US822024A - Phonograph, gramophone, and other similar sound-reproducing machines. - Google Patents

Phonograph, gramophone, and other similar sound-reproducing machines. Download PDF

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US822024A
US822024A US24661205A US1905246612A US822024A US 822024 A US822024 A US 822024A US 24661205 A US24661205 A US 24661205A US 1905246612 A US1905246612 A US 1905246612A US 822024 A US822024 A US 822024A
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vibrations
rod
needle
sound
reproducing
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Frank F Shanks
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Frank F Shanks
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04RLOUDSPEAKERS, MICROPHONES, GRAMOPHONE PICK-UPS OR LIKE ACOUSTIC ELECTROMECHANICAL TRANSDUCERS; DEAF-AID SETS; PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEMS
    • H04R1/00Details of transducers, loudspeakers or microphones
    • H04R1/20Arrangements for obtaining desired frequency or directional characteristics
    • H04R1/32Arrangements for obtaining desired frequency or directional characteristics for obtaining desired directional characteristic only
    • H04R1/34Arrangements for obtaining desired frequency or directional characteristics for obtaining desired directional characteristic only by using a single transducer with sound reflecting, diffracting, directing or guiding means
    • H04R1/38Arrangements for obtaining desired frequency or directional characteristics for obtaining desired directional characteristic only by using a single transducer with sound reflecting, diffracting, directing or guiding means in which sound waves act upon both sides of a diaphragm and incorporating acoustic phase-shifting means, e.g. pressure-gradient microphone

Description

No. 822,024. PATENTED MAY 29, 1906.
P. F. SHANKS. PHONOGRAPH, GRAMOPHONE, AND OTHER SIMILAR SOUND REPRODUGING MACHINES.
APPLICATION FILED FEB. 20, 1905.
Ezfiwasva a fin 37%;:
No. 822,024. PATENTED MAY 29, 1906. F. F. SHANKS.
PHONOGRAPH, GRAMOPHONB, AND OTHER SIMILAR SOUND REPRODUOING MACHINES.
APPLICATION FILED FEB. 20. 1905.
2 SHEETSSHEET 2,
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.
FRANK F. SHANKS, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. PHONOGRAPH. GRAMOPHONE, AND OTHER SIMILAR SOUND-REPRODIJCING MACHINES.
I To all whom it may concern.-
, originally received by the record. T is was Be it known that I, FRANK F. SHANKS, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Phonographs, Gramophones; and other Similar Sound-Reproducing Machines, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.
My invention relates to machinesfor reproducing sounds from records in what are commonly known as phonographs, gramophones, &c.; and its particular object is to provide means whereby sound-Waves energized by the instrument are transmitted therefrom and audibly delivered at a distance from the needle or tracker engaging the record to the bearer in clear ringing tones.
Heretofore it has generally been found very difficult and well-nigh impossible to reproduce sounds from the machine in the precise manner and tone in which the were often caused by the vibrations of the soundwaves passing through the metal horn or megaphone, and therefore the sound reproduced was metallic in tone and high notes or swells became harsh and rasping. These objectionalfeatures have all been overcome by my improved means for the transmission to a point he ond the range of the immediate vibrator fie d of the needle or tracker and the audi le delivery of the transmitted soundwaves after they have been projected upon a reproducing device. I accomplish this by the mechanism hereinafter fully described in the specificat on and illustrated in the drawings and as more fully pointed out in the claims. Y
In the drawings, Figure 1 is a side elevation of one form of myimproved device, showing the same in connection with a snare-drum and operating with a phonograph of the disk type. Fig. 2 is a top plan View of the same. Fig. 3 is. a front elevation in detail of the sound-wave-transmission portion of my im provement. Fig. 4 is a top plan view of the same. Figs. 5 and 6 are front elevation and end views of a modified form of resonator used in connection with my improvement. Fig. 7 is a transverse vertical section taken on line 7 7, Fig. 3, looking in the direction indicated by the arrows and showing the manner of connecting and adjusting the vibrating arms.
Specification of Letters Patent.
Application filed February 20, 1905. Serial No. 246,612.
able 1pivot stud or Patented may 29, 1906.
