WO2006067350A1 - Method and system for stand-alone electrical supply by means of renewable energy - Google Patents

Method and system for stand-alone electrical supply by means of renewable energy Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO2006067350A1
WO2006067350A1 PCT/FR2005/051099 FR2005051099W WO2006067350A1 WO 2006067350 A1 WO2006067350 A1 WO 2006067350A1 FR 2005051099 W FR2005051099 W FR 2005051099W WO 2006067350 A1 WO2006067350 A1 WO 2006067350A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
storage means
battery
renewable energy
characterized
energy source
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/FR2005/051099
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Didier Marquet
Olivier Foucault
Alain Peraudeau
Original Assignee
France Telecom
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to FR0413709A priority Critical patent/FR2879852A1/en
Priority to FR0413709 priority
Application filed by France Telecom filed Critical France Telecom
Publication of WO2006067350A1 publication Critical patent/WO2006067350A1/en

Links

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J7/00Circuit arrangements for charging or depolarising batteries or for supplying loads from batteries
    • H02J7/34Parallel operation in networks using both storage and other dc sources, e.g. providing buffering
    • H02J7/35Parallel operation in networks using both storage and other dc sources, e.g. providing buffering with light sensitive cells
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J7/00Circuit arrangements for charging or depolarising batteries or for supplying loads from batteries
    • H02J7/0013Circuit arrangements for charging or depolarising batteries or for supplying loads from batteries for charging several batteries simultaneously or sequentially
    • H02J7/0014Circuits for equalisation of charge between batteries
    • H02J7/0019Circuits for equalisation of charge between batteries using switched or multiplexed charge circuits

Abstract

The invention relates to a method and system for electrical energy supply to a piece of equipment (210), comprising a renewable energy source (220) and a first storage means (230) for storage of the energy produced by the source to provide at least daytime operation. The piece of equipment (210) is designed to operate in variable meteorological conditions comprising at least one long period of high energy production by the renewable energy source (220), which corresponds to an over-production and a period of energy requirement exceeding the capacity of the first storage means. In order to store the excess energy produced during the period of over-production, the renewable energy source (220) is connected to a second storage means (240) when the first storage means (230) has reached a given level of charge. Said excess can subsequently be used on connecting the piece of equipment (210) to the second storage means (240).

Description

Title of invention

Method and autonomous power supply by renewable energy system.

Field of the Invention

Disclosed power systems in electric power equipment that require an autonomous power supply by means of renewable energy such as those on remote sites from any electrical network or connected to a non-permanent power grid

Background of the invention

The supply of electrical energy on-grid power grid, and by extension the rest of the text on sites connected to a non-permanent power system, involves the use of a primary energy source that may be of fossil (oil, gas ...) and renewable known origin (wind, sun ...). In most applications, this power must be available at any time of day or night and at any time of the year, summer and winter. This imperative is required especially in the field of telecommunications, where the equipment installed on remote site must operate 24h / 24h, 365 days a year, with an almost constant consumption.

Therefore, whatever the case, but especially in that of renewable energy sources, it is necessary to link to this source a storage function, function mainly provided by batteries that are mostly technology and of lead-based design.

As illustrated in Figure 1, a conventional solar power station 100 is constituted by an assembly of panels or solar modules compounds of photovoltaic cells 120 (power source), a lead-acid battery 130 (power storage ) and a control device 160. in the example, this station is intended to provide an electrical power supply 110 such telecommunications equipment or an antenna terminal of a mobile telephony network.

Because of its intrinsic characteristics, a battery high capacity type of lead and discharge relatively slowly (ie several days), which is well suited to solar sources can remain deeply discharged for a long period of time without degrading irreversibly and lose capacity. It does not typically discharged by more than 15% per 24 hours for limit cycling (fraction of the capacity of the battery that is stored / from storage) and ensure a lifetime of several years. This involves an oversizing of its capacity compared to the useful operation. minimum effect is expected typical 10-day capacity while 5 would suffice.

The changing weather conditions throughout the year induce some difficulties in the production of energy from a renewable energy source (lack of wind for wind, lack of sun for solar panels ...) this complicates the overall design of the power station.

