US731089A - Automatic piano. - Google Patents

Automatic piano. Download PDF

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US731089A
US731089A US14467503A US1903144675A US731089A US 731089 A US731089 A US 731089A US 14467503 A US14467503 A US 14467503A US 1903144675 A US1903144675 A US 1903144675A US 731089 A US731089 A US 731089A
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piano
automatic
action
pneumatics
keys
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US14467503A
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Peter Welin
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10FAUTOMATIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10F1/00Automatic musical instruments
    • G10F1/02Pianofortes with keyboard

Description

PATBNTED JUNE 16, 1903.
' v P. WBLIN.
AUTOMATIC PIANO.
APPLIUATION FILED FEB. 24,}903.
NO MODEL. 4 SHEETS-SHEET 1.
l p l 'EZP- l6 10 \I 7- g? lL I I PATENTED JUNE 16', 1903.
P. WBLIN. AUTOMATIC PIANO.
APPLICATION FILED FEB. 24, 1903.
4 SHEETSSHEET 2.
N0 MODEL.
wfxiq I No. 731,089. PATENTED JUNE 16, 1903.
P. WELIN. I
AUTOMATIC PIANO.
APPLICATION EILED FEB. 24, 1903.
no MODEL. mums-smart s.
TERS o0. woTauwo msuvmmu. u. c.
PATENTED JUNE 16, 1903.
P. WBLIN. AUTOMATIC PIANO.
APPLICATION FILED 21113. 24, 1903.
4 SHEETS-SHEET 4.
N0 MODEL.
llll llll HllWlll wTiTcesses U ITED STATES Patented June 16, 1903.
PETER WELIN, OF WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS.
AUTOMATIC PIANO.
SPEGIFIGATION formingpart of Letters Patent No. 731,089, dated June 16, 1903.
Application filed February 24, i903. Serial No. 144,676. (No model.)
To 6!, whom it may concern:
Beit known that I, PETER WELIN, a citizen of the United States, residing at Worcester, in the county of Worcester and State of Massachusetts, have invented a new and useful Automatic Piano, of which the following is a specification.
This invention relates to that class of antomatic musical instruments which are controlled by rollsrof perforated paper.
The especial objects of this invention are to provide an automatic piano or similar instrument in which the working parts maybe entirely closed within the piano-casing, so that when not in use or when being played manually the'automatic character of the instrument will not be apparent; to provide a simple and efficient automatic action which will produce more powerful effects than other instruments of this class; to provide for looking the keys when the instrument is being played automatically, and to arrange the parts of the completed instrument so that they may be readily removed for purposes of repairs or renewals.
To these ends this invention consists of the automatic musical instrument and of the combinations of parts therein, as hereinafter described, and more particularly pointed out in the claims at the end of this specification.
In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a sectional view showing sufficient parts of a piano-action to illustrate the application of my invention thereto. Fig. 2 is a partial front View showing the relation of the paperwinding rolls and the tracker-board pipes. Fig. 3 is a fragmentary view illustrating the joints connecting the tracker-board pipes. Fig. 4 is an enlarged sectional view of one of said joints. Fig. 5 is a front view of a portion of the front of a piano-casing, the dropslide being closed to conceal the paper-winding devices. Fig. 6 is a sectional view of the construction shown in Fig. 5. Fig. 7 is a perspective view of the drop-slide. Fig. 8 is a perspective view of the rock-shaft which operates the key-locking bar. Fig. 9 is a front view, partially broken away, of the lower panel of the piano-casing. Fig. 10 is a sectional view of the construction shown in Fig. 9, and Fig. 11 is a similar view showing the bellows-operating pedals hung up inside the piano-casing.
To provide a mechanism for automatically playing a piano or similar instrument by the aid of perforated music-sheets, a number of automatic piano-players have been devised. In some of these automatic piano-players the operating devices are arranged in a separate instrument or housed in an entirely separate casing from the piano. Automatic pianoplayers of this class obstruct the keyboard of the pianos, necessarily occupy considerable room, and are regarded by many people as unsightly. In a number of constructions also it has been proposed to arrange the automatic playing devices so that they can be housed within the piano-casing. In all such constructions, however,with which I am familiar it has been necessary either to employ casings of special design or to disfigure and cut into ordinary piano-casings to considerable extents, and in all such constructions the automatic character of the instruments can be recognized at a glance.
One especial object of my present invention is to provide an automatic piano or similar instrument of that class in which the automatic action is housed within the piano-casing, but which will be so arranged that the automatic character of the instrument may, if desired, be entirely concealed, so that when the piano isnot in use or when being played upon manually it will have the appearance of an ordinary upright or other type of piano, with nothing about the same which will indicate the presence of the automatic playing instrumentalities. To accomplish this result, the automatic action is divided into two groups of instrumentalities, the paper-winding devices being grouped together and arranged above the keyboard and behind the music-desk panel, while the pneumatics and bellows are arranged below the keyboard directly behind the lower front panel of the piano casing. The tracker board pipes, which connect these two groups of instrumentalities, extend laterally from the trackerboard to the sides of the piano before being carried down to the pneumatics. These tracker-board pipes are preferably provided with joints, so that the different lengths of the pipes maybe removed for renewals or repairs.