For the purpose of a clear understanding of my invention I have illustrated the operating in connection with a phonograph of the disk type; but it will be obvious to those skilled in the art to which this invention appertains that the same is applicable to any of the sound-reproducing or talking machines now in general use.
By eferring to the drawings it will be seen that A represents the box'or casing in which 18 housed the proper mechanism for revolving the flat circular platform a or the table thereof, which latter carries the usual recorddisk B, from which the sound-waves are reproduced through the medium of a steel reproducer needle-point b. Extending horizontally from one side of the casing A is an elongated L-shaped supporting-arm C, that has arising from its outer extremity a suitwhic latter is reduced slightly in diameter to provide a shoulder, as will be seen in Fig. 1 of the drawings. -Upon the end of this arm G are supported my improved sound magnifying or intonating means, which, as will be hereinafter more fully described, may consist of a drum-shaped disk or resonator, a hollow elongated cylinder, a banjo, violin, or other stringed musical instrument from which the sound-waves are vibrated or deflected in a greater or increased volume than received. For the sake of convenience I Wlll describe the same in connection with the drumshaped resonator D illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawings. This resonator D is preferably constructed similar to an ordinary snare-drum, except that in place of the usual same pin 0, the upper portion of' sheepskin or parchment covering it is provided with a covering of cloth coated with a fibrous composition or paper and its dimensions are approximately twenty-four inches in diameter by one and one-half inches in thickness. These dimensions are not essential, however, and While I prefer to use the covering above described the usual sheepskin covering may be employed Without departing from the principle of my invention. Bridging across the face of the resonator D, but not in contact with the surface thereof, is a straight shaft d, that projects beyond the edge of the resonator nearest the phonograph until its end is over the center of the record-disk. This'shaft is used as a support for the resonator D, as well as to carry the means for holding the sound-vibrating devices and vibrators now to be described. These sound-vibrating devices comprise an elongated rock-bar E, eXten ing from near the outer end of the shaft (1 to about the center of the resonator D, and the same is sup ported away from said shaft (1 by fulcrumpivots m and is adjustable toward and away from said shaft by set-screws at either end of the same engaging with a screw-plate f, mounted upon the con ti uous portion of the shaft. On the outer end of this rock-bar E is mounted at a tangent angle thereto the needle-carrying block F, which is preferably secured thereto b means of a suitable adjusting-screw. T e needle-point b is adjustably held in said block I by means of a small thumb-screw in order to readily remove and re lace the same whenever so desired. This bar E is rocked by the engagement of the needle-stylus b with the recorddisk, and said rocking motion of the bar imparts a vibratory movement to arm G, hereinafter referredto. At the end of the rock-bar E opposite said needle is fastened a suitable transverse plate'H, that is provided mediate its extremities with 'a fulcrum-pivot h, and in order to adjust either end of said plate suitable adjusting-screws h are provided, one on each side of said pivot, while between the heads of said screws and said plate are interposed suitable coil-springs h. Near each end of said plate H are suitable fulcrum-pivots g, that form ribs extending across the width of the plate, and upon which is fulcrumed the contiguous flattened end of said vibratorarm G. These vibrator-arms G are adjustable toward and away from the surface of the resonator by suitable set-screws. g Upon the ends of each of these vibrator-arms G are mounted suitable hammers I, the surfaces of which are preferably formed of or covered with rubber or other suitable material. These hammers are adapted to be rapidly vibrated against the face of the diaphragm or resonator D and to impart thereto the bodilyvibratory movements transmitted to said hammers through the rock-bar E, said vibrations being in direct accord with the sound undulations on the record-disk.
When the machine is in operation, the sound-waves are imparted by the revolving disk B to the needle-point, and the vibrations thus created are conveyed along rod E and transmitted therefrom to the vibrating arms G. These arms G are caused to rapidly vibrate and the hammers I on their ends throw ofi the vibrations against the adjacent face of the resonator F, which latter re roduces the sound-waves and intensifies t e same in clear full tones.
