US719222A - Balanced rotary engine. - Google Patents

Balanced rotary engine. Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US719222A
US719222A US7212801A US1901072128A US719222A US 719222 A US719222 A US 719222A US 7212801 A US7212801 A US 7212801A US 1901072128 A US1901072128 A US 1901072128A US 719222 A US719222 A US 719222A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
steam
piston
ports
engine
casing
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US7212801A
Inventor
Francis P Huyck
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
JOHN D R LAMSON
Original Assignee
JOHN D R LAMSON
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by JOHN D R LAMSON filed Critical JOHN D R LAMSON
Priority to US7212801A priority Critical patent/US719222A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US719222A publication Critical patent/US719222A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01CROTARY-PISTON OR OSCILLATING-PISTON MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01C1/00Rotary-piston machines or engines
    • F01C1/30Rotary-piston machines or engines having the characteristics covered by two or more groups F01C1/02, F01C1/08, F01C1/22, F01C1/24 or having the characteristics covered by one of these groups together with some other type of movement between co-operating members
    • F01C1/34Rotary-piston machines or engines having the characteristics covered by two or more groups F01C1/02, F01C1/08, F01C1/22, F01C1/24 or having the characteristics covered by one of these groups together with some other type of movement between co-operating members having the movement defined in group F01C1/08 or F01C1/22 and relative reciprocation between the co-operating members
    • F01C1/344Rotary-piston machines or engines having the characteristics covered by two or more groups F01C1/02, F01C1/08, F01C1/22, F01C1/24 or having the characteristics covered by one of these groups together with some other type of movement between co-operating members having the movement defined in group F01C1/08 or F01C1/22 and relative reciprocation between the co-operating members with vanes reciprocating with respect to the inner member
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B24GRINDING; POLISHING
    • B24BMACHINES, DEVICES, OR PROCESSES FOR GRINDING OR POLISHING; DRESSING OR CONDITIONING OF ABRADING SURFACES; FEEDING OF GRINDING, POLISHING, OR LAPPING AGENTS
    • B24B55/00Safety devices for grinding or polishing machines; Accessories fitted to grinding or polishing machines for keeping tools or parts of the machine in good working condition

Description

No. 719,222. PATENTBD JAN. 27, 1903. P. P. HUYCK'. IB'ALANGED ROTARY ENGINE- APPLIOATION FILED-AUG. 15, 1901. lo IODEL.

4. SHEETS-SHEET 1.

)lill v v frazzaez v l 2%@ 11| llll mn/Wm l" Fg-yi.

PATENTED JAN. 27, 1903. v

F. P. HUYCK.

BALANCED ROTARY ENGINE.

APPLICATION INVENTOR,

PATENTED JAN. 27, 1903.

APPLICATION FILED AUG. 15, 19Q1.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

lo no DEL.

m d w1. W if A 7J 7 ff f J. 4 al w .A 77 0u 7 f E S 0 S W 6 m. n W

ATTO R Tammo.. WASHINGTON. n. c.

No. 719,222. .PATBNTED 11111.27, 1903.

1". P. HUYOK.

BALANCED ROTARY ENGINE.

APPLICATION FILED AUG. 15. 1901.

UniTTun STaTns FnTnNT OFFICE.

FRANCIS P. I-IUYOK, OF SVVANTON, OHIO, ASSIGNOR OF ONE-HALF TO JOI-IN D. R. LAMSON, OF TOLEDO, Ol-IIO.

BALANCE@ ROTARY ENGINE.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 719,222, dated January 27, 1903.

Application led August 15, 1901. Serial No. 72,128. (No model.)

fs tu whom, t Tft/ay cm2/cern: v

Be it known that I, FRANCIS I). HUYCK, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Swanton, in the county of Fulton and State 5 of Ohio, have invented a new and Improved Balanced Rotary Engine, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

My invention relates to rotary engines, and the several objects of my improvements are io to cause the moving parts to balance each other, to render the packing more efficient, to distribute the working strain more equally, and to provide a more eficient cnt-off.

The invention consists of novel features and 1 5 parts and combinations of the same, as will be fully described hereinafter and then pointed out in the claims.

A practical embodiment of the invention is represented in the accompanying drawings, 2o forming a part of this specification, in which similar characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in all the views.

