absolute stereochemistry was also determined using Bayesian statistics on the Bijvoet pair differences which resulted in a probability of the stereochemistry at the chiral centres C9, C IO and C33 being S, S and S respectively as 1.000 and R, R and R as 0.000. This supports the assignment of 5", S and S for C9, CIO and C33 respectively from the Flack parameter measurement.

• The calculated X-ray powder diffraction pattern from the single crystal X-ray structure was in agreement with the stereochemistry shown in Figure 2 (or the following).

Table 3. Atomic coordinates and equivalent isotropic, atomic displacement parameters, (A2), for compound 8. U(eq) is defined as one third of the trace of the orthogonalised Ujj tensor. x/a y/b z/c U(eq)

01 0.02763(10) 0.17316(1 1) 1.16556(8) 0.0228(2)

02 0.07430(9) -0.03465(10) 1.12294(7) 0.0194(2)

03 0.10561(8) 0.01057(10) 1.90142(8) 0.0184(2)

CI 0.08315(12) -0.12167(14) 1.47373(12) 0.0198(3)

C2 0.07248(13) -0.09752(14) 1.35802(12) 0.0192(3)

C3 0.08014(11) 0.02912(13) 1.31666(11) 0.0158(3)

C4 0.05975(1 1) 0.05851(14) 1.19195(1 1) 0.0164(3)

C5 0.10196(12) 0.13219(14) 1.39262(11) 0.0184(3)

C6 0.11261(13) 0.10790(14) 1.50817(11) 0.0197(3)

C7 0.10101(1 1) -0.01884(14) 1.55106(10) 0.0164(3)

C8 0.09988(12) -0.04205(14) 1.67717(10) 0.0177(3) C9 0.22568( -0.05199( ;i4) 1.7419K ;io) 0.0160(3)

CIO 0.2098K ;i2) -0.063901 ;i4) 1.8723 K ;io) 0.0173(3)

Cl l 0.32285( :i2) -0.00001( ;i4) 1.92450( :i i) 0.0183(3)

C12 0.366951 ;i3) -0.003231 ;i5) 2.03747< :i i) 0.0217(3)

C13 0.465231 ;i3) 0.07703( :i6) 2.07062( ;i2) 0.0263(3)

C14 0.51796( :i3) 0.157331 :i ) 1.99312( ;i3) 0.0271(3)

C15 0.473681 ;i3) 0.1606K :i5) 1.87974( ;i3) 0.0237(3)

C16 0.374761 ;i2) 0.08173( :i4) 1.84684( : i) 0.0188(3)

C17 0.30303( ;i2) 0.07486( ;i4) 1.73362( ;i i) 0.0189(3)

C18 0.295361 ;i2) -0.17122( :i4) 1.703801 ;io) 0.0170(3)

C19 0.244931 ;i3) -0.29849( :i5) 1.68674( :i i) 0.0224(3)

C20 0.34284( ;i3) -0.38466( ;i5) 1.64945( ;io) 0.0202(3)

C21 0.34340( :i5) -0.51740( :i6) 1.620931 ;i2) 0.0279(3)

C22 0.45250( ;i 8) -0.57426( ;i ) 1.593081 ;i3) 0.0363(8)

C23 0.55837( :i6) -0.50075( ,18) 1.59165( ;i3) 0.0317(4)

C24 0.55735( :i ) -0.36697( ;i 7) 1.61785( ;i2) 0.0269(3)

C25 0.44911( ;i3) -0.31016( ;i5) 1.64729( 0.0212(3)

C26 0.42215( ;i ) -0.17370( ,16) 1.6824K ;i2) 0.0238(3)

C18A 0.29536( ;i2) -0.17122( ;i4) 1.70380( ;io) 0.0170(3)

C19A 0.24493( ;i3) -0.29849( ;i5) 1.68674( :i i) 0.0224(3)

C20A 0.34284( ;i3) -0.38466( ,15) 1.64945( ;io) 0.0202(3)

C21A 0.34340( :i 5) -0.51740( ;i6) 1.62093( -12) 0.0279(3)

C22A 0.45250( ;i 8) -0.57426( 17) 1.59308( 13) 0.0279(3)

