US721462A - Manufacture of playing-balls. - Google Patents

Manufacture of playing-balls. Download PDF

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US721462A
US721462A US1902108936A US721462A US 721462 A US721462 A US 721462A US 1902108936 A US1902108936 A US 1902108936A US 721462 A US721462 A US 721462A
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mold
ball
core
chamber
playing
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Francis H Richards
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Francis H Richards
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C43/00Compression moulding, i.e. applying external pressure to flow the moulding material; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C43/02Compression moulding, i.e. applying external pressure to flow the moulding material; Apparatus therefor of articles of definite length, i.e. discrete articles
    • B29C43/18Compression moulding, i.e. applying external pressure to flow the moulding material; Apparatus therefor of articles of definite length, i.e. discrete articles incorporating preformed parts or layers, e.g. compression moulding around inserts or for coating articles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C31/00Handling, e.g. feeding of the material to be shaped, storage of plastics material before moulding; Automation, i.e. automated handling lines in plastics processing plants, e.g. using manipulators or robots
    • B29C31/04Feeding of the material to be moulded, e.g. into a mould cavity
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C35/00Heating, cooling or curing, e.g. crosslinking or vulcanising; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C35/02Heating or curing, e.g. crosslinking or vulcanizing during moulding, e.g. in a mould
    • B29C35/0227Heating or curing, e.g. crosslinking or vulcanizing during moulding, e.g. in a mould using pressure vessels, e.g. autoclaves, vulcanising pans
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29KINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES B29B, B29C OR B29D, RELATING TO MOULDING MATERIALS OR TO MATERIALS FOR MOULDS, REINFORCEMENTS, FILLERS OR PREFORMED PARTS, e.g. INSERTS
    • B29K2105/00Condition, form or state of moulded material or of the material to be shaped
    • B29K2105/06Condition, form or state of moulded material or of the material to be shaped containing reinforcements, fillers or inserts
    • B29K2105/20Inserts
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29LINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASS B29C, RELATING TO PARTICULAR ARTICLES
    • B29L2031/00Other particular articles
    • B29L2031/54Balls
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29LINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASS B29C, RELATING TO PARTICULAR ARTICLES
    • B29L2031/00Other particular articles
    • B29L2031/54Balls
    • B29L2031/545Football balls

Description

\ I M I PATBNTBD FEB. 24, 19os. F. H.. RICHARDS. MANUFACTURE OF PLAYING BALLS.

APPLICATION TILED MAY 26, 1902.

4 SHEETSrSHF-ET -1.

PATBNTBDPE'B.24,1903.

r. H. RICHARDS.

MANUFACTURE OF PLAYING BALLS.

APPLICATION FILED MAYN, 1902.

.4 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

no Kenny.

Wituesses:

THE NORRIS PETER! co., Puma-mike" w smNGTDM n. c

- P. H. RICHARDS. MANUFACTURE OF PLAYING BALLS.

PATENTED- FEB. 24, 190-3;

APPLICATION FILED MAY 26, 1902- 4 sung-sum a.

N0 MODEI W Sea NlTiED STATES FFICE.

nrnNr MANUFACTURE oF PLAYING-BALLS.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 721,462, dated February 24, 1903. Application filed May 26,1902. Serial N0.108,9S 6. (No model.) v

Playing-Balls, of which the following is av specification.

This invention relates to a process for man ufacturing golf or other playing balls, and especially to producing shells or covers upon cores or fillings. Certain features of the invention may be employed also in producing solid balls of gutta-percha or other plastic material.

Some difficulty is experienced in making cored balls in causing the core to occupy a position exactly central of the finished ball, especially when there is used for the shell gutta-perchaor other material which is sof-. tened or rendered plastic when compressed upon the core. It is necessary to regulate the heat within narrow limits, since it must sufficiently soften the shell, while if it is too great the shell material is liquefied, so that the core is apt to float out of its central position and become fixed in an eccentric position upon the hardening of the shell.

One object of my invention is to overcome these difficulties. i

A further object is to avoid the necessity of constructing a shell by welding segments together, since unless care is taken in the welding the ball is liable when struck a severe blow to burst at the weld.

Other objects are to eliminate irregular airbubbles from the ball and also to produce a uniformly-compact texture all over the shell and also to make the shell of uniform thickness, thereby producing a ball which gives a uniform response upon Whatever part of the ball the blow isreceived, which is a feature of importance in balls intended for use in the game of golf.