Figure 1 is a vertical section on the line 5c o' of Fig. 6 looking in the direction ot' the ar- 25 row. Fig. 2 is a section on the line oc of Fig.'G looking in the direction of the arrow. Fig. 3 is a detail showing the packing for rendering the movable parts steam-tight. Fig. 4; is adetail showing the piston or member which receives the steam-pressure proper. Fig. 5 is a detail showing the packings used at the ends of this piston. Fig. 6 is a side elevation of the engine. Fig. 7 is a plan of the engine. Fig. 8 is an elevation of the back side of the engine. Figtl is a detail showing the steam -ports and their connections as viewed from the center of the engine. Fig. 10 is a section on the line line :r2 r2 of Fig. 9 looking in the direction of the arrow. Fig. 11 is a section through the line y y of Fig. 3. The engine proper is mounted upon aframe 1. Two semicylindrical members 2 2 are moved asnnder, and sandwiched between them are spacing-blocks 3', by means ot which the parts taken together form an oval casing. Preferably the parts 2 are made in halves, so as to constitute a perfect cylinder which is bored in the usual manner, and the spacing-blocks 3 are afterward sandwiched between them. The semicylindrical parts terminate in flanges 3 and 4, to which are secured the casing-heads 5 and 6 by means of the bolts 7 in the usual manner. The bolts 8 pass vertically through holes made for the purpose, and thus connect the upper, middle, and lower parts of the casing together, making them practically integral.

EJ is a rotary shaft which passes diametrically through the casing and is supported in appropriate journals 59. It carries the y- 6o wheel and the governor-wheel 46. The rotary member 10 is secured upon the shaft 9 by means of the key 11 and is provided with longitudinal channels 12, which extend entirely across the cylinder. Normally rest- 615 ing in these channels 12 are two longitudinal shoes 12:3, which are mounted upon the universal joints 15 upon the pistons 47, which are in turn mounted upon the ribs or trusses 14, which are journaled at 16 in the revolu- 7o ble member. By means ofthe spring 17 these pistons are thrown outward, so that the shoes 13 are pressed outward against the casing, so as to tit the same steam-tight. The centrifugal force used in the rotation of the rotary mem beralso facilitates this action. The rotary member is provided with curved grooves or guideways 18, which have the general form of a mutilated cylinder, so that the curved pistons 47 tit into them precisely. When the 8o pistons are rocked back and forth, so that the shoes 13 alternately move into the channels 12 and out against the casing, the pistons 117', notwithstanding their curvature, move smoothly in and out of the guideways 18. The rotary cylinder 10 is braced by means of integral spokes 19. The ports where the steam is admitted are shown at 20. The ports of exit are shown, at 2l. The packing 2 is flexible, but is normally inert. Live eo steam from the port 2O is admitted through the channel 23 to the rear of this packing, whereby the packing is forced into proximity with the rotary cylinder,thereby rendering the same steam-tight. It will be noticed thatthe steam is admitted above this packing on the right-hand side of Fig. 1 and below the packing on the left-hand side of this figure. At

24 are the apertures through which the steam is immediately admitted upon leaving the roo steam-chest 26. This steam-chest 26 is provided interiorly with an annular space 25.

(Shown more particularly in Figs. 1 and 10.) The cylindrical sliding valves 27 are provided with apertures 28, which at certain times during the stroke register with the apertures 24 in the steam-chest. The sliding valves are actuated by means of valve-stems 29, which are connected to the cranks 30, these cranks being mounted upon rocking shafts 31, so that the rocking of the shafts causes the reciprocation of the valves. At the back of the engine, as shown more particularly in Fig. 8, the rocking shafts 31 are provided with a crank 32 and a crank-disk 33, which are provided, 1'espectively,\\'ith crank-pins 34 and 35. Upon the disk is another crank-pin 3G. The crank-pins 34 and 35 are connected by means of a connecting-rod 37, andthe crankpin 36 is engaged by an eccentric-rod 38, terminating at the otherend in an eccentric-strap 39, which is mounted upon the eccentric 40. This eccentric 40 is not secured rigidly to the rotary shaft 9, but is movable relatively to the same and is rigidly secured to the movable frame 41. This frame 41 slides upon guidepins 42 and. moves upon these pins, so as to carry with it within certain limits the eccentric 40. Pivoted to this frame 41 are two rods 43, which are likewise pivoted to the centrifugal weights 44, so that when these weights are thrown outward by centrifugal force the frame 41 is moved downward from its position shown in Fig. 8, its immediate travel being toward the center of the machine. As this frame is moved by the centrifugal force of the weights, the eccentric 40, being. carried with it across the center of the shaft, is immediately changed relatively to the center shaft 9, and the throw of the eccentricrod 38 is thereby shortened. As shown in Fig. 8, the eccentric-rod 33 has a maximum of throw; but when the weights 44 are thrown outward to the greatest extent the eccentricrod 38 has the minimum of throw. The outer ends of the weights 44 are secured together by a spring 45, and upon the tension of this spring depends the speed of the engine, because the stronger the tension of the spring the greater the effort required to throw the weights asunder, and thereby change the throw of the valve by governing the arcs in which the crank-pins 35 36 rock.

