US714036A - Grinding-machine. - Google Patents

Grinding-machine. Download PDF

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US714036A
US714036A US11231502A US1902112315A US714036A US 714036 A US714036 A US 714036A US 11231502 A US11231502 A US 11231502A US 1902112315 A US1902112315 A US 1902112315A US 714036 A US714036 A US 714036A
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work
grinding
holder
movement
machine
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US11231502A
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Charles F Roper
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DRAPER CO
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DRAPER CO
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B24GRINDING; POLISHING
    • B24BMACHINES, DEVICES, OR PROCESSES FOR GRINDING OR POLISHING; DRESSING OR CONDITIONING OF ABRADING SURFACES; FEEDING OF GRINDING, POLISHING, OR LAPPING AGENTS
    • B24B13/00Machines or devices designed for grinding or polishing optical surfaces on lenses or surfaces of similar shape on other work; Accessories therefor
    • B24B13/02Machines or devices designed for grinding or polishing optical surfaces on lenses or surfaces of similar shape on other work; Accessories therefor by means of tools with abrading surfaces corresponding in shape with the lenses to be made

Description

Z 0 m 8 V o .N d B t e a P .L m H C MA. I On 6 FW .0 B G & 3 M 7 0 N (Application filed June 19, 1902.1
4 5heets-Sheet 2.
No Model.)
MMSBS,
.No. 714,036; Patented Nov. l8. I902.
' c. F. norm Gmunme MACHINE.
(Application filed l'une 19, 1902.) (No Model.) 4 Sheets-Shet I.
No. 714,036. Patented Nov. l8, I902.
C. F. ROPEB. GRINDING MACHINE.
(Application filed Jun 19, 1902.1
4 Sheets-Sheet 3..
(No Model.)
all/11,111,.
No. 7l4,036.
Patented Nov. I8, |9o2. e. F. ROPER. GRINDING MACHINE.
(No Model.)
(Application filed June 19, 1902.|
4 Sheets-She'd 4.
X .76 6 a 31? ad f yllllll/lllll /llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll m wosfms PETERS do. PNOTO-UINQ. yvu Inn-m u C 'UNITED STATES -ATENT FFICE.
CHARLES F. ROPER, 0F HOPEDALE, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNOR TO DRAPER COMPANY, OF HOPEDALE, MASSACHUSETTS, A CORPO- GRINDING- MACHINE.
JPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 714,036, dated. November 18, 1902.
Application filed June 19 1902.
To all whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, CHARLES F. ROPER, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Hopedale, county of Worcester, State of Massachusetts, have invented an Improvement in Grinding-Machines, of which the following description, in connection with the accompanying drawings, is a specification, like characters on the drawings representing like parts.
This invention relates to grinding-machines adapted to grind the cylindrical end or ends of an article to a conical or tapered shape, and in the present embodiment of my invention I have shown a machine particularly adapted for grinding the ends of a spinning spindle-blade.
It is customary to point the ends of the spindle-blade, the tip thereof being permitted to retain its conical shape; but the opposite end of the blade is usually flattened after pointing to present a frusto-conical shape, such end being supported by a suitable step when the spindleis in use. Such pointing of the ends of the spindle-blade has heretofore been accomplished by hollow mills; but certain objections pertain to such practice, and I have invented a grinding-machine for shaping or pointing the ends of the spindle'blade by grinding, and in the machine to be hereinafter described the movement of the blank during the grinding is automatically controlled, so that as the grinding progresses the desired taper is effected. I have also in the present embodiment of my invention provided for simultaneously grinding the opposite ends of the blank, (generically designated the work,) and when a predetermined grinding has been eifected the work is automatically moved out of the field of action of the grinding-surface.
As will appear fully hereinafter, the insertion of the workinto the work-holder and the movement of the latter to present the work to the grinder are the only manual operations in the process until the grinding is completed, the work-holder automatically returning thereafter into position for the finished work to be removed and a new piece to be inserted.
Various adjustments are provided to ac- Serial No. 112,315. (No model.)
commodate the machine to spindle-blades of different sizes and means are provided for automatically equalizing the wear upon the grinding-surfaces.
These and other novel features of myinvention will be hereinafter described in the subjoined specification, and particularly pointed out in the following claims.
