US733898A - Upsetting-machine. - Google Patents

Upsetting-machine. Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US733898A
US733898A US9624002A US1902096240A US733898A US 733898 A US733898 A US 733898A US 9624002 A US9624002 A US 9624002A US 1902096240 A US1902096240 A US 1902096240A US 733898 A US733898 A US 733898A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
machine
upsetting
gripping
die
punch
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US9624002A
Inventor
Rudolph G Beker
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
FREDERICK H KINDL
Original Assignee
FREDERICK H KINDL
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by FREDERICK H KINDL filed Critical FREDERICK H KINDL
Priority to US9624002A priority Critical patent/US733898A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US733898A publication Critical patent/US733898A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B21MECHANICAL METAL-WORKING WITHOUT ESSENTIALLY REMOVING MATERIAL; PUNCHING METAL
    • B21JFORGING; HAMMERING; PRESSING METAL; RIVETING; FORGE FURNACES
    • B21J13/00Details of machines for forging, pressing, or hammering
    • B21J13/08Accessories for handling work or tools
    • B21J13/14Ejecting devices

Definitions

  • My invention relates to metal-upsettingn machines, and more especially to that class of machines in which hot metal rods are fed to the machine either automatically or by hand,
  • One of the objects of my invention is to provide a machine of this character with means whereby one, two, or more bars are automatically fed into the machine in order to make one, two, or more upset articles at a single stroke of the upsetting-punch.
  • a further object of my invention is to provide means whereby the stock-gage, the gripping-dies, and the upsetting-punch can be adjusted without stopping the machine.
  • Figure 1 is alongitudinal verticalsection of my machine.
  • Fig. 2 is a horizontal section of the same.
  • Figs. 3 and 4 are cross-sections on the line 3 3, Fig. 2, showing'the gripping-dies in closed and open positions, respectively.
  • -Fig. 5 is 50 an elevation of the front end of the machine.
  • Fig. 6 is a front view of the upsetting-punches.
  • Fig. 7 is a sectional detail showing the manner of mounting one of the feeding-rollers.
  • Fig. 8 is a transverse section through the head carrying the upsettingpunch; and
  • Figs. 9, 10, and 11 are horizontal sections through the gripping and shearing dies, showing the same in three different positions.
  • My machine does not deviate in general construction from present machines, and it is provided with the usual cutting and gripping dies, reciprocating upsetting punch, feeding means, stop-gage, and suitable mechanism for operating these parts.
  • the machine is provided with the frame 1, which carries at its forward end the rod-feeding rolls 2 and 3 and is preferably placed in front ofaheating-furnace 4,from which the hot rods are fed to the machine.
  • a plate 5 In the frame near its forward end is mounted a plate 5, having openings 6 therethrough, through which the stockrods pass. This plate serves as the stationary jaw of the shears and preferably has the openings th'erethrough beveled toward the front, as shown.
  • the stationary gripping jaw or I die 7 and the movable gripping jaw ordie 8 In proximity to this shearing-plate are the stationary gripping jaw or I die 7 and the movable gripping jaw ordie 8, the latter being mounted close to the face of the plate 5 and adapted to pass across the openings 6 therein, so that it will cut off t-hestockrod and carry the cut-off piece over sidewise and against the stationary gripping-die 7.
  • the stock-gage is shown at 9 and the heading-punch at 10, the latter being secured to a head 11, which is mounted to reciprocate in ways 12 in the frame, and being actuated by any suitable mechanism-such, for instance, as the connecting-rod 13', pivoted to said head at one end and having its other end connected to the crank or eccentric 14 on a horizontal shaft 15, mounted in the outer end of the frame.
  • This shaft 15 is provided with a fly-wheel l6 and will be driven from any suitable source and in any suitable way.
  • a horizontal shaft 17 which is driven from the shaft 15 by the bevel-gears 18, and which is provided with a crank or eccentric 19, to which is secured one end of a connecting-rod 20, the other end of which is couroo nected to the joint of the toggle-links 21, by means of which the movable gripping-die 8 is actuated.
  • the feed-rollers 2 and 3 are secured to the upper end of shafts 23 and 24, having at their lower ends beveled pinions 25 and 26, which mesh with beveled pinions 27 and 28 on a horizontal shaft 29, which is connected by means of the vertical shaft 30 and beveled pinions 31 and 32 to the shaft 17.
  • All of the parts so far described are or may be of the usual type and form no part of my invention, and the exact arrangement, especially of the driving-gearing, maybe departed from without affecting the principle of my invention.
  • the first part of my invention consists in so constructing the machine that a plurality of stock-rods can be simultaneously fed to the machine and cutoif and upset at asingle stroke.
  • the feed-rollers 2 and 3 are vertically disposed, as shown, and are provided on their peripheries with a plurality of grooves 33, two such grooves being shown, although a larger number may be provided.
  • two stock-rods 34 can be simultaneously fed to the machine.
