US797577A - Storage vessel for liquefied gases. - Google Patents

Storage vessel for liquefied gases. Download PDF

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Publication number
US797577A
US797577A US1904204130A US797577A US 797577 A US797577 A US 797577A US 1904204130 A US1904204130 A US 1904204130A US 797577 A US797577 A US 797577A
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Prior art keywords
vessel
neck
internal
vessels
storage
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Paulus Heylandt
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Paulus Heylandt
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F17STORING OF DISTRIBUTING GASES OR LIQUIDS
    • F17CVESSELS FOR CONTAINING OR STORING COMPRESSED, LIQUEFIED OR SOLIDIFIED GASES; FIXED-CAPACITY GAS-HOLDERS; FILLING VESSELS WITH, OR DISCHARGING FROM VESSELS, COMPRESSED, LIQUEFIED, OR SOLIDIFIED GASES
    • F17C3/00Vessels not under pressure
    • F17C3/02Vessels not under pressure with provision for thermal insulation
    • F17C3/08Vessels not under pressure with provision for thermal insulation by vacuum spaces, e.g. Dewar flask
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F17STORING OF DISTRIBUTING GASES OR LIQUIDS
    • F17CVESSELS FOR CONTAINING OR STORING COMPRESSED, LIQUEFIED OR SOLIDIFIED GASES; FIXED-CAPACITY GAS-HOLDERS; FILLING VESSELS WITH, OR DISCHARGING FROM VESSELS, COMPRESSED, LIQUEFIED, OR SOLIDIFIED GASES
    • F17C2203/00Vessel construction, in particular walls or details thereof
    • F17C2203/01Reinforcing or suspension means
    • F17C2203/014Suspension means

Description

1&0. mun. PATENTED AUG. 22. 1905 P, HEY-mum, STQRAGE VESSEL FOR LIQUEPIED GASES.

APPLICATION IiLED APR. 20. 1804.

. ZZZ

permitted when accompanied There are also metal storage vessels compris-' to be incapablelof-presei'vingthe lique UNITED s ATEs PATENT op nion. i

PAULUIS HE'YLANDT', OF ERFU'RT, GERMANY. 'sToRAGE vesse FOR L 'oiJEFn-w eases.

savezsvv. s ec mens;- of

of Germany, have invented a new and useful Storage Vessel for Liquefied Gases, of which I the following is a specification;

My invention relates to improvements in 1 storage vessels for liquefied gases'such as air, oxygen, nitrogen,-'&c.whereby these storage vessels are enabled to preserve the liquefied gases for a longer time than-hitherto;

and they are also renderedmoredurable and even capable of withstanding the strains on a" transport either by rail or- --by mail-carriage without being damagml'or losingtheir.con-"' 'tents by vaporization.beglphithefto-known metal storage vessels u for this purpose .falled to give everysatisfaction, chiefly by reason of the vaporization 'of the liquefied gases for want ofgood insulation. The glass bottles are too liable to break easily,'andtheir transportis in .certain countries only by a man.

ing external and internalvessels, so that spaces of a nearly uniform thickness are formed between themand v from which the air hasbee'n pumped out,-'so asto reduce the transmission ofheat from-without to the in-i ternal vessels by means of the rarefied air. 'Experience, however, hasshown that the temperature of the ambient-air transmitted to theliquefied gases by the conduction-of the necks and the walls of the internal vessels contributes to the vaporization of the gases:

7 There are also storage vesselsiof thiskind in which the internal vessels or thestorage vessels proper are made of woodi. e., a heat-nonconducting material-butsuch wooden ves-' sels are tightened and strengthened by hoops of iron or metal' i. e., aheat-conducting material. Trials have proved such; storage ves 'gases for a"'considerable*time. i n The storage vessels comprising external and nternal vessels are according to my inventlon so improved .asto combine the durability of theknp'wn metal storage vessels and the'good properties of the known glass b0t- -tles and thatjlsheycanbe transported "safely either rail or by mailicarriage;

(The objects of myimprovement are, first, to provide thepreferably ball like internal vessel with a narrow vertical neck and to make both "construction illustrated in th Letters Patent. Patented AWL-22,1906.