Figure l is a top or plan view of a grinding-machine embodying one form of my invention, the work-holder being Shown in position to receive the work. Fig. 2 is a front elevation thereof. Fig. 3is a right-hand end elevation of the machine illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2, the power-transmitting belts being omitted for the sake of clearness of illustration. Fig. 4 is a longitudinal vertical section of the work-holder, taken on the line :0 00, Fig. 1, the work being indicated by dotted lines. Fig. 5 is an enlarged detail, in plan and partly broken out,of the device for effecting the opening of the clamping means of the Work-holder. Fig. 6 is a longitudinal Sectional detail on the line no 00', Fig. 1, of one of the grinders and the supporting means therefor. Fig. 7 is an enlarged front elevation of the means for automatically controlling the bodily movement of the Work-holder, the movable pattern and the actuating mechanism therefor being clearly shown. Fig. 8 is a sectional view thereof on the line m 00 Fig. '7, looking toward the left. Fig. 9 is a side elevation of a spindle-blank ready to be ground at its ends, and Fig. 10 is a similar View of the blank after its ends have been pointed by grinding by the machine herein illustrated. Figs. 11 and 12 are enlarged sectional details of one of the chuck-bodies and its corresponding collet or work-clamp, respectively.
The frame of the machine is of suitable shape and size to properly support the operating parts and comprises, essentially,a heavy bed A, having a central longitudinally-extended and raised portion A, on which the work-holder is mounted, and oppositely extended, but non-alined parallel wings A A I At its rear end the bed has erected upon it two l ike standards A, provided with bearings for a shaft B, provided with a pulley B, adapted to be driven from any suitable source of power by a belt, (not shown,) said shaft having fast upon it two like eccentrics B B provided, respectively, with straps b b said shaft being shown in Fig. 1 as parallel to the wings A A the eccentrics being mounted on the shaft outside the standards and near its ends. The said wings are of like construction and each one supports a grinder, and inasmuch as the latter and their supports are alike it will only be necessary to describe in detail one of said Wings and the parts mounted thereupon, the two grinders, however, being indicated by the letters G G for convenience. Each wing has on its top two parallel undercut ribs a, extending the length thereof and forming a guideway or track for a cradle 0, its foot resting on and being slidable upon the top of the wing and having a longitudinal mortise to embrace the ribs a. (See dotted lines, Fig. 3.) The ends of the cradle are upturned at c to form bearings for a fulcrum shaft or pin O which is extended through a hole in the lower end of a rocking head O, inserted between the ends 0 of the cradle and made rigid with the fulcrum member by a set-screw c, Fig. '2. A Washer 0 surrounding the reduced outer end 0 of the fulcrum member, is held against the outer face of the adjacent upturned end 0 of the cradle by check-nuts c screwed upon the reduced end, which is threaded, so that wear can be compensated for between the contracting portions of the cradle and head. A bracket 0 secured to the outer end of the wing, is upturned to provide a bearing 0, Fig. 6, for an adjusting-screw 0 a collar 0 and head c, fast thereon on opposite sides of the bearing, preventing longitudinal movement of the screw, the inner end of which extends between the ribs a and engages a threaded nut 0 secured to the bottom of the cradle and depending between the ribs. By rotating the screw the cradle and the vparts supported thereon can be moved in or out longitudinallyof the wing to move the grindingsurfaces toward or from each other, according to the length of the work and the angle to be ground.
Referring more particularly now to Fig. 6, each of the rocking heads C is upturned at its ends, as at c 0 to receive journal-boxes 0 0 respectively held in place by suitable caps 12 and 13, and in these boxes the grindershaft is rot-atably mounted. This grindershaft G is provided at its end nearest the grinder with two annular enlarged shoulders 15 and 16 to cooperate with corresponding annular recesses in the adjacent end of the journal-box C and said shaft is reduced in thickness at g to leave an annular shoulder 17, and a pulley Gr is splined onto the shaft and butted against the shoulder 17, the hub of the pulley at the end adjacent the journal-box 0 being shouldered, as shown in Fig. 6, to correspond with the recessed end of the journal-box. Beyond the pulley the shaft G is provided with annular shoulders 18 and 19 to cooperate with corresponding recesses in the inner end of the journal-box 0 the reduced part g of the shaft rotating in the journal-box. An annular collar 9 is screwed onto the extremity of the part g of the grinder-shaft, which is threaded for the purpose, and check-nuts 9' hold said collar in place against the outer end of the journalbox C The arrangement of parts is such that the entrance of grit or dustand dirt into the hear ing for the grinder-shaft is made very difficult and practically prevented, so that the wear is reduced to a minimum. It is necessary to protect the bearings of the grindershaft, inasmuch as they are so close to the grinding-surface.
