New! View global litigation for patent families

US7949819B2 - Flash memory device and method of changing block size in the same using address shifting - Google Patents

Flash memory device and method of changing block size in the same using address shifting Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US7949819B2
US7949819B2 US11978582 US97858207A US7949819B2 US 7949819 B2 US7949819 B2 US 7949819B2 US 11978582 US11978582 US 11978582 US 97858207 A US97858207 A US 97858207A US 7949819 B2 US7949819 B2 US 7949819B2
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
block
address
memory
size
flash
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active, expires
Application number
US11978582
Other versions
US20080144381A1 (en )
Inventor
Sang-Chul Kang
Jin-Yub Lee
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Samsung Electronics Co Ltd
Original Assignee
Samsung Electronics Co Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G11INFORMATION STORAGE
    • G11CSTATIC STORES
    • G11C16/00Erasable programmable read-only memories
    • G11C16/02Erasable programmable read-only memories electrically programmable
    • G11C16/06Auxiliary circuits, e.g. for writing into memory
    • G11C16/08Address circuits; Decoders; Word-line control circuits
    • GPHYSICS
    • G11INFORMATION STORAGE
    • G11CSTATIC STORES
    • G11C16/00Erasable programmable read-only memories
    • G11C16/02Erasable programmable read-only memories electrically programmable
    • G11C16/06Auxiliary circuits, e.g. for writing into memory
    • G11C16/10Programming or data input circuits
    • G11C16/20Initialising; Data preset; Chip identification

Abstract

According to an example embodiment, a method of changing a block size in a flash memory device having a multi-plane scheme may include decoding an external input address and changing the block size of the flash memory device from a first block size to a second block size. The external input address may be decoded into a block address and a page address. The block size of the flash memory device may be changed from the first block size to the second block size by shifting at least one bit of the block address to the page address or shifting at least one bit of the page address to the block address.

Description

PRIORITY STATEMENT

This application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119 to Korean Patent Application No. 2006-0129664, filed on Dec. 18, 2006, in the Korean Intellectual Property Office, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND

Flash memory is a nonvolatile memory in which data may be electrically erased and programmed. Flash memory may be used as both random access memory (RAM), in which data may be freely written and deleted, and read only memory (ROM), which may preserve data even when power is not supplied thereto. Thus, flash memory may be widely used as a storage medium for portable electronic devices such as digital cameras, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and MP3 players.

FIG. 1A illustrates a flash memory device 10 having a fixed block size of 128 KB and FIG. 1B illustrates the address structure of the flash memory device 10 illustrated in FIG. 1A. FIG. 2A illustrates a flash memory device 20 having a fixed block size of 256 KB and FIG. 2B illustrates the address structure of the flash memory device 20 illustrated in FIG. 2A.

Referring to FIGS. 1A, 1B, 2A and 2B, the flash memory devices 10 and 20 may have a multi-plane structure including a plurality of planes Plane 1 and Plane 2. The memory cell array of the flash memory device 10 illustrated in FIG. 1A may include 2048 blocks, each having a size of 128 KB. Each of the blocks of the flash memory device 10 illustrated in FIG. 1A may be located in one of the two planes Plane 1 and Plane 2 and include 64 pages. The blocks of the flash memory device 10 illustrated in FIG. 1A may be addressed in a manner such that two neighboring blocks are located in different planes. Thus, blocks located in the plane Plane 1 may be addressed as Block0, Block2, Block4, . . . , Block2046.

The flash memory device 20 illustrated in FIG. 2A may include 1024 blocks, each having a size of 256 KB. One block of the flash memory device 20 illustrated in FIG. 2A may correspond to two combined blocks respectively located in different planes as illustrated in FIG. 2A. Thus, the blocks of the flash memory device 20 may have a size twice that of the blocks of the flash memory device 10. Each of the blocks of the flash memory 20 may include 128 pages.

FIGS. 1B and 2B respectively illustrate address structures corresponding to memory cell array structures of the flash memory devices 10 and 20 illustrated in FIGS. 1A and 2A. When the flash memory devices 10 and 20 receive a 17-bit external input address, an address controller (not shown) may decode the external input address into a block address and a page address in order to map the external input address to the memory cell array. Accordingly, the address structure corresponding to the flash memory device 10 illustrated in FIG. 1A may have an 11-bit block address and a 6-bit page address, as illustrated in FIG. 1B. The address structure corresponding to the flash memory device 20 illustrated in FIG. 2A may have a 10-bit block address and a 7-bit page address.