  • the shearing-plate 5 is provided with as many openings 6 as there are stock-rods, two such openings being shown in the present case, said openings being one above the other.
  • the gripping-dies 7 and 8 will be provided with a corresponding number of gripping-cavities 35, and the head 11 will carry a corresponding number of upsetting-punches 10, said punches being placed one above the other, as shown.
  • the vertical arrangement shown is not absolutely essential, still it is preferable, as by this means the plurality of upset blanks will generally drop out of the gripping-dies of their own accord as soon as the latter are opened, whereas if a horizontal arrangement were employed some ejector or knock-01f arrangement would be necessary, and this would further complicate the machine. In case the upset blanks should stick to the dies a knock-out will of course be employed.
  • one of the feeding-rollers is so moitnted that it can be moved away from the other one, th us loosening the grip of the rollers on the rod.
  • the shaft of one of said rollers-as for instance, the shaft24-mounted in stationary bearings 36, both at its upper and lower end, while the other shaft 23 is mounted at its upper end in the movable bearing 37 and at its lower end in the rocking bearing 38, which is pivoted at 39, so that the upper end of the shaft and the roller 2 can swing away from the roller 3.
  • roller 2 is held against the roller 3 by means of a cam-lever 40, suitably pivoted in the frame and having one arm pressing against the bearing 37,while the other arm is connected by a rod 41 to lever 42, mounted in the lower part of the frame and provided with a suitable spring or weight 43, which tends constantly to hold the two feed-rollers together.
  • the outer end of the lever is provided with a treadle 44,whereby the load 43 can be overcome, so that the roller2 will ofits own accord swing awayfrom the roller 3. In this manner the feeding of the stock-rod to the machine can be stopped whenever desired.
  • the gripping dies or jaws 7 and 8 are preferably formed as rectangular blocks,as shown in Figs. 3 and 4, each of which is provided with a plurality of gripping-recesses on each of its four sides, so that when the recesses on one side become worn the dies can be turned to present a new face, as will be readily understood.
  • the movable die 8 is clamped in a recess in the upper end of the lever 46, pivoted on the stud 47, which lever has connected thereto the toggle-links 21.
  • the stationary die 7 rests upon a plate 49 and is clamped thereagainst by the top setscrew 50 and is adjusted horizontally by the backingscrew 51, extending through the frame and having on its outer end the handwheel 52.
  • grippingrecesses 35 in the two dies correspond exactly to each other; otherwise there will be a tendency to form a ridge or fin on the two sides of the blank.
  • One of the features of my invention is to provide adjusting means for this purpose which can be operated without stopping the machine.
  • the vertical adj ustmentfor the movable die 8 is secured by mounting the stud 47 eccentrically in a sleeve 60, which is rotatably mounted in the frame and which is provided at its outer end with the gear 61, with which meshes a pinion 62 on a shaft 63, projecting outside of the frame and provided at its outer end with a hand-wheel 6%, which likewise is readily accessible, so that the sleeve can be turned to adjust the movable die vertically-without stopping the machine.
  • the movable die forms the movable jaw of the shears, it being moved by the toggle-links 21 across the open-' ings 6 in the shearing-plate 5, thus shearing off the stock-rods and carrying the cut-off portions sidewise against the stationary die 7.
  • This movement is clearly shown in Figs. 9, 10, and 11, Fig. 9 showing the grippingdies open, Fig. 10 showing the movable die in the act of cutting off a blank, and Fig. 11 showing the blank carried over against the stationary die and the upsetting-punch having headed the blank.
  • the movable die 8 In this operation it is of course essential that the movable die 8 have a dwell or pause, so that it will hold the blank against the stationary die-sufficiently long to enable the heading-punch to properly upset the blank.
  • the connecting-rod 20 As shown in the drawings, the connecting-rod 20 is provided with a shoulder or nut and passes through a sleeve 65, connected at the knuckles of the toggle-links.
  • a cap 66 To the outer end of said connecting-rod is secured a cap 66, between whichand a similar cap 67, formed on the sleeve 65, is interposed a strong compressionspring 68.
  • This spring is so adjusted that before the crank 19 has reached its full outer throw the movable die 8 will have been carried against the stationary die, and in the further movement of the crank the said spring will be further compressed, thus permitting the movable jaw to remain stationary until the crank has passed so far beyond its outer throw as to bring the shoulder 65 against the sleeve 65. In this manner a sufficient pause or dwell of the movable jaw is secured by means of a simple crank or eccentric.
  • the stock-gage 9 is preferably disposed in a vertical position and secured to a rocking shaft 70, suitably mounted in the frame of the machine.
  • This shaft is screw-threaded, as shown at 71, and is surrounded by the internally-threaded worm-wheel 72, with which meshes a worm 73 on the inner end of a shaft 74:, the outer end of which is provided with a hand-wheel 75 or the like outside of the frame,
  • the rod By turning this hand-wheel the rod will be moved longitudinally, and thus vary the position of the gage to vary the length of blank to be cutfrom the stock-rods.