C23A 0.55837( :i6) -0.50075( ,18) 1.59165( ,13) 0.0317(4)

C24A ' 0.55735( :i ) -0.36697( 17) 1.61785( 12) 0.0269(3)

C25A 0.44911( ;i3) -0.31016( 15) 1.64729( 1 1) 0.0212(3)

C26A 0.42215( ;i ) -0.17370( ,16) 1.6824K ,12) 0.0238(3)

Nl -0.09024( -0.21952( 13) 1.02800( 10) 0.0194(2)

C27 -0.1854K ;i2) 0.06679( 15) 0.92258( 12) 0.0220(3)

C28 -0.19466( -13) 0.15069( ,16) 0.8298K 13) 0.0256(3)

C29 -0.23606( ,14) 0.10317( 17) 0.7242K 13) 0.0273(3)

C30 -0.26855( 15) -0.02757( 18) 0.71 195( 13) 0.0301(3)

C31 -0.26063( ;i4) -0.1 1089( 16) 0.8048K 13) 0.0255(3)

C32 -0.21928( -1 ) -0.06417( 15) 0.91 135( 1 1) 0.0200(3)

C33 -0.21444( 12) -0.15827< 15) 1.01084( 12) 0.0205(3)

C34 -0.24587( ;i4) -0.09613( 16) 1.12172( 13) 0.0256(3)

Table 4. Selected bond lengths, (A), for compound 8

01 -C4 1.2528(18) 02-C4 1.2688(17)

03-ClO 1.4373(16) 03-H3A 0.88(2)

C1-C2 1.3909(19) C1-C7 1.3964(19)

C2-C3 1.383(2) C3-C5 1.3929(19)

C3-C4 1.5108(17) C5-C6 1.3893(18)

C6-C7 1.395(2) C7-C8 1.5141(16)

C8-C9 1.5457(17) C9-C18 1.5203(19) C9-C17 1.5537(19) C9-C10 1.5713(16)

ClO-Cll 1.5040(18) C11-C16 1.391(2)

C11-C12 1.3953(17) C12-C13 1.394(2)

C13-C14 1.385(2) C14-C15 1.401(2)

C15-C16 1.390(2) C16-C17 1.5152(18)

C18-C19 1.418(2) C18-C26 1.4380(19)

C19-C20 1.481(2) C20-C21 1.392(2)

C20-C25 1.398(2) C21-C22 1.394(2)

C22-C23 1.388(3) C23-C24 1.396(2)

C24-C25 1.391(2) C25-C26 1.485(2)

N1-C33 1.5073(18) N1-H1B 0.91(2)

N1-H1C 0.93(2) N1-H1D 0.90(2)

C27-C32 1.388(2) C27-C28 1.390(2)

C28-C29 1.391(2) C29-C30 1.383(3)

C30-C31 1.387(2) C31-C32 1.398(2)

C32-C33 1.5172(19) C33-C34 1.518(2)

Table 5. Selected bond angles, (°), for compound 8

C10-O3-H3A 107.0(15) C2-C1-C7 120.96(13)

C3-C2-C1 120.72(13) C2-C3-C5 118.95(12)

C2-C3-C4 121.50(12) C5-C3-C4 119.48(12)

01-C4-02 125.44(12) 01-C4-C3 116.78(12)

02-C4-C3 117.77(12) C6-C5-C3 120.23(13)

C5-C6-C7 121.32(13) C6-C7-C1 117.75(12)

C6-C7-C8 120.71(12) C1-C7-C8 121.43(13)

C7-C8-C9 115.87(10) C18-C9-C8 111.09(11)

C18-C9-C17 110.70(11) C8-C9-C17 113.19(11)

C18-C9-C10 108.74(10) C8-C9-C10 109.89(10)

C17-C9-C10 102.86(10) 03-ClO-Cll 109.18(11)

O3-C10-C9 109.69(10) C11-C10-C9 103.26(10)

C16-C11-C12 121.07(13) C16-C11-C10 110.61(11)

C12-C11-C10 127.84(13) C13-C12-C11 118.29(14)

C14-C13-C12 120.72(13) C13-C14-C15 120.99(14)

