WO1998055900A1 - Transparency for easy storage - Google Patents

Transparency for easy storage Download PDF

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Publication number
WO1998055900A1
WO1998055900A1 PCT/US1998/009336 US9809336W WO9855900A1 WO 1998055900 A1 WO1998055900 A1 WO 1998055900A1 US 9809336 W US9809336 W US 9809336W WO 9855900 A1 WO9855900 A1 WO 9855900A1
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WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
sheet
stripe
transparency
edge
film
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US1998/009336
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Jonathan P. Kitchin
Virtudes R. Lund
Original Assignee
Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US86933097A priority Critical
Priority to US08/869,330 priority
Application filed by Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company filed Critical Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company
Publication of WO1998055900A1 publication Critical patent/WO1998055900A1/en

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Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G03PHOTOGRAPHY; CINEMATOGRAPHY; ANALOGOUS TECHNIQUES USING WAVES OTHER THAN OPTICAL WAVES; ELECTROGRAPHY; HOLOGRAPHY
    • G03GELECTROGRAPHY; ELECTROPHOTOGRAPHY; MAGNETOGRAPHY
    • G03G7/00Selection of materials for use in image-receiving members, i.e. for reversal by physical contact; Manufacture thereof
    • G03G7/0006Cover layers for image-receiving members; Strippable coversheets
    • GPHYSICS
    • G03PHOTOGRAPHY; CINEMATOGRAPHY; ANALOGOUS TECHNIQUES USING WAVES OTHER THAN OPTICAL WAVES; ELECTROGRAPHY; HOLOGRAPHY
    • G03GELECTROGRAPHY; ELECTROPHOTOGRAPHY; MAGNETOGRAPHY
    • G03G7/00Selection of materials for use in image-receiving members, i.e. for reversal by physical contact; Manufacture thereof

Abstract

An imageable transparency sheet comprising a rectangular substrate having two major surfaces and four edges, two long edges and two short edges, said sheet bearing an image receptive coating on at least one of said major surfaces, said sheet having at least one opaque stripe on at least one edge of one surface, at least one of said edges having a plurality of voids therethrough disposed adjacent to the edge, and being of a size suitable for storage in a binder.

Description

TRANSPARENCY FOR EASY STORAGE

Background of the Invention Field of the Invention This invention relates to transparencies used on overhead projectors, and more particularly to transparency materials that incorporate storage and detector stripe features.

Description of the Related Art The overhead projector has been in use for many years as a presentation and teaching tool. To make the overhead projector easier to use, transparency materials have been developed that make the preparation of transparencies therefor more convenient to the user. For example, U.S. Patent No. 4,071,362 describes a electrophotographic copying film designed to pass through an electrophotographic copier, for example those manufactured by the Xerox Corporation, in the manner of a sheet of paper. Owing to differences in the composition and structure of papers and films, it was necessary to coat the film with a surface layer having certain properties, such as the ability to bond with the electrophotographic toner, and the ability to leak away the electrostatic charge that is an integral part of these processes. It has also proven necessary in certain cases to adjust the Coefficient of Friction of the surface coating to ensure reliable feeding through the electrophotographic copier mechanism. Coefficient of Friction must be controlled within a certain range. Very low coefficients of friction cause difficulty in handling, the sheets being too slippery. High Coefficients of Friction may prevent the top sheet of a stack being removed in the process of feeding. Thus the surface of the sheets are adjusted to be in an intermediate range. Such adjustment is most easily performed by the addition to the surface coating of a suitable particulate. A lubricant may also be included. It has also proved necessary in some copying machines, employing optical sensors, to add an opaque stripe to an edge of the transparent film. Optical sensors detect the presence of a imageable sheet by the detection of light reflected from a leading edge region, or by the blocking of light by an opaque leading edge region. In the absence of such edge detection, the copier mechanism is prevented from initiating an imaging cycle.

Thus when a transparent film is to be imaged, it has proved desirable to attach to the

/ leading edge region an additional material having similar optical properties to that of paper, so as to cause the copying machine to initiate a imaging cycle. Such stripes may be permanent or removable.