Each grinder is shaped, as shown in Figs. 3 and 6, to present an annular fiat grindingsurface g and the grinder is secured to the shaft by a screw-stud g, which is screwed into the larger end of the grinder-shaft, passing througha central hole in the grinder, and awasher g is interposed between the bottom of the circular recess g in the grinder and a check-nut ghwhich is screwed onto the threaded outer end of the screw-stud g. The grinder is thus rigidly secured to the grinder-shaft, but can be readily removed therefrom when worn or otherwise and a new grinder substituted.
Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, it will be seen that the grinding-surfaces of the two grinders (l (5} are located in parallel planes and that the axes of rotation of the two grinders are in parallelism, but non-alined. The rocking head 0, which is mounted on the wing A has one of its upturned portions 0 provided with ears 0 between which is pivotally connected by a stud b a link 6 the free end thereof being adjustably connected by a turnbuckle Z9 with the arm (3 of the eccentric-strap 19 so that by means of the eccentric B the grinder G will be reciprocated by or through the rotation of the shaft B. The upturned portion of the rocking head 0, which is mounted on the wing A, is provided with ears 0 (see Fig. 1) to receive between them a link Z7 pivotally connected with the ears by a stud b and adj ustably connected by a turnbuckle Z2 with an arm b secured to and forming a part of the eccentric-strap b The turnbuckles b b are alike, and so, too, are the eccentric-straps and the eccentrics B B but owing to the nearness of the wing A to the shaft B the link 12 is much shorter than the link 5 connected with the other grinder.
By the connections described the grinders are continuously reciprocated during the operation of the machine, while their grindingsurfaces are maintained in parallel vertical planes.
By means of the turnbuckles the paths of movement of the grinders can be adjusted or changed to accommodate the work, the reciprocation of the grinding-surface while the grinder is rotated serving to equalize the wear upon the acting'or grinding surface, and thereby prevents scoring or ridging thereof.
If the grinders are bodily adjusted in or out.
on the supporting-wings of the frame, the eccentrics B B will be correspondingly adjusted on the actuating-shaft B.
The raised will hereinafter appear, means are provided for automatically clamping the work in the work-holder by or through its movement from normal or work receiving and discharging position into position to present the work to the grinding-surfaces and to effect automatically the unclamping of the work when the work-holder is swung back into work receiving or discharging position.
Referring more particularly to the vertical longitudinal sectional view of the work-holder in Fig. 4, a turn-table W, having a longitudinally extended top W rigidly secured thereto, is pivotally connected by avertical turret-bolt W with the part A of the bed, the turn-table being recessedto receive the head to of the turret-bolt, which latter is shouldered at w and threaded at its lower end to receive set-nuts 10 which act upon a washer tu the turret bolt being thereby clamped to the top of the part A. The head W of the turn-table is provided with parallel longitudinal undercut guideways 1.0 (see Figs. 1, 2,' and 4,) said guideways being interrupted midway between their ends to receive between'them a transverse block w having a recess in its top' for a purpose to be described, the block 10 being secured to'the head of the turn-table by suitable screws, as 6. Upright chuck-brackets W -are mounted to slide on the guideways 10 and by referring to Fig. 4 it will be seen that these chuckbrackets are alike in their general shape and construction, the foot of each bracket being mortised to embrace the guideways, and a right and left hand threaded adjusting-screw Q05 engages threaded nuts 10 secured to the foot of each bracket and depending between the guideways w l' The adjusting-screw is provided with fixed collars w on each side of the transverse block w, the recess in the top of the latter serving as a seat for the cylindrical part of the adjusting-screw between the two collars, the block cooperating with the collars to prevent longitudinal movement of the screw. vBy rotating the latter in one direction or the other the chuck-brackets W will be moved toward or from each other to adjust the work-holder to the length of the work, and Ihave herein shown the adjustingscrew as nicked at its ends, as at 10 whereby by means of a screw-driver the screw may be rotated to efiect the desired adjustment of and longitudinally extended. central portion A of the bed has mounted the chuck-brackets. Each chuck-bracket at its upper end is provided with a bearing to" for the body of the chuck to be described, a