A further object is to simplify the opera tion and cost of making the balls, and other objects will hereinafter appear.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a part-sectional view of one of the several kinds of golf-balls which may be made by my improved process. Fig. 2 is asectional View of one form of apparatus for practicing my invention and is illustrative of the process of forming a shell. Fig. 3 is a plan of the apparatus shown at Fig. 2, but omitting the upper half of the ball-mold and its accessories. Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 2, but showing only the lower part of the apparatus and illustrating one method of setting a core within the ball-mold. Figs. 5, 6, and 7 are views, upon a smaller scale, of the ball-mold and accessories, the first figure showing the separation of the mold parts prior to the insertion of a core or after the removal of the finished ball, Fig. 6 showing the core in position prior tothe injection of the shell material, and Fig. 7 showing the ball completed in the 'mold.

In the several views similar parts are designated by similar characters of reference.

. For the core or filling of the ball I prefer to employ a softrubber sphere 1, preferably solid, although my invention contemplates the employment of any other suitable core.

This Isuspend within a mold consisting, preferably, of a lower section 2 and an upper section 3, each section having a hemispherical depression or cup, which depressions together form a spherical chamber or cavity 4. Said chamber may be provided with pits 5 for embossing the ball-shell with brambles. The lower mold-section Zmay have a recess 6, preferably rectangular, forming aseat for the upper section 3, thereby securing a perfect match of the sections. The core may be suspended within the relatively large mold-chamber 4 by means of needles or points, which are preferably arranged in opposite pairs, as indicated at7 and Wand 8 and 8 Fig. 3, the needles in each pair being on a single diametrical line and at right angles to the needles in the other pair and all of the needles being level with the center of the ball. arrangement of points or equivalent devices may be adopted or the ball may be otherwise suspended or maintained cent-rally within the chamber.

One method of setting the core is seen at Fig. 4, in which it is seen that the ball is held by the attendant centrally in the lower half of the mold, the needles being temporarily withdrawn. be employed for aiding the accurate positioning of the core. While the ball is held in the Fig. 4 position the four needles are driven Any suitable gage or gages may.

Any other into its periphery, as at Fig. 2, thereby to suspend the core centrally of the mold with the requisite stability during the subsequent casting of a shell thereon, the needles being firmlysupported in bearing-holes in the lower mold-section 2, as indicated at 7*. I preferably employ mechanism for projecting and withdrawing the needles, which mechanism is supported upon a framework, consisting, in this instance, of a bed 9, having legs 10 and also having a depressed seat 11 for the lower mold-section 2, said section being held to said seat by one or more screws 12. Theneedles are provided with horizontal shanks or slides 13 13 14 and 14, which are mounted in ears 15, provided upon the tops of standards 16, erected upon the bed 9. Each of said needleslides is rigidly guided in its supports and is capable of horizontal movement toward and from the center of the ball-mold. The needle-operating mechanism also includes four driving-arms 17,each extending down through an opening 18 in the bed and being mounted at its lower end upon a shaft or pivot 19, mounted in lugs 20 depending from the bed. Each ofsaid driving-armshasapin connection at 21 to the needle-slide, so that by vibrating said arms the needle-slides and needles may be driven to and fro. Rearwardly-extending arms 22, rigid with the vertical arms 17, are connected by drop-links 23 to a central vertically-sliding driver 24, said links working in radial slots 24, formed on said driver and being pivoted thereto at 25. Said driver 24 is mounted to slide upon a vertical stem 26, depending from the bed 9 at the center of the system of operating-levers, and is driven upwardly by means of a lever 27, pivoted between its ends at 28 to a hanger 29, depending from the bed and carrying at its outer end a handle 30, whereby the needles may be operated in unison. Preferably a spring 31, coiled about the upper end of stem 26 and compressed between the driver 24 and the lower surface of the bed 9, acts constantly upon the driver in a direction to press the needles inwardly or toward the center of the ball-mold, and the lower end of stem 26 is threaded and provided with a nut 32 to limit the movement of the levers effected by said spring.

