New! View global litigation for patent families

USRE42181E1 - Metal halide lamp for curing adhesives - Google Patents

Metal halide lamp for curing adhesives Download PDF

Info

Publication number
USRE42181E1
USRE42181E1 US11800522 US80052207A USRE42181E US RE42181 E1 USRE42181 E1 US RE42181E1 US 11800522 US11800522 US 11800522 US 80052207 A US80052207 A US 80052207A US RE42181 E USRE42181 E US RE42181E
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
lamp
range
source
invention
iodide
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Fee Related
Application number
US11800522
Inventor
Dale E. Brabham
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Ushio America Inc
Original Assignee
Ushio America Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J61/00Gas- or vapour-discharge lamps
    • H01J61/02Details
    • H01J61/12Selection of substances for gas fillings; Specified operating pressure or temperature
    • H01J61/125Selection of substances for gas fillings; Specified operating pressure or temperature having an halogenide as principal component
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J61/00Gas- or vapour-discharge lamps
    • H01J61/02Details
    • H01J61/025Associated optical elements
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J61/00Gas- or vapour-discharge lamps
    • H01J61/02Details
    • H01J61/12Selection of substances for gas fillings; Specified operating pressure or temperature
    • H01J61/18Selection of substances for gas fillings; Specified operating pressure or temperature having a metallic vapour as the principal constituent
    • H01J61/20Selection of substances for gas fillings; Specified operating pressure or temperature having a metallic vapour as the principal constituent mercury vapour

Abstract

An arc lamp assembly which includes in combination a reflector and a light source which is surrounded by said reflector. A dichroic coating on the reflector functions to reflect radiation in the range of about 300 to 600 nm. The light source is an arc lamp which contains a metal halide fill component which includes a mixture of scandium iodide, or other suitable lanthanide, indium iodide and cesium iodide, whereby the lamp assembly emits effective amounts of UV radiation to cure selected chemical compositions. The fill mixture, which contains no sodium component, contributes to improved lamp life and a reduction in passive lamp failure over halide fill mixtures which contain sodium iodide as a fill component.

Description

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates in general to lamps, and more specifically to a metal halide lamp which maximizes UV radiation in the desired useful range for curing chemical compositions.

It has long been a goal and objective in the field for a low wattage, long life, short arc gap lamp which could be used in a wide range of applications. Changing needs of the marketplace have identified the need for a short arc gap lamp in the range of 50 watts. Such an illumination source in one application could be used to irradiate small, light valves. This source would require a miniature source size, high radiance, good spectral properties, long life and low power. This goal was achieved with the development of a 50 watt arc lamp suitable for use as a projection lamp and is more fully described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,942,850.

When lamps of this type are attempted to be used in applications where UV radiation is required they are unsuitable in that even if operating conditions are modified to favorably promote UV radiation, lamp life or stability is compromised. Lamps of this type, therefore, do not satisfactorily operate to provide for enhanced radiation in the UV range, and as currently designed, are not candidates for applications where high UV response is essential.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to overcome the problems of the prior art described above.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a high performance UV irradiation or light source which can be used as a curing light to initiate polymeric reactions in plastic and adhesive substrates.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a high performance lamp for use in systems which require high UV radiation.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a compact lamp assembly which exhibits high radiance, long life, and good UV radiation.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed to a high performance miniature arc lamp. The lamp has a preferred use in curing chemical compositions which react to UV radiation. The lamp is used in an assembly that utilizes a dichroic coating on a reflector to concentrate UV light to the desired target or area.

It has been discovered that a unique metal halide mixture of individual compounds selected from the group of cesium iodide, indium iodide and scandium iodide provides a fill component which insures high lamp performance, and when used with a reflector having a suitable dichroic coating, is uniquely suited to providing an effective source of UV radiation. In the present invention the fill mixture does not contain a sodium component. Lamps tested with this unique metal halide mixture exhibited improved lamp life and a reduction in non passive failure over lamps which contained sodium iodide (NaI) as a fill component.

A suitable mixture which accomplishes the objectives of the present invention comprises scandium iodide (or other suitable lanthanide), indium iodide and cesium iodide in total amounts up to about 270 μg. The dichroic coating is selected to reflect UV radiation in a range from about 300 to 600 nm.

In additional embodiments the fill mixture can be used in the infrared range for a security lamp and also for use in a UV visible camera.

For use in the present invention it is essential that the lamp be of an acceptable miniature size, exhibit high radiance, long life and low power.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference should be made to the following description of a preferred mode of practicing the invention, read in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a side sectional view of the light source of the present invention.

FIG. 1A is an enlarged sectional view of the hermetically sealed chamber of the light source shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 2 is a side sectional view of a lamp containing the light source of FIG. 1.