cap w completing the bearing or seat for the said chuck-body, the longitudinal axes of the two chuck-bodies being in alinement and in a longitudinal plane intersecting the longitudinal center of the turret-bolt W. Each chuck-body comprises a sleeve w", Figs. 4 and 11, having at its inner end a broad annular flange 10 and near its outer end a narrower annular flange w, and between the flanges a bushing of bronze or other suitable metal 10 surrounds the chuck-body interposed between it and the bearing and cap of each chuck-bracket. An annularly-grooved pulley w is rigidly secured upon the inner flange 20 to rotate therewith, and beyond the outer flange w the chuck-body is extended, as at w", to receive a chuck-cap w rigidly secured in any suitable manner thereto. Longitudinal movement of the chuck in the bracket W is prevented by means of the pulley Z016 and the inner end of the chuck-cap 10 as will be manifest by an inspection of Fig. 4. A collet or work-clamp 7.0 is mounted in each chuckbody, the collet or clamp being shaped interiorly to accommodate the work, in this instance a spindle blade or blank, and it is longitudinally split, so that when the clamp or collet is moved outward the elasticity of the metal thereof will cause it to spring out or open to release or unclamp the Work. Each collet or clamp at its inner end has rigidly secured to it a sleeve 10 (see Fig. 12,) concentric therewith and extending into the interior of the chuck-body 1.0 which latter is of sufficiently large internal diameter to receive a strong coiled spring 8 surrounding the collet, the outer end of the spring bearing against an internal shoulder 10 formed on the chuck-body, the opposite end of the spring bearing against the inner end of the sleeve 10 and normally tending to retract the collet or clampw into the position shown in Fig. 4; to contract the same and clamp the work. Manifestly if the collets or clamps are moved outwardly in opposition to the stress of their springs s the resiliency of the metal of which the clamps are composed will operate to open them to release the work. Each ch uck-bracket W has secured to it on its inner upright side an ear 1.022, on which is fulcrumed at 10 an upright lever 11), having its upper end bifurcated or forked, as at 10 to straddle or loosely surround the work when the latter is in position, the bifurcated part of the lever bearing against the inner end of the adjacent collet or clamp, and the lower or depending end of each lever engages the inner headed end of a plunger 20 mounted to slide longitudinally in the lower part of each chuck-bracket, the outer ends of the two plungers projecting beyond the brackets, as clearly shown in Fig. 4:. I have provided means for automatically engaging and pushing the plungers r0 inward when the work- ICO holder is bodily swung upon its fulcrum W into position to receive or discharge the work, and an enlarged detail in plan of one of these devices is shown in Fig. 5. An upright post D is rigidly secured to the part A of the bed at each end thereof, and upon the top of each of these stands is pivotally mounted at d a horizontally-swinging arm d, the free end of each arm having pivotally connected to it at d a short arm d cut away at its inner end at d to leave a projecting end or shoulder d, and a spring s (see Fig. 5) is interposed between the pivoted end of the short arm d and a socket in the arm at, the spring acting to normally swing the short arm into the position shown in Fig. 5. The short arms d are located in the horizontal paths of movement of the outer ends of the plunger-510 one arm for and to cooperate at times with each plunger, and an adjustable stop-screw d is horizontally mounted in an upturned standard D forming a part of the bracket or casting D which carries the post D and so located that the inner end of the stop-screw will be behind and closely adjacent the pivoted end of the short arm (1*. (See Fig. 3.) Now when the work-holder is swung from its operative position, which is at an angle to the position shown in Fig. 1, toward the position shown in Fig. l the projecting ends @0 of the plungers will be moved into engagement with the cut-away ends (1 of the two short arms 61 and the latter will be swung on their fulcra (1 against the stress of their springs 3 as the work-holder approaches the position shown in Fig. 1, the stop-screws d preventing any swinging movement of the arms (1, and when the Work-holder assumes the position shown in Fig. 1 the arms d will be substantially in alinement with the two plungers w, and by such movement of the arms (1 from the position shown in Fig. 5 they will act with the plungers as a species of toggle-joint and will gradually force the plungers inward, to thereby rock the upturned levers 20 on their fulcra and move the collets or work-clamps w outwardly relatively to the chuck-bodies to re-.