The regulating device 160 is operable to control the charging and discharging of the battery. A lead battery that can not be completely discharged, otherwise damage it, using a switch 150 to disconnect the load of the equipment 110 to protect the battery 130 of a deep discharge and extended.

Furthermore, a lead battery does not change just because of deep discharge or excessive cycling, but also because of overloading. Indeed, when a battery is fully charged, and it is connected to a source such as solar panels which continue to produce energy, there is overload, which has the effect of reducing the life this battery by oxidation of the positive grid and increase maintenance due to a greater consumption of the electrolyte. For this purpose, the control device 160 also controls a switch 140 that allows to disconnect the battery 130 of the solar module 120. In the latter case, the solar module being disconnected although there are a lot of sunshine, the producible energy (energy that would be produced if the plates were connected to a charge or a discharged battery) is lost. For example, measurements on an experimental solar station showed that in winter, the energy produced is equal to the producible energy. Therefore, during this season, we consume the entire production because the battery is usually discharged and sunshine is low. Conversely, in summer, the producible energy is much greater than the energy actually produced, the battery is often busy with lots of sunshine. It is thus noted the potentially producible energy that is lost.

Purpose and Summary of the Invention

The present invention aims to remedy the aforementioned drawbacks and to propose a technical solution that optimizes the storage and management of available energy on an isolated site, despite the very slow variations in production source energy (eg. seasonal variations in solar pseudo-period than the autonomy of the energy storage medium (typically a few months) and very high amplitude (typically over 50% the period). This object is achieved by a method for supplying electrical power on a remote site equipment comprising a renewable energy source and a first storage means for storing the energy produced by said source to a daytime operation at least, the equipment is designed to operate in varying weather conditions over several days including at least a long period of strong producti corresponding one of energy to overproduction and a long period of reduced power generation by the renewable energy source corresponding to a required power exceeding the capacity of the first storage means, wherein, according to the invention , the renewable energy source is connected to a second storage means when the first storage means has reached a predetermined charge level and the equipment is connected to the second storage means when the first storage means has reached a level of predetermined discharge.

Thus, the invention proposes to use a second storage means independent of the first, which is used to store the excess energy generated in an initial period of high production and to restore it when the first storage means is empty in a second period in which the output is lower. This process allows, therefore, to adapt the energy storage and power equipment with very slow fluctuations but high amplitude (seasonal) production of renewable energy source.

According to one aspect of the invention the method may further comprise a step of disconnecting the second source of energy storage means when the latter has reached a predetermined charge level. It protects the second storage means against overloading.

According to another aspect of the invention the method may further comprise a step of disconnecting the second equipment storage means when the latter has reached a predetermined level of discharge. It protects the second storage means against deep discharges.

The invention also relates to an electric power supply system for a device on remote site comprising a renewable energy source and a first storage means for storing the energy produced by said source, the device being designed to function under varying conditions including at least one period of high energy production and a period of reduced power generation by the renewable energy source. According to the invention, the system further comprises a second storage means, a first switch disposed between the renewable energy source and the first and second storage means and a second switch disposed between the first and second storage means and equipment. The first and second switches are controlled by a regulating device for selectively connecting the renewable energy source to the first and second storage means and for selectively connecting the equipment to the first and second storage means depending on the state of charge the first storage means. As for the method described above, the system can store the surplus energy usually lost during periods of high energy and return it to the most valuable time, ie during periods of low production during which the first storage means can be charged sufficiently to provide a constant power to the equipment.

According to one embodiment of the invention, the first storage means comprises at least one battery such as a nickel-cadmium battery and the second storage means comprises at least one battery such as a lead battery.

According to one aspect of the invention, there are means for maintaining a constant charging current between the power source and the battery of the first storage means.

Renewable energy source may be formed of solar modules or equivalent devices which use solar energy to produce electricity.

Brief Description of Drawings

Other features and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description of specific embodiments of the invention, given as non-limiting examples, with reference to the accompanying drawings in which: - Figure 1 is a plan view schematic of a power system in electric power according to the prior art;

- Figures 2A, 2B and 2C are schematic views of an embodiment of a power system in electric power according to the invention; - Figure 3 is a graph showing the influence of the inventive supply system to the electrical power supply on isolated site equipment;

- Figure 4 is a schematic view of another embodiment of a power system in electric power according to the invention; - Figure 5 is a graph showing the evolution of battery charge states of the system of Figure 4 during the seasons; and

- Figure 6 is a curve showing the change day / night of the battery charge status of the system of Figure 4 in summer and winter.