Upon the ends of the piston 47 are two packings 47, secured in position by screws 43, as shown more particularly in Figs. 4 and 5. These packings are for the purpose of rendering the piston steam-tight at the ends. The shoes 13 are provided with curved surfaces 50, which correspond with the curvature of the parts of the casing 23, and with dat surfaces 51, which correspond with the inner fiat surfaces of the casing 3. Theses hoes 13 are made extensible, as shown in Fig. 3 and Fig. 11. This is done by separating each shoe into two members and coring each member so as to permit insertion of the plug 50', which not only touches the joint 15, but grazes the edge of one of the surfaces 50.

vBy this means the shoe 13 is rendered not only flexible in the direction of its length, but the joint is effectually rendered steamtight by the plug. The spring 51 is normally compressed when the shoe is in position, so as to force asunder the two members with a gentle pressure. The surfaces 50 are each provided with oil-grooves 49 for purposes of lubrication. Live steam is admitted through the pipe 52 and passes downward through one steam-chest and the pipe 53, then upward to the other steam-chest. The exhaust-ports 21 lead to the chambers 57 and then to the exhaust-pipes 54 55, which are connected to a larger exhaust-pipe 56. The braces 58 serve to make the casing stronger and to prevent undue strains. By releasing the bolt 61 access to the steamchest is facilitated. By means of bolts 62, passing through holes G3, the several parts of the rotary member 10 are held together.

The operation of my device is as follows: Steam being admitted through the inlet-pipe 52 and passing through the valves enters the respective inlet-ports and engages the pistons, which, as above explained, are steam-tight. The stationary packings 22,actuated bysteam, as above described, render the central rotary cylinder steam-tight, and when the steam encounters the pistons 47 it of course drives the cylindrical rotary member around. The springs 17, together with the centrifugal force, cause the pistons 47 to swing outward, so that the shoes 13 engage the casing steam-tight. The maximum steam-pressure is exerted upon the pistons when they occupy the respective top and bottom central portions of the casing, and of course there is no surface exposed to pressure of the steam when the pistons are at right angles with this position. The result is that as soon as the shoes 13 uncover the live-steam ports 20 the power gradually increases until it reaches a maximum and then gradually decreases until it reaches a minimum; but as the engine drives a light iy-Wheel the motion is rendered substantially uniform. The dead-centers being short, a heavy fly-wheel of the kind used in reciprocating engines is not necessary.

It will be noticed that every movable part of the mechanism isthus balanced and that the centrifugal force pulling different parts asunder balances itself, and the steam-pressures affecting the movable parts also balance each other. The valves 27 perform the office of cut-offs for the purpose of utilizing the local expansive force of the steam. It will be noticed that as the eccentric 40 (shown in Fig. 8) is actuated by the weights 44, and the rocking shaft 3l is thereby given a `different degree of play, the valves 27 have a different throw in consequence. The apertures 28 in the valve and the apertures 24 leading to the engine proper register with each other exactly under certain conditions; but as the play of the valves is controlled by the governor it is clear that the registry 0f the aper- IOO IIO

tures 28 and 24 varies with the speed of the engine. When the speed is very great and the eccentric 40 is substantially concentric with the shaft 9, so that the rocking shafts 3l have little play, it is clear that little steam will be admitted and that the engine must slow np. Vice versa, when the governor is in the position shown in Fig. 8 the cut-olf valves have a maximum of throw and the apertures are made to register exactly twice during each stroke, so that a maximum quantity of steam is admitted and the engine must therefore quicken its pace. It will be observed, therefore, that this particular type of governor has va peculiar relation to cut-off valves such as no other governor would have.

The piston is one of the prominent features of my invention. The web 47 is cored out for the purpose of making it light, and the ribs or trusses 14 are built in a form calenlated to secure a maximum of stiffness and strength and a minimum of weight.

The rocking shaft 16 is provided with a long wearing-surface to insure durability.