I preferably clamp the mold-sections 2 and 3 together by means of wing-nuts 33, working on the upper ends of vertically-threaded rods 34, which are pivoted at their lower ends in lugs 35, provided upon the lower mold-section 2, said nuts 33 bearing upon ears 36, which are provided upon the upper mold-section3, and said ears being slotted at their outer ends at 36", Fig. 5, so as to permit the clamping-rods to be cast off, thereby to release and permit removal of the upper moldsection.

The shell material may be supplied to the mold-chamber in a mobile or fluent condition by any suitable means, that illustrated here in consisting of a vertical cylindrical vessel .said pipe 39 with said chamber.

37, set upon a pedestal 88, erected upon the bed 9 and connected by a pipe 39 to the half of the ball-chamber 5 which is contained in the lower mold-section 2, said section having an inlet 40, which connects the lower end of The shell material, such as gutta-percha or celluloid, may be kept hot and fluent by means of any suitable heating device-such, for instance, as a gas-burner 41, placed beneath said vessel 37, the flame being indicated at 41 In the vessel 37 is fitted a piston 42, operated by a rod 43 or otherwise, for forcing the fluent material from the vessel through the pipe 39 into the mold at 40, one of the principal functions of the piston being to apply pressure to the fluent material after the mold is filled and maintain such pressure during the subsequent hardening of the shell.

In Fig. 2 is also indicated a vacuum-pump 44, which may be connected to a nozzle 45, inserted in the upper mold-section 3 and opening into the top ofthe mold-chamber, the opening being provided with a valve 46,whereby communication between the vacuumpump and the mold-chamber may be opened or closed. Any suitable air-exhausting apparatus may be employed, and I recommend an apparatus which includes a chamber in which a good vacuum is constantly maintained, which chamber may be put into communication with the mold'chamber at will by means of the valve 46.

In operation the clamping-rods 34 are cast off and the upper mold-section 3 is lifted or removed, as at Fig. 5, and by depression of the handle the sliding driver 24 is forced up, thrusting up all of the links 23 and arms 22 and swinging outwardly the vertical arms 17, thereby withdrawing the needles, as at Figs. 3, 4, and 5. Thereupon the rubber or other core 1 is inserted in the mold-chamber, as indicated at Fig. 4, and while it is held centrally of the chamber the handle 30 is released and the needle mechanism is forced by the spring 31 to normal position, the points of the needles preferably being caused to penetrate the core, as at Fig. 2. The four needles maintain the core immovably in the mold. The upper mold-section 3 is then replaced and by means of the rods 34 and nuts 33 is clamped firmly to the lower mold-section 2, forming a tight joint, Fig. 6. Steam or hot water is caused to circulate through one or more suitable channels 47 in the lower mold-section and 48 in the upper mold-section, so as to heat the same, although in some cases my invention may be practiced without previous heating of the mold. The valve 46 is opened, and by means of the pump 44 or other apparatus air is exhausted from the mold-chamber. Then by means of the piston 42 the fluent shell material 49 is forced down through the pipe 39 and inlet into the moldchamber 4, as at- 49, Fig. 2. When sufficient material is forced in to completely fill the chamber 4, the valve 46 is closed, and cscape of the material 49 is prevented, whereupon by means of the piston 42 great pressure is applied to the material 49 and 49,so as to compact the latter and also put the core 1 under'great compression. While this compression is maintained cold water or other fluid iscirculated through the channels 47 and 48, thereby cooling the shell material 49 to an extent to harden said shell, as at 49 Figs. 1 and 7. When the shell is sufficiently hardened to enable it to retain the core in a state of compression, the handle 30 is depressed, causing the needles to be withdrawn. The clamping-rods 34 are cast off, the upper mold-section 3 is removed, and the ball withdrawn from the lower section. If desired, the holes left by the needles may be plugged, as at 49 Fig. 1. This operation may be repeated indefinitely, the reheating of the mold at each operation through the channels 47 and 48 having the effect of reducing to a fluent condition any hardened portions of guttapercha which may be left 'in the passages from the previous operation.