U.S. Patent No. 4,873,135 discloses a sheet intended for use as an overhead transparency that is printed with an opaque border. In addition, a strip of pressure sensitive adhesive tape is applied at one edge to improve feeding in the copying machine. It has been observed that rigidity of the leading edge of a sheet intended for use in certain copying machines, leads to increased reliability of feeding. Such rigidity is markedly improved by incorporation, in the assembly, of a paper stripe which possess considerable rigidity in and of itself, and which also retains it's rigidity at the elevated temperatures of some copiers with high temperature fuser rolls. In one product available from 3M Visual Systems Division, as "PP 2200". a strip of removable adhesive tape is attached to one edge as a means to indicate to the sensors of an electrophotographic copying machine that a sheet is about to enter the machine. Subsequent to the copying process this strip of tape may be removed and discarded. In one product, available from 3M Visual Systems Division, as "CG 3650", a carrier sheet of paper or material having equivalent properties is adhesively attached to a essentially contiguous imageable film sheet, said imageable sheet having a score line, that being a line where the tensile properties of the film has been deliberately weakened to allow the imageable film sheet to be detached from the carrier sheet by a tearing action.

It must be noted that the addition of score lines, or lines of closely-spaced voids to film or paper sheets, to aid in separation of parts of those sheets, such as is done with theater tickets and fan-fold materials for use in computer printers, is unlike the use of voids seen in some pads of paper where the voids are intended for mounting the individual paper sheets in a storage binder, for example, a three-ring binder. Any serious reduction in strength caused by such voids in the latter example is considered undesirable.

Other coated sheets for use with overhead projectors have been developed in addition to those described above for use in copiers. For example, U.S. Patent No. 5.413,843 describes an inkable sheet intended for use in an ink jet printer. Such a material has an ink-absorptive layer on at least one side. Materials of this type may also have attached stripes, for the purpose of indicating to the optical sensors of the printer that a sheet is about to enter the mechanism. The above described materials are just a few of a range of materials intended to make transparencies for overhead projection.

U.S. Patent No. 5,208,211 discloses an imaging receiving sheet that incorporates a stripe that changes from opaque to transparent on passing through the toner fuser mechanism of an electrophotographic copier. Thus a sensor-detectable stripe has been devised that becomes transparent and needs no subsequent removal. In addition to the making of transparencies, means have been devised for the convenient use and storage of overhead transparencies. U.S. Patent No. 4,402,585 describes a film envelope having attached flaps and voids suitable for insertion into a three-ring binder. The transparency is inserted in the envelope, and may be displayed while still in the envelope. The material comprising the envelope has no coating or specially formulated surface layer.

U.S. Patent No. 5,319,400 discloses an imageable film having flaps and voids. Such a film can be imaged in a suitable machine, for example, an ink jet printer, and stored in a three-ring binder. Other means adaptable for storing overhead transparencies may be seen in U.S. Patent No. 5,486,883. which discloses a film envelope comprised of a single sheet of film, suitably folded, and having holes for storage in a three-ring binder. A similar assembly may be seen in U.S. Patent No. 4,819,544 which discloses a printing media sleeve. This sleeve incorporates a double sided adhesive strip so as to produce positive closure of the assembly. It is illustrated as having voids along one edge for the purpose of storage in a three-ring binder. U.S. Patent No. 5,426,475 discloses one of many devices for storing and using overhead transparencies. Such devices are obviously convenient for storage and transport of overhead transparencies, keeping them in the correct order and avoiding accidental loss of a transparency during transportation.

Pre-punched holes or perforations in imageable materials are known, for example, 35 mm slide film, and ink-accepting films having edge voids for the purpose of feeding in certain printers having what is know as a tractor drive mechanism. Certain document binder systems are also known to provide cover sheets of heavy transparent plastic having rows of voids down an edge for the purpose insertion of a plastic spine element designed to retain all the components of the report. While informational markings may be made on the surface of these cover sheets, they are neither intended for surface marking nor are they designed to pass through imaging devices such as copiers.

Transparency materials having voids adapted for storage are not available, although it known for users to punch voids in overhead transparencies for storage purposes. This is an inconvenience, in addition to a problem that if there is any wear or looseness in the punch device, it may prove difficult to cleanly cut holes in favored materials such as 100 micron thick bi-axially oriented polyester terephthalate film, favored for clarity, strength and heat resistance.