lease or unclamp the work, and the completed work can then be removed from thechucks and another piece of work inserted. Supposing a blank, such as shown in Fig. 9, having been inserted in the work-holder, such insertion being efiected by pushing it longitudinally through the open clamps rearwardly until the inner end of the blank engages a stop-gage, to be described, so that the blank will assume the dotted-line position shown in Fig. 4, the operator by means to be described swings the work-holder bodily to present the work to the grinding-surfaces, and as the work-holder is thus swung the plungers @0 pass from engagement with the arms d of the releasing devices, hereinbefore described, and the strong springs s, Fig. 4, immediately operate to retract the collets or clamps into the chuckbodies and firmly clamp the work in the chucks to be rotated bodily therewith, the
clamping of the work being efiec'ted before the Work is presented to the grinding-surfaces G G The head XV is secured by bolts 8, Fig. 1, to the turn-table, and the latter has rigidly secured to it a handle W which is moved in the direction of the arrow 10 by the operator to swing the work-holder to present the work to the grinding-surfaces, such swinging movement of the work-holder being resisted by a strong spring S, attached at one end to the base of the handle and at its other end toa fixed pin 100. (See Fig.1.) A sizegage H is adjustably secured by a set-screw h to the top of the part D of the front bracket D in the horizontal path of movement of the outer end of the work when the work-holder is swung to prevent such swinging movement if a blank of improper length is inserted in the work-holder, and on the part D of the rear bracket D a stop-gage H is adjustably mounted by means of a set-screw h and in the path of movement of the inner or rear end of the work when inserted in the workholder. This stop-gage indicates to the operator when the blank or spindle-blade is properly positioned in the work-holder, the acting end of the gage being concaved, .as at h, on a circle having as its center the center of the turret-bolt W.
Referring to Fig. 1, it will be noticed that the size-gage H is oifset from the longitudinal center of the chucks when the work-holder is in position to receive or discharge the work in order to permit the operator to handle the work, and the acting end of the gage is also concave, as at h to permit the outer end of the work to swing clear of the same when the work-holder is swung.
When the work has been presented to the grinding-surfaces by the described manual movement of the work-holder, the grinding operation begins, and as UlJGWOIlC is ground away the work-holder must be moved to keep the work up to the grinding-surface until the desired shape or taperof the ends of the work has been attained, and I have herein devised means for automatically controlling the swinging movement of the work-holder for this purpose, the construction being such that the movement of the work-holder to opera tively position the work enables the automatic means to automatically assume control of the work-holder.
As will appear hereinafter, when the grinding has been completedthat is, when the predetermined taper has been imparted to the ends of the work-the work-holder is antomatically released from the automatic controlling means, and such work holder is swung back to receiving or discharging position (shown in Fig. l) by or through the action of the strong spring S.
Referring to Figs. 1, 3, 7, and 8, the shaft B has secured to it between the pillars or standards A a tappet-cam B (see Fig. 8,) which codperates with a follower-roll f rotatably mounted on a pin f, extended transversely through a box-like portion or hood F of a link F, the hood extending over the tappet and protecting the same from dust and dirt, the sides of the hood being longitudinally slotted, as at f, Fig. 8, to embrace the shaft B and permit longitudinal movement of the link F by or through the cooperation of the follower-roll with the tappet B The link is bifurcated atf to receive between such bifurcated portions or sidesa boss f Fig. 7, on the upper end of a pawl-carrier F, a pin f pivotally connecting the link and pawl-carrier. The lower end of the latter is provided with a hub f through which is extended a short shaft F rotatably mounted in bearings F secured to or forming part of a cam-bracket F, mounted on the bed of the machine between the pillars A and the raised part A thereof, as shown in Fig. 1. The hubf is provided with a depending hookf", (see Fig. 7,) to which one end of a strong spring S is attached, the other end of the spring being fixedly secured to a part of the bed, the spring acting to keep the follower X in engagement with the tappet-cam B and to effect the retractive stroke of the pawlcarrier. A toothed disk or ratchetf is secured to the shaft F adjacent the hub f the hubj of the ratchet being extended to the left, viewing Fig. 7, and into the hub f of the pawl-carrier, forming a bearing for the latter and upon which the pawl-carrier rocks. A pawl f is pivotally mounted at f on the pawl-carrier to cooperate with the ratchet, the free end of the pawl having projecting laterally therefrom a pin or stud f, said pin extending over the upper convexed end of a controlling device or detent, shown as a longitudinally-slotted bar f, embracing the shaft F and having a depending stem f, adapted to enter a socket f (see dotted lines, Figs. 7 and 8) in a depending enlargement F of the bracket F The lower end of the stemf is reduced in diameter, as at f, and extends loosely through a hole in the bot tom of the socket, a suitable spiral spring, as surrounding such reduced portion in the socket f between the bottom thereof and the lower end of the stemf, said spring normally acting to elevate the bar f and maintain it in the position shown in Figs. 7 and 8 to act through the pin f to lift the pawl f from engagement with the ratchet. The shaft B is rotated continuously, it will be remembered, and thus the pawl-carrier F is rocked or swung about the shaft F as a center; but so long as the controlling device is in the position shown in said Figs. 7 and 8 the pin F will ride over the convex surface 75 and will not engage the ratchet. The barf has extended therefrom a lug f, having a cam-face f for a purpose to be described, and a suitable spring-controlled detent-pa-wl f prevents retrograde movement of the ratchet,
' the detent-pawlf being made as a plungerpawl and controlled by a suitable spring 8 (See dotted lines, Fig. 7.) A circular disk P, having an elongated hub 19 is rigidly secured to the shaft F between the slotted bar f and the right-hand bearing F viewing Fig. 7, said disk having a rentrant portion or notch 19 in its periphery and a lateral pin p projecting from the disk above the notch. The inner face of the disk is cam-shaped to constitute a pattern, the lowest portion thereof being at the point 200 at the top of the notch 19, and the high point is located at 300 at the bottom of the notch, the face of the disk gradually rising in an annular direction from 200 to 300.