FIG. 2A is an enlarged sectional view taken through the wall of the reflector shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 3 is a rear view of the lamp shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 illustrates a plot of the UV output of the lamp of the present invention at three different apertures.

FIG. 5 is a plot of lamp life for two different fill mixtures of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The light source 10 of the present invention in the form of an elongated fused quartz envelope is shown in more detail in FIG. 1 as being a double ended structure having a pair of elongated electrodes 16 (cathode) and 18 (anode) disposed at opposite ends of neck sections 36 and 38, respectively. The electrodes are separated from each other by a predetermined critical distance D or arc gap (FIG. 1A) preferably in the range of about 0.8 mm to about 1.5 mm. The light source is in the shape of an elongated body having an overall length (L in FIG. 1) in the range of about 28 mm to about 32 mm having the neck sections with a diameter in the range of about 3 mm to about 5 mm, and has a double cone shaped central hermetically sealed chamber 12 having a volume 14 of about 70 mm3±10 mm3. The wall thickness of chamber 12 is about 1 mm. The light source contains a critical fill mix which comprises an inert noble gas, mercury and metal halides which are formulated to enhance, UV output.

More specifically, the sealed chamber is designed to provide a unique UV spectral response for the lamp of the present invention as evidenced by the plot of spectral power in the UV range of about 300-600 nm as shown in FIG. 4. The radiation illustrated in FIG. 4 is obtained from the lamp described herein operated at 50W with a spectroradiometer traceable to NIST standards.

The volume of the chamber can be approximated to that of a double cone with radius of the base b and height of one cone b, a and semi-minor axis b.
V=2/3πb2·a

The semi-major axis length (a in FIG. 1A) for the light source of the present invention is one half of the overall chamber length and in a range of about 4 to 6 mm. The semi-minor axis length (b in FIG. 1a) is one half of the chamber inner diameter and has a range of about 2 to 3 mm.

The preferred range of the chamber volume to yield optimal performance specifications is about 65 to 75 mm3. The lamp power divided by the chamber volume is known as the volume-power loading of the lamp. This number calculates out to be 0.8 watt/mm3 given the preferred range of design factors. This metric is significant because it relates to the amount of heat dissipated power per unit size of the lamp and therefore influences the operating temperature of the lamp.

The appropriate volume of the chamber is determined in combination with other interrelated design factors, primarily the type and amount of fill materials and operating power.

Deviation from the optimal volume could lead to performance degradation as a result of either improper internal operating pressure or improper thermal operation as dictated by the volume-power loading.

The electrodes respectively consist of a shank portion the ends of which contain wrapped metal coils 20 and 22, respectively. Proper thermal and electrical design of electrodes are required to achieve the desired performance. Coils, or wraps of wire, around the primary electrode shank can be added to properly balance the electrical and thermal requirements. Coils can serve the function of providing an additional thermal radiative surface to control the temperature of the electrode shank. The size and length of the coil can be designed to achieve optimal thermal performance. An additional function of coils is to provide the appropriate electrical field properties for efficient and reliable arc initiation, or lamp starting. In certain applications, the coil on the cathode is optional and is not required. The opposite end of the shank portions are respectively connected to one end of a foil member 28 and 30 respectively sealed in the opposite end of the neck portion. Typically, the foil members are made of molybdenum. The foil members have their other end respectively connected to relatively thicker outer lead wires 32 and 34 which in turn are respectively connected to the structural members shown more clearly in FIG. 2.

FIG. 2 illustrates the miniature lamp 40 of the present invention which includes a reflector 42 containing the light source 10 having an insulating thermally resistant connector 44 having a pair of pins 46 and 48 suitable for connection to a suitable source of power. Structural members 35, 37 and 39 are used to orient the light source in a substantial horizontal axis with respect to the reflector and form the electrical connections along with lead wire 32. The reflector internal glass surface 43 further contains a coating of dichroic material 45 (FIG. 2A) which functions to transmit selected light, and reflect or direct UV radiation to a desired target or location. Suitable dichroic materials are combinations of silicon dioxide (S1O2), aluminum oxide (Al2O3), zirconium dioxide (ZrO2), or tantalum oxide (Ta2O5). Multiple coatings are applied in alternating layers. The dichroic coating is a submicron layer, typically about 0.005 to 0.010 microns thick. Multiple coatings (up to 100) of at least two different oxides are alternately formed on the inside surface of the reflector by a conventional vapor deposition technique.

In the present invention, a refractory insulating material is formed into an elongated envelope into which the following components are inserted and hermetically scaled:

    • a. a pair of refractory metal electrodes;
    • b. a quantity of metal halide material;
    • c. a quantity of metallic mercury; and
    • d. a quantity of an inert noble gas.

The electrodes are aligned in an axial manner facing each other. The light source is operating in a direct current (DC) mode at a low electrical power.