International Patent Organization WO 95/34431 illustrates in Figure 12, a strip assembly that comprises a pile of strips having an adhesive portion, and holes in the non-adhesive portion. This assembly is available from the 3M Company as "Scotch Personal Organizer Accessory 673RA1". It is intended for attachment to a sheet, by means of the adhesive, so that the attached sheet may be stored, by means of the holes, in a ring binder. Thus storage of a sheet, by the provision of suitable voids, is shown to be a valuable feature. It is apparent from the foregoing that the features of storability, imagability and feedability are most valued by users, but that there is no product that offers the combination of all three in a convenient and low-cost manner.

Summary of the Invention A sheet of transparent carrier film having on at least one side, an imageable coating, said sheet also having along one or more edges voids suitable for storing the said film in a ring binder, said film also having on one or more edges a radiation reflecting and/or absorbing, sensing stripe or stripes for the purpose of indicating to the optical sensors of the imaging device that the imaging cycle should be initiated. Specifically, an imageable transparency sheet of the invention is one comprising a rectangular substrate having two major surfaces, each surface having four edges, two long edges and two short edges, said sheet bearing an image receptive coating on at least one of said major surfaces, said sheet having at least one opaque stripe on at least one edge of one surface, at least one of said edges having a plurality of voids disposed adjacent to such edge, such voids being suitable for attachment to a binder. Obviously many combinations of sensing stripe edge, edge location for voids, choice of sensing stripe, number and size of voids, painted stripe, permanently adhered stripe, releasably adhered stripe, so-called "vanishing stripe", patterns of perforation, nature of the image-accepting coating, presence of the coating on one or more surfaces etc., may be used without departing from the spirit of the invention. The following terms have these meanings when used herein.

1. The term "transparency" means a transparent article carrying a toner image suitable for projection on an overhead projector, such image may have been formed via electrographics, ink jet printing, thermal mass transfer imaging or other imaging device.. 2. The terms "copier" and "copying machine" are used interchangeably to refer to any electrographic or xerographic apparatus which is capable of forming an image on an article of the invention.

3. The term "opaque" means a property that prevents a major portion of the incident radiation from reaching a sensor. As used herein, all parts, percents, and ratios are by weight.

Brief Description of the Drawings FIG. 1 shows an embodiment of the invention having a sensing stripe on the same edge as the voids, the voids extending through the sensing stripe.

FIG. 2 shows an embodiment of the invention having a sensing stripe on the same edge as the voids, but with voids only in the film material.

FIG. 3 shows an embodiment of the invention having a sensing strip on an edge other than the edge with voids.

FIG. 4 shows an embodiment of the invention having a sensing stripe on the edge opposite the voids. Detailed Description of the Invention Films of the invention comprise both a plurality of voids disposed adjacent to at least one of the edges of the substrate and an opaque stripe disposed along at least one of the edges. The rectangular substrate has two major surfaces, each surface having four edges, two long edges and two short edges. The plurality of voids is disposed adjacent to at least one such edge, but voids may be disposed adjacent to more than one edge. The voids are suitable for placing such films directly into a storage system, such as a ring binder, for easy storage without need of special storage envelopes which add expense. Various types of stripes are useful. The stripe can be formed of a separate material and adhered to the film, either permanently or releaseably. The stripe is typically opaque, although translucent or even transparent, but colored or patterned stripes may be used herein if desired. Such a separate stripe may be formed from paper, nonwoven materials, or films. In one embodiment, the stripe is formed from a thin film having a tensile energy to break of at least 0.1 joule, preferably at least about 0.25 joule.

This thin stripe can be selected from a variety of heat-resistant materials, as long as such materials are available in the requisite thickness, i.e., less than 30 μm, and possess sufficient structural integrity such that no tearing of the layer occurs during imaging or removal. Heat-resistance means that useful films must retain sufficient cohesive strength to be easily removed in one piece from the imaging sheet when normally fused, and when a misfeed results in extended contact with hot fusing rolls. Useful films must have sufficient cohesive strength to allow a clean removal in most samples from the fusing roll of the copier should a premature release from the imaging sheet causes retention in the copier machine.

