WO2005122916A1 - An imageless robotized device and method for surgical tool guidance - Google Patents

An imageless robotized device and method for surgical tool guidance Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2005122916A1
WO2005122916A1 PCT/EP2005/052751 EP2005052751W WO2005122916A1 WO 2005122916 A1 WO2005122916 A1 WO 2005122916A1 EP 2005052751 W EP2005052751 W EP 2005052751W WO 2005122916 A1 WO2005122916 A1 WO 2005122916A1
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WO
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Prior art keywords
robot arm
device
tool
surgical
device according
Prior art date
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PCT/EP2005/052751
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French (fr)
Inventor
Bertin Nahum
Eric Tassel
Lucien Blondel
Pierre Maillet
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Zimmer Gmbh
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/14Surgical saws ; Accessories therefor
    • A61B17/15Guides therefor
    • A61B17/154Guides therefor for preparing bone for knee prosthesis
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B34/00Computer-aided surgery; Manipulators or robots specially adapted for use in surgery
    • A61B34/20Surgical navigation systems; Devices for tracking or guiding surgical instruments, e.g. for frameless stereotaxis
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B34/00Computer-aided surgery; Manipulators or robots specially adapted for use in surgery
    • A61B34/70Manipulators specially adapted for use in surgery
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B34/00Computer-aided surgery; Manipulators or robots specially adapted for use in surgery
    • A61B34/70Manipulators specially adapted for use in surgery
    • A61B34/76Manipulators having means for providing feel, e.g. force or tactile feedback
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B2017/00017Electrical control of surgical instruments
    • A61B2017/00022Sensing or detecting at the treatment site
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B34/00Computer-aided surgery; Manipulators or robots specially adapted for use in surgery
    • A61B34/10Computer-aided planning, simulation or modelling of surgical operations
    • A61B2034/108Computer aided selection or customisation of medical implants or cutting guides
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B34/00Computer-aided surgery; Manipulators or robots specially adapted for use in surgery
    • A61B34/20Surgical navigation systems; Devices for tracking or guiding surgical instruments, e.g. for frameless stereotaxis
    • A61B2034/2068Surgical navigation systems; Devices for tracking or guiding surgical instruments, e.g. for frameless stereotaxis using pointers, e.g. pointers having reference marks for determining coordinates of body points
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B34/00Computer-aided surgery; Manipulators or robots specially adapted for use in surgery
    • A61B34/25User interfaces for surgical systems
    • A61B2034/252User interfaces for surgical systems indicating steps of a surgical procedure
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B34/00Computer-aided surgery; Manipulators or robots specially adapted for use in surgery
    • A61B34/25User interfaces for surgical systems
    • A61B2034/254User interfaces for surgical systems being adapted depending on the stage of the surgical procedure
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B90/00Instruments, implements or accessories specially adapted for surgery or diagnosis and not covered by any of the groups A61B1/00 - A61B50/00, e.g. for luxation treatment or for protecting wound edges
    • A61B90/06Measuring instruments not otherwise provided for
    • A61B2090/064Measuring instruments not otherwise provided for for measuring force, pressure or mechanical tension
    • A61B2090/065Measuring instruments not otherwise provided for for measuring force, pressure or mechanical tension for measuring contact or contact pressure
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B90/00Instruments, implements or accessories specially adapted for surgery or diagnosis and not covered by any of the groups A61B1/00 - A61B50/00, e.g. for luxation treatment or for protecting wound edges
    • A61B90/08Accessories or related features not otherwise provided for
    • A61B2090/0801Prevention of accidental cutting or pricking
    • A61B2090/08021Prevention of accidental cutting or pricking of the patient or his organs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B90/00Instruments, implements or accessories specially adapted for surgery or diagnosis and not covered by any of the groups A61B1/00 - A61B50/00, e.g. for luxation treatment or for protecting wound edges
    • A61B90/36Image-producing devices or illumination devices not otherwise provided for
    • A61B2090/363Use of fiducial points
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B34/00Computer-aided surgery; Manipulators or robots specially adapted for use in surgery
    • A61B34/25User interfaces for surgical systems
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B34/00Computer-aided surgery; Manipulators or robots specially adapted for use in surgery
    • A61B34/30Surgical robots
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B90/00Instruments, implements or accessories specially adapted for surgery or diagnosis and not covered by any of the groups A61B1/00 - A61B50/00, e.g. for luxation treatment or for protecting wound edges
    • A61B90/10Instruments, implements or accessories specially adapted for surgery or diagnosis and not covered by any of the groups A61B1/00 - A61B50/00, e.g. for luxation treatment or for protecting wound edges for stereotaxic surgery, e.g. frame-based stereotaxis
    • A61B90/14Fixators for body parts, e.g. skull clamps; Constructional details of fixators, e.g. pins