  • This gage must of course lie in the path of movement of the stock-rods while the latter are being fed into the machine; but it must be moved out of the way before the upsettingpunch is projected.
  • the gage therefore is lever will contact with the finger 77 and rock the gage 9 and move the same out of the path of the upsetting-punch.
  • the finger 77 is of considerable length, as shown, so that it will permit the longitudinal adjustment of the gage and still be in the path of movement of the lever 46.
  • the gage In order to again rock the gage into its vertical position when the movable die 8 recedes, it may be provided with a suitable counterweight which will swingit to the vertical position; but I prefer to connect the finger 77 to the lever 46 by means of a light spiral spring 78, so that when the lever 46 moves outward the spring will pull the gage back to its vertical position.
  • the reciprocating head 11 is provided at its forward end with a yoke 80, and in said yoke are the top and bottom saddle-blocks 81, between which the plurality of upsettingpunches are held and one of whichas, for
  • the head 11 is provided with a chamber or cylinder 85,in which moves a backing-block 86,
  • the piston 86 is constantly pressed outward, by a spiral spring 90, arranged in thechamber 85.
  • the outward movement of said piston is limited by a forked lever 91, which To this end 1
  • the chamber straddles the forward end of the piston and is pivoted at its lower end at 92 and has its upper end provided with the adjusting-screw 93, the end of which contacts with some stationary part of the head 11, such as the yoke 80. Should the heading-punches get out of adjustment, so that it is necessary to move them slightly forward, the screw 93 will be slightly turned, so as to permit the spring 90 to force the piston 86 out a short distance.
  • the suction thus created will raise the checkvalve 89, permitting liquid to pass from the chamber 88 into the cylinder 85.
  • the checkvalve 89 will prevent the impact of the upsetting-punches against the blank from driving the liquid back into the chamber 88, and as the liquid is incompressible a practically nonyielding backing for the punch is provided.
  • All of these adjusting means are readily accessibleon the outside of the machine and are not in the path of any moving part thereof, so that the adjustment can be efiected without stopping the machine.
  • the machine can be kept in practically continuous operation, and as a plurality of stock-rods can be worked up simultaneously the output is increased three or four fold over prior machines.
  • the relief-valve 96 the tension can be relieved and the machine turned backward.
  • the means for adjusting the punches is practically self-controlled, and this feature of the invention is applicable to any machine having a reciprocating head carrying tools of various kinds which must be projected to a uniform distance.
  • a metal-upsetting machine the combination with a stationary shearing-die, of a movable shearing and gripping die, a coopcrating gripping-die, said gripping-dies opening on a vertical line and having a plurality of gripping-recesses, means for opening and closing said dies, a pair of vertical rollers having a plurality of feedingrooves therein, a reciprocating head movable toward and from said shearing and gripping dies, and a plurality of u psetting-punches carried thereby.
  • a metal-upsetting machine the combination with an upsetting-punch, of a stationary gripping and shearing die, a movable gripping and shearing die, a lever in which the latter is mounted, a pivot for said lever on which it swings toward and from the other die, an eccentric sleeve surrounding said pivot, a hand-wheel located outside of the machine-frame, and connections between the same and said sleeve for rotating the latter.
  • a metal-upsettingmachine the combination with the gripping and shearing dies for the blank, of a reciprocating head, an npsettingpunch inovably mounted therein, means for limiting the outward movement of said punch, and a self-adjusting abutment in said head against which said punch rests.

Description

PATENTED JULY 14, 1903.
R. BBKBR. UPSETTING MACHINE.
APPLICATION FILED I13. 1, 1902.
4 snnmssnnm 1.
N0 MODEL.
fizz/anion- @I "'7 JY/Zarneyr.
Monk's Prrsns w, l woYo-umo.v WASHIMGTON D c PA'TBNTED JULY 14, 1903.
R. G. BEKER. UPSETTING MACHINE. Arrmol'rx on FILED In. 1, 1902.
4 SHEETS-SHEET 3.
no uopsn.
W 1. Eymmmmmm m: ucflms PETERS c0. wrouma, wunmmomm c.
No.- 733,898. PATENTED JULY 14, 1903. R. e. BEKER, UPSETTING MACHINE.
APPLICATION IILED IAB. 1. 1902.
N0 MODEL. 7 I 4 SHEETS-SHEET 4 THE NORM PETERS co. momumo" WASHINGTON nv c.
U ITED STATES Patented July 14, 1903. I
FATENT GFFICE.
RUDOLPH G. BEKER, OF PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA, ASSIGNOR OF TWO- THIRDS TO FREDERICK H. KINDL, OF -PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA.
UPSETTlNG-MACHINE.
sricczmcamron forming part of Letters Patent No. 733,898, dated July 14, 1903.
Application filed March 1, 1902.