Description of an embodiment

The present invention is based on the principle of using a storage medium (eg. Battery) additional parallel to the main storage means so far used, the charge / discharge of these two means of storage being as described more detail below, controlled by control means using a method of the invention.

More specifically, the present invention provides a system and implementation process of the system that are adapted to these two distinct storage means so as to define the principle of "inter-seasonal load" specific to the invention. This principle is reflected in general by operating with loads / short period of landfills for the primary storage medium and long-term storage (inter-seasonal) for the secondary storage medium with also a regulation to protect them against deep discharge or against overloads.

The characteristics of the storage means are different. The first storage means has to be very robust to accept many charge and discharge cycles with an amplitude that can typically reach 20% of its capacity.

The second storage medium must have a very low self-discharge (loss of internal energy) over a long period regardless of the environmental conditions (temperature, humidity, air pressure, ...) and aging.

The concept of inter-seasonal load is shown in Figures 2A-2C, representing an electric power supply system 200 comprising solar modules 220 (ex. Photovoltaic cell panel) as a source of renewable energy into electricity, a first electrical battery 230 as main storage means, a second electric heater 240 as a means of secondary storage, or long term feeding equipment 210 such as an antenna or terminal of a mobile network and a device control 250, which controls two switches 260 and 270, the switch 260 being disposed between the modules 220 and the two batteries 230, 240 while the switch 270 is in turn arranged between the two batteries and the device 210. the switches 260 and 270 may be, for example well known devices such as reversing contactors or electromechanical or electronic relay s.

The control device may be formed of an electronic circuit (not shown) comprising processing means (eg. Programmable microcontroller) programmed specifically to carry out the regulation of the batteries as described below. For this purpose, the circuit further comprises measurement means (eg. Multimeters) for monitoring the state of charge of each battery and control means (eg. Control signal generators) for controlling the switches etyou switches depending of predetermined threshold values ​​of charge / discharge of the batteries as explained below.

The system of the invention is described here with a renewable source of electrical energy from solar type. However, the system may use other sources of renewable energy such as a wind turbine or a combination of several types of renewable energy sources. Similarly, the long-term storage medium used in the example described here is an electric battery. This medium could also be a reversible fuel cell hydrogen storage or a storage system by bottle filled with compressed air (ie, charged) by a compressor powered by the renewable energy source, the returning energy (ie discharge) being made using a compressed air motor and a dynamo. 2A shows the system 200 in normal operation, that is to say using only the battery 230, the inter-seasonal load is not implemented. In this configuration, the switches 260 and 270 are both controlled by the control device 250 to be placed in position A so that the solar module 220 charges the battery 230 while supplying the equipment 210. Once the charged battery 230, the control device 250 controls the switch 260 so that switches to position B, i.e. the battery 250 as shown in Figure 2B. The electrical energy produced by the solar module 220, previously lost, is switched to the battery 250, which takes care of the surplus energy producible. System 200 shown in Figure 2B corresponds to that used in summer and autumn when the sun is important.

In winter, if the system is properly sized (ie energy production versus need equipment) there is no solar energy surplus. The configuration of the system in winter then that of Figure 2A. However, during winter or long periods of lack of sunlight, the battery 230 may discharge into the equipment 210 to the point to be emptied. The control device then controls, from a predetermined discharge threshold of the battery 230, the switch 270 so that switches to position B so as to protect the battery 230 from over-discharge as shown in Figure 2C . By switching in this position, the switch 270 connects the battery 240 which is charged to the summer and fall on the equipment continues to be powered by it. The battery 230 in turn is loaded with a low production of electrical energy from the solar modules 220 to reach a predetermined charge level when the switch 260 is switched back again to the position B by the control device 250, c that is to say on the battery 240. the control device 250 therefore controls the changeover switches 260 and 270 according to the levels of charging and discharging of the battery 230. for this purpose, it has measuring means ( not shown) of the level of charge / discharge of this battery. The curves shown in Figure 3 are used to compare the operation of a plant with or without inter-seasonal load, that is to say, with or without secondary battery used as explained above. The fine line (series 1) represents the operation of a plant such as that shown in Figure 1, without secondary battery which undergoes power-downs (peaks towards 0). The thick curve (series 2) shows the operation of an installation with secondary battery, as in Figures 2A-2C, for which there is no power failure.