To secure powerful action, the pneumatics instead of being connected to operate the keys are arranged to operate upon the abstracts through short multiplying-levers, so that the keys will not be required to be removed, and a leverage will be secured for striking the notes with more power.
When the piano is being played automatically, the keys are locked. The key-locking bar is preferably arranged to be released when the sliding door or panel is closed in front of the paper-winding devices.
The bellows-operating pedals are prefer-' ably mounted in a frame, which may be hung up inside the piano-casing, if desired, when not in use.
Referring to the accompanying drawings by reference characters for a detail description of an automatic musical instrument embodying my invention, as shown most clearly in Fig. 1, A designates a key-lever pivoted on a pin Ct in the ordinary manner. At its rear end the key A-is provided with a pin engaging a thrust-rod or abstract B. The abstract B is pivoted at its upper end to the rocker C, which rocker O carries a trigger or jack D, operating a hammer H, and which rocker C also operates the lever I, carrying the damper J, which normally engages the wire W.
The parts as thus far described will be rec ognized as an ordinary form of piano-action. In applying my invention to such ordinary piano-action the pneumatic devices are preferably arranged below the keyboard. As shown herein, these parts comprise a base or channel-board 10, leading to which are the tracker-board pipes 11, to be hereinafter referred to. Detachably clamped on the channel-board 10 are valve-casings 12, each of which carries a main or striking pneumatic 13. In this case Ihave illustrated the action as including the pneumatics and valve-boxes, forming a bank or number of tiers, in which each valve-box and its pneumatic is independently removable. It is to be understood, however, that I do not desire to cover specifically in this application for patent this detachable arrangement of individual pneumatics, as such subject-matter is claimed in an application for patent filed by me December 23, 1902, Serial No. 136,351. The movable section of each of the pneumatics is connected by a link to a spring-pressed lever 14. Cooperating with each of the spring-pressed levers 14 is a screw-adjusted stop 15, which may be set to limit the striking motion of each pneumatic.
I regard the construction shown as a desirable one, because the pneumatics are accessi ble by simply removing the front panel of the piano-casing and the stops may be readily adjusted to secure the desired striking movements.
At their rear ends the spring-pressed levers 14 are connected by rods 16 to small multiplying-levers 17, each of said multiplying-levers being pivoted at one end in a frame 18 and being connected at its center to one of the abstracts B of the piano-action.
In practice I have found that by connecting onto the abstracts of a piano-action in this way I am enabled to secure more powerful and brilliant eifects, while at the same time the piano-keys are left stationary while the instrument is being played mechanically.
Cooperating with the piano-keys I preferably provide a spring-pressed lock-bar 19, which is held down by springs 20 when the piano is being played automatically,but which may be lifted by an operating-rod 21 when it is desired to play the instrument manually.
The connections between the tracker-board and the bank of pneumatics below the keyboard are most clearly illustrated in the second sheet of the drawings.-
As shown in Fig. 2, the paper-winding mechanism of an automatic musical instrument constructed according to my invention may comprise a tracker-board 23, over which the perforated paper may be drawn from a musicroll 22 and wound onto a winding-roll 24. These paper-winding devices are located in a box or compartment immediately over the keyboard. Leading from the tracker-board 23 through the back of this compartment are the tracker-board pipes. The tracker-board pipes are divided into two groups 25 and 26, which separate and extend laterally to the sides of the piano.
As shown in Fig. 3, the primary trackerboard pipes, as 25, are connected by boards 27 and 28, which are detachably clamped together to second lengths of tracker-board pipe 29, which second lengths of trackerboard pipes 29 are connected by the boards 30 and 31, detachably clamped together, to the tracker-board pipe 11, before referred to that is to say, in the construction herein illustrated between each channel of the tracker-board and the pneumatic corresponding therewith I provide three lengths of tracker-board pipe,which are detachably connected by the joints or coupling before referred to. I regard this as a feature of advantage, as by means of this construction the parts may be more readily taken out for renewal or repairs without dismantling the entire instrument.
The paper-winding devices are normally concealed behind a drop-panel or sliding door. The closing of this drop-panel is preferably relied upon for operating the connections for releasing the key-locking bar. The constructions employed for this purpose are most clearly illustrated in the third sheet of the drawings.