Referring now more particularly to Figs. 1 and 3, the turn-table W has extended laterally therefrom and toward the rear of the machine a rigid arm W provided at its extremity with an extension 10 of such dimensions that it can readily enter or leave the notch 13 of the pattern-disk, said notch being in the lateral path of movement of the extension when the work-holder is swung.
The rear one of the brackets D which .is the one shown in detail, Fig. 5, has a socket (1 therein to receive a coiled spring 5 which surrounds and controls a headed plunger-bolt (1 which is longitudinally movable in the socketed part of the bracket, the head d of the bolt being in the path of movement of the outer end of the arm W when swung in the direction of arrow 11, Fig. 1.
Referring to Fig. 1,the arm W has mounted on its side a stop 10 fulorumed on a stud w, and a spring 5 is coiled around the stud in a socket in the arm, one end of the spring being fixed and its other end being secured to the stop 10 the winding of the spring being such that normally it maintains a lug 10 thereon against a stop-pin 10 on the arm. \Vhen the operator swings the work-table to present the work to the grinding-surfaces, the extension w passes through the notch p, and the stop w engages the lateral pin 19 on the disk P at the instant the lower edge of the extension to has traveled over the beveled facef of the projection f on the pawl controller or det-ent f and onto the top of said projection, depressing the latter as the stop 10 brings up against the pin 10. Any additional manual movement of the work-holder is thereby prevented, and the operator cannot by inadvertence press the Work against the grinding-surface. The depression of the detent f releases the pawl f and the latter engages the ratchet f and through the rotation of the ratchet the disk P is turned in the direction of the arrow, Fig. 8, far enough to move the upper edge of the notch 19 below the top of the extension 10 Consequently when the operator releases the handle W the spring S will act to hold the extension against the pattern or cam-face of the disk P at its low point; but the extension will continue to depress the detentf so that the pawl and ratchet will remain in coopera- Lion. The continued rotation of the disk P thus effected causes its pattern or cam-surface to act upon the extension 10 which then serves as a follower to gradually swing the work-holder in the direction of arrow 11, keeping the work up to the grinding-surfaces, it being manifest that the pin 19 will pass beneath the lower edge of the stop to just after rotation of the disk P is begun. The movement of the work-holder to operatively position the work is thus made effective tostart the movement of the pattern automatically, so that the work-holder is placed under the control of the means for automatically governing its movement during the grinding. The shape or contour of the pattern is such that as the grinding progresses the work will be advanced to the grindingsurface to give to the work the desired shape. Just before the stop 10 encounters the pinp the arm W engages the plunger-bolt (Z the latter acting to cushion the blow and prevent the stop from sticking with improper force against the pin 1), and as the pattern moves the arm W during the grinding the spring S of the plunger-bolt will permit the latter to yield to such movement.
It will be manifest that the action of the pattern will move the stop w close to the outer face of the disk P as the high part of the pattern is approached and into the path of the pin 19; but owing to the pivotal mounting of said stop it will be depressed by the pin against the stress of its spring 3 until the notch 19 comes into position opposite the extension to at the completion of the grinding. Immediately the spring S is free to act to swing the work-holder into the position shown in Fig. 1 and as the arm W swings oppositely to arrow 11 the extension releases the detentf and moves out through the notchp. The lifting-spring s Figs, 7and 8, at once elevates the detent, and the pawl and ratchet are disengaged, the pattern-disk P coming to a stop in its original starting position. During the movement of the workholder, due to the spring S, the work-clamps will be released or opened, as described, and the projections 01 on the short arms d act to finally stop the work-holder in the position shown in Fig. l, with the piece of work unclamped and ready to be removed.
The grinders are rotated by means of suitable belts (not shown) cooperating with the pulleys G and run from any suitable overhead shaft, and in like manner the front and rear chucks of the work-holder are rotated by belting engaging the pulleys w, the latter being grooved to prevent the belting from slipping off when the Work-holder is swung on its fulcrum W.