Application filed A rilao, 1004. Serial No. 204,130.

conducting material; second, toma'ke-the en- .ternal vessel of metal or enameled metal and, to provide it with. aadome which surrounds. the narrow neck and is connected therewith;-

third, to provide a ball-like protectingmasing l: for inclosing the external vessel, and, fourth-,--'

to provide means for automatically bringing the neck of' the internal vessel into the.verti-' cal position during any inclination of the p i'i tectiug-casing. I attain these objects'by thel; 'a camm g' drawings, in'which-' 1 V Figural shows a'vertical central "section: through a ball-like storage vessel, a ball-like; brotecting-ca singfand'a device for holding; 'tlie neck in its vertical position, while Fig. 2'- .is' avertical section, on an enlarged scale, through the upper part of the storage vessel. The storage vessel Shown comprises an in-- ternal vessel a, of heatnon-conducting' material, for containing the liquefied gasand an external vessel 6, of metal, and is inclosed ina protecting-casing m. Theneck u is made in one piece with the internal vessel a and di-- verges upward. -An annular piece '0, of lead or other metal-or an alloy, is seen edin any known manner on the upper edge the neck u, and another piece '0 ofa similar material and provided with an internal screw-thread, Fig. 2, is secured within the neck it. "Both pieces 0 and o are rigidly connected by so!- dering at w or otherwise. The internal piece 22 serves for receiving a plug n with-a springpressed safety-valve c. The annular piece 0 may be formed by casting on the neck, orit may be'cast separately and fit loosely on the upper edge of the neck u, so that the space .between them requires to be filled up with a 'suitable'c m position for rigidly connecting the parts; The external vessel 6 is providedwith a dome g, which issoldered on the pieces sand '0. Thereby the two vessels a and bare connected with each other. 4 They are preferably made ball-like in order to better resist the-"internal pressure on the walls of' the in' ternal vessel and the external pressure of the the two vessels a space 1' of preferably uniformthickness'is left, from which the airis pumped out in any -'knownlmanuer-through a, narrow .tube iof lead or the like, and afterward this tube z' is closed by bending ands'ol-J Idering. "As -the internal vessel ois' suifi ciently' strong it need not-be secured at the bottom on the external vessel b, For reasons the internal vessel and the neck of'a heatsnon- 'to be hereinafter. explained it is only-neces eraljlyzprovided with a foot (I at the bottom sary to hold the neck 1/ and the dome q in the vertical position shown. For this purpose a 1 weight 2, of lead or other heavy material, is

secured on the lower half of the external vessel b and made to rest on three or four small balls 1: k, which run on the internal wall of the ball-like protecting-casing m and engage distance beneath the center 1 of the protecting-casing mthat the whole will readily adjust itself and bring the neck u and the dome- I (1 into the vertical position should the protecting-casing m be inclined by chance. The

protectingcasing m is preferably made in halves, which are hinged to each other at l and can be opened and closed at the other side by means of a double screw 0, engaging in lugs The lower half of the casingm is pref and with .a plurality of small perforations p p at a convenient height.' The upper half of the casing mjis provided-at the top with a" ring s, in which a screw-threaded cover It can engage.

.This storage vessel is operated as follows: ,After removing the cove r t and the plug the liquefied gas is in aknown mannerintro- (luced into the internal vessel a through a tube placedin the necle u, and then the plug and the cover are replaced. As the material of the internal vessel a and the neck dis a bad heat-conductor and the transmission of heat from without through the nearly,absolute vacuum in the space r is 'very slow, it follows that the gas will remain in its liquefied state for a longer time than hitherto. Should at last a certain small quantityof the same have vaporized anda certain small overpressure thereby be produced, the spring -'pressed safetywalve a will open andallow the excess of the vaporized gas to escape into the space between the external vessel 6 and the protecting-casing m. There the gas will expand and produce an intense cold, while it passes down- .ward until it escapes through the perforations p p to without. Where so preferred, of course the protecting-casingm may .-be covercd with a layer of heat-non-conducting material-such as felt, hay, '&c., as indicated by the circle m "so as to delay as much as possible the vaporization of the liquefied gas. For the same reason the outside of the internal vessela and its neck u and the inside of the external vessel 6 and its dome q are preferably brightened or polished. in any known manner. 3.