As described above, conventional flash memory devices may have fixed block sizes and physically fixed address structures, where the block size of the flash memory devices may not be changed.

SUMMARY

According to an example embodiment, a method of changing a block size in a flash memory device having a multi-plane scheme may include decoding an external input address and/or changing the block size of the flash memory device from a first block size to a second block size. The external input address may be decoded into a block address and a page address. The block size of the flash memory device may be changed from the first block size to the second block size by shifting at least one bit of the block address to the page address or shifting at least one bit of the page address to the block address.

According to another example embodiment, a method of operating a flash memory having a multi-plane scheme may include combining two 1-plane blocks having a first block size and respectively located in different planes into a single 2-plane block having a second block size by shifting at least one bit of a block address to a page address. The method may also include obtaining the block address and the page address by decoding an external input address. The method may also include erasing the 2-plane block in response to a single erase command set. The method may also include programming the 2-plane block.

According to another example embodiment, a flash memory device may include a memory cell array, an address controller, and/or a decoder. The memory cell array may be divided into a plurality of planes and include blocks. Each block may have a plurality of pages. The address controller may be configured to decode an external input address into a block address and a page address. The address controller may also be configured to change the size of the blocks from a first block size to a second block size by shifting at least one bit of the block address to the page address or shifting at least one bit of the page address to the block address in response to a block size change signal. The decoder may be configured to activate a block and a page of the memory cell array based on the block address and the page address.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The above and other features and advantages of the example embodiments will become more apparent by describing in detail example embodiments with reference to the attached drawings. The accompanying drawings are intended to depict example embodiments and should not be interpreted to limit the intended scope of the claims. The accompanying drawings are not to be considered as drawn to scale unless explicitly noted.

FIGS. 1A and 1B respectively illustrate a conventional flash memory device having a fixed block size of 128 KB and an address structure of the conventional flash memory device.

FIGS. 2A and 2B respectively illustrate a conventional flash memory device having a fixed block size of 256 KB and an address structure of the conventional flash memory device.

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of a flash memory device according to an example embodiment.

FIG. 4A illustrates an address structure for combining two blocks in the flash memory device of FIG. 3 according to an example embodiment.

FIG. 4B illustrates an address structure used to divide a single block in the flash memory device of FIG. 3 according to an example embodiment.

FIG. 5A illustrates a multi-plane erase method for use in a conventional flash memory device.

FIG. 5B illustrates a multi-plane erase method for use in a flash memory device according to an example embodiment.

FIG. 6 illustrates an address structure for multi-plane programming in a flash memory device according to an example embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EXAMPLE EMBODIMENTS

Detailed example embodiments are disclosed herein. However, specific structural and functional details disclosed herein are merely representative for purposes of describing example embodiments. Example embodiments may, however, be embodied in many alternate forms and should not be construed as limited to only the embodiments set forth herein.

Accordingly, while example embodiments are capable of various modifications and alternative forms, embodiments thereof are shown by way of example in the drawings and will herein be described in detail. It should be understood, however, that there is no intent to limit example embodiments to the particular forms disclosed, but to the contrary, example embodiments are to cover all modifications, equivalents, and alternatives falling within the scope of example embodiments. Like numbers refer to like elements throughout the description of the figures.

It will be understood that, although the terms first, second, etc. may be used herein to describe various elements, these elements should not be limited by these terms. These terms are only used to distinguish one element from another. For example, a first element could be termed a second element, and, similarly, a second element could be termed a first element, without departing from the scope of example embodiments. As used herein, the term “and/or” includes any and all combinations of one or more of the associated listed items.

It will be understood that when an element is referred to as being “connected” or “coupled” to another element, it may be directly connected or coupled to the other element or intervening elements may be present. In contrast, when an element is referred to as being “directly connected” or “directly coupled” to another element, there are no intervening elements present. Other words used to describe the relationship between elements should be interpreted in a like fashion (e.g., “between” versus “directly between”, “adjacent” versus “directly adjacent”, etc.).

The terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only and is not intended to be limiting of example embodiments. As used herein, the singular forms “a”, “an” and “the” are intended to include the plural forms as well, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise. It will be further understood that the terms “comprises”, “comprising,”, “includes” and/or “including”, when used herein, specify the presence of stated features, integers, steps, operations, elements, and/or components, but do not preclude the presence or addition of one or more other features, integers, steps, operations, elements, components, and/or groups thereof.