To allwhom it may concern.-
Be it known that I, RUDOLPH G. BEKER, a resident of Pittsburg, in the'county of Allegheny and State of Pennsylvania, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Upsetting-Machines and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description thereof.
My invention relates to metal-upsettingn machines, and more especially to that class of machines in which hot metal rods are fed to the machine either automatically or by hand,
out into exact lengths while in the heated state, and then upset for the purpose of formx; ing rivets, bolt-blanks, pins, and the like.
One of the objects of my invention is to provide a machine of this character with means whereby one, two, or more bars are automatically fed into the machine in order to make one, two, or more upset articles at a single stroke of the upsetting-punch.
A further object of my invention is to provide means whereby the stock-gage, the gripping-dies, and the upsetting-punch can be adjusted without stopping the machine.
In most prior machines of this kind only a single stock-rod could be fed to the machine at a time, so that only a single rivet, bolt, or other blank could be produced at one stroke of the machine. Furthermore, the stock-gage, grippingjawsordies,and headingorupsetting punch could be adjusted only-while the ma chine was at rest, thus making it necessary to frequently stop the machine and greatly decreasing the output. While in my ma-. chine the general arrangement for feeding the bars to the machine, cutting the same into sections, and upsettingthe samedoes not differ essentially from present machines, the improvements ab'ove referred to enable the output to be increased three or four times over prior machines without increasing the speed of the machine;
In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is alongitudinal verticalsection of my machine. Fig. 2 is a horizontal section of the same. Figs. 3 and 4 are cross-sections on the line 3 3, Fig. 2, showing'the gripping-dies in closed and open positions, respectively. -Fig. 5 is 50 an elevation of the front end of the machine.
Fig. 6 is a front view of the upsetting-punches.
Serial No. 96,240. (No model.)
Fig. 7 is a sectional detail showing the manner of mounting one of the feeding-rollers. Fig. 8 is a transverse section through the head carrying the upsettingpunch; and Figs. 9, 10, and 11 are horizontal sections through the gripping and shearing dies, showing the same in three different positions.
My machine. does not deviate in general construction from present machines, and it is provided with the usual cutting and gripping dies, reciprocating upsetting punch, feeding means, stop-gage, and suitable mechanism for operating these parts. The machine is provided with the frame 1, which carries at its forward end the rod-feeding rolls 2 and 3 and is preferably placed in front ofaheating-furnace 4,from which the hot rods are fed to the machine. In the frame near its forward end is mounted a plate 5, having openings 6 therethrough, through which the stockrods pass. This plate serves as the stationary jaw of the shears and preferably has the openings th'erethrough beveled toward the front, as shown. In proximity to this shearing-plate are the stationary gripping jaw or I die 7 and the movable gripping jaw ordie 8, the latter being mounted close to the face of the plate 5 and adapted to pass across the openings 6 therein, so that it will cut off t-hestockrod and carry the cut-off piece over sidewise and against the stationary gripping-die 7. The stock-gage is shown at 9 and the heading-punch at 10, the latter being secured to a head 11, which is mounted to reciprocate in ways 12 in the frame, and being actuated by any suitable mechanism-such, for instance, as the connecting-rod 13', pivoted to said head at one end and having its other end connected to the crank or eccentric 14 on a horizontal shaft 15, mounted in the outer end of the frame. This shaft 15 is provided with a fly-wheel l6 and will be driven from any suitable source and in any suitable way. Mounted in hearings on the side of the frame 1 is a horizontal shaft 17, which is driven from the shaft 15 by the bevel-gears 18, and which is provided with a crank or eccentric 19, to which is secured one end of a connecting-rod 20, the other end of which is couroo nected to the joint of the toggle-links 21, by means of which the movable gripping-die 8 is actuated. The feed-rollers 2 and 3 are secured to the upper end of shafts 23 and 24, having at their lower ends beveled pinions 25 and 26, which mesh with beveled pinions 27 and 28 on a horizontal shaft 29, which is connected by means of the vertical shaft 30 and beveled pinions 31 and 32 to the shaft 17. Thus all parts of the machine are actuated from the single drive-shaft 15. All of the parts so far described are or may be of the usual type and form no part of my invention, and the exact arrangement, especially of the driving-gearing, maybe departed from without affecting the principle of my invention.
The first part of my invention consists in so constructing the machine that a plurality of stock-rods can be simultaneously fed to the machine and cutoif and upset at asingle stroke. To this end the feed-rollers 2 and 3 are vertically disposed, as shown, and are provided on their peripheries with a plurality of grooves 33, two such grooves being shown, although a larger number may be provided. By means of these two grooves two stock-rods 34 can be simultaneously fed to the machine. The shearing-plate 5 is provided with as many openings 6 as there are stock-rods, two such openings being shown in the present case, said openings being one above the other. So, too, the gripping-dies 7 and 8 will be provided with a corresponding number of gripping-cavities 35, and the head 11 will carry a corresponding number of upsetting-punches 10, said punches being placed one above the other, as shown. While the vertical arrangement shown is not absolutely essential, still it is preferable, as by this means the plurality of upset blanks will generally drop out of the gripping-dies of their own accord as soon as the latter are opened, whereas if a horizontal arrangement were employed some ejector or knock-01f arrangement would be necessary, and this would further complicate the machine. In case the upset blanks should stick to the dies a knock-out will of course be employed. By the arrangement shown two stock-rods will be simultaneously fed to the machine, out 01f, and upset at a single stroke, and by providing additional feeding-grooves in the rolls, gripping-recesses in the holding-dies, and upsetting-punches it would be possible to work up more than two rods at a single stroke. The construction, however, does not prevent a single stock-rod being worked up, if desired.