In actual practice the belting driving the chucks will preferably be so arranged as to effect their rotation only while the work is clamped; but that may be accomplished in any convenient manner and is not shown, as it forms no part of my present invention.
By using different patterns the shape to be given the ends of the work will be varied accordingly, and by reference to Figs. 9 and 10 it will be seen that the square ends of the blank M are by the grinding reduced to tapered or conical extremities m m the angle of the side of the cone depending upon the pattern and the adjustment of the working parts.
Not only may the grinders be adjusted toward and from each other, but the workholder can be adjusted for work of different lengths, and by means of the stops (1 the clamp-releasing devices can be adjusted correspondingly.
The control of the work is automatically assumed just as soon as the workman swings the work-holder far enough to start the automatic controlling means, and thereafter the control is automatic until the grinding is completed, so that no carelessness, inattention, or lack of skill on the partof the workman can injure the grinders or the work.
I have shown one practical embodiment of my invention without attempting to show or describe the various changes or modifications which may be made therein by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention.
Having described my invention, What I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-
l. In a grinding-machine, a grinding-surface and a work-holder, means to effect their relative movement to place the work in operative position, and independent means to thereupon automatically assume control of and govern the relative movement of said grinding-surface and the work-holder during the completion of the grinding operation.
2. In a grinding-machine, a grinding-surface and a work-holder, manually-operated means to eifect their relative movementand place the work-holder in operative position, and means to thereupon automatically assume control of and govern the relative movement of the grinding-surface and work-holder during the completion of the grinding operation.
3. In a grinding-machine, arotatable grinding surface and a rotatable work-holder, means to move one relatively to the other to present the work to the grinding-surface, and independent automatic means to thereupon assume control of and govern such relative movement of the parts during the completion of the grinding operation.
4. In a grinding-machine, a rotatable grinding-surface, means to automatically reciprocate it bodily, a Work-holder, means to move it to present the work to the grinding-s11 rface, and automatic means to thereupon assume control of and govern subsequent movement of the Work-holder during the grinding operation.
5. In agrinding-machine, a rotatable grinding-surface, means to automatically reciprocate it bodily, a rotatable, bodily-movable work-holder, manually-operated means to move it to present the work to the grindingsurface, and means to automatically assume control of the work-holder after such movement and to control the subsequent bodily movement thereof during the completion of the grinding operation.
6. In a grinding-machine, a rotatablegrinding-surface. means to automatically recipro-' ment of the work-holder has been effected thereby.
7. In a grinding-machine, a grinding-surface, and a work-holder, means to effect their relative movement to present the work to the grinding-surface, automatic means to thereupon assume control of and govern such relative movement duringthe grinding operation, and a device to automatically render said latter means inoperative when a predetermined relative movement of the grinding-surface and work-holder has been effected by said antomatic means.
8. In a grinding-machine, a rotatable grinding-surface,means to reciprocate it bodily, a work-holder, manually-operated means to move it to present the work to the grindingsurface, automatic means to thereupon assume control of and govern subsequent movement of the work-holder, to give the requisite shape to the work, and a device to automatically release the work-holderfrom the control of said automatic means when by a predetermined movement of the work-holder the desired grinding has been effected.
9. In a grinding-machine, a rotatable grinding-surface, means to bodily reciprocate the same, a rotatable work-holder bodily movable about a fulcrum at right angles to its axis of rotation, means to move it about such fulcrum to present the work to the grinding-surface, automatic means to thereupon assume control of and govern subsequent bodily movement of the Work-holder to complete the grinding, a device to automatically release the work-holder from the control of said automatic means, and a spring to return the work-holder to inoperative position when so released.
10. In a grinding machine, a rotatable grinder having a flat grinding-surface, means to bodily reciprocate the grinder, a workholder, manually-operated means to move it in a lateral path to present the work to the grinding-surface at an angle thereto, automatic means to thereupon assume control of the work-holder and change the angle of presentation of the work during grinding, to give the requisite shape to the work, and a device to automatically release the work-holder from such control when a predetermined automatic movement of the work-holder has been effected.
11. In a grinding machine, a rotatable grinder having a flat, annular grinding-surface, means to reciprocate the grinder, a rotatable work-holder having its axis of rotation in a plane at right angles to the grinding-surface, a pivot upon which the workholder is bodily movable, to vary the angle between the intersecting axes of rotation of the grinder and work-holder, means to move the work-holder upon its pivot to present the work to the grinding-surface, and automatic means to thereupon assume control of and govern subsequent bodily-movement of the work-holder during the grinding, to advance the work and change the angle of presentation thereof to the grinding-surface, thereby giving the work the requisite shape.