The thin film can be formed from heat-resistant polymer films including, but not limited to, polyolefins such as polyethylene and polybutylene; polystyrene; polyesters such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET); polymethylmethacrylate; cellulose acetate; polyvinylchloride and polyvinylidene fluoride; polyamides and polyimides; and mixtures thereof. Polyethylene and PET are preferred, with PET being highly preferred. This stripe can be bonded to the transparent sheet by a permanent or repositionable adhesive composition. Where permanent adhesion is desired, e.g., where the stripe also serves as a decorative border, the adhesive may be selected from polyurethanes, epoxies, acrylate adhesives and the like. Where the stripe is meant to be removed, an adhesive must be chosen which has enough adhesion for the stripe to remain attached while the sheet is in the imaging device, but yet be easily removable. Removable and repositionable compositions are well known in the art, especially preferred are those particulate adhesives disclosed in U.S. 3,691,140, (Silver et al.). These repositionable adhesives are infusible, solvent- dispersible, solvent-insoluble, inherently tacky, elastomeric copolymer microspheres consisting essentially of 90 percent to 99.5 percent by weight of at least one alkyl acrylate ester and 10 to 0.5 percent by weight of at least one monomer selected from the group consisting of substantially oil-insoluble, water-soluble, ionic monomers and maleic anhydride. The microspheres are prepared by aqueous suspension polymerization utilizing emulsifier in an amount greater than the critical micelle concentration. Also useful are such repositionable adhesives as dispersions of crosslinked rubbers or acrylates.

The stripe may also be formed from a material painted directly onto the transparent film substrate. If the opaque thin film layer is coated or painted directly onto the imageable sheet, the composition may be permanent or may be chosen to exhibit removability without leaving any unwanted residue on the imageable sheet. Materials useful for forming permanent stripes include paint, inks, lacquers, and the like.

Useful compositions for removable stripes include hot-melt binders, and UV- curable binders such as water-soluble polymers. Examples include poly(vinyl alcohol). poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), and gelatin; solvent-soluble binders such as poly(bisphenol-A-ester), available under the trade name Atlac® from Reichold Chemical; acrylic resins, and the like.

These removable compositions may contain pigments or dyes for coloring purposes, with the pigment to binder ratio being preferably less than one. Lower ratios of binder in the composition tend to produce brittle layers, whereas higher ratios tend to excessively soften the layers. Preferred pigments include conventional pigments and dyes such as titanium dioxide, carbon black, metallic oxides, metal powders lead chromates. natural and synthetic dyes and pigments used in inks, fabrics and the like. The surface of the substrate may be treated to better receive or retain the opaque thin film layer. However, any treatment to improve adhesion of the stripe to the substrate should not interfere with the removability of the stripe.

The stripe is typically 5-15 mm in width, and is disposed along and in register with the leading edge of the transparent sheet (which may be a long edge or a short edge, depending on the desired format of the image). One purpose of the stripe is to signal certain copying machines that a transparency has been fed therein. The copier then reduces the fuser speed to increase the fusing time. Without the opaque stripe, a transparency cannot be seen by these copiers. If the width of the stripe exceeds 20 mm, the film is treated identically to a piece of paper, with no reduction in fuser speed.

Imageable transparency films of the invention comprise upon at least on surface of the transparent film substrate, an imageable coating. In one preferred embodiment, films of the invention are optimized for use in electrographic copying machines. In such embodiment, the imageable coating may be an aqueous, or water based polymeric coating, as disclosed in U.S. Patent No.5,310,598.

Such coatings contain from 65 to 99.9 parts of an imaging copolymer. The imaging copolymer contains from 80 parts to 99 parts of at least one monomer selected from the group consisting of bicyclic alkyl (meth)acrylates. aliphatic alkyl (meth)acrylates having from one to twelve carbon atoms, and aromatic (meth)acrylates.