It will be observed that my valve-gear is one of unusualefciency. Byits use the ports are opened precisely at the same time, admitting steam against the pistons while exactly in the same position regardless of the length of time the valves remain open. This is done by the control of the governor. In some other forms of gear the time of opening ports is changed when the closing time is changed. The effect of this is to make the opening too early or too late against the pistons as they pass the ports. To thus make the ports both open at exactly the same time, as in my construction, regardless of the length of time the valves remain open is an important feature.

By virtue of the balancing effect above mentioned not only does the centrifugal force neutralize itself, but the engine is so arranged that any tendency to displacement of any part by steam-pressure is exactly met by a contrary steam-pressure, so that in all respects the engine balances itself'exactly.

It may sometimes be advisable to use live steam, especially in the larger machines, instead of the springs above described. When this is the case, I simply run a small pipe provided with a cock from the supply-pipe at a point above the throttle-valve to one of the cylinder-heads, near the hub thereof. By this means both in starting and in stopping I allow live steam to enter the piston-hub independently of the throttle-valve to throw the pistons outward and into contact with the oval casing. Of course after starting I shut off this independent supply of steam as soon as centrifugal force acts upon the pistons so as to keep them thrown outward.

Having thus fully described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent- 1. In a rotary engine, the combination of a revoluble member provided with radial guideways each terminating at its outer end in an enlarged transverse groove, a casing, swinging piston members pivoted in said revoluble member and having pressure sections arranged to travel in said guideways and project through said grooves, and shoes loosely connected to said pressure-sections and arranged to be received within said grooves and to lie iiush with the revoluble member on the retraction of the swinging piston members.

2. In a rotary engine, the combination of a revoluble member having external transverse grooves in its exposed surface, and a series of curved guideways lying in generally radial directions and intersecting with said grooves, said grooves being wider than the guideways, swinging piston members pivoted in said revoluble member at points concentric with said guideways and having pressure-sections arranged to travel in said guideways, and shoes loosely connected to said pressure members and arranged to be received in said grooves, each shoe being extensible.

3. In a rotary engine, a skeletonized piston member cast in a single piece and comprising a pivotal shaft or rod, a solid or imperforate pressure-section disposed longitudinally to said shaft or rod and ata distance therefrom, and a series of spaced arms arranged at an angle to the pressure-section and integral with said shaft and the pressuresection, in combination with a casing, and a revoluble piston member adapted to carry a series of said swinging members.

4. In a rotary engine, a swinging piston member having a solid pressure-section joined by a series of angular-1y disposed arms to a pivotal rod or shaft, an extensible shoe at the exposed edge of the pressure section, and packings fitted to the end portions of said solid pressure-section, combined with a casing, and a revoluble member arranged to carry a series of said swinging members.

5. In a rotary engine, an extensible pistonshoe comprising members arranged endwise to eachother, and a cylindrical plug coupling said members together and arranged to open through the active surface of the shoe, combined with a casing, a revoluble piston member, and movable piston members each arranged to carry one of said piston-shoes.

6. In a rotary engine, an extensible pistonshoe comprising members arranged in opposing endwise relation and provided with a curved active face, and aplug socketed in the opposing ends of said shoe members and coupling them together, combined with a casing, a revoluble piston member, and movable piston members each arranged to carry one of said piston-shoes.

7. In a rot-ary engine, an extensible pistonshoe comprising members coupled together for endwise movement, each shoe member having its active face formed with a fiat portion between curved side portions thereof, and said curved portions of the shoe-face provided with lubricating-channels, combined with a casing, a revoluble piston member,

IOO

IIO

abutments arranged for the iiat face of each piston-shoe to traverse the same, and swinging piston members each having pivotal connection With one piston-shoe.

8. In a rotary engine, a valve-chest having a surrounding annular live-steam space in communication With the valve-chamber of said chest, a series of inlet-ports supplied with steam from the annular space, the exhaustports, a packing-space which is disposed between the two series of respective inlet and exhaust ports, packings in said space and arranged to be exposed Within the piston-chainber, and a valve operable in the valve-chamber of said chest, combined with a piston-casing, and a revoluble piston therein.

9. A rotary engine having a casing, au engine-shaft, a revoluble piston therein, vertical valve-chests disposed on opposite sides of the axis of rotation of said piston and each having connections with a common source of live-steam supply and adapt-ed to maintain equal pressures in said chests, the exhaust and live steam ports to said piston-casing, valve shafts mounted transversely in said chests, tubular valves fitted slidably in the chests andl provided with ports arranged to simultaneously register with said inlet-ports of the chests and having operative connection with the shafts to be given equal travel thereby, means connecting said valve-shafts, and a governor on the engine-shaft and connected with one valve-shaft.