To enable the feeding of the stock-rod to the machine to be interrupted, one of the feeding-rollers is so moitnted that it can be moved away from the other one, th us loosening the grip of the rollers on the rod. I have shown the shaft of one of said rollers-as, for instance, the shaft24-mounted in stationary bearings 36, both at its upper and lower end, while the other shaft 23 is mounted at its upper end in the movable bearing 37 and at its lower end in the rocking bearing 38, which is pivoted at 39, so that the upper end of the shaft and the roller 2 can swing away from the roller 3. A very slight movement only is necessary in order to loosen the feedinggrip on the stock-rod, and as the pivot 39 is very near the lower end of the shaft it results in such a slight movement of the bevelgear 25 as not to interfere with its proper mesh with the gear 27. The roller 2 is held against the roller 3 by means of a cam-lever 40, suitably pivoted in the frame and having one arm pressing against the bearing 37,while the other arm is connected by a rod 41 to lever 42, mounted in the lower part of the frame and provided with a suitable spring or weight 43, which tends constantly to hold the two feed-rollers together. The outer end of the lever is provided with a treadle 44,whereby the load 43 can be overcome, so that the roller2 will ofits own accord swing awayfrom the roller 3. In this manner the feeding of the stock-rod to the machine can be stopped whenever desired.
The gripping dies or jaws 7 and 8 are preferably formed as rectangular blocks,as shown in Figs. 3 and 4, each of which is provided with a plurality of gripping-recesses on each of its four sides, so that when the recesses on one side become worn the dies can be turned to present a new face, as will be readily understood. The movable die 8 is clamped in a recess in the upper end of the lever 46, pivoted on the stud 47, which lever has connected thereto the toggle-links 21. The stationary die 7 rests upon a plate 49 and is clamped thereagainst by the top setscrew 50 and is adjusted horizontally by the backingscrew 51, extending through the frame and having on its outer end the handwheel 52. It is essential that the grippingrecesses 35 in the two dies correspond exactly to each other; otherwise there will be a tendency to form a ridge or fin on the two sides of the blank. By reason of the great strain to which these dies are subjected they easily get out of adjustment, so that frequent stoppages of the machine are necessary in order to adjust them. One of the features of my invention is to provide adjusting means for this purpose which can be operated without stopping the machine. I have therefore shown the plate 49, upon which the stationary die 7 is seated, resting on an eccentricpin 54 on the inner end of a shaft 55, which extends through the frame and is provided at its outer end with suitable means whereby it can be rotated,such as the worm-segment 56, which is engaged by a worm 57, having thereon a hand-wheel 58 for turning the same. This hand-wheel is on the outside of the machine where it is readily accessible when the latter is in operation, so that by means of it the eccentric-pin 54 can be turned to raise or lower the stationary die 7, the top screw 50 being of course adjusted simultaneously therewith. The vertical adj ustmentfor the movable die 8 is secured by mounting the stud 47 eccentrically in a sleeve 60, which is rotatably mounted in the frame and which is provided at its outer end with the gear 61, with which meshes a pinion 62 on a shaft 63, projecting outside of the frame and provided at its outer end with a hand-wheel 6%, which likewise is readily accessible, so that the sleeve can be turned to adjust the movable die vertically-without stopping the machine.
The movable die, as heretofore stated, forms the movable jaw of the shears, it being moved by the toggle-links 21 across the open-' ings 6 in the shearing-plate 5, thus shearing off the stock-rods and carrying the cut-off portions sidewise against the stationary die 7. This movement is clearly shown in Figs. 9, 10, and 11, Fig. 9 showing the grippingdies open, Fig. 10 showing the movable die in the act of cutting off a blank, and Fig. 11 showing the blank carried over against the stationary die and the upsetting-punch having headed the blank. In this operation it is of course essential that the movable die 8 have a dwell or pause, so that it will hold the blank against the stationary die-sufficiently long to enable the heading-punch to properly upset the blank. In order to secure this dwell or pause and also to prevent breakage in case a distorted blank is in the dies, I provide a yielding or flexible connection between the crank 19 and toggle-links 21. As shown in the drawings, the connecting-rod 20 is provided with a shoulder or nut and passes through a sleeve 65, connected at the knuckles of the toggle-links. To the outer end of said connecting-rod is secured a cap 66, between whichand a similar cap 67, formed on the sleeve 65, is interposed a strong compressionspring 68. This spring is so adjusted that before the crank 19 has reached its full outer throw the movable die 8 will have been carried against the stationary die, and in the further movement of the crank the said spring will be further compressed, thus permitting the movable jaw to remain stationary until the crank has passed so far beyond its outer throw as to bring the shoulder 65 against the sleeve 65. In this manner a sufficient pause or dwell of the movable jaw is secured by means of a simple crank or eccentric.