While it is not absolutely essential, I may construct the drum-shaped resonator airtight and provide an outward pressure-valve M in the edge thereof. By forcing air between the heads of the drum or resonator 4' shaft the tension of the face thereof may be adjusted to a nicety and a purer tone obtained thereb In t e modification shown in Figs. 5 and 6 in place of the drum-shaped resonator described heretofore I employ a hollow elongated cylinder J, made of any suitable resounding material that is preferably stretched over a suitable framework and formed airtight. In this modification the supportingd and rock-bar E, as well as the reproducing-needle b and the means for adjusting said bar E, are all .similar in construction to the corresponding elements described in connection with resonator D.- The vibrating arm, however, is of a segmental character,
. and its curvature corresponds with the curvature of the outer circumference of said cylinder and extends around the same about onequarter of the circumference thereof. A hammer j is also provided, which, if desired, may be similar to the hammer I.
When different kinds of musical selections are to be reproduced by the phonograph, I have found it very advisable to employ dif ferent kinds and sizes of resonators. When the record contains a violin solo, it has been found that by substituting a violin in place of the drum, hereinbefore described, and
permitting the vibrating arm, which may be covered with rubber, to pass over all the strings thereof, that the sound waves and tone of reproduction are decidedly more natural and the music is not harsh or rough, as is now the case with phonographs employing a horn or megaphone. By substituting the proper instrument for one similar to the instrument used in making the record much better results have been attained. It has been found also that an orchestral or band selection is better reproduced by mounting an entirely metallic cylinder similar to that shown in Figs. 5 and 6 upon the supportingshaft, and when itis desired to reproduce the human voice it has been found that the drum hereinbefore described is the most satisfactory.
What I claim as new is-' 1. In combination, a phonographic record; devices engaging the sound-interlineations thereon; a solid bar for transmitting the vibrations resulting from said engagement to a point beyond the range of the synchronous sympathetic vibrations of said devices; and disconnected means for audibly reproducing said vibrations at the opposite end of said bar.
2. In combination, a phonograpnic record; devices engaging the sound-interlineations thereon; a solid bar directly engaging said devices which transmit the vibrations resulting from saidengagement to a point beyond the range of the synchronous sympathetic vibrations of said devices; and disconnected means for audibly. reproducing said vibrations at the opposite end of said bar.
3. In combination, a phonographic record; a needle engaging the sound-interlineations thereon; a rod for transmitting the vibrations resulting from said engagement to a point beyond the'range of the synchronous sympathetic vibrations of said needle; a vibratory arm carried by said rod; and means for reproducing said vibrations at the end of said rod nearest said vibratory arm.
4. In combination, a phonographic record; a needle engaging the sound-interlineations thereon; a fulcrumed rod for transmitting the vibrations resulting from said engagement to a point beyond the range of the synchronous sympathetic vibrations of said needle; a vibratory arm carried by said rod; and means for reproducing said vibrations at the end of said rod nearest said vibratory arm.
5. In combination, a phonographic record; a needle engaging the sound-interlineations thereon; a yieldingly-fulcrumed rod for transmitting the vibrations resulting from said engagement to a point beyond the range of the synchronous sympathetic vibrations of said needle; a vibratory arm carried by said rod; and means for reproducing said vibrations at the end of said rod nearest said vibratory arm.
6. In combination, a phonographic record; a needle engaging the sound-interlineations thereon; a rod for transmitting the vibrations resulting from said engagement to a point beyond the range of the synchronous sympathetic vibrations of said needle; an adjustable vibratory arm carried by said rod; and means for reproducing said vibrations at the end of said rod nearest said vibratory arm.
7. In combination, a phonographic record; a needle engaging the sound-interlineations thereon; a rod for transmitting the vibrations resulting from said engagement to a point beyond the range of the synchronous sympathetic vibrations of said needle; an adjustable fulcrumed arm carried by said rod; and means for reproducing said vibrations at the end of said rod nearest said vibratory arm.
8. In combination, a phonographic record; a needle en aging the sound-interlineations thereon; a y1eldingly-fulcrumed rod for transmitting the vibrations resulting from said 'en gagement to a point beyond the range of the synchronous sympathetic Vibrations of said needle; an adjustable fulcrumed vibratory arm carried by said rod; and means for reproducing said vibrations at the end of said rod nearest said vibratory arm 9. In combination, a phonographic record;
a needle engaging the soundinterlineations thereon; a rod for transmitting the vibrations resulting from said engagement to a point beyond the range of the synchronous sympathetic vibrations of said needle; vibratory arms each fulcrumed mediate their length and carried by said rod; and means for reproducing said vibrations at the end of said rod nearest said vibratory arm.