Abstract

An imageless robotized device for guiding surgical tools to improve the performance of surgical tasks is provided. The method of using it comprises the steps of: collecting anatomical landmarks with a robot arm; combining landmarks data with geometric planning parameters to generate a position data; automatically positioning a guiding tool mounted to the robot arm. For example, in total knee replacement surgery this device improves the accuracy of implant installation. Particular embodiments for a limb fixation device are also described.

Description

AN IMAGELESS ROBOTIZED DEVICE AND METHOD FOR SURGICAL TOOL GUIDANCE

FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of robotic-aided surgical systems and methods. It applies in particular to mechanical guidance for an oscillating saw blade or a drill in a variety of surgical applications. For instance, in a total knee replacement surgery, the present invention improves the accuracy of implant installation and its longevity providing a reliable guidance system. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Many surgical procedures in various specialities (orthopaedics, neurosurgery, maxillofacial, etc.) require precise bone cutting or drilling. It is the case for example for surgeries around the knee (knee arthroplasty, tibial or femoral osteotomy, ligamentoplasty), in spine surgery (pedicular screws placement) or in neurosurgery. These procedures are traditionally carried out using motorized instruments (surgical drill, oscillating saw, etc.) positioned and maintained either directly by the surgeon or using basic mechanical guides. However, there are many studies in the literature showing that existing techniques do not guarantee a good and foreseeable result. They suggest that a more precise execution of cuts and drillings would lead to better post-operative results. It would be desirable to provide improved systems and methods for performing surgical gestures that would perfectly match surgeon's operative plans. Crucial issues in such surgical gestures include the necessity to obtain perfect alignments of cuts or drillings with respect to patient anatomy as well as relative alignments of cuts or drillings. Total knee replacement (TKR) is an example of a surgical procedure that requires accurate cuts. In TKR, the surgeon resects the distal femur and the proximal tibia and replaces them with prosthetic components to restore correct functionality of the knee. Theses components have to be properly aligned with respect to the mechanical axes of the bones. Otherwise, the result can lead to poor knee kinematics or loosening of the components. Misalignment can occur in many different ways: orientations along three axes (varus/valgus, flexion/extension, internal/external) and translation along three axes (medial/lateral, proximal/distal, anterior/posterior). Currently, conventional TKR involves a complex jig system of cutting blocks and alignment rods. It is difficult for the surgeon to correctly position the cutting blocks with alignment rods laid along the estimated axes. There are evidence in the literature that theses techniques are not satisfactory. According to studies such as "Navigation in total-knee arthroplasty: CT-based implantation compared with the conventional technique.", Perlick L, et al., Acta Orthop Scand. 2004, vol. 4, pp 464-470, and "The effect of surgeon experience on component positioning in 673 PFC posterior cruciate-sacrificing total knee arthroplasties", by Mahaluxmivala J, et al., J. Arthroplasty 2001 , vol.5, pp 635-640, almost one third of such operations are outside the alignment limits (between 3 degrees varus and 3 degrees valgus from ideal postoperative leg axis). Perlick L., et al., in "Useability of an image based navigation system in reconstruction of leg alignment in total knee arthroplasty", Biomed Tech (Berlin) 2003, vol. 12, pp 339-343, found in a study of 50 knees that only 70 percent were inside the alignment limits. Conventional instrumentation is of some assistance to the surgeon in achieving the correct alignment between the leg axis and the implant but the result depends highly on the surgeon's experience. Different approaches have been proposed to assist the surgeon during TKR. Navigation systems are based on a tracking system that locates the spatial position of trackers. Trackers are fixed on the femur, on the tibia and on mechanical devices such as cutting blocks and pointing tools. The surgeon can visually follow the relative position of the tool with respect to the bones. In a first step, the surgeon registers anatomical landmarks and surfaces with a tracked pointer and defines the center of the hip joint by a kinematic procedure. The navigation system is then able to compute the mechanical axes of the bones and the optimal position for the different cuts. Implanting pins, the surgeon fixes the cutting blocks on the bone with the visual help provided by the navigation system. Drawbacks of such systems are their complexity, the