Copolymers containing at least one bicyclic alkyl (meth)acrylate are preferred for use with most commercial copiers, as they improve the adhesion of toner to the image receptive coating. Useful bicyclic (meth)acrylates include, but are not limited to, dicyclopentenyl (meth)acrylate, norbornyl (meth)acrylate, 5-norborene-2- methanol, and isobornyl (meth)acrylate. Preferred bicyclic monomers include dicyclopententyl (meth)acrylate, and isobornyl (meth)acrylate. Useful aliphatic alkyl (meth)acrylates include, but are not limited to, methyl acrylate, ethyl acrylate, methyl (meth)acrylate, isobutyl (meth)acrylate, isodecyl (meth)acrylate, cyclohexyl (meth)acrylate, and the like. Preferred aliphatic monomers include methyl (meth)acrylate, ethyl (meth)acrylate, and isodecyl (meth)acrylate. For imaging polymers to be emulsion polymerized, the bicyclic alkyl

(meth)acrylates preferably comprise from 10 parts to 80 parts, more preferably from 20 parts to 60 parts. For solution polymers, the preferred minimum amount is lower, i.e., 5 parts, more preferably 10 parts. The copolymer must also contain from 1 to a 20 parts of a polar monomer. Since many copiers have a styrene based toner system; the addition of styrene and substituted styrene monomers yield imaging sheets having very good toner adhesion with such machines. Preferred aqueous coatings of this type also comprise a bimodal particulate filler system comprising at least one polymeric particle, and having an average particle size of from 0.25 mm to 15 mm; however, a narrow particle size distribution is also preferred, i.e., a standard deviation of up to 20% of the average particle size.

The toner receptive layer can be coated out of a water-based emulsion or aqueous solution using well-known coating techniques. For coating out of an emulsion, at least one nonionic emulsifier with hydrophilic/lipophilic balance (HLB) of at least 10 is also present.

An antistatic agent may also be present in the toner receptive layer. Useful agents are selected from the group consisting of nonionic antistatic agents, cationic agents, anionic agents, and fluorinated agents. Useful agents include such as those available under the trade name AMTER™, e.g., AMTER™ 110, 1002. 1003, 1006. and the like, derivatives of Jeffamine™ ED-4000, 900, 2000 with FX8 and FX10, available from 3M, Larostat™ 60A, and Markastat™ AL-14, available from Mazer Chemical Co., with the preferred antistatic agents being steramido-propyldimethyl-β- hydroxy-ethyl ammonium nitrate, available as Cyastat™ SN, N,N'-bis(2- hydroxyethyl)-N-(3'-dodecyloxy-2'2-hydroxylpropyl) methylammonium methylsulfate, available as Cyastat™ 609, both from American Cyanamid. When the antistatic agent is present, amounts of up to 20% (solids/solids) may be used. Preferred amounts vary, depending on coating weight. When higher coating weights are used, 1-10%) is preferred, when lower coating weights are used, 5-15% is preferred.

Another useful coating is an aqueous, or water-based toner-receptive composition comprising a core/shell latex polymer, wherein the ratio of core to shell of said core/shell latex polymer ranges from 10/90 to 90/10, preferably from 25/75 to 50/50, as disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 5,624,747. The core polymer has a lower Tg than the shell. The TB of the core preferably ranges from -60°C to about 20°C, more preferably from -10°C to 5°C. The Tg of the shell preferably ranges from 35° to about 100°C, more preferably, from 40° to 90°C.

The core is made from at least one α,β-ethylenically unsaturated monomer having from 1 to 12 carbon atoms. This monomer makes up from 60 to 100 parts, preferably from 75 to 90 parts of the core. Where this monomer comprises less than 100%), the core also contains at least one monomer selected from the group consisting of bicyclic alkyl (meth)acrylates, and aromatic (meth)acrylates. This monomer can comprise up to 40 parts, preferably from 10 to 25 parts.

The shell is likewise formed from at least one α,β-ethylenically unsaturated monomer containing from 1 to 12 carbon atoms. This monomer may comprise up to 100 parts of the shell, preferably from 45 to 80 parts. Where this monomer comprises less than 100 parts, the shell can also comprise up to 65 parts, preferably from 20 to 55 parts, of at least one monomer selected from the group consisting of bicyclic alkyl (meth)acrylates, and aromatic (meth)acrylates.

