USPP41P - Cherry - Google Patents

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Publication number
USPP41P
USPP41P US57883331V US41P US PP41 P USPP41 P US PP41P US 57883331 V US57883331 V US 57883331V US 41 P US41 P US 41P
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Prior art keywords
color
fruit
cherry
inch
tree
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Luther Burbank
Waters Elizabeth Burbank
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Luther Burbank
Waters Elizabeth Burbank
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Application filed by Luther Burbank, Waters Elizabeth Burbank filed Critical Luther Burbank
Priority to US57883331 priority Critical patent/USPP41P/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01HNEW PLANTS OR NON-TRANSGENIC PROCESSES FOR OBTAINING THEM; PLANT REPRODUCTION BY TISSUE CULTURE TECHNIQUES
    • A01H6/00Angiosperms, i.e. flowering plants, characterised by their botanic taxonomy
    • A01H6/74Rosaceae, e.g. strawberry, apple, almonds, pear, rose, blackberries or raspberries
    • A01H6/7427Prunus, e.g. almonds
    • A01H6/7445Cherries
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01HNEW PLANTS OR NON-TRANSGENIC PROCESSES FOR OBTAINING THEM; PLANT REPRODUCTION BY TISSUE CULTURE TECHNIQUES
    • A01H5/00Angiosperms, i.e. flowering plants, characterised by their plant parts; Angiosperms characterised otherwise than by their botanic taxonomy
    • A01H5/08Fruits