It will be seen that by means of my improvements either ball shells or. complete balls may be cast in rapid succession at very low cost, that the operation is simple and the apparatus is inexpensive, that the core is accurately centered within the shell, that the liability of forming irregular air bubblesor pockets is wholly avoided, that the material of the shellis highly compacted owing particularly to the exclusion of minute air-bubbles,.which is due in a large. degree to the process of casting the shell in a vacuum, the completed shell consisting of a single homogeneous mass instead of a mixed mass of plastic material and air, that the liability is avoided of either the displacement of the core or the undue thinning of the shell at any point by reason of the existence of a large air-bubble between the core and the shell, that the liability present in welded balls of bursting of the ball at the weld is wholly avoided, that the expense of making separate half-shells and welding them together is avoided, that the liability sometimes present in laminated shells of cracking or peeling off is also avoided, and that the core is held under powerful compression by a shell which is practically unbreakable, and hence an efficient and durable ball is produced at very low cost. The cores are accurately centered within the shells, while an indefinite quantity of balls may be produced all exact duplicates in structure and quality. The herein-described machine is made the subject-matter of my pending divisional application,Serial No. l1l,264,filed June 12,1902. Many variations may be resorted to within the scope of my improvements, portions whereof may be employed in producing solid balls of gutta-percha or other plastic material, if desired. In some instances the exhaust apparatus 44 may be omitted, especially when forming shells upon cores.

Having described my invention, I claim 1. A process in producing a playing-ball, consistingin reducing gutta-percha to a fluent condition, injectingit into a separable spherical mold, subjecting it to compression while it is in the mold, and maintaining the compression while the gutta-percha hardens in the mold.

2. A process in producing a playing-ball, consisting in casting a spherical shell of guttapercha upon a core 3. A process in producing a playing-ball, consisting in castinga shell of gut-ta-percha upon a spherical core of yielding material.

4. A process in producing'a playing-ball consisting in casting a shell of gutta-percha upon a sphere of soft rubber.

5. A process in producing a playing-ball, consisting in causing gutta-percha in a fluent condition to fill a spherical mold-chamber in which a core is caused to maintain a central position, and causing said gutta-percha to harden into a shell.

6. A process in producing a complete playing-ball, consisting in suspending a core within a spherical mold-chamber of larger diameter, than said core; causing fluent gutta-p cha to fill said chamber, and causing said gutta-percha to harden.

7. A process in producing a complete playing-ball, consisting in suspending or maintaining a core centrally within a spherical mold-chamber of larger diameter, causing gutta-percha to fill said chamber, and causing said gutta-percha to harden.

ICO

8. A process in producinga complete playing-ball, consisting in suspending acore of yielding springy material within a spherical mold-chamber of greater diameter than said core, heating plastic material, causing the heated material to fill said chamber, and cooling said material.

9. A process in producing a complete playing-ball,consisting in heating plastic material, injecting it into a spherical mold, subjecting the plastic material to great pressure after the mold is filled, cooling the mold, and maintaining the pressure until the sphere hardens by cooling.

10. A process in producinga complete playing-ball, consisting in heating gutta-percha, injecting it into a spherical mold,'subjecting the gutt'a-percha to great pressure after the mold is filled, cooling the mold, and maintaining the pressure until the sphere hardens.

11. A process in producing a playing-ball, consisting in casting and simultaneously compressing a shell of plastic material upon a spherical core of yielding springy material, and hardening the shell at the time of compression, the compression being carried to such an extent that thev shell permanently holds the yielding core in a powerful grip.

12. A process in producing a playing-ball, consisting in casting and compressing a shell of gutta-percha upon a sphere of rubber.

13. A process in producinga complete playlarger diameter, causing fluent material to fill said chamber, subjecting said fluent material to pressure, and causing the material to harden while pressure is maintained.

15. A process in producing a complete play ing-ball, consisting in suspending a core within a spherical mold-chamber of greater diameter than said core, heating plastic material, causing the heated material to fill said chamber, subjecting said material to pressure, and maintaining the pressure while said material hardens bycooling; said pressure being carried to such extent that the core is held under permanent compression by the hardened shell.

16. Aprocess in producinga complete playing-ball, consisting in impaling a core centrally upon needles within a spherical moldchamber of larger diameter than said core, causing fluent material to fill said chamber, causing said fluent material to harden, withdrawing the needles, and plugging the needleholcs in the shell.

17. The process of casting a sphere of plastic material in a vacuum to form a playingball.

18. The process of casting a sphere of guttapercha in a vacuum.

19. A process in producing a playing-ball, consisting in exhausting air from a mold, and then casting a sphere of plastic material therein.

20. A process in producing a playing-ball, consisting in exhausting air from a spherical mold, and then casting a sphere of guttapercha therein.