Useful α,β-ethylenically unsaturated monomers include, but are not limited to, methyl acrylate, ethyl acrylate. methyl (meth)acrylate, isobutyl (meth)acrylate, isodecyl (meth)acrylate, cyclohexyl (meth)acrylate, n-butyl acrylate, styrene, vinyl esters, and the like. Preferred monomers include methyl (meth)acrylate, ethyl (meth)acrylate and isodecyl (meth)acrylate.

Useful bicyclic (meth)acrylates include, but are not limited to, dicyclopentenyl (meth)acrylate, norbornyl (meth)acrylate, and isobornyl (meth)acrylate. Preferred bicyclic monomers include dicyclopentenyl (meth)acrylate. Useful aromatic (meth)acrylates include, but not limited to. benzyl(meth)acrylate. The core polymer, and/or the shell polymer, can also contain from 0 to 20 parts of a polar monomer selected from the group consisting of acrylic (meth)acrylic acid or hydroxyalkyl(meth)acrylates; and nitrogen-containing compounds including N-alkylacrylamide, N,N-dialkyl amino monoalkyl (meth)acrylate, N-alkyl amino alkyl (meth)acrylate, and their cationic salts thereof, all said above alkyl groups having up to 8 carbon atoms, preferably up to 2 carbon atoms.

Coatings for the transparency films useful for copying devices typically range in thickness from 100 nm to 1500 nm, preferably 200 run to 500 nm.

Where it is desired to optimize transparency films for use with ink-jet printers, or thermal mass transfer imaging devices, other coatings can be used including, but not limited to those disclosed in U.S. Patent Nos. 4,935,307; 5,389,723; 5472,789; 5,241,006; 5,376,737; 5208092: 5688,603, and 5,518,809.

The transparent film substrate may be formed from any polymer capable of forming a self-supporting sheet, e.g., films of cellulose esters such as cellulose triacetate or diacetate, polystyrene, polyamides, vinyl chloride polymers and copolymers, polyolefin and polyallomer polymers and copolymers, polysulphones, polycarbonates, polyesters, and blends thereof. Suitable films may be produced from polyesters obtained by condensing one or more dicarboxylic acids or their lower alkyl diesters in which the alkyl group contains up to 6 carbon atoms, e.g., terephthalic acid, isophthalic, phthalic, 2,5-,2,6-, and 2,7-naphthalene dicarboxylic acid, succinic acid, sebacic acid, adipic acid, azelaic acid, with one or more glycols such as ethylene glycol, 1,3-propanediol, 1 ,4-butanediol, and the like.

Preferred film substrates or backings are cellulose triacetate or cellulose diacetate, poly(ethylene naphthalate), polyesters, especially poly(ethylene terephthalate), and polystyrene films. Poly(ethylene terephthalate) is most preferred. It is preferred that film backings have a caliper ranging from 50 μm to 200 μm. Film backings having a caliper of less than about 50 μm are difficult to handle using conventional methods for graphic materials. Film backings having calipers over 200 μm are suffer, and present feeding difficulties in certain commercially available ink jet printers and pen plotters. When polyester film substrates are used, they can be biaxially oriented to impart molecular orientation, and may also be heat set for dimensional stability during fusion of the image to the support. These films may be produced by any conventional extrusion method. To promote adhesion of the ink-receptive layer to the film backing, it may be desirable to treat the surface of the film backing with one or more primers, in single or multiple layers. Useful primers include those known to have a swelling effect on the film backing polymer. Examples include halogenated phenols dissolved in organic solvents. Alternatively, the surface of the film backing may be modified by treatment such as corona treatment or plasma treatment.

The primer layer, when used, should be relatively thin, preferably less than 2 micrometers, most preferably less than 1 micrometer, and may be coated by conventional coating methods.

Transparencies of the invention are particularly useful in the production of imaged transparencies for viewing in a transmission mode, e.g., in association with an overhead projector.

Detailed Description of the Drawings Figure 1 illustrates an embodiment of the invention. A transparent sheet of polymeric film base 2, bears an image-receptive coating 4, on at least one major surface. The second major surface may have a similar or different coating, or may be untreated. An opaque stripe 8, which may be permanently adhered, or releasably adhered, to a long edge of the sheet has voids 6. in this illustration three in number, which penetrate the opaque stripe, the image receptive layer, and the transparent polymeric film base. Arrow 10 indicates the direction of passage of the assembly through an imaging device. This embodiment is particularly suited to use in a copying machine.