10. A rotary engine comprising a cylinder, a :revoluble piston therein, valve-chests disposed on opposite sides of the cylinder and each having inlet and exhaust ports in cornmunication with the cylinder, said ports being separated byintervening abutments normally engaged by said piston, cylindrical valves reciprocable in the valve-chests to cut off the supply to the inlet-ports and each having ports arranged to supply live motive fluid to the inlet-ports, a governor, and crank connections actuated by the governor and connected with said cylindrical Valves; said crank connections imparting motion to the Valves to positively open the inlet-ports at fixed periods and to close the ports at variable periods.

11. A rotary engine comprising a cylinder, a revoluble piston therein, valve-chests on opposite sides of the cylinder and each having. a series of inlet-ports and a series of exhaustports, the ports of the tWo series being separated by an intermediate abutment and each chest being also provided with a surrounding channel Which communicates with the inletports only, hollow cylindrical valves slidable inthe chests and each having ports arranged at one period ofthe valve to register With the surrounding channel of the chest, crankshafts linked to said valves, and a governor having crank connections with said shafts; the shafts serving to simultaneously actuate said valves for opening the ports at fixed intervals and to close the ports at variable intervals.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this speciication in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

FRED. E. PILLIoD, DAVID HUYCK.

US7212801A 1901-08-15 1901-08-15 Balanced rotary engine. Expired - Lifetime US719222A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US7212801A US719222A (en) 1901-08-15 1901-08-15 Balanced rotary engine.

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US7212801A US719222A (en) 1901-08-15 1901-08-15 Balanced rotary engine.

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US719222A true US719222A (en) 1903-01-27

Family

ID=2787738

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US7212801A Expired - Lifetime US719222A (en) 1901-08-15 1901-08-15 Balanced rotary engine.

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US719222A (en)

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2853978A (en) * 1956-03-05 1958-09-30 Elmer D Smyser Improved fluid motor
US2882868A (en) * 1955-06-07 1959-04-21 Elmer D Smyser Fluid motor
US3938478A (en) * 1974-04-29 1976-02-17 Piper Jack N Rotary internal combustion engine
US7395805B1 (en) 2005-10-31 2008-07-08 Macmurray Seth Single cycle elliptical rotary engine
US20100170469A1 (en) * 2009-01-06 2010-07-08 Scott Hudson Rotary energy converter with retractable barrier

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2882868A (en) * 1955-06-07 1959-04-21 Elmer D Smyser Fluid motor
US2853978A (en) * 1956-03-05 1958-09-30 Elmer D Smyser Improved fluid motor
US3938478A (en) * 1974-04-29 1976-02-17 Piper Jack N Rotary internal combustion engine
US7395805B1 (en) 2005-10-31 2008-07-08 Macmurray Seth Single cycle elliptical rotary engine
US20100170469A1 (en) * 2009-01-06 2010-07-08 Scott Hudson Rotary energy converter with retractable barrier
US8286609B2 (en) 2009-01-06 2012-10-16 Scott Hudson Rotary energy converter with retractable barrier
US8613270B2 (en) 2009-01-06 2013-12-24 Scott Hudson Rotary energy converter with retractable barrier
US9394790B2 (en) 2009-01-06 2016-07-19 Scott E. Hudson Rotary energy converter with retractable barrier
US10208598B2 (en) 2009-01-06 2019-02-19 Scott Hudson Rotary energy converter with retractable barrier
US10830047B2 (en) 2009-01-06 2020-11-10 Scott Hudson Rotary energy converter with retractable barrier

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US710756A (en) Rotary engine.
US122713A (en) Improvement in rotary engines
US955896A (en) Fluid-motor.
US674258A (en) Rotary engine.
US822700A (en) Rotary engine.
US137261A (en) Improvement in rotary steam-engines
US621193A (en) Rotary engine
US763963A (en) Rotary engine.
US342721A (en) Steam-motor
US1024098A (en) Oscillating engine.
US309734A (en) oehlmann
US734533A (en) Steam-engine.
US565845A (en) douglas
US1046170A (en) Steam-engine.
US398143A (en) Steam-engine
US563814A (en) Rotary steam-engine
US669000A (en) Rotary engine.
US617529A (en) Motive engine
US263573A (en) Rotary engine
US470978A (en) Valve for engines
US788390A (en) Rotary motor.
US780640A (en) Rotary engine.
US781342A (en) Rotary engine.
US285271A (en) Steam-engine
US263505A (en) A lex andes