longer procedure time required, and their lack of assistance for the actual surgical gesture realization. There can also be significant loss of accuracy in the positioning of cutting blocks at the very moment when the surgeon looks away from the navigation system screen to implant the fixation pins. Therefore, these navigated solutions still mainly rely on surgeon's skill. Robotic systems have also been proposed to improve bone cutting during knee replacement surgery. T.C. Kienzle in 'Total Knee Replacement, IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology, vol. 14, no. 3, 1995-05-01 , describes a computer-assisted surgical system using a calibrated robot. The system uses a workstation which displays a 3D model of the patient's bones obtained from a CT scan of the leg and a modified industrial robot which directs the placement of prosthetic components. Positions of fiducial markers fixed on the bones are measured with a probe attached to the robot mounting flange. They serve to register the preoperative image data (CT scan frame) with the position of the patient (robot reference frame). After computing the optimal placement of the prosthesis component, the robot positions a drill guide where the holes for the cutting block are to be placed. Main drawback of this system is that surgeon has to perform a pre-operative surgical procedure to. place invasive pins in the patient's femur and tibia before carrying out a CT-scan of the leg. Another robotic device is disclosed in U.S Pat. No. 5,403,319. This device comprises a bone immobilization device, an industrial robot and a template attached to the robot mounting flange. The template has a functional interior surface corresponding to the exterior surface of the femoral component of a knee prosthesis. In the first step, the surgeon positions the template in the desired position of the prosthesis and the robot registers the position. In the second step, the system combines the registered position with a geometric database to generate coordinate data for each cutting task. The robot then positions a tool guide perfectly aligned for each specific task. The actual surgical task is carried out by the surgeon through the tool guide. One of the main drawbacks of this system is that its accuracy entirely relies on an unlikely hypothesis: surgeon's ability to determine visually the optimal spatial position of the prosthesis. Practically, it is almost impossible even for a high-skilled surgeon to position freehand a prosthesis template with an accuracy sufficient to obtain a good postoperative result. Authors describe some rudimentary alignment means such as cut guide marks, alignment tabs and reference rods that could be used for evaluating the position and orientation of the prosthesis relative to the bone. These means are far less accurate than conventional instrumentation. Therefore, this system would be certainly less accurate than conventional jig systems. Another main drawback is that this system anticipates one prosthesis template for each type and size of implant component. As there are around a hundred different models of prosthesis commercialized and around 5 to 7 sizes for each model, this solution seems rather unadapted to operating room constraints. Other robotic systems have been proposed for performing total knee replacement, many of them using pre-operative image data of the patient. ROBODOC (TM) and CASPAR (TM) surgical systems are active robots that mill automatically the bones, realizing autonomously the surgical gesture. The Acrobot (TM) surgical system is a semi-active robot assisting the surgeon during the milling. All these systems are image based. Other automated systems are proposed in combination with a navigation system. It is the case for the Praxiteles (TM) device from PRAXIM, the Galileo (TM) system from Precision Implants and the GP system (TM) from Medacta International (TM). All these systems are bone-mounted, requiring a large incision, and cannot work without a navigation system. Other surgeries around the knee like tibial osteotomy and ligament repairs share the same issues as TKR: accurate cuts or drillings are required to restore knee functionality. In a tibial osteotomy for example, a bone wedge is removed from the tibia to change the axis of the bone. The angular correction is determined pre-operatively on an X-ray. As for TKR, conventional instrumentation includes very basic mechanical guides. There is a need for assistance in precise bone cut. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides an imageless system and method for surgical tool guidance by accurately positioning a guide mounted to a robot arm, typically a cutting guide used in knee replacement surgery for guiding an oscillating saw. The method of using it comprises the steps of: collecting anatomical landmarks with a robot arm; combining landmarks data with geometric planning parameters to generate a position data; automatically positioning a tool guide mounted to the robot arm. In one preferred embodiment, the device is a robotized surgical device used for the optimal positioning of a cutting or drilling guide. The robotized device is rigidly attached to the operating table by a specific fixation device. Preferably, the robot arm presents at least six degrees of freedom and is adapted to receive a cutting and/or drilling guide and/or a pointing tool. Same instrument can be used both for pointing and guiding. The robotized device accurately positions the guide at the place where cutting or drilling must be carried out. Bone cutting or drilling is realized through the guide by a surgeon using an oscillating saw or a surgical drill. In one preferred embodiment, the robot arm comprises a force sensor and can work in a cooperative mode in which the user has the ability to move the robot arm manually by grabbing it by its final part. In another preferred embodiment, movements of the guide in the cooperative mode can be restricted either to a plane for a cutting guide or to an axis for a drilling guide. In another preferred embodiment, the system such as briefly exposed above comprises a display monitor provided with a user communication interface to receive planning parameters from a user. Anatomical landmarks data and planning parameters are combined to define the optimal position of the guide. For example, in TKR, the internal rotation of the femoral component is a planning parameter for implant positioning. The user communication interface could be, for example, a keyboard, a touch screen and/or a mouse. In another embodiment, the device also comprises an interface with a surgical navigation system being able to work from preoperative images of the bone (CT scan, radiography...) or from intra-operative data. Data provided by the surgical navigation system are then used to generate position data for the guide. In this case, the use of a navigation system supplements the step of collecting anatomical landmarks with the robot. Data is provided from the navigation system through a communication interface in accordance to a predefined protocol. The robotized device object of the invention is then a peripheral for precise execution of the surgical planning realized by means of the surgical navigation system. Preferably, the guiding tool comprises limited surfaces to reduce contact and friction with an oscillating saw while preserving an efficient guidance. In another preferred embodiment, the robotized device comprises a limb fixation device adapted to ensure immobilization of the leg at two levels: at the level of the ankle with a toothed rack; at the level of the knee with two pins screwed in the femoral or tibial epiphysis. These means of fixation of the limb ensure the immobility of the leg during the steps of anatomical landmarks collection and bone cutting and/or drilling. Other advantages, goals and characteristic of this invention will arise from the following description. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS For a better understanding of the nature, objects and function of the present invention, reference should be made to the following detailed description in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which: FIG. 1 is an overview of the system of the present invention showing a mobile base, a robot arm with a force sensor and a tool mounted on, and a display monitor; FIG. 2A is a perspective view of the pointing tool; FIG. 2B is a perspective view of the guiding tool; FIG. 2C is a perspective view of a pointing and guiding tool; FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a fixation device for rigidly fixing the mobile base to the operating table; FIG. 4A is a perspective view of a limb fixation device that rigidly holds the leg to the operating table; FIG. 4B is a perspective view of the plate of the limb fixation device described in FIG. 4A; FIG. 4C is a perspective view of the knee part of the limb fixation device described in FIG. 4A; FIG. 4D is a perspective view of the ankle part of the limb fixation device described in FIG. 4A; FIG. 5 is an exploded view of the pointing tool, the force sensor and the robot arm mounting flange; FIG. 6 is an overview of the system of the present invention including a patient positioned on an operating table; and FIG. 7 is a block diagram showing various modules of the control software. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE SPECIFIC EMBODIMENTS With reference to FIG. 1 , it can be seen that a preferred embodiment of the present invention generally includes a robotized device 100 comprising a mobile base 110; a robot arm 120; a control unit 130 inside the mobile base, that controls the robot arm 120 and allows a surgeon to manually input data through the use of an interface 150 that can be a touch screen, a mouse, a joystick, a keyboard or the like; a display monitor 140; a tool 190 and a force sensor 180 mounted to the robot arm mounting flange; and specific fixation device 170 to fix the robotized device 100 to an operating table (not represented here). Mobile base 110 ensures easy handling of the robotized device 100 with its wheels and handles. Mobile base 110 is also preferably provided with immobilization pads or equivalent. Robot arm 120 is a six joint arm. Each joint is provided with an encoder which measures its angular value. These data, combined with the known geometry of the six joints, allow to compute the position of the robot arm mounting flange and the position of the tool mounted to the robot arm, either a pointing tool, a guiding tool or a pointing and guiding tool. FIG. 2A illustrates a pointing tool 190. The pointing tool 190 comprises a base plate 200; a handle 210; and a pointing sphere 220. FIG. 2B illustrates a cutting guide. The cutting guide comprises a base plate 230; a handle 240 and a slit 250 to guide a saw blade. FIG. 2C illustrates a pointing and guiding tool. It comprises a base plate 260; a handle 270; a slit 280 to guide a saw blade and a pointing sphere 290. The tools described in FIGS. 2A to 2C are just three examples of pointing and/or guiding tools that may be utilized with the device shown in FIG. 1. Preferably, robot arm 120 is rigidly attached to the operating table by a specific base fixation device. As shown in FIG. 3, a base fixation device includes two sets of clamps 300 adapted to the operating table rail 310 and U-shape bars 320. Initially, the user installs one clamp 300 on the operating table rail 310 and another clamp on the mobile base rail 330. When clamps are in place, the user inserts the U-shape bar in the cylindrical holes of the clamps, locks the clamps in place and locks the U-shape bar inside the clamps using the knobs. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the system comprises a limb fixation device (see FIGS. 4A, 4B, 4C and 4D) to ensure the immobility of the leg during the procedure. This limb fixation device allows an immobilization of leg at two levels: at the level of the ankle with a toothed rack (FIG. 4D); at the level of the knee with two pins screwed on femoral or tibial epiphysis (FIG. 4C). FIG. 4B shows the main plate 400 of the limb fixation device. Main plate 400 is fixed on the operating table with two clamps 300. The knee fixation part 410 and the ankle fixation part 420 can slide along the main plate 400 and be locked in place by screws. FIG. 4C is a front view of the means of immobilizing patient's leg at the level of the knee. Knee rests on the support bar 440. As bones are exposed in a knee replacement surgery, two pins 430 are screwed either in the femoral epiphysis or in the tibial epiphysis. The position of the support bar 440 can be adjusted vertically and locked with two knobs. The orientation can be adjusted from 0 to 90° by rotating around the main axis 450 and locked with one knob. The whole system can slide along the plate. FIG. 4D illustrates the means of immobilizing patient's leg at the level of the ankle. Patient foot and ankle are rigidly fixed with surgical tape or other sterile means to lock the foot in the boot 460. The boot 460 is adapted to be clamped in a carriage 470 that can slide along the main plate 400 and be locked in place with a knob. Both parts of the limb fixation device (ankle part and knee part) are independent but are used in combination to guarantee immobilization of the lower limb during the procedure. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, control unit 130 can set the robot arm 120 in a cooperative mode in which a user is able to move the robot arm 120 manually by grabbing it by its final part. With reference to FIG. 5, the system of the present invention comprises a force sensor 180 mounted to the robot arm mounting flange 125. Force sensor 180 is adapted to receive a tool like the pointing tool 190. When the user grabs the tool and tries to move it in a direction, the control unit 130 receives efforts measured by the force sensor 180 and combines them with the position of the robot arm 120 to generate the movement desired by the user. Once the robotized device has been fixed to the operating table, the first step of the procedure is collecting anatomical landmarks on the patient. These anatomical landmarks are known by the surgeon. For example, in a TKR procedure, the malleoluses, the internal part of tibial tuberosity, the middle of the spines and the tibial plateaus are collected on the tibia; the notch middle point, the distal and posterior condyles and the anterior cortex are collected on the femur. FIG. 6 illustrates positions of the patient and of the robotized device 100 at the beginning of the landmarks collection step for a TKR procedure. During the landmarks collection step, the control unit 130 sets the robot arm 120 in cooperative mode and indicates through the display monitor 140 the anatomical landmarks to acquire. The surgeon moves the pointing tool 190 until being in contact with the required anatomical landmark and validates the acquisition of the point coordinates using the user interface 150. The control unit