Refractory materials for the envelope can be fused silica or alumina oxide. The refractory materials for the electrodes typically are tungsten (with or without thorium) or molybdenum. The description of electrodes is defined in more detail below. The metal halide materials and quantity of mercury is also described below.

Preferably the envelope material is fused silica and the electrodes are tungsten. Fused silica is easier to handle and process, and tungsten allows for higher operating temperatures and increases light output and life.

The opposing electrodes are set apart and separated at a distance to provide optimal performances for light guide applications. Maximum utilization of optical component light collection requires the light source to be as near to “point source ” as possible.

The broad range of separation is 0.8 mm to 1.5 mm.

The preferred range of separation is 1.2 mm±0.2 mm.

Falling below the preferred range of separation will cause a corressponding loss in lamp luminous efficacy. Exceeding the preferred range will minimize the effectiveness of the lamp as a miniature source for projection optics.

In operating the light source in a DC mode, one electrode is identified as the anode, the other as the cathode, and each is sized appropriately for optimal operation for a given lamp power and current. The electrodes are constructed from known techniques that incorporate an overwound refractory metal coil attached to the metal shank. The optimal design is determined given the range of electrical power and current over which the source is intended to operate. Table I below tabulates the electrode wire diameters and power and current ranges for the present invention.

TABLE I
Range of Wattage: Preferred Wattage:
40 W-60 W 50 W ± 2 W
Range of Current: Preferred Current:
0.5 A-1.5 A 0.9 A ± .2 A
Anode Shank 0.020 in. ± 0.008 in. 0.020 in. ± 0.001 in.
Anode Overwind Wire 0.010 in. ± 0.005 in. 0.010 in. ± 0.001 in.
Cathode Shank 0.014 in. ± 0.004 in. 0.014 in. ± 0.001 in.
Cathode Overwind 0.005 in. ± 0.005 in. 0.007 in. ± 0.001 in.
Wire

A mismatch between electrical operating characteristics and electrode design could be disastrous from a product performance standpoint. Generally, a design that permits too high of an operating temperature of the electrodes (high current/small electrodes) will result in rapid electrode erosion, darkening of the envelope, short life and low light output. Too low of an operating temperature of the electrode (low power/large electrodes) will result in an unstable or flickering arc.

InIt has been discovered that a unique sodium free metal halide mixture of individual compounds selected from the following group of scandium iodide, indium iodide and cesium iodide in conjunction with the other fill components results in a lamp which exhibits enhanced UV output. It is the specific dose of metal halide salts in combination with a reflector having a dichroic coating that concentrates only the desired LWUV radiation that is the key combination of components of the present invention.

The scandium iodide, or any other suitable lanthanide, provides a means of controlling undesired secondary processes within the lamp. The indium iodide contributes radiation emission in the blue to ultraviolet regions to enhance the total spectral output fundamental to this invention. Cesium iodide provides the appropriate electrical, thermal, and convective characteristics of the plasma.

Two suitable mixtures, shown in Table II below, which accomplishes the objectives of the present invention are metal halide doses of 240 and 264 μg, respectively, of material composed of (by mass percent) containing both high and low concentrations of InI along with a prior art mixture which contains NaI.

TABLE II
Mass of Total doses
Percent by Component in
Type of Weight (micrograms) micrograms
Dose CsI ScI3 InI NaI CsI ScI3 InI all
No sodium, 70 20 10 185 26 53 264
high indium
No sodium, 88 8 4 211 19 10 240
low indium
Prior art with 104 7 14 7 132
sodium

The operative concentration range which provides a combination that optimize stable electrical behavior is also listed in Table III below:

TABLE III
Operative Range
Mass of Component
Compound Wt. % Range (micrograms)
ScI3 8-20 5-25 μg
In 4-10 3-15 μg
CsI 70-88  10-200 μg

FIG. 5 illustrates the lamp life for these two fill mixtures of Table II which equals or exceeds 4000 hours for the low and high indium fill mixtures, respectively.

Tables IV and V illustrate the radiant UV power and life performance of the high and low indium mixtures of the present invention as compared to a typical prior art mixture containing NaI. The results were attained using a lamp having the specifications described herein for FIGS. 1 and 1A.

TABLE IV
Radiant UV Power into 5 mm aperture
Ration of Components in UV Power
Description Micrograms (Watts)
No Sodium high indium CsI:ScI3:InI 185:26:53 1.15
low indium CsI:ScI3:InI 211:19:10 1.57
Prior Art With low indium NaI:CsI:ScI3:InI 104:7:14:7 1.48
Sodium

TABLE V
Life Performance*
Ration of Components in Life in
Description Micrograms Hours
No Sodium high indium CsI:ScI3:InI 185:26:53 4500
low indium CsI:ScI3:InI 211:19:10 4000
Prior Art With high indium NaI:CsI:ScI3:Inl 71:14:11:192 2500
Sodium low indium NaI:CsI:ScI3:Inl 104:7:14:7 2000
*Life is defined as the median time to failure. Failure includes when out-put goes below 50 percent of initial.