The stock-gage 9 is preferably disposed in a vertical position and secured to a rocking shaft 70, suitably mounted in the frame of the machine. This shaft is screw-threaded, as shown at 71, and is surrounded by the internally-threaded worm-wheel 72, with which meshes a worm 73 on the inner end of a shaft 74:, the outer end of which is provided with a hand-wheel 75 or the like outside of the frame,
so thatitis readily accessible in order to adjust the position of the stock-gage without stopping the machine. By turning this hand-wheel the rod will be moved longitudinally, and thus vary the position of the gage to vary the length of blank to be cutfrom the stock-rods. This gage must of course lie in the path of movement of the stock-rods while the latter are being fed into the machine; but it must be moved out of the way before the upsettingpunch is projected. The gage therefore is lever will contact with the finger 77 and rock the gage 9 and move the same out of the path of the upsetting-punch. The finger 77 is of considerable length, as shown, so that it will permit the longitudinal adjustment of the gage and still be in the path of movement of the lever 46. In order to again rock the gage into its vertical position when the movable die 8 recedes, it may be provided with a suitable counterweight which will swingit to the vertical position; but I prefer to connect the finger 77 to the lever 46 by means of a light spiral spring 78, so that when the lever 46 moves outward the spring will pull the gage back to its vertical position.
The reciprocating head 11 is provided at its forward end with a yoke 80, and in said yoke are the top and bottom saddle-blocks 81, between which the plurality of upsettingpunches are held and one of whichas, for
instance, the top blockis adjustable by the,
screw 82 to clamp the punches in place.
These punches have their contact-faces flattened off, as shown at 83, and the saddleblocks 81 are provided with substantially V- grooves, so that the punches will always be they soon get out of adjustment, so that they no longer move into close contact with the gripping-dies, and thus permit the formation of a fin at the head of the upset article. It
is therefore necessary to frequently adjust.
these punches, and in prior machines this v could only be done by stopping the machine and placing washers or shims behind the punches. I provide an adjustment, however, which is practically automatic. the head 11 is provided with a chamber or cylinder 85,in which moves a backing-block 86,
which is practically a piston, and the outer end of which serves as an abutment against. which the rear ends of the upsetting-punches. rest, although, if desired, the punches might be integral with the piston.
oil, water, or other incompressible liquid, The piston 86 is constantly pressed outward, by a spiral spring 90, arranged in thechamber 85. The outward movement of said piston is limited by a forked lever 91, which To this end 1 The chamber straddles the forward end of the piston and is pivoted at its lower end at 92 and has its upper end provided with the adjusting-screw 93, the end of which contacts with some stationary part of the head 11, such as the yoke 80. Should the heading-punches get out of adjustment, so that it is necessary to move them slightly forward, the screw 93 will be slightly turned, so as to permit the spring 90 to force the piston 86 out a short distance. The suction thus created will raise the checkvalve 89, permitting liquid to pass from the chamber 88 into the cylinder 85. The checkvalve 89 will prevent the impact of the upsetting-punches against the blank from driving the liquid back into the chamber 88, and as the liquid is incompressible a practically nonyielding backing for the punch is provided.
It frequently occurs that the cut-ofi blank becomes wedged in the machine in such a manner that it will prevent the upsettingpunches from reaching the limit of their outward stroke. When this happens, all of the parts of the machine are put under such tension or strain that it is practically impossible to turn the same backward to release the blank, thus occasioning much delay and annoyance. To avoid any delay for this reason, I provide a relief-passage 95, leading from the cylinder 85 to the chamber 88, which relief-passage is controlled by the screwvalve 96. By merely opening said valve the liquidpressure in the cylinder 85 can be released, thus allowing the upsetting-punches to recede and taking the strain off the machine, so that it can be turned backward.