130 then memorizes the coordinates of the point and its anatomical significance. After the landmarks collection step, the surgeon inputs planning parameters through the user interface 150. For example, in a TKR procedure, the surgeon chooses the model and the size of the prosthesis components and defines their positions and orientations relative to the mechanical axes of the femur and the tibia. Typical geometric parameters are varus/valgus angle, posterior slope and thickness of resection for the tibia and varus/valgus angle, flexion/extension angle, external rotation and thickness of resection for the femur. In another embodiment of the invention, control unit 130 comprises a data-processing interface that enables the system to be connected with another computer-assisted surgical system, like a navigation system. Navigation systems work with preoperative images of the bone (CT scan, X-ray, fluoroscopy, etc) or with intra-operative data. In the latter case, they use a 3D reconstruction algorithm based on the digitalization of the bone. Data provided by the navigation system then replaces, or is combined with the landmarks collection step data. Position of the guiding tool may be generated by the navigation system and transmitted to the robotized device in accordance with a predefined communication protocol. Once the required position of the guide has been generated, the user mounts the guiding tool to the robot arm. Preferably, a pointing and guiding tool is used, so that the user does not need to change the tool between the landmarks collection step,and the cutting or drilling step. The robotized device 100 accurately aligns the guide relative to patient's anatomy, in accordance with surgeon's planning. If the guiding tool is a cutting guide for a saw blade, the robot arm 120 holds it in the chosen cutting plane. If the guiding tool is a drilling guide, the robot arm 120 holds it along the chosen drilling axis. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, planar cooperative mode can then be activated by the user to restrict movements of the guide in the plane. Similarly, axial cooperative mode restricts movements of the guide along the axis. The user moves the guiding tool to what he/she estimates is the optimal position, as the control unit 130 restricts movements of the robot arm to a plane or an axis. Once this optimal position reached, the control unit 130 stops the robot arm 120 that holds the guiding tool in place. Surgical task like bone cutting or drilling is carried out by the surgeon using a conventional instrument (oscillating saw or surgical drill) through the guide. In a TKR procedure, the same guiding tool is used for the tibial cut and the five femoral cuts. In a tibial osteotomy procedure, the same guiding tool is used for both tibial cuts. With reference to FIG. 7, control unit 130 runs a control software 132, that exchanges data with elements of the robotized device. Software communicates with the user through the user interface 150 and the display monitor 140. Software communicates with another computer-assisted surgical system as described above through the data-processing interface. Software communicates with the force sensor 180 to regularly measure the efforts exerted by the user at the tool mounted to the robot arm. Software communicates with the robot arm 120 to control its position. Control software 132 comprises five independent modules 134 to 138. Preferably, these modules run simultaneously under a real time environment and use a shared memory to ensure a good management of the various tasks of the control software. Modules have different priorities, safety module 134 having the highest. Safety module 134 monitors the system status and stops the robot arm