A quantity of mercury is added to the fill mixture such that it will evaporate and enter the discharge in a gaseous state and regulate the electrical operational parameters.

The amount of mercury can range from 5 to 15 milligrams and is a function of the internal volume of the envelope.

The preferred amount being about 9 milligrams±10%.

Excess mercury will cause excess pressure within the bulb and could result in early failure. Too low of an amount of Hg could result in improper electrical operating characteristics, primarily thereby reducing luminous efficacy.

The fill inert gas is added to provide a gas that can be ionized to aid in the starting of the lamp. Suitable fill gasses include Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe with cold fill pressures in the range of 0.5 atm to several atmospheres.

A preferred gas for use in the present invention is Ar at about 500 Torr±2%. Excess Ar would cause the required voltage to initiate the discharge to be very high and impose large costs on the electrical operating circuitry.

The above specification for the electrode arc gap, quantity of metal halide, mercury, and noble gas must be used in conjunction with an hermetically sealed chamber having a critical volume, which in the case of the present invention is about 70 mm3±10 mm3.

The source size is dictated by the electrode separation (arc gap) in the range of 0.8 mm to 1.5 mm. The overall length of the envelope and associated structure being about 2 inches long. The service life exceeding 4,000 hrs.

With respect to the comparative test data set forth in Tables IV and I the measured UV radiant power in this invention can exceed the power of lamps made with the prior art. Table IV shows that the high indium dose embodiment suffers from a loss of UV radiant power compared to prior art, but the low indium does embodiment has greater power than prior art.

The cesium iodide embodiments with no sodium have a significant life advantage over the prior art sodium iodide containing embodiments. The big difference is the change from primarily sodium iodine to cesium iodine with no sodium iodide. Differences between low and high indium doses can be attributed to either higher scandium triiodide or the higher indium iodide.

Keeping the indium dose low is important for UV output, but there may be a slight reduction in life performance compared to a high indium dose version. The main conclusion is that life can nearly double over that of prior art by changing to a no sodium dose.

The primary embodiment described in this patent applies to UV curing applications. An embodiment for an UV camera application would change the surface of the reflector to include 200-400 nm radiation. Parabolic shaped reflectors could be fashioned to create the beam spread and center beam radiant power needed in the application. Applications of the present invention in the IR (infrared) are also possible. Dichroic coatings reflecting only IR (>800 nm) can be used in both parabolic and elliptical reflectors to create an advantage of center beam radiant power or radiant power into an aperture. In this embodiment radiation formerly found in the visible from sodium emission is no now found in the near IR from cesium emission, especially between 850 and 950 nm.

The light source and lamp of the present invention has been particularly shown and described with reference to the preferred mode as illustrated in the drawing, it will be understood by one skilled in the art that various changes in detail may be effected therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the claims.

Claims (14)