It should also be noted that in some alternative implementations, the functions/acts noted may occur out of the order noted in the figures. For example, two figures shown in succession may in fact be executed substantially concurrently or may sometimes be executed in the reverse order, depending upon the functionality/acts involved.

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of a flash memory device 100 according to an example embodiment. Referring to FIG. 3, the flash memory device 100 may include a memory cell array, an address controller 140, and/or a decoder 160. The flash memory device 100 may be a NAND type flash memory device, for example. The memory cell array may be divided into two planes 122 and 124.

The flash memory device 100 may have a structure similar to either of those illustrated in FIGS. 1A and 2A. For example, the flash memory device 100 may include 2048 blocks each having a size of 128 KB as illustrated in FIG. 1A, or 1024 blocks each having a size of 256 KB as illustrated in FIG. 2A. As described above, two neighboring blocks illustrated in FIG. 1A may be respectively located in two planes, and each of the blocks illustrated in FIG. 2A may correspond to two combined blocks respectively located in different planes.

Hereinafter, the block size of the blocks illustrated in FIG. 1A may be referred to as a first block size, and the block size of the blocks illustrated in FIG. 2A may be referred to as a second block size. In addition, blocks located in different planes and having the first block size may be referred to as a 1-plane block, and a block corresponding to two combined 1-plane blocks with the second block size may be referred to as a 2-plane block.

The address controller 140 may change the block size of the flash memory device 100 in response to a block size change signal XBSC. For example, the address controller 140 may change the block size of a flash memory device 100 from the first block size to the second block size, or change the block size of the flash memory device 100 from the second block size to the first block size. For example, when the memory cell array includes 1-plane blocks, the 1-plane blocks may be combined into a 2-plane block. When the memory cell array includes 2-plane blocks, each of the 2-plane blocks may be divided into two 1-plane blocks.

Thus, the flash memory device 100 according to an example embodiment may combine or divide blocks to change the block size using address shifting.

FIG. 4A illustrates an example address structure which may be used to combine two blocks each having a size of 128 KB into a single block having a size of 256 KB, in the flash memory device 100, according to an example embodiment. Referring to FIGS. 3 and 4A, when the flash memory device 100 receives an external input address XAddr, the address controller 140 may decode the external input address XAddr into a block address BAddr and a page address PAddr. For example, when the memory cell array of the flash memory device 100 is an equivalent size to the memory cell arrays illustrated in FIGS. 1A and 2A, the external input address XAddr may include 17 bits.

Thus, when the flash memory device 100 includes 2048 blocks each having a size of 128 KB with 64 pages, as illustrated in FIG. 1A, the address controller 140 may decode the 17-bit external input address XAddr into an 11-bit block address BAddr and a 6-bit page address PAddr.

When the block size change signal XBSC is applied to the flash memory device 100, the address controller 140 may shift the least significant bit (LSB) of the block address BAddr to the LSB of the page address PAddr, as illustrated in FIG. 4A. Accordingly, the 11-bit block address BAddr may be adjusted to 10-bits, and the 6-bit page address PAddr may be adjusted to 7-bits. Accordingly, the address structure illustrated in FIG. 1B may be changed to the address structure illustrated in FIG. 2B. The upper 10 bits of the block address BAddr and the upper 5 bits of the page address PAddr may remain unchanged.

For example, the “Block 0” and “Block 1” illustrated in FIG. 1A may be combined into the “Block 0” illustrated in FIG. 2A, and the address of the “2nd page” of “Block 1” before combination may be compared to the address of the “2nd page” of “Block 1” after combination. The “2nd page” of “Block 1” may be mapped to the block address BAddr of “00000000001” and the page address PAddr of “000001”, for example. When the address controller 140 receives the block size change signal XBSC, the LSB “1” of the “2nd page” of “Block 1” may be shifted to the LSB of the page address PAddr. Accordingly, the “2nd page” of “Block 1”, after “Block 0” and “Block 1” are combined, may be mapped to the block address BAddr of “0000000000” and the page address PAddr of “0000011”. This may correspond to the “4th page” of “Block 0” illustrated in FIG. 2A. Thus, the block size may be changed from 128 KB to 256 KB without varying the design of the flash memory 100. The block size change signal XBSC may be set as a given value in a register, for example.

