US916516A - Ornamenting glass. - Google Patents

Ornamenting glass. Download PDF

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Publication number
US916516A
US916516A US27815105A US1905278151A US916516A US 916516 A US916516 A US 916516A US 27815105 A US27815105 A US 27815105A US 1905278151 A US1905278151 A US 1905278151A US 916516 A US916516 A US 916516A
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United States
Prior art keywords
glass
liquid
layer
lacing
paint
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Expired - Lifetime
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US27815105A
Inventor
William George Williams
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Walter George Kent
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Priority to US27815105A priority Critical patent/US916516A/en
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C03GLASS; MINERAL OR SLAG WOOL
    • C03CCHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF GLASSES, GLAZES OR VITREOUS ENAMELS; SURFACE TREATMENT OF GLASS; SURFACE TREATMENT OF FIBRES OR FILAMENTS MADE FROM GLASS, MINERALS OR SLAGS; JOINING GLASS TO GLASS OR OTHER MATERIALS
    • C03C17/00Surface treatment of glass, not in the form of fibres or filaments, by coating
    • C03C17/34Surface treatment of glass, not in the form of fibres or filaments, by coating with at least two coatings having different compositions
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C04CEMENTS; CONCRETE; ARTIFICIAL STONE; CERAMICS; REFRACTORIES
    • C04BLIME, MAGNESIA; SLAG; CEMENTS; COMPOSITIONS THEREOF, e.g. MORTARS, CONCRETE OR LIKE BUILDING MATERIALS; ARTIFICIAL STONE; CERAMICS; REFRACTORIES; TREATMENT OF NATURAL STONE
    • C04B41/00After-treatment of mortars, concrete, artificial stone or ceramics; Treatment of natural stone
    • C04B41/009After-treatment of mortars, concrete, artificial stone or ceramics; Treatment of natural stone characterised by the material treated