C16-C15-C14 118.34(14) C15-C16-C11 120.58(13)

C15-C16-C17 129.14(13) C11-C16-C17 110.16(12)

C16-C17-C9 103.90(11) C19-C18-C26 109.64(13)

C19-C18-C9 124.70(12) C26-C18-C9 125.65(13)

C18-C19-C20 107.21(12) C21-C20-C25 120.31(14)

C21-C20-C19 131.41(14) C25-C20-C19 108.27(13)

C20-C21-C22 118.51(15) C23-C22-C21 121.31(15)

C22-C23-C24 120.24(15) C25-C24-C23 118.68(15)

C24-C25-C20 120.94(14) C24-C25-C26 130.48(14)

C20-C25-C26 108.57(13) C18-C26-C25 106.29(13)

C33-N1-H1B 108.3(13) C33-N1-H1C 112.0(13)

HIB-NI-HIC 107.4(18) C33-N1-H1D 111.6(13) HIB-Nl-HID 112.5(18) H1C-N1-H1D 105.0(17)

C32-C27-C28 120.51(14) C27-C28-C29 120.09(15)

C30-C29-C28 119.78(14) C29-C30-C31 120.10(14)

C30-C31-C32 120.61(15) C27-C32-C31 118.89(14)

C27-C32-C33 122.36(13) C31-C32-C33 118.74(13)

N1-C33-C32 110.61(11) N1-C33-C34 108.16(11)

C32-C33-C34 114.30(12)

Table 6. Selected torsion angles, (°), for compound 8

C7-C1-C2-C3 0.4(2) C1-C2-C3-C5 1.7(2)

C1-C2-C3-C4 -175.50(12) C2-C3-C4-01 156.41(13)

C5-C3-C4-01 -20.75(18) C2-C3-C4-02 -22.38(18)

C5-C3-C4-02 160.46(12) C2-C3-C5-C6 -1.7(2)

C4-C3-C5-C6 175.57(12) C3-C5-C6-C7 -0.5(2)

C5-C6-C7-C1 2.5(2) C5-C6-C7-C8 -173.65(12)

C2-C1-C7-C6 -2.52(19) C2-C1-C7-C8 173.64(12)

C6-C7-C8-C9 -83.92(16) C1-C7-C8-C9 100.03(15)

C7-C8-C9-C18 -64.43(16) C7-C8-C9-C17 60.83(15)

C7-C8-C9-C10 175.19(12) C18-C9-C 10-O3 -155.49(11)

C8-C9-C 10-O3 -33.70(15) C17-C9-C 10-O3 87.10(12)

C18-C9-C10-C11 88.22(13) C8-C9-C10-C11 -149.99(11)

C17-C9-C10-C11 -29.19(13) O3-C10-C11-C16 -96.36(13)

C9-C10-C11-C16 20.29(15) O3-C10-C11-C12 75.67(18)

C9-C10-C11-C12 -167.68(14) C16-C11-C12-C13 -0.5(2)

C10-C11-C12-C13 -171.75(13) C11-C12-C13-C14 -0.3(2)

C12-C13-C14-C15 0.3(2) C13-C14-C15-C16 0.4(2)

C14-C15-C16-C11 -1.2(2) C14-C15-C16-C17 174.32(14)

C12-C11-C16-C15 1.2(2) C10-C11-C16-C15 173.88(13)

C12-C11-C16-C17 -175.05(12) C10-C11-C16-C17 -2.40(16)

C15-C16-C17-C9 167.34(14) CU-C16-C17-C9 -16.79(15)

C18-C9-C17-C16 -88.09(12) C8-C9-C17-C16 146.44(11)

C10-C9-C17-C16 27.92(13) C8-C9-C18-C19 -44.46(16)

C17-C9-C18-C19 -171.10(11) C10-C9-C18-C19 76.60(15)

C8-C9-C18-C26 137.25(13) C17-C9-C18-C26 10.60(17)

C10-C9-C18-C26 -101.70(15) C26-C18-C19-C20 -1.81(14)

C9-C18-C19-C20 179.67(11) C18-C19-C20-C21 -179.77(14)