Vthen the liquefied gas is required for use,

the covert and the plug 2/ are removed and a device of any known construction is introduced into the neck 1/. after which the liquetied gas can he extracted. as usual.

The tubes 7 1. with the ad ustable hearings ff and the balls Z- /r, may be omitted.

The internal vessel 11, and more particularly its neck 1/, may he made of any heat-non-conducting matcr1al--such as, forexample, earthenware, celluloid, air-tight papier-mz'ich, or

a composition of non-conducting materials.

It is essential that this material be air-tight,

sufiicientlystrong, and not liable to damages from the difference in. temperatu res'i. a, from the difference between the intense cold of the liquefied gas and the temperature of the ambient air. I have-found that porcelain is mostsuitable for this purpose. It will have todepend upon the material how thick the internal vessel (1 and its neck ushould be made. Celluloid vessels and necks may be i made much'thinner than paper or earthenware or porcelain vessels and necks.

According to the material the neck u will require to be made more or less thick, so as to support the internal vessel It and to protect it from breaking off under the action of jerks. The annular pieces a and may be made of any other material or a composition which renders their fastening'on the neck u possible and leads from the non-conducting- -i. e., less contracting and expandingmate' rial up to the conducting-tl a, more.con Itracting and expanding-materiat Owing to the very low point of ebullition' of most liquefied gixses--such as air, oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, &c.a small quantity of the gas will continuously vaporize, and hence a certain pressure will be produced, "so that it is not'possible to conserve such liquefied gases in perfectly-closed vessels. For this reason it is absolutely necessary that the spring-pressed safety-valve a should always remain at the top to enable the vaporized gas to escape through this valve and, to prevent the liquefiedgas from flowing off in case the valve is at a point beneath the level. -'lhe vaporized gas above the level having a greaterspecific weight than the ambient'air will then be able to check the admission of air. To insure this isolation of the storage vessel by the vaporized gas, and thereby the preservation of the liquefied gas for a longer time, itis necessary to provide means for keeping the neck of the internal vessel and the spring-pressed safety-valve in thevertie'al position. Such an arrangement has been described abovewith reference to Fig. 1. The balls /1 l: l 1" may also be replaced by equivalent means. For example, the outside of the weight 2 may be ground and fitted to slide on the inside of" the casingm, while a suitable lubricating material is employed to reduce the friction. The

storage vessel so arranged will be able to au-

US797577A 1904-04-20 1904-04-20 Storage vessel for liquefied gases. Expired - Lifetime US797577A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2729357A (en) * 1953-05-06 1956-01-03 Cambridge Corp Vacuum jacketed container
US2863297A (en) * 1955-03-29 1958-12-09 Herrick L Johnston Inc Method and apparatus for storing liquified gases
US3087883A (en) * 1957-10-28 1963-04-30 Babcock & Wilcox Ltd Pressure vessels
US4343413A (en) * 1979-10-18 1982-08-10 Kernforschungsanlage Julich Gmbh Double-wall vessel especially Dewar flasks, with wall spacer

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2729357A (en) * 1953-05-06 1956-01-03 Cambridge Corp Vacuum jacketed container
US2863297A (en) * 1955-03-29 1958-12-09 Herrick L Johnston Inc Method and apparatus for storing liquified gases
US3087883A (en) * 1957-10-28 1963-04-30 Babcock & Wilcox Ltd Pressure vessels
US4343413A (en) * 1979-10-18 1982-08-10 Kernforschungsanlage Julich Gmbh Double-wall vessel especially Dewar flasks, with wall spacer

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