Figure 2 illustrates a further embodiment of the invention. A transparent sheet of polymeric film base 2, bears an image-receptive coating 4, on a major surface. The second major surface may have a similar or different coating, or may be untreated. An opaque stripe 8, which is releasably adhered to a long edge of the sheet, obscures voids 6. in this illustration three in number, which penetrate only the image receptive layer and the transparent polymeric film base. Arrow 10, indicates the direction of passage of the assembly through an imaging device. It is intended that, after imaging, the stripe 8 shall be removed to permit insertion of the imaged transparency in a ring binder. Figure 3 illustrates a further embodiment of the invention. A transparent sheet of polymeric film base 4, bears an image-receptive coating 2, on a major surface. A short edge of the sheet has releasably attached a sensing stripe 8, comprised of paper coated with a repositionable microsphere adhesive. Perforation holes 6. in this illustration, 5 in number are present in the area adjacent to a long side of the sheet. Arrow 10, illustrates the direction of motion of the sheet through an imaging device. This embodiment is particularly suited for a material intended for use in an ink jet printer.

Figure 4 illustrates a further embodiment of the invention. A transparent sheet of polymeric film base 4, has on one major surface an image receptive coating 2, and on a short edge a sensing stripe 8, comprised of a permanent ink layer. The opposite short edge has in the area adjacent to it, perforation holes 6, in this case 3 in number. Arrow 10 illustrates the direction of motion of the sheet through an imaging device. This embodiment, with suitable choice of image receptive coating could be suitable for use in a number of imaging devices, for example copiers, color copiers, thermal transfer printers, ink jet printers and the like.

Example 1 A sheet of 3M Visual Systems Division "PP2200" film, being a Plain Paper Copier film having a removable paper sensing stripe adhered to a long edge of the film sheet, and having a toner-receptive coating on both sides of the sheet, was placed in a "Rolodex" three-hole punch so that the edge with the paper stripe was in position to be perforated. The punch mechanism was operated resulting in a sheet having a paper stripe with three holes through the stripe. This sheet was then fed through a Xerox 5053 copier via the bypass feed mechanism. It fed without difficulty, and the paper stripe was then removed, and the resulting overhead transparency stored in a three-ring binder. Example 2 A sheet of 3M Visual Systems "PP2500" film, a film having no sensing stripe, and having a toner-receptive coating on both sides, was positioned with its long edge in a Rolodex three hole punch. The mechanism was operated resulting in a sheet of film having three punch holes positioned on its long edge. A strip of Post-It® brand tape, one half inch wide, was then placed on the same long edge as had been perforated, covering the voids. This sheet was then fed through the bypass feed of a Xerox 5053 copier. It fed without difficulty, and after removal of the tape, was placed for storage in a three-ring binder.

Example 3

A sheet of 3M Visual System Division "CG 3460" film, a film having a removable sensing stripe on one short side, and an ink-receptive coating on the other side, was placed with a long side in the mechanism of a Rolodex Three Hole punch. The mechanism was operated resulting in an ink jet film having voids proximate to a long edge. This sheet was then inserted in the feed tray of Hewlett Packard DeskJet® 660C ink jet printer, and an image formed on it. The resulting overhead transparency was stored directly in a three-ring binder without removal of the paper stripe.

Example 4 A sheet of 3M CG 2260 film for color copiers, having a removable paper stripe down one long edge was punched, as above, on the non-striped edge, and fed through a Xerox 5760 Color Copier. The paper stripe was removed, and the overhead transparency stored in a three-ring binder.

These examples merely illustrate a number of ways in which this invention may be practiced, and that many other variants of the above will be obvious to those skilled in the art. For example, other combinations of stripe position and perforation holes are possible. Other imaging devices not described above, for example Laser Printers, may be employed to generate the image.