C18-C19-C20-C25 1.34(15) C25-C20-C21-C22 1.5(2)

C19-C20-C21-C22 -177.24(14) C20-C21-C22-C23 -1.1(2)

C21-C22-C23-C24 -0.3(2) C22-C23-C24-C25 1.2(2)

C23-C24-C25-C20 -0.7(2) C23-C24-C25-C26 177.73(14)

C21-C20-C25-C24 -0.6(2) C19-C20-C25-C24 178.39(12)

C21-C20-C25-C26 -179.41(12) C19-C20-C25-C26 -0.38(15)

C19-C18-C26-C25 1.57(15) C9-C18-C26-C25 -179.92(11)

C24-C25-C26-C18 -179.32(14) C20-C25-C26-C18 -0.71(15)

C32-C27-C28-C29 -1.2(2) C27-C28-C29-C30 0.3(2) C28-C29-C30-C31 0.4(2) C29-C30-C31-C32 -0.3(2) C28-C27-C32-C31 1.2(2) C28-C27-C32-C33 -178.07(13) C30-C31-C32-C27 -0.5(2) C30-C31-C32-C33 178.85(14) C27-C32-C33-N1 -86.99(16) C31-C32-C33-N1 93.72(15) C27-C32-C33-C34 35.36(18) C31-C32-C33-C34 -143.93(14)

Table 7. Anisotropic atomic displacement parameters, (A2), for compound 8 The anisotropic atomic displacement factor exponent takes the form: -2 ^ [ h^a*^ UJ J + ... + 2hka* b* U12

Ui i u22 U33 U23 U13 U12

01 0.0325(5) 0.0206(5) 0.0153(4) 0.0025(4) 0.0015(4) 0.0044(4)

02 0.0255(5) 0.0206(5) 0.0123(4) -0.0017(4) 0.0024(3) -0.0014(4)

03 0.0205(4) 0.0232(5) 0.01 16(4) -0.0002(4) 0.0027(3) 0.0016(4)

CI 0.0257(7) 0.0179(7) 0.0159(6) 0.0017(5) 0.0018(5) -0.0028(5)

C2 0.0267(7) 0.0171(7) 0.0139(6) -0.0035(5) 0.0024(5) -0.0019(5)

C3 0.0160(6) 0.0187(7) 0.0128(6) -0.0004(5) 0.0017(4) 0.001 1(5)

C4 0.0166(5) 0.0193(7) 0.0134(6) 0.0000(5) 0.0014(4) -0.0018(5)

C5 0.0234(6) 0.0155(7) 0.0159(6) -0.0001(5) -0.0011(5) 0.0020(5)

C6 0.0251(6) 0.0175(7) 0.0158(6) -0.0030(5) -0.0024(5) 0.0028(5)

C7 0.0150(5) 0.0213(7) 0.0129(6) 0.0000(5) 0.0009(4) 0.0028(5)

C8 0.0188(6) 0.0217(7) 0.0124(6) -0.0007(5) 0.0000(4) 0.0018(5)

C9 0.0186(6) 0.0177(7) 0.01 17(5) 0.0004(5) 0.0007(4) -0.0002(5)

CIO 0.0206(6) 0.0190(7) 0.0121(6) 0.0000(5) 0.0005(4) 0.0022(5)

Cl l 0.0201(6) 0.0185(7) 0.0163(6) -0.0030(5) 0.0004(5) 0.0033(5)

C12 0.0234(6) 0.0249(8) 0.0166(6) -0.0018(5) -0.0015(5) 0.0056(5)

C13 0.0237(7) 0.0322(9) 0.0216(7) -0.0074(6) -0.0074(5) 0.0074(6)

C14 0.0196(7) 0.0284(8) 0.0324(8) -0.0099(6) -0.0049(6) 0.0015(6)

C15 0.0199(6) 0.0229(7) 0.0282(7) -0.0035(6) 0.0008(5) 0.0012(6)

C16 0.0186(6) 0.0198(7) 0.0178(6) -0.0023(5) 0.0007(5) 0.0028(5)

C17 0.0213(6) 0.0203(7) 0.0151(6) 0.0004(5) 0.0018(5) -0.0008(5)