Description

W. G. WILLIAMS. ORNAMENTING GLASS. APPLICATION FILED SEPT. 12, 1905.
Patented Mar. 30, 1909 INVENTUR. WITNESSES;
' Attm-neq.
glass, celluloid or other transparent UNITED t lilllillffin PATENT ()FFICE.
\l'lhlihilifi, or MOVE, ENGLAND, ASSIGNOR 'lO WALTER GEORGE KENT,
()l LONDON, ENGLAND.
ORNAMENTING GLASS.
Specification of. Letters Patent.
Patented March 30, 1909.
Application filed September 12, 1905. Serial No. 278,151.
To all whom it may cancel-n:
Be it known that l, .lnaaan thcoucn .Yn.- mans, a subject ol the liing oi, Urea-t lirilain and lreland, residing at llovo, Sussex, ting land, have invented a ncwor linprored Process ol ()rnainenting Glass, ol which. the 'lollowing is a specification.
' My invention relates to a new or improvial process of ornaincnting glass, or other ti ansparent or translui-mit materials, by means ol which highly decorative cllects may be oh tained cheaply and elliciently.
In the accompanying drawings l have shown, somewhat diagrammatically, the several steps constituting my present invention.
Figure '1 shows a small sheet o'l' glass lying llat upon a table and with a lacing or layer of water glass paint llowed upon the upper surface of the sheet ol' glass; Fig. '3 shows said sheet, drops ol alcohol, or other liquid which alters the sin-lace tension ol said lacing or la er, having been sprinkled thereon; lig. shows the said sheet with the lacing drit-u thereon and spaces ol clear glass lornied as a 'result of the application ol the tension-altering liquid; Fig. 4 shows the backing partially applied to the sheet of glass; and Fig. 5 shows a completed sheet.
J In carrying my invention into ellec't i take or translucent materials and on one sin-lace thercol I. place a coating or layer ol coloring matter. This may ci'inveniently be made up ol a ltllX- ture of water color pigment and water and with or without, prelerahly with, size therein. This coating or layer, hereinalter termed the facing, may no laid on by a brush or by pouring or otherwise as may be lound convenient. While the lat-in is still wet i add thereto a liquid which alters the surface tension of the lacing, and which consists o'l any convenient liquid such as alcohol, naphtha, or the like which will lrre the ell'cct ol open-- ing out or separating the still liquid lacing into patches, streaks or insular or ol ltlt'lllltlf); s aces or laguna: ol itscll (that is ol the ten men-altering liquid) within the said lacing. I then allow the whole to dry. \Yhen dry, it is found that the patches, streaks or lllfillliil are now represented by hardened or dried coloring matter and that the spaces or laguuar formerly occupied by the tension-alterin liquid are new represented by more orless clear SPtLC'QSSlIOWIHQ the glass or other material employed. 1 now add another coating thick layer of silicate paint.
or layer which lor distinction I term the flnicking ol" paint, varnish, metallic foil, paper or other suitable material and caused to adhere in any convenientway. 'When the whole has been allowed to dry or set it is ready for use.
llaving brielly described my invention and in such manner as to define its scope, I shall now proceed to describe by way of a type or example a prelerred way of carrying it into' in this preferred way l first tak'o practice. a piece of translucent or transparent material (a in the drawings) that is to be ornainentcd, and which for the purpose of the lollowing description I shall assume to be glass, and l lay it flatupon a table or bench, A. l then apply to the upper surface of the glass (1' in the drawings) a lacing ol waterglass paint, that is to say a paint'consisting ol a pigment mechanically suspended in a weak solution of water glass. The facing is applied to thrsur'r'ace ol' the glass by means ol a hog-hair distcinper brush. After the lacing has been applied and while it is still in a wet. condition, l sprinkle the tension-alterlug liquid (drops thereol' being shown at x in the drawings) thereon by means of a brush.
The liquid prclerred consists of alcohol in the lorm ol" ordinary commercial methylated spirit, and it acts on the facing in the manner l have already described. After the appli cation ol said liquid 1 maintain the glass in its horizontal position and allow the tensionaltering liquid to evaporate and the facing to dry hard. When thoroughly dry lapply over the whole ol the upper surlacc of the glass, '1'. a. over the patches, streaks or insulin and over the spaces or lagnnae (7/ in the drawing) a backing (c in the drawings) ol oil color paint of a color and shade that is in contrast with that of the lacing. The oil color paint preferably used is composed ol japan gold size, 2 parts; turpentine, 1 part; boiled linseed oil, 1 part; and a proportion of coloring .uratter suitable for obtaining the desired tint or tints.
in order to protect the backing, and revent moisture or damp acting on it an on the lacing, and so in time spoiling the ellect that has been produced by the treatment 1 have described, I coat the backingwith a This protective coating should be allowed to have l'ree access ol' air to it. for several days belore the treated lass is applied to walls or the like.
' said liquid over the facing.
In some cases I may use a silicate paint or a colorpigment mixed with Water to which a bindin medium is added, as the facing. When I employ such, the binding medium I use depends upon the nature of the pigment employed. For instance, with pigment having, a metallic or earthy base I find it desirable to use a weak solution of water lass, and with bronze or other metallic powders, dextrin.
Instead of sprinkling the tension-altering liquid over the facing by means of a brush, feathers Will answer the purpose, or a syringe or spraying device may be used to apply the Althou h I have mentioned oil color paint as a suita le backing, paints may be employed for the same purposes.
In some cases before putting on the back ing I ap ly over the-Whole upper surface, a water si icate paint of a different color from that employed to'iorm the facing, and when this second application of water scribed.
Spaces or lagunae in the facing may also be produced, but less readily and safely, by liquids. other than alcohol. For instance, acetic acid, naphtha, spirits of turpentine and the like may be employed. But I find that none of the liquids mentioned are so clearly and effective in working as the alcohol.
After the glass has been subjected to the processes mentioned, the ornamented glass spirit, water or silicate silicate paint is dry I apply the backing and the protective coating in the manner I have desurlace of the back of said is read y foruse and can be aJplied to and securely fixed to the wall or other surface to be decorated by means of an oil cement or con position. v
Ilaving now described my invention What claim and desire to secure by Letters Patnt 1. In a process cut or translucent of ornamenting transparmaterial, applying to the material a layer of liquid colored matter, and sprinkling upon said layer, While wet, a plain liquid which alters the surface tension ol'the said liquid colored layer, so as to leave clear spaces in the layer of colored matter as viewed from the saie transparent or translucent material.
In a process of ornamenting transpan cut or tr slucent material, applying to the surface oi the back ol said material a layer ,of liquid coloring matter, sprinkling upon said layer, while wet, a plain. liquid which alters the surface tension of the said liquid colored layer so as to leave clear spaces inthe layer of colored matter as viewed from the uncoated front side of said transparent or trans lucent material, allowing the whole to dry, and applying to the dried layer a backing of ground color.
In testimony name to this specification in the two sui'iscribing 'WltIlGSSGS.
iVlLLlAill GEORGE WlhLlAlvlS.
presence of Vii tnesses:
tonnmoir Psnnn'r'r, CHARLES CARTER.
whereof I have signed my
US27815105A 1905-09-12 1905-09-12 Ornamenting glass. Expired - Lifetime US916516A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2467228A (en) * 1945-12-07 1949-04-12 Pritzker Lee Process for obtaining decorative crackle finishes
US2586394A (en) * 1949-06-17 1952-02-19 William J Stepien Process for ornamenting glass
US3663290A (en) * 1969-12-17 1972-05-16 Klinge Enameling Co Inc Temperature resistant coating and method

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2467228A (en) * 1945-12-07 1949-04-12 Pritzker Lee Process for obtaining decorative crackle finishes
US2586394A (en) * 1949-06-17 1952-02-19 William J Stepien Process for ornamenting glass
US3663290A (en) * 1969-12-17 1972-05-16 Klinge Enameling Co Inc Temperature resistant coating and method

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