11. In combination, a phonographic record; a needle engaging the sound-interlineations thereon; a yieldingly-fulcrumed rod for transmitting the vibrations resulting from said engagement to a point beyond the range of the synchronous sympathetic vibrations of said needle; vibratory arms each fulcrumed mediate their length and carried by said rod;
and means for reproducing said vibrations at the end of said rod nearest said vibratory arm.
' 12. In combination, a phonographic record; a needle engaging the soun tions thereon;a rod for transmitting the vibrations resulting from said engagement to a point beyond the range of the synchronous sympathetic vibrations of said needle; adjustable vibratory arms each fulcrumed mediate their length and carried by said rod; and means for reproducing said vibrations at the e:..d of said rod nearest said vibratory arm.
13. In combination, a phonographic record; a needle engaging the soun -interlinea tions thereon; a rod for transmitting the vibrations resulting from said engagement to a point beyond the range of the synchronous sympathetic vibrations of said needle; adjustable fulcrumed vibratory arms each pivoted mediate their length and carried by said rod; and means for reproducing said vibrations at the end of said rod nearest said vibratory arm.
14. In combination, a phonographic record; a needle engaging the sound-interlineations thereon; a yieldingly-fulcrumed rod for transmitting the vibrations resulting from said engagement to a point beyond the range of the synchronous sympathetic vibrations of said needle; adjustable fulc'rumed vibratory arms each pivoted mediate their length and -interlineacarried by said rod; and means for reproducing said vibrations at the end of said rod nearest said vibratory arm.
15. In combination, a phonographic record; a needle engaging the sound-interlineations thereon; a rod for transmitting the vibrations resulting from said engagement to a point beyond the range of the synchronous sympathetic vibrations of said needle; vibratory arms carried by said rod that are fulcrumed mediate their length and adjustable inde endent of each other; and means for reprod iicing said vibrations at the end of said rod nearest said vibratory arm.
16. In combination, a phono raphic roo 1 0rd; a needle engaging the soundinterlinea tions thereon; a fulcrumed rod for transmitting the vibrations resulting from said engagement to a point beyond the range of the synchronous sympathetic vibrations of said needle; vibratory arms carried by said rod that are fulcrumed mediate their length and adjustable independent of each other; and means for reproducing said vibrations at the end of said rod nearest said vibratory arm.
17. In combination, a phono raphic record a needle engaging the soun -i.nterlineations thereon; a yieldingly-fulcrumed rod for transmitting the vibrations resulting from said engagement to a point beyond the range of the synchronous sympathetic vibrations of said needle; vibratory arms carried by said rod that are fulcrumed mediate their length and adjustable independent of each other; and means for reproducing said vibrations at the end of said rod nearest said vibratory arm. 18. In combination, a phono raphc rec- 0rd; a needle engaging the soun -interlineations thereon; a rod for transmitting the vibrations resulting from said engagement to a point beyond the range of the synchronous sympathetic vibrations of said needle; adjustable vibratory arms carried by said rod that are fulcrumed mediate their length and adjustable independent of each other, and means for reproducing said vibrations at the end of said rod nearest said vibratory arm.
19. In combination, a phonographic record; a needle engaging the sound-interlineations thereon; a rod for transmitting the vibrations resulting from said engagement to a point beyond the range of the synchronous sympathetic vibrations of said needle; adjustable fulcrumed vibratory arms carried by said rod that are pivoted mediate their length independent of each other; and means for reproducing said vibrations at the end of said rod nearest said vibratory arm.
20. In a phonograph, the combination with a record having superficial soundinterlineations thereon, and mechanism for revolving the same; of devices engaging said sound-interlineations, consisting of a horizontal rod extending from within the circumference of said record to a point beyond the same; a needle carried on the inner end thereof and adapted to engage said interlineations; a vibratory arm mounted on the opposite end of said rod; and disconnected means for audibly reproducing the vibrations caused by the engagement between said needle and said interlineations.
In testimony whereof I hlive hereunto set my hand this 10th day of February, A. D. 1905.
FRANK F. SHANKS.
Witnesses:
FRANK D. THOMASON, E. K. LUNDY.
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