1. An arc lamp assembly which includes in combination a reflector and a light source which is surrounded by said reflector, the improvement comprising a dichroic coating on said reflector which functions to reflect radiation in the range of about 300 to 600 nm, and where said light source is an arc lamp which consists of contains a metal halide fill component which includes consists of a mixture of scandium iodide, indium iodide, and cesium iodide, whereby said lamp assembly emits effective amounts of UV radiation to cure selected chemical compositions, and where said metal halide mixture has the following concentrations amounts of metal halides:
ConcentrationAmount ScI3 19-26 μg InI 10-53 μg CsI 185-211 μg Total 240-264 μg.
2. A miniature lamp which provides an effective source of UV radiation for curing chemical compositions which includes a reflector which surrounds a light source wherein
(a) said reflector contains a dichroic coating selected to reflect UV radiation in the range of about 300 to 600 nm; and
(b) said light source including includes an elongated fused quartz envelope having a pair of opposite neck portions each with a coaxial central opening having a reduced section and a central hermetically scaled chamber containing a fill consisting of;:
an argon pressure at room temperature at a range of about 0.5 atmospheres to about 2.0 atmospheres; mercury in an amount in the range of about 5 mg to about 15 mg; and a mixture of metal halide material in an amount from about 50 up to 1000 micrograms wherein said metal halide mixture consists of a mixture of scandium iodide, indium iodide and cesium iodide; a pair of axially aligned electrodes respectively positioned at said opposite neck portions and separated from each other by a predetermined distance from about 0.8 to 1.5 mm, said electrodes each having a shank portion which includes a distal end, with at least one of said ends having a coil wrapped around said end.
3. The lamp of claim 2 in which the metal halide mixture consists of the following:
ConcentrationAmount ScI3 19-26 μg InI 10-53 μg CsI 185-211 μg Total 240-264 μg.
4. The lamp of claim 2 in which the dichroic coating is a material selected from the group consisting of silicon dioxide, aluminum oxide, zirconium dioxide, and tantalum oxide in a plurality of alternating layers of different oxides.
5. An arc lamp assembly which includes in combination a reflector and a light source which is surrounded by said reflector, the improvement comprising a dichroic coating on said reflector, and where said light source comprises a metal halide fill component which consists of a mixture of scandium iodide, indium iodide, and cesium iodide, whereby said lamp assembly emits ultraviolet radiation, and where said metal halide mixture has the following amounts of metal halides:
Amount ScI3 19-26 μg InI 10-53 μg CsI 185-211 μg Total 240-264 μg.
6. The arc lamp assembly of claim 5 wherein said dichroic coating is selected to reflect at least radiation in the range of about 200 to about 950 nm.
7. The arc lamp assembly of claim 5 wherein the volume-power loading of said lamp is about 0.8 watts/mm3.
8. A miniature lamp which includes a reflector that surrounds a light source wherein
(a) said reflector is coated with at least one dichroic coating selected to reflect at least ultraviolet radiation; and
(b) said light source includes an elongated refractory material envelope having a pair of opposite neck portions each with a coaxial central opening and a central hermetically sealed chamber containing a fill consisting of:
an inert gas pressure at room temperature at a range of about 0.5 atmospheres to about 2.0 atmospheres; mercury in an amount in the range of about 5 mg to about 15 mg; and a mixture of metal halide material in an amount from about 50 up to 1000 micrograms wherein said metal halide mixture consists of a mixture of scandium iodide, indium iodide and cesium iodide; a pair of axially aligned electrodes respectively positioned at said opposite neck portions and separated from each other by a predetermined distance.
9. The lamp of claim 8 in which the metal halide mixture consists of the following:
Amount ScI3 19-26 μg InI 10-53 μg CsI 185-211 μg Total 240-264 μg.
10. The lamp of claim 8 in which said at least one dichroic coating comprises a material selected from the group consisting of silicon dioxide, aluminum oxide, zirconium dioxide, and tantalum oxide, said at least one dichroic coating being laid out in a plurality of alternating layers of different oxides.
11. The lamp of claim 8 wherein said at least one dichroic coating is selected to reflect at least radiation in the range of about 200 to about 950 nm.
12. The lamp of claim 8 wherein said electrodes each has a shank portion which includes a distal end, at least one of said distal ends having a coil wrapped around said end.
13. The lamp of claim 8 wherein said hermetically sealed chamber contains one or more inert gases selected from the group consisting of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe.
14. The lamp of claim 8 wherein the volume-power loading of said lamp is about 0.8 watts/mm3.
US11800522 2002-12-13 2007-05-03 Metal halide lamp for curing adhesives Expired - Fee Related USRE42181E1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10318824 US6888312B2 (en) 2002-12-13 2002-12-13 Metal halide lamp for curing adhesives
US11800522 USRE42181E1 (en) 2002-12-13 2007-05-03 Metal halide lamp for curing adhesives

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11800522 USRE42181E1 (en) 2002-12-13 2007-05-03 Metal halide lamp for curing adhesives

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10318824 Reissue US6888312B2 (en) 2002-12-13 2002-12-13 Metal halide lamp for curing adhesives

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
USRE42181E1 true USRE42181E1 (en) 2011-03-01

Family

ID=32506473

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10318824 Active 2023-07-10 US6888312B2 (en) 2002-12-13 2002-12-13 Metal halide lamp for curing adhesives
US11800522 Expired - Fee Related USRE42181E1 (en) 2002-12-13 2007-05-03 Metal halide lamp for curing adhesives

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10318824 Active 2023-07-10 US6888312B2 (en) 2002-12-13 2002-12-13 Metal halide lamp for curing adhesives

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (2) US6888312B2 (en)

Families Citing this family (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE102005022376B4 (en) * 2005-05-13 2009-11-19 Perkinelmer Optoelectronics Gmbh & Co.Kg Lamp and method of manufacturing the same
KR101158962B1 (en) * 2007-10-10 2012-06-21 우시오덴키 가부시키가이샤 Excimer lamp
WO2016068233A1 (en) * 2014-10-31 2016-05-06 ウシオ電機株式会社 Photocuring device