On the type of battery used in the system of the invention, the use of a second battery 240 reduces the capacity of the main battery 230 to a minimum, that is to say 3 or 4 days autonomy, against usually 8 to 12 days of autonomy (depending on geographic location).

This also results in a lower cost for the main battery, which should be normally robust technology and, therefore, relatively expensive.

Excess energy storage also allows either to reduce the surface of the panels of solar modules for the same application, panels which are also expensive, either, for the same surface of solar modules, to provide more power averaged over the year (the average power is equivalent to a fairly constant continuous power absorbed by telecommunications equipment).

The overall cost of the station is thus minimized.

Therefore, the main battery 230 is preferably a nickel-cadmium battery technology and intensive type solar or cycling. Indeed, the fact of size the autonomy of the battery 3 or 4 days for example, implies that it will be much in demand, suffering, every day, loads and significant discharges

(Typical diurnal cycling of the solar energy), the conditions for which nickel-cadmium technology, moreover insensitive to temperature variations, is better suited in certain environments as lead-acid technology.

The secondary battery 240, meanwhile, is much less stressed so a conventional stationary lead technology, cheaper cycling a battery, can be used. This type of battery has the advantage, important here to have a low self-discharge. All batteries suffer from self-discharge effect, but it is higher for those with nickel while it is lowest for those who have to lead a self-discharge that typically 5% per month and lower low temperature, which is interesting for a need in winter. However, it must also choose a capable of restoring its capacity technology.

4 illustrates another embodiment of the feed system of the invention which differs from that of Figs 2A to 2C in that it allows a regulation of the secondary battery so as to protect against overload when there still too much energy in the summer and against deep discharge in the event of exceptionally bad conditions. The power system 300 shown in Figure 4 includes solar modules 320, a main battery 330, a secondary battery 340, a device 310 to supply such as an antenna or terminal of a mobile telephony network and a control device 350 which controls two switches 360 and 370 (ie. reversing contactors or relays), the switch 360 selectively connects the modules 320 in one of the two batteries 330, 340 while the switch 370 selectively connects one of the two batteries in 'equipment 310. in this embodiment, the control device 350 further controls two switches 380 and 390, such as opening contactors (eg. relays which open when they are controlled), which are arranged respectively each side of the battery 340 between the two switches 360 and 370. the two switches 380, 390 thus arranged form a device that allows to protect the battery 240 against the su rcharges and excessive discharge.

Moreover, as for the battery pack 230 described above, the main battery 330 of the system 300 of Figure 4 is preferably a nickel-cadmium battery type (NiCd) which supports more frequent stresses in charge / discharge a battery lead. However, a NiCd battery needs to be charged to 100%, absorb 140% capacity. To this end, when using this type of battery, the system of the invention may further comprise a resistor or an equivalent current limiting electronic device 361 placed in parallel with the switch 360 located between the array 320 and the battery master 330, as shown in figure 4.

Resistance or equivalent electronic device 361 allows the battery 330 to finish its charge properly when it is disconnected from the source of production of electric power in general at 90% load. For this purpose, the resistor 361 should be selected so as to allow a load with a high voltage and a small current determined by the battery capacity. Indeed, for a NiCd battery capacity C in Ah (ampere (s) -hour (s)), it takes a current of C / 50 to C / 100 A, so as to provide 140% of capacity so that it is 100% charged.

The R value of the resistor 361 is defined by the relation:

R _ Upv - Ubi Ibi + Iu

with Upv: Voltage solar modules UBI: voltage main battery IBI: main battery current Iu: current used by the device

For example, when Upv = 36 V (the highest voltage corresponding to the charge control of the secondary battery, i.e. solar panels almost empty), Ubi = 28 V (voltage of the main battery to the end of load) Ibi = 1.5 a and Iu = 2.5 a, then R = 2 Ω. Instead of the resistance 361, we can also use any other equivalent means which can deliver a specific current such as a DC source such as a high frequency switching MOS circuit.