Claims

What is claimed is:
1. An imageable transparency sheet comprising a rectangular substrate having two major surfaces, and four edges, two of said edges being long edges and two of said edges being short edges, said sheet bearing an image receptive coating on at least one of said major surfaces, said sheet having at least one opaque stripe on at least one edge of one surface, at least one of said edges having a plurality of voids adjacent thereto.
2. A transparency sheet according to claim 1 wherein said stripe is adjacent to at least one long edge.
3. A transparency sheet according to claim 1 wherein said stripe is adjacent to at least one short edge.
4. A transparency sheet according to claim 1 wherein said stripe is on said edge having a plurality of voids adjacent thereto.
5. A transparency sheet according to claim 4 wherein said voids are punched through said sheet and said stripe.
6. A transparency sheet according to claim 1 where said image receptive coating is compatible with an electrophotographic toner.
7. A transparency sheet according to Claim 1 where said image coating surface is ink receptive or receptive to wax transfer images.
8. A transparency sheet according to Claim 1 where said stripe is printed on the transparency sheet.
9. A transparency sheet according to Claim 1 where said stripe is formed from a separate material and is adhered to said sheet by means of an adhesive.
10. A transparency sheet according to claim 9 wherein said adhesive is a repositionable microsphere adhesive.
PCT/US1998/009336 1997-06-05 1998-05-07 Transparency for easy storage WO1998055900A1 (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP1167053A2 (en) * 2000-06-30 2002-01-02 Eastman Kodak Company Ink jet recording element
US6558753B1 (en) 2000-11-09 2003-05-06 3M Innovative Properties Company Inks and other compositions incorporating limited quantities of solvent advantageously used in ink jetting applications
WO2006034597A1 (en) * 2004-09-29 2006-04-06 Celfa Ag Transfer medium suitable for printing in laser printers
US7423072B2 (en) 2000-11-09 2008-09-09 3M Innovative Properties Company Weather resistant, ink jettable, radiation curable, fluid compositions particularly suitable for outdoor applications

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US4873135A (en) * 1988-01-29 1989-10-10 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Preframed transparency film having improved feeding reliability
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EP0695973A1 (en) * 1994-07-08 1996-02-07 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Removable nonporous opaque thin film layer
WO1998006588A1 (en) * 1996-08-12 1998-02-19 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Recording assembly for ink-jet printing and transparencies

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US4402585A (en) * 1980-03-13 1983-09-06 Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company Envelope for transparencies for overhead projectors and like projecting apparatuses
DE3204964A1 (en) * 1982-02-12 1983-08-25 Demolux Storage device for projection sheets
EP0138287A2 (en) * 1983-06-01 1985-04-24 Moore Business Forms, Inc. Method for making overhead projection transparency and transparency assemblies
DE3702877C1 (en) * 1987-01-31 1988-06-30 Pelikan Ag Backing for slide films for overhead projectors
US4873135A (en) * 1988-01-29 1989-10-10 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Preframed transparency film having improved feeding reliability
US5319400A (en) * 1993-01-06 1994-06-07 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Light-blocking transparency assembly
WO1995034431A1 (en) * 1994-06-13 1995-12-21 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Binding assembly
EP0695973A1 (en) * 1994-07-08 1996-02-07 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Removable nonporous opaque thin film layer
WO1998006588A1 (en) * 1996-08-12 1998-02-19 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Recording assembly for ink-jet printing and transparencies

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP1167053A2 (en) * 2000-06-30 2002-01-02 Eastman Kodak Company Ink jet recording element
EP1167053A3 (en) * 2000-06-30 2003-07-23 Eastman Kodak Company Ink jet recording element
US6558753B1 (en) 2000-11-09 2003-05-06 3M Innovative Properties Company Inks and other compositions incorporating limited quantities of solvent advantageously used in ink jetting applications
US6730714B2 (en) 2000-11-09 2004-05-04 3M Innovative Properties Company Inks and other compositions incorporating limited quantities of solvent advantageously used in ink jetting applications
US7423072B2 (en) 2000-11-09 2008-09-09 3M Innovative Properties Company Weather resistant, ink jettable, radiation curable, fluid compositions particularly suitable for outdoor applications
US7943681B2 (en) 2000-11-09 2011-05-17 3M Innovative Properties Company Weather resistant, ink jettable, radiation curable, fluid compositions particularly suitable for outdoor applications
WO2006034597A1 (en) * 2004-09-29 2006-04-06 Celfa Ag Transfer medium suitable for printing in laser printers

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