As shown in Figs. 5 and 6, M designates a front panel or music-desk of the piano-casing. Sliding in the music-desk M is a droppanel 32, which when closed normally con ceals the paper-winding devices. The droppanel 32 may be operated by a knob or handle 33 On its rear face, as shown in Fig. 7, the drop-panel 32 is provided with a groove or channel 34, having a block or lug 35, cooperating with a spring-catch 86. \Vhen the drop-panel is lifted, the spring-catch 36 will hold the same open, and extending down from the spring-catch 36 is a finger-button 37, which may be pushed up when it is desired to release the drop-slide, so as to permit the same to be closed. Extending up from the drop-slide 32 is a cam 38, having an inclined face engaging the cranked end of a rock-shaft 39, which rock-shaft 39 is connected to the operating-rod 21 for lifting the key-locking bar 19. By means of this construction, as shown most clearly by the dotted lines in Fig. 5, when the drop-panel 32 is closed the connections above described will raise the key-locking bar, so that the keyboard will be left free, permitting the instrument to be played manually, if desired.
The pedals or foot-controlled connections which are employed for operating the bellows are preferably arranged in a frame, which may be hung up inside the piano-casing when not in use. This construction is illustrated most clearly in the fourth sheet of drawings. As shown in Figs. 9 to 11, inclusive, P designates the ordinary panel or base-board, which closes the front of the piano-casing below the keyboard. The lower part of the casing is substantially the same as that of an ordinary upright piano, except that the pedals are preferably in an arch or recess. Detachably secured in sockets in the piano-casing are the side arms 40 of a wire or metal frame. Pivoted on the front bar of the metal frame are treadles or foot-operated sections 41, connected by straps 42 to brackets 43, eX- tending up from the movable sections 44 of the bellows.
When the piano is not being used or when it is not desired to operate the same automat ically, the front panel P may be swung out and the pedal-frame may be removed from. the front of the piano and hung up on hooks 45 within the piano-casing, as illustrated in Fig. 11. I regard this as a desirable construction, because when the drop-panel is closed to conceal the paper-winding mechanism the hanging of the treadles within the casing will leave no indication of the automatic character of the piano.
I am aware that numerous changes may be made in practicing myinvention by those who are skilled in the art without departing from the scope thereof as expressed in the claims. I do not wish, therefore, to be limited to constructions I have herein shown and described; but
What I do claim, and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, is-
1. In a construction of the class described, the combination of a piano-action, comprising keys, an abstract operated from each key, main pneumatics, and operating connections pneumatic pneumatics, and connections between each between each main pneumatic and its abstract, comprising a spring-pressed lever, a thrust-rod and a multiplying-lever connected to the abstract.
2. In a construction of the class described, the combination of a piano-action, comprising keys, and an abstract operated from each key, playing devices comprising main main pneumatic and a corresponding abstract, comprising a spring-pressed lever, a vertical thrust-rod, and a multiplying-lever pivoted at one end and having an abstract connected thereto between the thrust-rod and the pivot of the lever, whereby the abstract will be operated with increased power.
3. In a construction of the class described, the combination of a piano-action, comprising keys and parts operated thereby, pneumatic playing devices connected to operate other parts of the action without operating the keys and a spring-pressed locking-bar for locking the keys when the piano is being played antomatically.
4. In a construction of the class described, the combination of a piano-action, comprising keys and parts operated thereby, pneumatic playing devices connected to operate other parts of the action-without operating the keys, a spring-pressed locking-bar for holding the keys stationary while the piano is being played automatically, and means for raising the locking-bar when the piano is to be played manually.
5'. In a construction of the class described, the combination of a piano-action, comprising keys and parts operated thereby, pneumatic playing devices comprising a bank of main pneumatics, spring-pressed levers operated by the pneumatics, an adjustable stop forlimitin g the motion of each of said levers, and connections fromsaid levers to work other parts of the action without operating the keys.
(5. In a construction of the class described, the combination of a piano-action, automatic playing devices comprising pneumatics, pa per-winding devices, and a tracker-board controlling the pneumatics, a slide or door, and means for locking the piano-keys when the door is opened to allow access to the paperwinding devices.
7. In a construction of the class described, the combination of a piano-action, automatic playing devices comprising pneumatics, paper-winding devices, and a tracker-board controlling the pneumatics, a vertically-movable panel or door, a spring-pressed locking-bar, and means for releasing the locking-bar to lock the piano-keys when the door is raised to allow access to the paper-winding devices.
8. In a construction of the class described, the combination of a piano-action, playing devices comprising pneumatics, paper-winding mechanisnnand a tracker-board controlling the pneumatics, a drop-panel normally concealing the paper-winding devices, a spring pipes extending laterally from the trackerboard to the sides of the piano, and thence down to the pneumatics, each of said trackerboard pipes having joints formed by boards detachably clamped together.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.
PETER WELIN.
Witnesses:
PHILIP W. SOUTHGATE, JOHN F. CROWELL.
US14467503A 1903-02-24 1903-02-24 Automatic piano. Expired - Lifetime US731089A (en)

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