21. A process in producing a playing-ball, consisting in exhausting air from a mold, then admitting sufficient hot plastic material to fill the mold, and then cooling the mold.

22. A process in producing a playing-ball, consisting in exhausting air from a mold, reducing plastic material to a fluid condition by means of heat, injecting sufficient plastic material into the mold to fill the same, and cooling said plastic material within the mold.

23. A process in producing a playing-ball, consisting in casting in a vacuum a spherical shell of plastic material upon a core.

24. A process in producing a playing-ball, consisting in casting in a vacuum a shell of plastic material upon a spherical core of more yielding material.

25. A process in producing a playing-ball consisting in casting in a vacuum a shell of gutta-percha upon a sphere of soft rubber.

26. A process in producing a complete playing-ball, consisting in suspending a core within a spherical mold-chamber of larger diameter than said core, exhausting the air from said chamber, causing fluent material to fill said chamber, and causing said fluent material to harden.

27. A process in producing a complete play ing-ball, consisting in suspending a core centrally within a spherical mold-chamber of larger diameter, exhausting the air from said chamber, causing gutta-percha to fill said chamber, and causing said gutta-percha to harden.

28. A process in producing a complete playing-ball, consisting in suspending a core within a spherical mold-chamber of greater diameter than said core, exhausting the air from said chamber, heating plastic material, causing the heated material to fill said chamber, and cooling said material.

29. A process in producing a playing-ball consisting in casting a sphere of plastic material in a vacuum and compressing said sphere.

30. Aprocess in producing a complete playing-ball, consisting in heating plastic material, injecting it into a spherical mold exhaustedof air, subjecting the plastic material to great pressure after the mold is filled, cooling the mold, and maintaining the pressure until the sphere hardens.

31. A process in producing a complete playing-ball, consisting in heating gutta-percha, injecting it into a spherical mold exhausted of air, subjecting the gutta-percha to great pressure after the mold is filled, cooling the mold, and maintaining the pressure until the sphere hardens.

32. A process in producing a playing-ball, consisting in casting in a vacuum and then compressing a shell of plastic material upon a spherical core.

33. A process in producing a playing-ball, consisting in casting in a vacuum and then compressing a shell of gutta-percha upon a sphere of rubber.

34. A process in producing a complete playing-ball, consisting in suspending a core within a spherical mold-chamber of larger diameter than said core, exhausting the air from said mold, causing fluent material to fill said chamber, subjecting said fluent material to pressure, and causing the material to harden while the pressure is maintained.

35. A process in producing a playing-ball, consisting in suspending a core centrally within a sperical mold-chamber of larger diameter, exhausting the air from said chamber, causing fluent material to fill said chamber, subjecting said fluent material to pressure, and causing the material to harden while pressure is maintained.

36. A process in producing a playing-ball,

consisting in suspending a core within a spherical mold-chamber of greater diameter than said core, exhausting the air from said chamber, heating plastic material, causing 5 the heated material to fill said chamber, subjecting said material to pressure, and maintaining the pressure. while said material cools and hardens; said pressure being carried to such extent that the core is held under per- .:0 manent compression by the hardened shell.

37. Aprocess in producing a playing-ball, consisting in suspending a core by means of needles within a spherical mold-chamber of larger diameter than said core, exhausting 15 the air from said chamber, causing fiuent material to fill said chamber, causing said fluent material to harden, withdrawing the needles, and plugging the needle-holes in the shell. I

38. A process in producing a playing-ball, consisting in heating a mold, filling the mold with plastic material, applying pressure to the plastic material, and cooling the moldwhile the pressure is maintained. 1 39. A process in producing a playing-ball,

consisting in heating a mold, exhausting airfrom the mold, filling the mold with plastic material, and cooling the mold.

40. A process in producing a playing-ball,

consisting in heating a mold, exhausting air b from the mold, filling the mold with plastic v material, subjecting the plastic material to compression and cooling the mold whilethe compression is maintained.