FIG. 4B illustrates an address structure which may be used to divide a single block having a size of 256 KB into two blocks, each having a size of 128 KB. Referring to FIGS. 3 and 4B, the flash memory device 100 may include 1024 blocks, each having a size of 256 KB and including 128 pages, as illustrated in FIG. 2A. Thus, for example, the address controller 140 may decode a 17-bit external input address XAddr into a 10-bit block address BAddr and a 7-bit page address PAddr.

When the block size change signal XBSC is applied to the address controller 140, the address controller 140 may shift the LSB of the page address PAddr to the LSB of the block address BAddr. Thus, the 10-bit block address BAddr may be changed to 11-bits, and the 7-bit page address PAddr may be changed to 6-bits. Accordingly, the address structure illustrated in FIG. 2B may be changed to the address structure illustrated in FIG. 1B.

When address shifting is used, blocks may be mapped to the same addresses even when the block size is changed, irrespective of the address structure of the flash memory.

FIG. 5A illustrates a multi-plane erase method used in the conventional flash memory device 10. Referring to FIGS. 1A and 5A, for a multi-plane erase operation to simultaneously erase “Block 0” and “Block 1” respectively located in different planes, the flash memory device 10 may set an address and apply an erase command for each plane.

Specifically, the multi-plane erase operation in the structure as illustrated in FIG. 1A may apply a block erase setup command 1 to a plane Plane1 and set an address, and then apply a block erase setup command 2 to another plane Plane2 and set an address. An erase confirm command may be applied to simultaneously erase the contents of cells located in “Block 0” and “Block 1”.

FIG. 5B illustrates a multi-plane erase method used in a flash memory device according to an example embodiment. Referring to FIGS. 1A, 2A and 5B, “Block 0” and “Block 1” illustrated in FIG. 1A may be combined into the “Block 0” illustrated in FIG. 2A using the aforementioned addressing shifting, and thus the multi-plane erase operation may require only a single address setting and erase setup command (including an erase confirm command).

FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate an address structure for a multi-plane programming operation for use in a flash memory device according to an example embodiment. The multi-plane programming operation for use in a flash memory device having a multi-plane structure may alternately program pages respectively located in different 1-plane blocks. For example, the “1st page” of “Block 0” illustrated in FIG. 1A may be programmed, and then “1st page” of “Block 1” may be programmed. In this manner, pages respectively located in different 1-plane blocks may be alternately programmed.

Accordingly, in the address structure illustrated in FIGS. 6A and 6B, the LSB “0” of the block address BAddr may become a “Don't care.” However, the flash memory device 10 illustrated in FIG. 1A may not be able to execute a sequential reading operation on data programmed by multi-plane programming. For example, the flash memory device 10 illustrated in FIG. 1A may read data in a manner that pages are sequentially read in the same plane. Specifically, “1st page” of “Block 0” illustrated in FIG. 1A may be read, and then “2nd page” of “Block 0” may be read. Subsequently, “3rd page” of “Block 0” may be read. Accordingly, data programmed by multi-plane programming operation may not be sequentially read.

However, a flash memory device according an example embodiment may sequentially read data programmed by multi-plane programming operation by combining the 1-plane blocks illustrated in FIG. 1A into the 2-plane blocks illustrated in FIG. 2A without changing the design of the flash memory.

As described above, in a flash memory device and method of changing the block size of a flash memory device according example embodiments, the LSB of the block address may be shifted to the LSB of the page address or the LSB of the page address may be shifted to the LSB of the block address in order to combine blocks located in different planes or divide combined blocks to internally change the block size. Furthermore, a flash memory device according example embodiments may more easily execute a multi-plane erase operation and a sequential reading operation.

Example embodiments having thus been described, it will be obvious that the same may be varied in many ways. Such variations are not to be regarded as a departure from the intended spirit and scope of example embodiments, and all such modifications as would be obvious to one skilled in the art are intended to be included within the scope of the following claims.