Is now described the various stages of regulation that can occur during an inter-seasonal load with the system of Figure 4. Regulatory steps described below are implemented from the control device 350 that controls both switches 360 and 370 and the switches 380 and 390.

In the example of Figure 4, the main battery 330 is a NiCd battery composed of a series of 19 elements or elementary cells of 1.2 V nominal (actual voltage ranging from 1 to 1.7 V depending on load) and which has a capacity of 214 Ah. The secondary battery

340 is itself a sealed lead acid battery with a capacity of 400 Ah formed of 12 elements of 2 V nominal (actual voltage ranging from 1.9 to 2.5 V). Step 1: load the battery pack 330.

The battery pack 330 is charged by the solar modules 320 up to 90% via the switch 360 in position A. The secondary battery 340 is disconnected. The equipment 310 is powered by the battery 330 hours via the switch 370 in position A.

Detecting the end of charging the battery 330 (90%) corresponds to a high voltage threshold of 1.6 V per cell thereof or 30.4 V.

Step 2: end of charging of the main battery 330 and charging the secondary battery 340.

Upon detection of the high threshold voltage of 30.4 V, the flip-flop 360 switch to the position B, that is to say runs most of the energy flow delivered by the solar panels to the battery 340 which load (the switch 390 being closed at rest).

A small part of the energy is channeled through the resistor 361 to the device 310 (via switch 370 in position A) and to the battery 330, thereby allowing the latter to complete its charge properly (ie with a current of the order of 1 to 2 A).

Step 3: end of charging batteries 330 and 340. When the battery voltage UB2 340 reaches 29 to 30 V, the switch 390 is controlled so that it opens in order to limit overload of the battery 340. the battery 330 continues its low-end current charging via resistor 361.

Step 4: re-charging the battery 330.

When it is dark, or when the production of solar modules is low, the current is supplied to the equipment by the battery 330, which discharges. The voltage of the battery 330 drops until 27.5 V threshold voltage (1.45 V per cell). The switch 360 is then switched back to position A so as to recharge the battery 330 at the return of day or sufficient sunlight. Step 5: Back in battery 340.

If the voltage of the battery 340 decreases to a threshold voltage of 27-28 V, the switch 390 is no longer actuated, and returns to its rest position (ie closed).

Step 6: Complete discharge of the battery 330.

When the battery 330 is discharged (10% remaining capacity, or UBI = 21 V), the switch 370 is switched to position B. The battery 340 then takes over supplying the energy necessary for the equipment 310.

Step 7: End of discharge of the battery 340.

When the battery 340 is discharged by 90%, that is to say UB2 = 22.8 V (period of very bad weather in winter), the switch 380 opens to protect the latter from a deep discharge . The equipment is then no longer supplied. (Extreme weather conditions).

Step 8: reconnection of the battery 330.

When the battery 330 is sufficiently charged (UBI = 23.5 to 24 V), switches back the switch 370 in position A so that the battery 330 powers the equipment 310 again.

Step 9: reconnection of the battery 340

When the battery 340 is sufficiently charged (UB2 = 25-26 V), the switch 380 is no longer actuated and returns to its rest position (ie closed).

Figure 5 shows the average charge states (excluding daily cycle) during the seasons, the batteries 330 and 340. The area S corresponds to the period of storage in the secondary battery of the surplus of electrical energy produced in summer and area H to the restitution of this energy in the secondary battery in winter.

Figure 6 shows an example of changing day / night state batteries 330 and 340 at the end of the summer load (top) and the end of discharge in winter (bottom chart). In summer, T E1 corresponds to the disconnection of the main battery

330 solar module 320 which continues to charge via the resistor 361 and the start of charging of the secondary battery 340 (switch 360 in position A). T E2 corresponds to the beginning of the discharge of the battery 330. T E3 corresponds to the end of charge of the battery 330. T E4 corresponds to the end of the battery 340 when the switch 390 is open. In winter, T H1 is when it switches the switch 370 in position B for disconnecting the main battery 330 of the equipment 310 and supplying the latter with the secondary battery 340. T H2 corresponds to the disconnection of the secondary battery 340 of the equipment 310 to protect against excessive discharge. The period between T H2, and T H3 corresponds to the exceptional disconnection of the two batteries of the equipment until the main battery 330 is charged sufficiently to reconnect to the equipment (TΗ 3).