FRANCIS H. RICHARDS. Witnesses:

B. O. STIOKNEY FRED. J DOLE.

US1902108936 1902-05-26 1902-05-26 Manufacture of playing-balls. Expired - Lifetime US721462A (en)

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US2435567A (en) * 1944-10-18 1948-02-10 Columbia Protektosite Company Method and apparatus for molding wire core temples
US3074112A (en) * 1959-04-15 1963-01-22 Joseph A Bobrow Apparatus for molding an embedment within a plastic mass
US3082486A (en) * 1959-03-25 1963-03-26 Khawam Antoine Method of molding a reinforced foam article
US3270108A (en) * 1962-07-05 1966-08-30 John L Randolph Method for making bowling balls
US3340342A (en) * 1963-09-16 1967-09-05 Brunswick Corp Method of suspending a core means in a mold
US4184832A (en) * 1974-02-10 1980-01-22 Leesona Corporation Die construction
US4668460A (en) * 1985-04-02 1987-05-26 The Sherwin-Williams Company Method of molding and coating a substrate in a mold.
US4959000A (en) * 1989-10-31 1990-09-25 Acushnet Company Retractable pin mold
US5147657A (en) * 1989-10-31 1992-09-15 John Giza Retractable pin for an injection mold
US5837183A (en) * 1996-03-11 1998-11-17 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf ball molding method and apparatus
US5888437A (en) * 1992-07-06 1999-03-30 Acushnet Company Method for forming polyurethane cover on golf ball core
US6326951B1 (en) 1995-09-13 2001-12-04 Primax Electronics, Ltd. Track ball
US6328921B1 (en) 2000-02-01 2001-12-11 Callaway Golf Company De-molding method and apparatus for a golf ball
US6371870B1 (en) 1992-07-06 2002-04-16 Acushnet Company Solid golf ball with cast cover
US6379138B1 (en) 2000-11-08 2002-04-30 Acushnet Company Injection molding apparatus
US6387316B1 (en) 2000-02-01 2002-05-14 Callaway Golf Company Method of casting a thermoset layer on a golf ball precursor product
US6395218B1 (en) 2000-02-01 2002-05-28 Callaway Golf Company Method for forming a thermoset golf ball cover
US6439873B1 (en) 2000-02-01 2002-08-27 Callaway Golf Company Golf ball casting mold assembly
US6443858B2 (en) 1999-07-27 2002-09-03 Callaway Golf Company Golf ball with high coefficient of restitution
US6478697B2 (en) 1999-07-27 2002-11-12 Callaway Golf Company Golf ball with high coefficient of restitution
US6592472B2 (en) 1999-04-20 2003-07-15 Callaway Golf Company Golf ball having a non-yellowing cover
US6607686B2 (en) 1999-04-20 2003-08-19 Callaway Golf Company Thermosetting polyurethane material for a golf ball
WO2003068480A1 (en) * 2002-02-11 2003-08-21 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Apparatus for forming a golf ball with deep dimples
US6685455B2 (en) 2001-10-12 2004-02-03 Callaway Golf Company Golf ball casting mold
US20040116209A1 (en) * 2002-12-12 2004-06-17 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf ball manufacturing method
US6762273B2 (en) 2002-05-31 2004-07-13 Callaway Golf Company Thermosetting polyurethane material for a golf ball cover
US6787626B2 (en) 2002-05-31 2004-09-07 Callaway Golf Company Thermosetting polyurethane material for a golf ball cover
US20040186245A1 (en) * 1999-04-20 2004-09-23 Callaway Golf Company [GOLF BALL HAVING A POLYURETHANE COVER(Corporate Docket Number PU2163)]
US20050037865A1 (en) * 1999-07-27 2005-02-17 Callaway Golf Company Golf ball with high coefficient of restitution
US20050227790A1 (en) * 2004-04-07 2005-10-13 Callaway Golf Company Low volume cover for a golf ball
US20060043643A1 (en) * 2004-09-01 2006-03-02 Callaway Golf Company Injection Mold Assembly
US20060122008A1 (en) * 2004-12-07 2006-06-08 Callaway Golf Company Polyurethane materal for a golf ball cover
US20060122009A1 (en) * 2004-12-08 2006-06-08 Callaway Golf Company Polyurethane material for a golf ball cover
US20070042067A1 (en) * 2005-08-17 2007-02-22 Callaway Golf Company Method and Apparatus for Demolding a Golf Ball
US20080203615A1 (en) * 2007-02-26 2008-08-28 William Brum Mold for forming golf ball covers

Cited By (61)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2435567A (en) * 1944-10-18 1948-02-10 Columbia Protektosite Company Method and apparatus for molding wire core temples
US3082486A (en) * 1959-03-25 1963-03-26 Khawam Antoine Method of molding a reinforced foam article
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