The operation of the machine is in the usual and ordinary way and will be readily gathered from the foregoing description. By means of my improvements a plurality of stock-rods can be simultaneously fed to the machine, cut into sections, and upset, and said upset sections will of their own accord fall out of the machine as soon as the gripping-dies are opened. The feeding mechanism can be stopped whenever desired by merely pressing the treadle 44, which will permit the feedingrolls to separate. The stock-gage can be adjusted to vary the length of blank by merely turning the hand-wheel 75. The grippingdies can be adjusted if they get out of alinement by suitably turning the hand-wheels 58 or 64:, as the case may be, and the adjustment of the punches is secured by merely turning the adjusting-screw 93. All of these adjusting means are readily accessibleon the outside of the machine and are not in the path of any moving part thereof, so that the adjustment can be efiected without stopping the machine. As a consequence the machine can be kept in practically continuous operation, and as a plurality of stock-rods can be worked up simultaneously the output is increased three or four fold over prior machines. Furthermore, should any accident happen to the machine, so that it becomes stalled with the parts under great tension, by merely opening the relief-valve 96 the tension can be relieved and the machine turned backward. The means for adjusting the punches is practically self-controlled, and this feature of the invention is applicable to any machine having a reciprocating head carrying tools of various kinds which must be projected to a uniform distance.
What I claim as my invention, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-
1. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with a stationary shearing-die, of a movable shearing and gripping die, a coopcrating gripping-die, said gripping-dies opening on a vertical line and having a plurality of gripping-recesses, means for opening and closing said dies, a pair of vertical rollers having a plurality of feedingrooves therein, a reciprocating head movable toward and from said shearing and gripping dies, and a plurality of u psetting-punches carried thereby.
2. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with shearing and gripping dies for the blank and an upsetting-punch, of a pair of positively-driven feed-rollers mounted on vertical shafts, a rocker hearing at the lower end of one of said shafts, a cam bearing against the upper end thereof, and movable pressure means for holding said cam against said shaft.
3. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combinationwith shearing and gripping dies for the blank and an upsetting-punch, of a pair of positively-driven feed-rollers mounted on vertical shafts, a rocker bearing at the lower end of one of said shafts, an arm bearing against the upper end of said shaft, and a Weighted lever connected to said cam-arm for holding the roller on said shaft against the opposite roller.
4. In a metalupsetting machine, the combination with shearing and gripping dies for the blank and an upsetting-punch, of a stop or gage for determining the length of the blank, a longitudinally-movable rod to which the same is secured, said rod being provided with screw-threads, an internally-threaded gear working thereon, and means for rotating said gear, thereby moving said rod longitudinally.
5. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with shearing and gripping dies for the blankand an upsetting-punch, of a vertically-disposed stop or gage, a rocking bearing therefor, and connections between the movable jaw and the gage for rocking the same.
6. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with a stationary and a movable gripping-die for the blank, of an upsettingpunch, a stop or gage, a rocking bearing therefor, an arm on said gage adapted to contact with the movable die, and a spring connected to said arm and die moving means.
7. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with stationary and movable shearing and gripping dies, of an upsetting-punch, a stop or gage, a rocking bearing therefor,
IIO
means for adjusting said gage longitudinally, and an elongated finger onsaid gage and adapted to contact with the movable die.
8. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with an upsetting-punch, of a stationary gripping and shearing die, a movable gripping and shearing die, a leverin which the latter is mounted, a pivot for said lever on which it swings toward and from the other die, and means for adjusting the pivot of said lever vertically.
9. In ametal-upsetting machine, the combination with an upsetting-punch, of a stationary gripping and shearing die, a movable gripping and shearing die, a lever in which the latter is mounted, and an eccentricallymounted pivot on which said lever is mounted and on whichit swings toward and from the other die.
10. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with an upsetting-punch, of a stationary gripping and shearing die, a movable gripping and shearing die, a lever in which the latter is mounted, a pivot for said lever on which it swings toward and from the other die, an eccentric sleeve surrounding said pivot, and means for rotating said sleeve.
11. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with an upsetting-punch, of a stationary gripping and shearing die, a movable gripping and shearing die, a lever in which the latter is mounted, a pivot for said lever on which it swings toward and from the other die, an eccentric sleeve surrounding said pivot, a hand-wheel located outside of the machine-frame, and connections between the same and said sleeve for rotating the latter.
12. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with an upsetting-punch, of a movable gripping-die, a stationary gripping-die, bearings for the latter in which the same can be moved vertically, an eccentric upon which said stationary die rests, and means for rotating said eccentric.
13. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with an upsetting-punch, of a movable gripping-die, a stationary gripping-die, adjustable means bearing on top of the same, an eccentric upon which said die rests, and means for rotating said eccentric.
14:. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with the upsettingpunch, of a movable gripping-die, a stationary gripping-die, an eccentric upon which the same rests, a worm-segment connected to said eccentric, and a worm and hand wheel for operating said segment.
15. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with the gripping-dies one of which is movable, toggle -links for actuating the same, a crank or eccentric, a rod connected to said crank and extending beyond the to gle-links and having a shoulder on its extended portion, and a compression-spring between said shoulder and the toggle-links.
16. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with the gripping-dies one of which rod connected to said crank and extending through said sleeve and provided with a shoulder near its end, and a compressionspring between said shoulder and said sleeve.
17. In a metal-upsettingmachine, the combination with the gripping and shearing dies for the blank, of a reciprocating head, an npsettingpunch inovably mounted therein, means for limiting the outward movement of said punch, and a self-adjusting abutment in said head against which said punch rests.
18. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with the gripping and shearing dies for the blank, of an upsetting-punch, a reciprocating head therefor, means for pressing the punch outward, a stop for limiting the outward movement thereof, and non-yielding means for preventing the inward move ment of said punch.
19. In a metal-upsetting machine, the cornbinat-ion with the gripping and shearing dies for the blank, of an upsetting-punch, a reciprocating head in which the same is mounted, a spring for forcing the punch forward, an adjustable stop for limiting the forward movement thereof, and non-yieldingself-adjusting means for preventing the punch from moving backward.
20. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with the gripping and shearing dies for the blank, of an upsetting-punch, a reciprocating head in which it is mounted, means for moving the punch forward, an adjustable stop for limiting the forward movement thereof, and automatic means for admitting fluid behind said punch.
21. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with the gripping and shearing dies for the blank, of an upsetting-punch, a reciprocating head in which the same is mounted, said head being provided with a cylinder or chamber, a piston therein against which said punch rests, means for projecting said piston outward, and a fluid-passage to said chamber having a check-valve therein.
22. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with the gripping and shearing dies for the blank, of an upsetting-punch, a reciprocating head in which it is mounted, said head having a chamber or cylinder, a piston therein against" which said punch rests, a spring for projecting said piston outward, a forked lever-for limiting the outward movement of said piston, a screw for adjusting said lever, and a fluid-passage to said chamber provided with a check-valve.
23. In a metal-upsetting machine, the combination with the gripping and shearing dies for the blank, of an upsetting-punch, a reciprocating head in which the same is mounted, said head having a chamber, a piston therein against which the punch rests, means for projecting the piston outward, a fluid-passage to said chamber having a check-valve therein, a relief-outlet from said chamber, for clamping said punches and saddle-blocks and a valve for controlling the same. in said head. [O
24:. In a metal-upsetting machine, the com- In testimony whereof I, the said RUDOLPH bination with the gripping and shearing dies G. BEKER, have hereunto set my hand. 5 for the blank, of a reciprocating head, two RUDOLPH G. BEKER.
or more punches having fiat contact-surfaces, Witnesses: grooved or V-shaped saddle-blooks'in said F. W. IVINTER,
head and embracing said punches, and means ROBERT C. TOTTEN.
US9624002A 1902-03-01 1902-03-01 Upsetting-machine. Expired - Lifetime US733898A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US9624002A US733898A (en) 1902-03-01 1902-03-01 Upsetting-machine.

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US9624002A US733898A (en) 1902-03-01 1902-03-01 Upsetting-machine.

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US733898A true US733898A (en) 1903-07-14

Family

ID=2802406

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US9624002A Expired - Lifetime US733898A (en) 1902-03-01 1902-03-01 Upsetting-machine.

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US733898A (en)

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2491279A (en) * 1947-06-25 1949-12-13 Dayton Rogers Mfg Co Safety overload pitman for power presses
US2499341A (en) * 1944-08-03 1950-02-28 Waterbury Farrel Foundry & Mac Movable work stop for solid die headers
US3041899A (en) * 1958-08-22 1962-07-03 Benninghoff William Leroy Relief means for preventing interruption of the forming cycle of an upset forging machine due to overload of gripper die

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2499341A (en) * 1944-08-03 1950-02-28 Waterbury Farrel Foundry & Mac Movable work stop for solid die headers
US2491279A (en) * 1947-06-25 1949-12-13 Dayton Rogers Mfg Co Safety overload pitman for power presses
US3041899A (en) * 1958-08-22 1962-07-03 Benninghoff William Leroy Relief means for preventing interruption of the forming cycle of an upset forging machine due to overload of gripper die

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US733898A (en) Upsetting-machine.
US53782A (en) Improvement in nut-machines
US45116A (en) Improved machine for making rivets
US733998A (en) Bolt-heading machine.
US2302531A (en) Forging machine stock gauge
US168135A (en) Improvement in machines for forging wrench-bar heads
US170151A (en) Improvement in machines for making bolts, rivets
US164459A (en) Improvement in machines for upsetting metallic bars and rods
US220497A (en) Improvement in bolt-heading machines
US58040A (en) Improvement in making bolts
US353584A (en) Machine for heading bolts and rivets
US1417294A (en) Gripping device
US797934A (en) Rivet-making machine.
US204381A (en) Improvement in machines for making bridge-eyes
US149185A (en) Improvement in machines for finishing horseshoe-nails
US188772A (en) Improvement in machines for making rivets
US246933A (en) worsley
US987282A (en) Manufacture of bolts, rivets, &c.
US1731355A (en) Cut-off mechanism for metal-working machines
US78105A (en) Improved maohiie foe,, foemiig sheet-metal waee
US317320A (en) And clayton
US850212A (en) Power-hammer.
US391465A (en) Attachment for na
US843790A (en) Upsetting-machine.
US399828A (en) burdsall