C18 0.0200(6) 0.0206(7) 0.0101(5) 0.001 1(5) -0.0009(4) 0.0004(5)

C19 0.0245(7) 0.0249(8) 0.0176(6) -0.0024(5) 0.0008(5) 0.0029(5)

C20 0.0256(7) 0.0227(7) 0.0124(6) 0.0001(5) 0.0015(5) 0.0027(5)

C21 0.0392(8) 0.0237(8) 0.0215(6) -0.0032(6) 0.0059(6) -0.0017(7)

C22 0.063(2) 0.0236(16) 0.0226(13) -0.0024(1 1) 0.0090(13) 0.0165(15)

C23 0.0359(8) 0.0356(9) 0.0240(7) -0.0034(6) 0.0049(6) 0.0140(7)

C24 0.0253(7) 0.0331(9) 0.0225(7) -0.0050(6) 0.0034(5) 0.0047(6)

C25 0.0253(7) 0.0253(8) 0.0129(5) 0.0003(5) 0.0016(5) 0.0035(5)

C26 0.0277(7) 0.0248(8) 0.0197(6) -0.0005(6) 0.0069(5) 0.0012(6)

C18A 0.0200(6) 0.0206(7) 0.0101(5) 0.0011(5) -0.0009(4) 0.0004(5)

C19A 0.0245(7) 0.0249(8) 0.0176(6) -0.0024(5) 0.0008(5) 0.0029(5)

C20A 0.0256(7) 0.0227(7) 0.0124(6) 0.0001(5) 0.0015(5) 0.0027(5) to to

ο

Appendix 3

Compound Chemical Name

No.

1 4-((( 1 S,2S)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- 1 H, 1 'H-2,2'-biinden-2-yl) methyl)benzoic acid

2 4-((( 1 S,2S)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- 1 H, 1 'H-2,2'-biinden-2-yl) methyl)benzoic acid

3 4-(((lR,2R)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH, H-2,2'-biinden-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid

4 4-((( 1 R,2S)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- 1 H, 1 'H»2,2'-biinden-2-yl)methyl)benzoic acid

5 4-(((lS,2R)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-2,2'-biinden-2- yl)methyl)benzoic acid

6 6-(Methylamino)hexane- 1 ,2,3,4,5-pentanol 4-((( 1 S,2S)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- 1 H, rH-2,2'-biinden-2-yl)me†hyl)benzoate

7 6-(Methylamino)hexane- 1 ,2,3,4,5-pentanol 4-((( 1 S,2R)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- lH, H-2,2'-biinden-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

8 (S)- 1 -Phenylethylammonium 4-((( 1 S,2S)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3 - dihydro- 1 H, 1 Ή-2,2'- biinden-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

9 (R)- 1 -Phenylethylammonium 4-((( 1 R,2S)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3 -dihydro- 1H, 1 Ή-2,2'- biinden-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

10 methyl 4-((( \R,2R> 1 -hydroxy-2,3 -dihydro- 1 H, 1 *H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyI) benzoate

11 ethyl 4-(((li?,2 ?)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH, l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl) benzoate

12 propyl 4-(((li?,2i?)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH, l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2~yl)methyl) benzoate

13 4- { [( 1 'R,2'R)- 1 '-hydroxy- 1 ',3 '-dihydro- lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl}

Benzamide

14 4-{[(l' ?,2' ?)-l'-hydroxy-l',3,-dihydro-lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl}-N-(2- hydroxyethyl)benzamide

15 4-{[(l'J?,2'i?)-l'-hydroxy-l',3'-dihydro-lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl}-N- methylbenzamide

16 4- { [( 1 'R,2'R)- 1 '-hydroxy- 1 ',3 '-dihydro- 1 H,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methy 1 }-N,N- dimethyibenzamide

17 methyl 4-(((l.S,25)-l -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,rH-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl) benzoate

18 ethyU-WlS'^^-l-hydroxy^^-dihydro-lHJ'H-P^'-biindenj^-y methyl)

benzoate

19 propyl 4-((( 1 S,2S)- 1 -hydroxy-2,3-dihydro- 1 H, 1 'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl) benzoate