Claims (17)

1. A method of changing a block size in a flash memory device having a multi-plane scheme, the method comprising:
decoding an external input address into a block address and a page address; and
changing the block size of the flash memory device from a first block size to a second block size by shifting at least one bit of the block address to the page address or shifting at least one bit of the page address to the block address,
wherein changing the block size includes combining two 1-plane blocks of the first block size respectively located in different planes into a 2-plane block of the second block size, and
wherein changing the block size shifts a least significant bit (LSB) of the block address to a LSB of the page address.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the second block size is twice the first block size.
3. The method of claim 1, wherein the flash memory device includes two planes.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein the flash memory device is a NAND type flash memory device.
5. A method of changing a block size in a flash memory device having a multi-plane scheme, the method comprising:
decoding an external input address into a block address and a page address; and
changing the block size of the flash memory device from a first block size to a second block size by shifting at least one bit of the block address to the page address or shifting at least one bit of the page address to the block address,
wherein changing the block size includes dividing a 2-plane block having the first block size into two 1-plane blocks having the second block size and respectively located in different planes, and
wherein changing the block size shifts a least significant bit (LSB) of the page address to a LSB of the block address.
6. The method of claim 5, wherein the first block size is twice the second block size.
7. A method of operating a flash memory having a multi-plane scheme, the method comprising:
combining two 1-plane blocks having a first block size and respectively located in different planes into a single 2-plane block having a second block size by shifting at least one bit of a block address to a page address; and
obtaining the block address and the page address by decoding an external input address,
wherein combining the two 1-plane blocks shifts a least significant bit (LSB) of the block address to a LSB of the page address.
8. The method of claim 7, further comprising:
erasing the 2-plane block in response to a single erase command set.
9. The method of claim 7, further comprising:
programming the two 1-plane blocks.
10. The method of claim 9, wherein programming the two 1-plane blocks alternately programs of the two 1-plane blocks.
11. The method of claim 10, further comprising:
sequentially reading programmed pages in an order of the programming.
12. A flash memory device, comprising:
a memory cell array divided into a plurality of planes and including blocks, each block having a plurality of pages; and
an address controller configured to decode an external input address into a block address and a page address, and to change the size of the blocks from a first block size to a second block size by shifting at least one bit of the block address to the page address or shifting at least one bit of the page address to the block address in response to a block size change signal,
wherein the address controller is configured to combine two 1-plane blocks having the first block size and respectively located in different planes into a 2-plane block having the second block size, and
wherein the address controller shifts a least significant bit (LSB) of the block address to a LSB of the page address.
13. The flash memory device of claim 12, wherein the second block size is twice the first block size.
14. The flash memory device of claim 12, wherein the block size change signal is set as a register value.
15. The flash memory device of claim 12, wherein the memory cell array is divided into two planes.
16. The flash memory device of claim 12, wherein the flash memory is a NAND type flash memory device.
17. The flash memory device of claim 12, further comprising:
a decoder configured to activate a block and a page of the memory cell array based on the block address and the page address.
US11978582 2006-12-18 2007-10-30 Flash memory device and method of changing block size in the same using address shifting Active 2029-10-01 US7949819B2 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
KR20060129664A KR100843218B1 (en) 2006-12-18 2006-12-18 Flash memory device and method for changing a block size using address shifting
KR10-2006-0129664 2006-12-18

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20080144381A1 true US20080144381A1 (en) 2008-06-19
US7949819B2 true US7949819B2 (en) 2011-05-24

Family

ID=39526975

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11978582 Active 2029-10-01 US7949819B2 (en) 2006-12-18 2007-10-30 Flash memory device and method of changing block size in the same using address shifting

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US7949819B2 (en)
KR (1) KR100843218B1 (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110029717A1 (en) * 2009-07-29 2011-02-03 Stec, Inc. Flash storage device with flexible data format
US9424928B2 (en) 2014-12-08 2016-08-23 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Nonvolatile memory device including multi-plane

Families Citing this family (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
KR101684583B1 (en) * 2008-09-03 2016-12-08 마벨 월드 트레이드 리미티드 A multi-programming data into the plane of a flash memory
KR100967008B1 (en) * 2008-11-14 2010-06-30 주식회사 하이닉스반도체 Non volatile memory device and operating method thereof
US8255615B1 (en) 2009-01-08 2012-08-28 Marvell International Ltd. Flexible sequence design architecture for solid state memory controller
US8688893B2 (en) * 2009-06-23 2014-04-01 Intel Mobile Communications GmbH Memory device and memory interface
KR101012887B1 (en) 2009-06-30 2011-02-08 주식회사 하이닉스반도체 Operating method of nonvolatile memory device
KR20150091918A (en) * 2014-02-04 2015-08-12 삼성전자주식회사 Storage device and operating method thereof
US20170123994A1 (en) * 2015-10-28 2017-05-04 Sandisk Technologies Inc. Handling Of Plane Failure In Non-Volatile Storage