According to an alternative embodiment, one can use, instead of the switch 390, a switching charge controller (maintaining a constant voltage lead of the load).

According to another variant, between the array 320 and the switch 360, can be inserted a research converter maximum output point of the solar modules (MPPT: Maximum Power Point Tracker) which saves 15-30% of energy over the year.

Input of the switch 390, the battery 340 can be installed an extra generator, such as a small wind turbine to compensate for self-discharge over long periods and to avoid the leaving deeply discharged too long which would harm its life.

Claims

1. A method for electric power supply of a device (210; 310) comprising a renewable energy source (220; 320) and a first storage means (230; 330) for storing the energy produced by said source for operating at least daytime, the equipment being designed to operate under changing conditions and comprising at least one period of high energy by the renewable energy source (220; 320) and a reduced production period energy by the renewable energy source (220; 320), these periods corresponding to overproduction and an energy need than the capacity of the first storage means, characterized in that it comprises at least one connecting step of the renewable energy source (220; 320) to a second storage means (240; 340) when the first storage means (230; 330) has reached a predetermined charge level and a step of connecting eq uipement (210; 310) to the second storage means (240; 340) when the first storage means (230; 330) has reached a predetermined level of discharge.
2. Method according to claim 1, characterized in that it further comprises a step of disconnecting the second storage means (240; 340) of the renewable energy source (220; 320) when said second storage means has reached a predetermined charge level.
3. The method of claim 1 or 2, characterized in that it further comprises a step of disconnecting the second storage means (240; 340) of the equipment when said second storage means has reached a predetermined discharge level .
4. A method according to any one of claims 1 to 3, characterized in that the first and second storage means (230, 240; 330, 340) each comprise at least one electric battery.
5. The method Ia claim 4, characterized in that it has means (361) for holding a load current between the renewable energy source (220; 320) and the battery of the first storage means (230; 330 ), when the inverter 260 is in position B.
6. A method according to any one of claims 1 to 5, characterized in that the renewable energy source (220; 320) uses solar energy.
7. supply system electrical energy to a device (210; 310) on isolated site comprising a renewable energy source (220; 320) and a first storage means (230; 330) for storing the energy produced by said source equipment (210; 310) being adapted to operate in varying conditions including at least one period of high energy by the renewable energy source (220; 320) and a reduced production period energy from the renewable energy source (220; 320), characterized in that it further comprises a second storage means (240; 340), a first switch (260; 360) disposed between the renewable energy source and the first and second storage means (230, 240; 330, 340) and a second switch (270; 370) disposed between the first and second storage means (230, 240; 330, 340) and the equipment (210 ; 310), the first and second switches (260, 270; 360, 370) e as controlled by a control device (250; 350) for selectively connecting the renewable energy source (220; 320) to the first and second storage means and for selectively connecting the equipment (210; 310) to the first and second storage means (230, 240; 330, 340 ) depending on the state of charge of the first storage means (230; 330).
8. System according to claim 7, characterized in that it further comprises a switch (390) disposed between the first switch (360) and the second storage means (340), said first switch being controlled by the regulating device (350) for disconnecting the second storage means (340) from the source of renewable energy (320) according to a predetermined charge level thereof.
9. The system of claim 7 or 8, characterized in that it further comprises a switch (380) disposed between the second storage means (340) and the second switch (370), said switch being controlled by the device control (350) for disconnecting the second storage means (340) of the equipment (310) according to a predetermined discharge level thereof.
10. System according to any one of claims 7 to 9, characterized in that the first and second storage means (230, 240; 330, 340) each comprise at least one electrical accumulator.
11. The system of claim 10, characterized in that the first storage means (230; 330) comprises at least a nickel-cadmium battery and that the second storage means (240; 340) comprises at least a lead battery .
12. The system of claim 10 or 11, characterized in that it further comprises means (361) for holding a load current between the renewable energy source (320) and the battery of the first storage means (330 ).
13. System according to any one of claims 7 to 12, characterized in that the renewable energy source (220; 320) uses solar energy.
PCT/FR2005/051099 2004-12-22 2005-12-16 Method and system for stand-alone electrical supply by means of renewable energy WO2006067350A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
FR0413709A FR2879852A1 (en) 2004-12-22 2004-12-22 Method and autonomous electric power system for renewable energy
FR0413709 2004-12-22