Citations (42)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB1109135A (en) * 1964-07-16 1968-04-10 Philips Electronic Associated Improvements in and relating to super high pressure mercury vapour discharge lamps
US3840767A (en) * 1973-08-23 1974-10-08 Gen Electric Selective spectral output metal halide lamp
US4074164A (en) * 1976-04-15 1978-02-14 Patent-Treuhand-Gesellschaft Fur Elektrische Gluhlampen Mbh Sun lamp
US4206387A (en) * 1978-09-11 1980-06-03 Gte Laboratories Incorporated Electrodeless light source having rare earth molecular continua
US4524302A (en) * 1983-08-01 1985-06-18 General Electric Company General service incandescent lamp with improved efficiency
US5017839A (en) * 1988-12-19 1991-05-21 Patent-Treuhand Gesellschaft Fur Elektrische Gluhlampen M.B.H Illumination system having a low-power high-pressure discharge lamp and power supply combination
US5057743A (en) 1988-09-12 1991-10-15 Gte Products Corporation Metal halide discharge lamp with improved color rendering properties
US5065069A (en) 1990-12-06 1991-11-12 Gte Products Corporation Arc discharge lamp with spring-mounted arc tube, shroud and frame
US5075588A (en) 1990-12-06 1991-12-24 Gte Products Corporation Arc discharge lamp with spring-mounted arc tube and shroud
US5111104A (en) 1989-12-11 1992-05-05 Gte Products Corporation Triple-enveloped metal-halide arc discharge lamp having lower color temperature
US5144201A (en) 1990-02-23 1992-09-01 Welch Allyn, Inc. Low watt metal halide lamp
US5184044A (en) * 1990-08-13 1993-02-02 Welch Allyn, Inc. Dental curing lamp
US5220237A (en) * 1990-05-31 1993-06-15 Iwasaki Electric Co., Ltd. Metal halide lamp apparatus
US5239232A (en) * 1990-04-24 1993-08-24 Patent-Treuhand-Gesellschaft Fur Elektrische Gluhlampen Mbh Light balance compensated mercury vapor and halogen high-pressure discharge lamp
US5270615A (en) 1991-11-22 1993-12-14 General Electric Company Multi-layer oxide coating for high intensity metal halide discharge lamps
US5334906A (en) 1992-10-23 1994-08-02 Osram Sylvania Inc. Metal halide arc discharge lamp having short arc length
US5363007A (en) * 1991-09-30 1994-11-08 Patent-Treuhand-Gesellschaft Fuer Elektrische Gluehlampen Mbh Low-power, high-pressure discharge lamp, particularly for general service illumination use
US5381077A (en) 1993-12-20 1995-01-10 Mcguire; Thomas B. Power control circuit for high intensity discharge lamps
US5394057A (en) 1992-08-07 1995-02-28 General Electric Company Protective metal silicate coating for a metal halide arc discharge lamp
US5493167A (en) 1994-05-03 1996-02-20 General Electric Company Lamp assembly with shroud employing insulator support stops
US5552670A (en) 1992-12-14 1996-09-03 Patent-Treuhand-Gesellschaft F. Elektrische Gluehlampen Mbh Method of making a vacuum-tight seal between a ceramic and a metal part, sealed structure, and discharge lamp having the seal
US5646472A (en) * 1994-05-12 1997-07-08 Iwasaki Electric Co., Ltd. Metal halide lamp
US5694002A (en) 1996-05-08 1997-12-02 Osram Sylvania Inc. Metal halide lamp with improved color characteristics
US5708328A (en) 1992-06-03 1998-01-13 General Electric Company Universal burn metal halide lamp
US5798611A (en) * 1990-10-25 1998-08-25 Fusion Lighting, Inc. Lamp having controllable spectrum
US5831388A (en) * 1995-08-23 1998-11-03 Patent-Truehand-Gesellschaftfuer Elektrische Gluelampen Mbh Rare earth metal halide lamp including niobium
US5866983A (en) 1996-11-25 1999-02-02 General Electric Company Protective metal silicate coating for electrodeless HID lamps
US5889368A (en) * 1997-08-11 1999-03-30 Osram Sylvania Inc. High intensity electrodeless discharge lamp with particular metal halide fill
US5898273A (en) 1997-07-01 1999-04-27 General Electric Company Metal halide lamp with pre-start arc tube heater
US5905340A (en) * 1997-11-17 1999-05-18 Osram Sylvania Inc. High intensity discharge lamp with treated electrode
US5905341A (en) * 1996-10-07 1999-05-18 Ushiodenki Kabushiki Kaisha High pressure mercury ultraviolet lamp
US5914817A (en) * 1998-05-15 1999-06-22 Optical Coating Laboratory, Inc. Thin film dichroic color separation filters for color splitters in liquid crystal display systems
US5942850A (en) 1997-09-24 1999-08-24 Welch Allyn, Inc. Miniature projection lamp
EP1134778A2 (en) * 2000-01-25 2001-09-19 Welch Allyn, Inc. Metal halide lamp for curing chemical compositions
US6469445B1 (en) 1999-02-22 2002-10-22 Osram Sylvania Inc. High CRI metal halide lamp with constant color throughout life
US6498433B1 (en) 1999-12-30 2002-12-24 General Electric Company High temperature glaze for metal halide arctubes
US6600254B2 (en) 2000-12-27 2003-07-29 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Quartz metal halide lamps with high lumen output
US6639341B1 (en) 1999-03-26 2003-10-28 Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd. Metal halide discharge lamp
US6707252B2 (en) 2001-06-29 2004-03-16 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Metal halide lamp
US6731069B1 (en) 1999-04-14 2004-05-04 Osram Sylvania Inc. Mercury-free metal halide arc lamps
US6756721B2 (en) 2001-06-28 2004-06-29 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Metal halide lamp
US6979958B2 (en) 2002-01-31 2005-12-27 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. High efficacy metal halide lamp with praseodymium and sodium halides in a configured chamber