Citations (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4315312A (en) * 1979-12-19 1982-02-09 Ncr Corporation Cache memory having a variable data block size
US5295254A (en) * 1990-09-29 1994-03-15 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Semiconductor memory device cell array divided into a plurality of blocks
JPH06332797A (en) 1993-05-27 1994-12-02 Nec Corp Semiconductor memory device
US5860147A (en) 1996-09-16 1999-01-12 Intel Corporation Method and apparatus for replacement of entries in a translation look-aside buffer
KR100204810B1 (en) 1996-09-13 1999-06-15 윤종용 Semiconductor memory device having variable erasing block size
US6591327B1 (en) * 1999-06-22 2003-07-08 Silicon Storage Technology, Inc. Flash memory with alterable erase sector size
US20030154351A1 (en) * 2001-11-16 2003-08-14 Jim Nilsson Coherence message prediction mechanism and multiprocessing computer system employing the same
US6611796B1 (en) * 1999-10-20 2003-08-26 Texas Instruments Incorporated Method and apparatus for combining memory blocks for in circuit emulation
US20040024971A1 (en) * 2000-09-21 2004-02-05 Zohar Bogin Method and apparatus for write cache flush and fill mechanisms
US20050144361A1 (en) * 2003-12-30 2005-06-30 Gonzalez Carlos J. Adaptive mode switching of flash memory address mapping based on host usage characteristics
US20060140001A1 (en) * 2004-12-28 2006-06-29 Hynix Semiconductor Inc. NAND flash memory device capable of changing a block size
US20070124531A1 (en) * 2005-11-30 2007-05-31 Sony Corporation Storage device, computer system, and storage device access method
US20070263457A1 (en) * 2006-05-12 2007-11-15 Hynix Semiconductor Inc. Flash memory device and erase method thereof
US20080034154A1 (en) * 1999-08-04 2008-02-07 Super Talent Electronics Inc. Multi-Channel Flash Module with Plane-Interleaved Sequential ECC Writes and Background Recycling to Restricted-Write Flash Chips
US20080034153A1 (en) * 1999-08-04 2008-02-07 Super Talent Electronics Inc. Flash Module with Plane-Interleaved Sequential Writes to Restricted-Write Flash Chips
US20080037324A1 (en) * 2006-08-14 2008-02-14 Geoffrey Wen-Tai Shuy Electrical thin film memory
US7366866B2 (en) * 2003-10-30 2008-04-29 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Block size allocation in copy operations

Family Cites Families (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6850438B2 (en) 2002-07-05 2005-02-01 Aplus Flash Technology, Inc. Combination nonvolatile memory using unified technology with byte, page and block write and simultaneous read and write operations
US7212440B2 (en) * 2004-12-30 2007-05-01 Sandisk Corporation On-chip data grouping and alignment