0 4- { [( 1 'S,2'S)- 1 '-hydroxy- 1 ',3'-dihydro- 1 H,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl }

Benzamide

1 4-{[(l'5',2,5)-l,-hydroxy-l,,3'-dihydro-lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl}-N-(2- hydroxyethy l)benzam i de

2 4- {[(1'5,2'5 -1 '-hydroxy- l*,3'-dihydro-l H^'H^^'-biinden-^-ylJmethyll-N- methylbenzamide

3 4- { [( 1 'S,2'S)- 1 '-hydroxy- 1 *,3'-dihydro- lH,2*H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl }-N,N- dimethylbenzamide

4 4- { [( 1 'R,2'R)- 1 '-(L-leucyloxy)- 1 ',3'-dihydro- 1 H,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl} benzoic acid

4-{[(l^,2'i?)-l'-(L-valyloxy)-l',3'-dihydro-lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl} benzoic acid

4-{[(VR,2'R)- 1 '-(L-isoleucyloxy)- 1 ',3'-dihydro-lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2,yl]methyl } benzoic acid

4- { [( 1 'R,2'R)- 1 '-(glycy loxy)- 1 ',3'-dihydro- lH,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-y ljmethyl } benzoic acid

4- { [( 1 'S,2'S)- 1 '-(L-leucyloxy)- 1 ',3'-dihydro- 1 H,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2*-yl]methyl } benzoic acid

4- { [( 1 'S,2'S)- 1 '-(L-valy loxy)- 1 ',3'-dihydro- 1 H,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl} benzoic acid

4-{ [( 1 '5,2'5)- 1 '-(L-isoleucyloxy)- r,3'-dihydro- 1 H,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'-yl]methyl } benzoic acid

4- { [( 1 ,2'S 1 '-(glycyloxy)- 1 ',3 '-dihydro- 1 H,2'H-2,2'-biinden-2'- yl]methyl} benzoic acid

methyl 4-(((lR,2R)-l-(((S)-2-amino-4-methylpentanoyl)oxy)-2,3-dihydro-lH, l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

ethyl 4-((( 1 R,2R)- 1 -(((S)-2-amino-4-methylpentanoyl)oxy)-2,3-dihydro- 1 H, 1 Ή- [2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

propyl 4-(((lR,2R)-l-(((S)-2-amino-4-methylpentanoyl)oxy)-2,3-dihydro-lH, l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

(l ?,2i?)-2-(4-carbamoylbenzyl)-2,3-dihydro-lH, l'H-2,2'-biinden-l-yl L-leucinate

(li?,2^)-2-{4~[(2-hydroxyethyl)carbamoyl]benzyl}-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-2,2'-bi inden-l-yl L-leucinate

( 1 ?,2i?)-2-[4-(methylcarbamoyl)benzyl]-2,3-dihydro- 1H, 1 'H-2,2'-biinden- 1 -yl L- leucinate

(li?,2i?)-2-[4-(dimethylcarbamoyl)benzyl]-2,3-dihydro-lHl'H-2,2'-biinden-l-yl L-leucinate (38)

methyl 4-(((l S,2S)-l-(((S)-2-amino-4-methylpentanoyl)oxy)-2,3-dihydro- H, l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

ethyl 4-(((lS,2S)-l-(((S)-2-amino-4-methylpentanoyl)oxy)-2,3-dihydro-lH, l*H- [2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

propyl 4-(((l S,2S)-l-(((S)-2-amino-4-methylpentanoyl)oxy)-2,3-dihydro-lH, l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl)methyl)benzoate

(15,,2S)-2-(4-carbamoylbenzyl)-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-2,2'-biinden-l-yl L-leucinate

(15,25)-2-{4-[(2-Hydroxyethyl)carbamoyl]benzyl}-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-2,2'-bi inden-l-yl leucinate

(ll ,25)-2-[4-(methylcarbamoyl)benzyl]-2,3-dihydro- 1H, 1 'H-2,2*-biinden- 1 -yl L- leucinate

( 11S,25)-2-[4-(dimethylcarbamoyl)benzyl]-2,3-dihydro- 1 H, 1 'H-2,2'-biinden- 1 -yl L- leucinate