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2006067350A1 true WO2006067350A1 (en) 2006-06-29

Family

ID=34952083

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/FR2005/051099 WO2006067350A1 (en) 2004-12-22 2005-12-16 Method and system for stand-alone electrical supply by means of renewable energy

Country Status (2)

Country Link
FR (1) FR2879852A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2006067350A1 (en)

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120235495A1 (en) * 2009-06-24 2012-09-20 Enocean Gmbh Supply energy arrangement and method for providing a supply energy
JP2012523215A (en) * 2009-04-01 2012-09-27 イーグルピッチャー テクノロジーズ,エルエルシー Hybrid energy storage system, renewable energy systems and methods of use thereof comprising the reservoir system
CN102804543A (en) * 2009-06-12 2012-11-28 高通股份有限公司 Devices for conveying wireless power and methods of operation thereof
US9502909B2 (en) 2009-11-17 2016-11-22 Qualcomm Incorporated Power management for electronic devices
WO2018231039A2 (en) 2017-06-12 2018-12-20 Université Ibn Tofail Method for the automatic pooling of renewable electrical energy in isolated micro-grids

Families Citing this family (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
ITPA20090016A1 (en) * 2009-07-13 2011-01-14 Ludovico Ingoglia recharge control system for electric vehicle batteries.
EP2482332A1 (en) 2011-01-26 2012-08-01 Mohamed Papa Talla Fall Energy converting apparatus and method
FR2994351A1 (en) * 2012-08-03 2014-02-07 2Iser Device for charging a battery by sequential individual load its internal cells
US9831706B2 (en) 2013-06-17 2017-11-28 Graham T. MacWilliams Techniques and systems for generating power using multi-spectrum energy
US9525304B2 (en) 2014-03-20 2016-12-20 Graham T. MacWilliams Techniques and systems for charging electronic devices
FR3045850B1 (en) * 2015-12-21 2018-02-02 Sagemcom Energy & Telecom Sas Method to estimate a surplus power

Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6034506A (en) * 1998-01-16 2000-03-07 Space Systems/Loral, Inc. Lithium ion satellite battery charge control circuit

Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6034506A (en) * 1998-01-16 2000-03-07 Space Systems/Loral, Inc. Lithium ion satellite battery charge control circuit

Non-Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
CARRASCO J A ET AL: "ON THE APPLICATION OF SPACE TECHNOLOGY TO TERRESTRIAL POWER ELECTRONICS" PROCEEDINGS OF THE INTERNATIONAL POWER ELECTRONICS AND MOTION CONTROL CONFERENCE, vol. 3, 2 septembre 1996 (1996-09-02), pages 83-87, XP001039618 *
SULLIVAN R M ET AL: "AMPTE/CCE battery and charger performance" ENERGY CONVERSION ENGINEERING CONFERENCE, 1996. IECEC 96., PROCEEDINGS OF THE 31ST INTERSOCIETY WASHINGTON, DC, USA 11-16 AUG. 1996, NEW YORK, NY, USA,IEEE, US, vol. 1, 11 août 1996 (1996-08-11), pages 410-415, XP010197758 ISBN: 0-7803-3547-3 *