Description

NOV. 8, 1932. BURBANK Plant Pat. 4]
CHERRY Filed Dec. 3, 1931 Patented Nov. 8, 1932 UNITED STATES Plant Pat. ll
PATENT o l-" ics LUTHER BURBANK, DECEASED, LATE OF SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA, BY ELIZABETH WATERS BURBANK, EXECUTRIX, OF SANTA. ROSA, CALIFORNIA, ASSIGNOB TO STARK BROS NURSER-IES & ORGHARDS COMPANY, LOUISIANA, IMISSOURI CHERRY Application filed December 3, 1931.
This invention relates to a new and distinct variety of cherry. From a commercial standpoint, the new variety is especially valuable owing to the vigorousness of tree growth and toughness and strength of the wood, enabling the branches to carry heavy crops readily without damage to the tree. In addition, the large size of the fruit and the fact that it is not susceptible to cracking or brown rot after rain, as is generally the case in most varieties of cherries, enhances the value and desirability of the new variety.
The prominent distinctions and characteristics of the new variety of cherry which has been asexually reproduced are pointed out and become apparent from the following description and annexed drawing.
Tree
Growth.-The tree growth is moderately vigorous, the branches being divergent, about 45 from the vertical and generally straight, from which side limbs extend in rather widely spaced relation, making an open tree structure. lVhile the branches are relatively slender, the wood is tough and strong, carrying heavy crops easily. The older bark is roughened by the development of the large lenticels and weathering of the heavy gray scarfskin, the smooth portions being a slate-purple color.
LenticeZa-The lenticels are large and rough, generally gray in color but showing light brown under color where broken or rubbed oil.
S0arfs7cin.-The scarfskin is heavy and dull gray in color, extending in transverse lines and bands. On smaller branches, this creates a banded or mottled effect, becoming uniform gray on the older twigs.
Twigs.l3ecause of the prominent leafand fruit-bud scars, the twigs are very rough and knotty. Terminal bud-scale rings are also very plainly marked. The bark, where smooth, is purple drab in color, largely covered with the light gray scarfskin, and the lenticels small, round, ochraceous tawny (brown), and not very numerous.
N ew gr0wth.-The new growth has rather short to medium internodes, fairly stout, with Serial No. 578,833.
smooth bark which is slightly glossy. The underside is absinthe green, while the exposed side is shaded with a brownish tinge. Large, prominent axillary buds are produced, russet brown in color, subtended by a distinct shoulder to which the leaf stem is attached. Spur fruit buds are inclusters.
Petz'0Ze.-The petiole is rather stout, 1 to 1% inches long, with a distinct but narrow groove on the upper side. The color generally is absinthe green, modified on the upper side by a strong tinge of vandyke red. The glands are large and prominent, round to elliptical, and distinctly indented, ranging in color from buckthorn brown to ferruginous (reddish brown The glands are always on the stem and usually to inch from the base of the blade, two in number, and in position from opposite and touching to inch distant.
Mature Zeaces.The mature leaves on new growth vary in size from large to very large, the blade ranging from 3 to 4 inches long and 2% to 2 inches wide, long oval or ovate in form, with obtuse to acute base. The margin is rather coarsely double-crenate to near- 1y serrate. The apex is acute. As seen on t e tree, the blade is flat or slightly upturned at the margin, and the color of the upper surface is Varleys green to forest green (disregarding the luminous character due to transmitted light). The under surface color is modified to light elm green by't-he surface layer of white cells. The midrib and veins are prominent, attended by faintly brownish pubescence. Scattering minute hairs appear on the entire under surface.
FZOwers.The flowers are large andproduced in large clusters, well spaced along the twigs. Large petals, circular in outline with obscure stem at insertions on the calyx, are characteristic of the flower, pure white in color. The anthers are small, producing pollen in moderate amount throughout a large portion of the bloom period, some pollen being still discernible after petal fall.
Fruit Sze.An important characteristic of the fruit 15 its size, ranging-from large to very large. For a particular tree, the size of the frult is substantially uniform. On an average the axial diameter is about inch (long), with the greatest transverse diameter about 1 inch (wide) and the shortest transverse diameter about inch (thick).
F0'r'm.-In shape, the fruit is rounded, blunt cordate, regular, and symmetrical, with a moderately slender stem 1 to 1% inches long which is only slightly enlarged at the juncture with the twig, 'butnoticeably enlarged into a collar at the insertion in the cavity of the fruit. The color of the stem is lumiere green. The base of the fruit is very broad with a wide cavity, medium in depth and regular exce t for the indentation of the suture, of which there is also a suggestion on the opposite side of the cavity. The suture depression is very shallow, practically disappearing over the side of the fruit, the suture becoming merely a fruit line of color, a little more prominent near the apex, and ending abruptly at the pistil scar. The apex is rounded or very slightly indented, with the scar not quite at the median line.
Surface.The surface of the fruit is very smooth and glossy with some dots faintly depressed, while the color of the surface at the lightest areas is light orange yellow, shaded orange pink, with increasing depth of color due to dots and marblings of (pinkish') peach red, shading to nopal red and deep carmine in the most heavily colored portion. The dots are minute and pale orange yellow in color, merging with the general color effect. Owing to the'thinncss, toughness, and close adherence of the skin, it is only removable from the flesh with some difficulty.
FZ'es-h1The flesh is firm, fibrous, moderately tender andjuicy, and only slightly adhere's to the pit except at the ventral suture. In color,-the flesh is pale ochraceous bufl, modified by the whitish radial Veinings and faintly pink reflection through the translucent portions from the skin color. Commercially, the fr'uitwould be termed a whitefleshed cherry. The juice is colorless, and of but slight sweetness or other flavor unless the flesh is crushed. In flavor, the flesh is mildly sweet,'with most of the aroma near the skin.
Stone.The stone is round and almost globular, and is rather small as compared with the size of the fruit, being about inch long, 4 inch wide, and inch thick. The ventral suture is broad and heavily ridged while the dorsal suture is a single moderate ridge. The stone is rounded at the base, with the sides slightly uneven, and rounded apex with a minute projecting point. The color of a moist stone is cinnamon buff, while a dry stone is ivory yellow.
Seas0n.In the locality of California, the mature to commercial picking stage is around May 28, while first best quality fruit,
ripe for immediate use is about June 8. The last good fruit is obtained about June 20. The fruit hangs well and as has been hereinbefore mentioned, does not crack after rain, nor is it seriously affected by brown rot under these conditions.
In a commercial classification, the cherry hereinbefore described would be placed with the Napoleon, as a firm-fleshed red sweet cherry. There is some resemblance between these varieties, but there are very important distinctions. For example, the foliage of the Napoleon cherry has larger glands, and
more often an acuminate apex. Also the fruit is of decided cordate form with rounded apex, and is more compressed than that of the new variety forming the subject matter of this application. The color effect of the fruits are somewhat the same, but the dots are not nearly as numerous and are moresubmerged in the Napoleon. The axial and longest transverse diameters ofthe Na poleon cherry are practically equal, which, with the cordate form, gives the fruit a long appearance.
It is to be understood that the foregoing characteristics of the new variety of cherry are typical but subject perhaps to slight variation which may arise by reason of change of environment.
Colors mentioned taken from Ridgeways Color Standards.
What is claimed is:
A new variety of cherry tree as described characterized by its vigor of growth, the toughness of its wood, and the large size and absence of susceptibility of cracking and rot of its fruit, as shown. 1
In testimony whereof I aflix my signature.
ELIZABETH l/VATERS BURBANK, Emecutrim of the Estate of Luther Burbank,
Deceased.
US57883331 1931-12-03 1931-12-03 Cherry Expired - Lifetime USPP41P (en)

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US57883331 USPP41P (en) 1931-12-03 1931-12-03 Cherry

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US57883331 USPP41P (en) 1931-12-03 1931-12-03 Cherry

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USPP41P true USPP41P (en) 1932-11-08

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USPP9436P (en) * 1991-04-16 1996-01-23 Konta; Koichiro `Hakko` cherry tree

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USPP9436P (en) * 1991-04-16 1996-01-23 Konta; Koichiro `Hakko` cherry tree

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