Patent Citations (43)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB1109135A (en) * 1964-07-16 1968-04-10 Philips Electronic Associated Improvements in and relating to super high pressure mercury vapour discharge lamps
US3840767A (en) * 1973-08-23 1974-10-08 Gen Electric Selective spectral output metal halide lamp
US4074164A (en) * 1976-04-15 1978-02-14 Patent-Treuhand-Gesellschaft Fur Elektrische Gluhlampen Mbh Sun lamp
US4206387A (en) * 1978-09-11 1980-06-03 Gte Laboratories Incorporated Electrodeless light source having rare earth molecular continua
US4524302A (en) * 1983-08-01 1985-06-18 General Electric Company General service incandescent lamp with improved efficiency
US5057743A (en) 1988-09-12 1991-10-15 Gte Products Corporation Metal halide discharge lamp with improved color rendering properties
US5017839A (en) * 1988-12-19 1991-05-21 Patent-Treuhand Gesellschaft Fur Elektrische Gluhlampen M.B.H Illumination system having a low-power high-pressure discharge lamp and power supply combination
US5111104A (en) 1989-12-11 1992-05-05 Gte Products Corporation Triple-enveloped metal-halide arc discharge lamp having lower color temperature
US5144201A (en) 1990-02-23 1992-09-01 Welch Allyn, Inc. Low watt metal halide lamp
US5239232A (en) * 1990-04-24 1993-08-24 Patent-Treuhand-Gesellschaft Fur Elektrische Gluhlampen Mbh Light balance compensated mercury vapor and halogen high-pressure discharge lamp
US5220237A (en) * 1990-05-31 1993-06-15 Iwasaki Electric Co., Ltd. Metal halide lamp apparatus
US5184044A (en) * 1990-08-13 1993-02-02 Welch Allyn, Inc. Dental curing lamp
US5798611A (en) * 1990-10-25 1998-08-25 Fusion Lighting, Inc. Lamp having controllable spectrum
US5075588A (en) 1990-12-06 1991-12-24 Gte Products Corporation Arc discharge lamp with spring-mounted arc tube and shroud
US5065069A (en) 1990-12-06 1991-11-12 Gte Products Corporation Arc discharge lamp with spring-mounted arc tube, shroud and frame
US5363007A (en) * 1991-09-30 1994-11-08 Patent-Treuhand-Gesellschaft Fuer Elektrische Gluehlampen Mbh Low-power, high-pressure discharge lamp, particularly for general service illumination use
US5270615A (en) 1991-11-22 1993-12-14 General Electric Company Multi-layer oxide coating for high intensity metal halide discharge lamps
US5708328A (en) 1992-06-03 1998-01-13 General Electric Company Universal burn metal halide lamp
US5394057A (en) 1992-08-07 1995-02-28 General Electric Company Protective metal silicate coating for a metal halide arc discharge lamp
US5334906A (en) 1992-10-23 1994-08-02 Osram Sylvania Inc. Metal halide arc discharge lamp having short arc length
US5552670A (en) 1992-12-14 1996-09-03 Patent-Treuhand-Gesellschaft F. Elektrische Gluehlampen Mbh Method of making a vacuum-tight seal between a ceramic and a metal part, sealed structure, and discharge lamp having the seal
US5381077A (en) 1993-12-20 1995-01-10 Mcguire; Thomas B. Power control circuit for high intensity discharge lamps
US5493167A (en) 1994-05-03 1996-02-20 General Electric Company Lamp assembly with shroud employing insulator support stops
US5646472A (en) * 1994-05-12 1997-07-08 Iwasaki Electric Co., Ltd. Metal halide lamp
US5831388A (en) * 1995-08-23 1998-11-03 Patent-Truehand-Gesellschaftfuer Elektrische Gluelampen Mbh Rare earth metal halide lamp including niobium
US5694002A (en) 1996-05-08 1997-12-02 Osram Sylvania Inc. Metal halide lamp with improved color characteristics
US5905341A (en) * 1996-10-07 1999-05-18 Ushiodenki Kabushiki Kaisha High pressure mercury ultraviolet lamp
US5866983A (en) 1996-11-25 1999-02-02 General Electric Company Protective metal silicate coating for electrodeless HID lamps
US5898273A (en) 1997-07-01 1999-04-27 General Electric Company Metal halide lamp with pre-start arc tube heater
US5889368A (en) * 1997-08-11 1999-03-30 Osram Sylvania Inc. High intensity electrodeless discharge lamp with particular metal halide fill
US5942850A (en) 1997-09-24 1999-08-24 Welch Allyn, Inc. Miniature projection lamp
US5905340A (en) * 1997-11-17 1999-05-18 Osram Sylvania Inc. High intensity discharge lamp with treated electrode
US5914817A (en) * 1998-05-15 1999-06-22 Optical Coating Laboratory, Inc. Thin film dichroic color separation filters for color splitters in liquid crystal display systems
US6469445B1 (en) 1999-02-22 2002-10-22 Osram Sylvania Inc. High CRI metal halide lamp with constant color throughout life
US6639341B1 (en) 1999-03-26 2003-10-28 Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd. Metal halide discharge lamp
US6731069B1 (en) 1999-04-14 2004-05-04 Osram Sylvania Inc. Mercury-free metal halide arc lamps
US6498433B1 (en) 1999-12-30 2002-12-24 General Electric Company High temperature glaze for metal halide arctubes
EP1134778A2 (en) * 2000-01-25 2001-09-19 Welch Allyn, Inc. Metal halide lamp for curing chemical compositions
US6495844B1 (en) 2000-01-25 2002-12-17 Welch Allyn, Inc. Metal halide lamp for curing adhesives
US6600254B2 (en) 2000-12-27 2003-07-29 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Quartz metal halide lamps with high lumen output
US6756721B2 (en) 2001-06-28 2004-06-29 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Metal halide lamp
US6707252B2 (en) 2001-06-29 2004-03-16 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Metal halide lamp
US6979958B2 (en) 2002-01-31 2005-12-27 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. High efficacy metal halide lamp with praseodymium and sodium halides in a configured chamber