2-hydroxy-5-(4-(((lR,2R)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH, rH-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl) methyl)benzamido)benzoic acid

2-hydroxy-5-(4-(((lS,2S)-l-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-lH,l'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl) methyl)benzamido)benzoic acid

Claims

Claims
1. A compound of the relative stereochemistry and formula:
wherein R is selected from one or more of the same or different of hydrogen, hydroxyl, optionally substituted alkyl, optionally substituted aryl, alkoxy, aryloxy, thiol, and optionally substituted amino, and wherein Ri is selected from one or more of the same or different of hydrogen,
acetyl,
optionally substituted alkyl,
optionally substituted aryl, an amino acid selected from leucine, valine, isoleucine, and glycine, or pharmacologically acceptable salts, esters, amides, solvates, and prodru thereof.
A compound of the absolute stereochemistry and formula:
wherein R is selected from one or more of the same or different of
hydrogen, hydroxy 1, optionally substituted alkyl, optionally substituted aryl, alkoxy, aryloxy, thiol, and optionally substituted amino, and wherein Ri is selected from one or more of the same or different of
hydrogen, acetyl,
optionally substituted alkyl,
optionally substituted aryl,
an amino acid selected from leucine, valine, isoleucine, and glycine, or pharmacologically acceptable salts, esters, amides, solvates, and prodrugs thereof.
A compound as claimed in claim 1 or 2 wherein alkyl contains from 1 to 10 carbon atoms in a straight or branched chain and may be saturated or unsaturated, or cycloalkyl groups containing 3 to 8 carbon atoms which may be saturated or unsaturated.
A compound as claimed in any of claims 1 to 3 wherein alkyl is substituted with one or more of the same or different from alkyl, alkoxy, alkylamino, amido, amino, aryl, aralkyl, aryloxy, carboxy, halo, hydroxy,nitrile, nitro or oxo groups.
A compound as claimed in any of claims 1 to 4 wherein aryl is substituted with one or more of the same or different from alkyl, alkoxy, alkylamino, amido, amino, anhydride, aryl, aralkyl, aryloxy, carboxy, halo, hydroxy, nitrile, nitro, or oxo groups.
A compound as claimed in any of claims 1 to 5 wherein amino is substituted with one or more of the same of different from alkyl, hydroxyalkyl, aryl, and substituted aryl .
A compound as claimed in claim 6 wherein amino is substituted with aryl substituted by one or more of OH, NH2, and COOH.
A compound as claimed in claim 1 or 2 wherein R is OH.
A compound as claimed in claim 1 or 2 wherein K\ is H.
10. A compound of the following formula with the absolute stereochemistry and formula
wherein R is selected from: OH, OCH3, OCH2CH3, OCH2CH2CH3, NH2, NHCH2CH2OH, NHCH3, N(CH3)2, NH(4-OH-3-benzoic acid)
1 1. A compound of the absolute stereochemistry and formula
wherein R1 is H or leucine and R is selected from: OH, OCH3, OCH2CH3, OCH2CH2CH3, NH2, NHCH2CH2OH, NHCH3, N(CH3)2, NH(4-OH-3-benzoic acid)
12. A pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of a compound as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 1 and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier.
13. A method for the prophylaxis or treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, comprising administering to a subject an effective amount of a compound as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 1 1.
14. A method for the prophylaxis or treatment of ulcerative colitis, comprising administering to a subject an effective amount of a compound as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 1 1.
15. A method for the prophylaxis or treatment of Crohn's disease, comprising administering to a subject an effective amount of a compound as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 1 1.
16. A compound as claimed in any of claims 1 to 1 1 for use in the prophylaxis or treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.
17. A compound as claimed in any of claims 1 to 1 1 for use in the prophylaxis or treatment of ulcerative colitis.
18. A compound as claimed in any of claims 1 to 1 1 for use in the prophylaxis or treatment of Crohn's disease.
19. A compound as claimed in any of claims 1 to 1 1 for use in the prophylaxis of an autoimmune inflammatory disease.
PCT/IE2012/000038 2011-07-22 2012-07-20 Indane dimers for use in the treatment of autoimmune inflammatory disease WO2013014660A1 (en)

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