*..120 when a critical situation is detected (emergency,, stop, software failure, collision with an obstacle, etc). Interface module 135 manages the communication between the surgeon and the control software through the user interface 150 and the display screen 140. Display screen 140 displays a graphical interface that guides the user through the different steps of the procedure. User interface 150 enables the user to have permanent control during the procedure (validating landmarks collection, defining planning parameters, stopping the robot arm if needed, etc). Force module 136 monitors the forces and torques measured by the force sensor 180. Force module is able to detect a collision with an obstacle and alert the safety module. Control module 137 manages the communication with the robot arm 120. It receives data encoder values of each joint and sends position commands. Calculations module 138 does all the calculations necessary for the procedure. For example, in a TKR procedure, it reconstructs the mechanical axes of the bones combining anatomical landmarks data and statistical data. It also defines the trajectory of the robot arm 120 using direct and inverse kinematics. Present invention is not limited by what has been described above. It will be appreciated that various changes can be made therein without departing from the spirit and the scope of the invention.

Claims

CLAIMSWhat is claimed is
1. A device for guiding a surgical tool, the device including a robot arm, characterized in that it further includes: - a means of collecting anatomical landmarks using said robot arm, - a means of processing said anatomical landmarks and - a means of automatically positioning a tool guide carried by said robot arm, said positioning being a function of the result of said processing.
2. A device according to claim 1 , wherein said robot arm presents at least six degrees of freedom and is adapted to receive a cutting and/or drilling guide and/or a pointing tool.
3. A device according to either one of claims 1 and 2, wherein said robot arm comprises a force sensor and can work in a cooperative mode in which a user has the ability to move the robot arm manually by grabbing it by its final part.
4. A device according to claim 3, wherein said robot arm can work in a cooperative mode restricting movements of the guide in a plane or along an axis.
5. A device according .to any one of claims 1 to 4, that further includes a control monitor and a communication interface adapted to receive surgical planning parameters from a user.
6. A device according to any one of claims 1 to 5, that further includes an interface with a surgical navigation system working from preoperative image data of the bone, e.g., from scanner or radiograph image data, or from per-operative information.
7. A device according to any one of the claims 1 to 6, that further includes a limb fixation device adapted to ensure immobilization of the leg at two levels: - at the level of ankle with a toothed rack - at the level of the knee with pins screwed on femoral and tibial epiphysis.
8. A method of surgical tool guidance, characterized in that it includes: - a step of collecting anatomical landmarks using a robot arm; - a step of combining landmarks data with planning parameters to generate a position data and - a step of automatically positioning a tool guide mounted to said robot arm.
PCT/EP2005/052751 2004-06-15 2005-06-14 An imageless robotized device and method for surgical tool guidance WO2005122916A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
FR0406491A FR2871363B1 (en) 2004-06-15 2004-06-15 A robotic surgical tool for guiding
FR0406491 2004-06-15

Applications Claiming Priority (6)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AU2005253741A AU2005253741B2 (en) 2004-06-15 2005-06-14 An imageless robotized device and method for surgical tool guidance
CA 2570336 CA2570336C (en) 2004-06-15 2005-06-14 An imageless robotized device and method for surgical tool guidance
EP20050749593 EP1755466B1 (en) 2004-06-15 2005-06-14 An imageless robotized device for surgical tool guidance
DE200560003943 DE602005003943T2 (en) 2004-06-15 2005-06-14 Picture lots robot device to guide a surgical tool
JP2007515953A JP4724711B2 (en) 2004-06-15 2005-06-14 Robotized apparatus and method does not use the image to induce tool for surgery
US11610728 US20070156157A1 (en) 2004-06-15 2006-12-14 Imageless robotized device and method for surgical tool guidance

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US11610728 Continuation US20070156157A1 (en) 2004-06-15 2006-12-14 Imageless robotized device and method for surgical tool guidance

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