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
Keyword search result of U.S. Patent database (conducted on Aug. 20, 2007).

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US6888312B2 (en) 2005-05-03 grant
US20040113558A1 (en) 2004-06-17 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6404129B1 (en) Metal halide lamp
US4710679A (en) Fluorescent light source excited by excimer emission
US4810938A (en) High efficacy electrodeless high intensity discharge lamp
US5610469A (en) Electric lamp with ellipsoidal shroud
US5763999A (en) Light source device using a double-tube dielectric barrier discharge lamp and output stabilizing power source
US5034655A (en) Circular fluorescent lamp
US5479065A (en) Metal halide discharge lamp suitable for an optical light source having a bromine to halogen ratio of 60-90%, a wall load substantially greater than 40 W/cm2, and a D.C. potential between the anode and cathode
US5144201A (en) Low watt metal halide lamp
US4734612A (en) High pressure metal vapor discharge lamp
US3209188A (en) Iodine-containing electric incandescent lamp with heat conserving envelope
US3445719A (en) Metal vapor lamp with metal additive for improved color rendition and internal self-ballasting filament used to heat arc tube
US4281267A (en) High intensity discharge lamp with coating on arc discharge tube
US20050248279A1 (en) Metal halide lamp with improved lumen value maintenance
US20050194908A1 (en) Ceramic metal halide lamp with optimal shape
US20060164017A1 (en) Ceramic metal halide lamp
US5691601A (en) Metal-halide discharge lamp for photooptical purposes
US4717852A (en) Low-power, high-pressure discharge lamp
US5670840A (en) Tungsten-halogen incandescent lamp with reduced risk of containment failure
US4490642A (en) High-pressure sodium discharge lamp
JPH0831382A (en) Metal halide lamp equipped with reflecting mirror
US6483237B2 (en) High intensity discharge lamp with single crystal sapphire envelope
US20030062831A1 (en) Ceramic HID lamp with special frame wire for stabilizing the arc
US4197480A (en) Reflector-type hid sodium vapor lamp unit with dichroic reflector
US5587625A (en) Gas discharge tube
US5093601A (en) Double bulb type halogen lamp in which a space between inner and outer bulbs is filled with a weak oxidation gas

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: USHIO AMERICA, INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: PATENT ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:WELCH ALLYN, INC.;REEL/FRAME:024434/0144

Effective date: 20100517

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 8

REMI Maintenance fee reminder mailed
LAPS Lapse for failure to pay maintenance fees