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2012523215A (en) * 2009-04-01 2012-09-27 イーグルピッチャー テクノロジーズ,エルエルシー Hybrid energy storage system, renewable energy systems and methods of use thereof comprising the reservoir system
US8638061B2 (en) 2009-04-01 2014-01-28 Eaglepicher Technologies, Llc Hybrid energy storage system, renewable energy system including the storage system, and method of using same
USRE46156E1 (en) 2009-04-01 2016-09-20 Eaglepicher Technologies Llc Hybrid energy storage system, renewable energy system including the storage system, and method of using same
CN102804543A (en) * 2009-06-12 2012-11-28 高通股份有限公司 Devices for conveying wireless power and methods of operation thereof
US8853995B2 (en) 2009-06-12 2014-10-07 Qualcomm Incorporated Devices for conveying wireless power and methods of operation thereof
US20120235495A1 (en) * 2009-06-24 2012-09-20 Enocean Gmbh Supply energy arrangement and method for providing a supply energy
US9502924B2 (en) * 2009-06-24 2016-11-22 Enocean Gmbh Supply energy arrangement and method for providing a supply energy
US9502909B2 (en) 2009-11-17 2016-11-22 Qualcomm Incorporated Power management for electronic devices
US9680313B2 (en) 2009-11-17 2017-06-13 Qualcomm Incorporated Authorized based receipt of wireless power
WO2018231039A2 (en) 2017-06-12 2018-12-20 Université Ibn Tofail Method for the automatic pooling of renewable electrical energy in isolated micro-grids

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
FR2879852A1 (en) 2006-06-23

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4962462A (en) Fuel cell/battery hybrid system
KR101084214B1 (en) Grid-connected energy storage system and method for controlling grid-connected energy storage system
Dursun et al. Comparative evaluation of different power management strategies of a stand-alone PV/Wind/PEMFC hybrid power system
JP5265639B2 (en) Energy storage system of flats, as well as integrated power management system and a control method thereof
EP1772939B1 (en) Methods and apparatus for coupling an energy storage system to a variable energy supply system
EP1058367A2 (en) Battery accumulating apparatus
KR101156533B1 (en) Energy storage system and method for controlling thereof
US20110144822A1 (en) Grid-connected energy storage system and method of controlling grid-connected energy storage system
Joseph et al. Battery storage systems in electric power systems
JP5449334B2 (en) CONTROL DEVICE AND CONTROL METHOD
EP2325970A2 (en) Energy management system and grid-connected energy storage system including the energy management system
EP2415140B1 (en) Hybrid energy storage system, energy system including the storage system, and method of using same
Boicea Energy storage technologies: The past and the present
US8350411B2 (en) Modular system for unattended energy generation and storage
US20050200133A1 (en) Separate network and method for operating a separate network
CN102113194B (en) Storage system that maximizes the utilization of renewable energy
JP5401003B2 (en) Solar power system
WO2011162025A1 (en) Dc power distribution system
WO2009141651A2 (en) Supervisory system controller for use with a renewable energy powered radio telecommunications site
KR20110072912A (en) Energy storage system and method for controlling thereof
Kimball et al. A system design approach for unattended solar energy harvesting supply
EP0508694B1 (en) A battery charging system
PT1323222E (en) Island network and method for operation of an island network
US20090266397A1 (en) Solar battery charging system and optional solar hydrogen production system for vehicle propulsion
JP5327407B2 (en) Battery system and control method thereof

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AK Designated states

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): AE AG AL AM AT AU AZ BA BB BG BR BW BY BZ CA CH CN CO CR CU CZ DE DK DM DZ EC EE EG ES FI GB GD GE GH GM HR HU ID IL IN IS JP KE KG KM KN KP KR KZ LC LK LR LS LT LU LV LY MA MD MG MK MN MW MX MZ NA NG NI NO NZ OM PG PH PL PT RO RU SC SD SE SG SK SL SM SY TJ TM TN TR TT TZ UA UG US UZ VC VN YU ZA ZM ZW

AL Designated countries for regional patents

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): GM KE LS MW MZ NA SD SL SZ TZ UG ZM ZW AM AZ BY KG KZ MD RU TJ TM AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HU IE IS IT LT LU LV MC NL PL PT RO SE SI SK TR BF BJ CF CG CI CM GA GN GQ GW ML MR NE SN TD TG

121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application
NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: DE

122 Ep: pct app. not ent. europ. phase

Ref document number: 05825397

Country of ref document: EP

Kind code of ref document: A1

WWW Wipo information: withdrawn in national office

Ref document number: 5825397

Country of ref document: EP