Patent Citations (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4315312A (en) * 1979-12-19 1982-02-09 Ncr Corporation Cache memory having a variable data block size
US5295254A (en) * 1990-09-29 1994-03-15 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Semiconductor memory device cell array divided into a plurality of blocks
JPH06332797A (en) 1993-05-27 1994-12-02 Nec Corp Semiconductor memory device
US5398210A (en) * 1993-05-27 1995-03-14 Nec Corporation Semiconductor memory device having memory cells reorganizable into memory cell blocks different in size
KR100204810B1 (en) 1996-09-13 1999-06-15 윤종용 Semiconductor memory device having variable erasing block size
US5860147A (en) 1996-09-16 1999-01-12 Intel Corporation Method and apparatus for replacement of entries in a translation look-aside buffer
US6591327B1 (en) * 1999-06-22 2003-07-08 Silicon Storage Technology, Inc. Flash memory with alterable erase sector size
US20080034154A1 (en) * 1999-08-04 2008-02-07 Super Talent Electronics Inc. Multi-Channel Flash Module with Plane-Interleaved Sequential ECC Writes and Background Recycling to Restricted-Write Flash Chips
US20080034153A1 (en) * 1999-08-04 2008-02-07 Super Talent Electronics Inc. Flash Module with Plane-Interleaved Sequential Writes to Restricted-Write Flash Chips
US6611796B1 (en) * 1999-10-20 2003-08-26 Texas Instruments Incorporated Method and apparatus for combining memory blocks for in circuit emulation
US20040024971A1 (en) * 2000-09-21 2004-02-05 Zohar Bogin Method and apparatus for write cache flush and fill mechanisms
US20030154351A1 (en) * 2001-11-16 2003-08-14 Jim Nilsson Coherence message prediction mechanism and multiprocessing computer system employing the same
US7366866B2 (en) * 2003-10-30 2008-04-29 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Block size allocation in copy operations
US20050144361A1 (en) * 2003-12-30 2005-06-30 Gonzalez Carlos J. Adaptive mode switching of flash memory address mapping based on host usage characteristics
US20060140001A1 (en) * 2004-12-28 2006-06-29 Hynix Semiconductor Inc. NAND flash memory device capable of changing a block size
US7193897B2 (en) * 2004-12-28 2007-03-20 Hynix Semiconductor Inc. NAND flash memory device capable of changing a block size
US20070124531A1 (en) * 2005-11-30 2007-05-31 Sony Corporation Storage device, computer system, and storage device access method
US20070263457A1 (en) * 2006-05-12 2007-11-15 Hynix Semiconductor Inc. Flash memory device and erase method thereof
US20080037324A1 (en) * 2006-08-14 2008-02-14 Geoffrey Wen-Tai Shuy Electrical thin film memory

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110029717A1 (en) * 2009-07-29 2011-02-03 Stec, Inc. Flash storage device with flexible data format
US8473672B2 (en) 2009-07-29 2013-06-25 Stec, Inc. System and method for storing data using a flexible data format
US8510497B2 (en) * 2009-07-29 2013-08-13 Stec, Inc. Flash storage device with flexible data format
US9424928B2 (en) 2014-12-08 2016-08-23 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Nonvolatile memory device including multi-plane
US9589643B2 (en) 2014-12-08 2017-03-07 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Nonvolatile memory device including multi-plane

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20080144381A1 (en) 2008-06-19 application
KR100843218B1 (en) 2008-07-02 grant
KR20080056586A (en) 2008-06-23 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6465818B1 (en) Semiconductor memory device capable of performing data writing or erasing operation and data reading operation in parallel
US6996014B2 (en) Memory devices with page buffer having dual registers and method of using the same
US6917543B2 (en) Flash memory for improving write access time
US7472331B2 (en) Memory systems including defective block management and related methods
US20080055993A1 (en) System and memory for sequential multi-plane page memory operations
US20080098195A1 (en) Memory system including flash memory and mapping table management method
US7227777B2 (en) Mode selection in a flash memory device
US20050286297A1 (en) Multiple level cell memory device with single bit per cell, re-mappable memory block
US6198685B1 (en) Word-line driving circuit and semiconductor memory device
US6097666A (en) Nonvolatile semiconductor memory device whose addresses are selected in a multiple access
US7778084B2 (en) Non-volatile memory devices and operating methods thereof
US20080239812A1 (en) Nonvolatile semiconductor memory system
US20020085419A1 (en) Nonvolatile semiconductor memory device and data input/output control method thereof
US20060262626A1 (en) Method for accessing memory
US20040174727A1 (en) Apparatus for dividing bank in flash memory
US20050273549A1 (en) Memory device with user configurable density/performance
US6724682B2 (en) Nonvolatile semiconductor memory device having selective multiple-speed operation mode
EP1280161A1 (en) Memory devices with page buffer having dual registers and methods of using the same
US7916538B2 (en) Memory device employing NVRAM and flash memory cells
US20080266962A1 (en) Flash memory device and flash memory system
US20040221092A1 (en) Flash memory device with partial copy-back mode
US6208581B1 (en) Hybrid memory device and method for controlling same
US6781879B2 (en) Nonvolatile semiconductor memory with a page mode
US20100091576A1 (en) Nonvolatile memory device, program method and precharge voltage boosting method thereof, and memory system including the nonvolatile memory device
US6643758B2 (en) Flash memory capable of changing bank configuration

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: SAMSUNG ELECTRONICS CO., LTD., KOREA, REPUBLIC OF

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:KANG, SANG-CHUL;LEE, JIN-YUB;REEL/FRAME:020097/0974

Effective date: 20070912

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4