12. In a grinding machine, a rotatable grinder having a flat, annular grinding-surface, a work-holder to present the work to the grinding-surface, and means to bodily reciprocate the grinder at right angles to its axis of rotation and thereby equalize the wear upon its grinding-surface.
13. In a grinding machine, a rotatable grinder having a flat grinding-surface, a support therefor, adapted to rock on a fulcrum parallel to the axis of rotation of the grinder, means to rock the support, and a work-holder to present the work to the grinding-surface, the reciprocation of the grinder by or through its rocking support equalizing the wear upon the grinding-surface.
14. Inagrinding-machine,arotatableshaft, a support therefor adapted to rock on a fulcrum parallel to the shaft, a grinder secured to the latter and having a flat, annular grinding-surface, means to rock the support on its fulcrum, a work-holder, and means to move it in a lateral path to present the work to the grinding-surface, the Wear upon the latter being equalized by the reciprocation imparted to the grinder by rocking its support.
15. In a grinding machine, a rotatable grinder having a flat grinding-surface, a support therefor, adapted to rock on a fulcrum parallel to the axis of rotation of the grinder, means to rock the support, a work-holder adapted to be swung in a lateral plane, to present the work to the grinding-surface, a fixed fulcrum on which the work-holder is movable, and means to adjust the grindersupport in the direction of the length of its fulcrum.
16. In a grindingmachine, a rotatable grinding-surface, a work-holder, including means to clamp the work, means to effect relative movement of the grinding-surface and the work-holder, to present the work to the former, and means actuated automatically by or through such relative movement to set the clamping means.
17. In a grinding-machine, a rotatable IIO grinding-surface, a Work-holder including a work-clamp, means to effect relative movement of the grinding-surface and the workholder, to move the work into and out of position to be ground, and means actuated automatically by or through such relative movement to set the clam ping means when the work is presented to the grinding-surface, and to release the clamping means when the work is withdrawn from operative position.
18. In a grinding-machine, a grinding-surface, a work-holder, means to manually eifect relative movement of said parts to operatively position the work,means to automatically control the position of the work relative to the grinding-surface during grinding, and a device to automatically place the work-holder under the control of said controlling means when the work is operatively positioned, and to release the work-holder from such control when grinding has been completed.
19. In a grinding-machine, a grinding-surface, a work-holder, means to manually effect relative movement of said parts to operatively position the work, a pattern to control the position of the latter relatively to the grindingsurface during the grinding operation, intermittingly-operative means to move the pattern, and a starting device for said means, actuated by manual movement of the workholder to operatively position the work.
20. In a grinding-machine, a grinding-surface, a work-holder, means to manually effect relative movement of said parts to operativel y position the work, a pattern to control the position of the latter relatively to the grindingsurface during the grinding operation, intermittingly-operative means to move the pattern, a startingdevice for said means actuated by operative positioning of the work, and a device to render said means inoperative when a predetermined grinding has been effected.
21. In a grinding-machine, a grinding-surface, a work-holder, means to effect relative movement of said parts to operatively position the work, a rotatable pattern to control the position of the latter relatively to the grinding-surface during grinding, intermittingly-operative means to rot-ate the pattern, a starting device for said means, actuated by or through operative positioning of the work, and means actuated by a predetermined rotation of the pattern to effect the stoppage of the means for rotating it.
22. In a grinding machine, a rotatable grinding-surface, a work-holder movable in a lateral path to move the work into and out of operative position relatively to the grindingsurface, an intermittingly-rotatable pattern to control the position of the work during grinding, said pattern having a notch in its periphery, means bodily movable with the work-holder to pass through the notch and effect the starting of the pattern, the latter acting through said mea us to control the workholder during grinding, and a spring to return the latter, to inoperative position when rotation of the pattern has brought the notch therein opposite the said means.
23. In a grinding machine, a rotatable grinding-surface, a work-holder movable in a lateral path to move the work into and out of operative position, relatively to the grindingsurface, an intermittingly-rotatable pattern to control 'the position of the work during grinding, means to rotate the pattern, a deviceoperated by or through movement of the Work-hold er to o perativel y position the work to effect the rotation of the pattern by said means, the position of the Work relatively to the grinding-surface being thereafter controlled by said pattern during grinding, and a stop to limit the movement of the work into operative position and thereby prevent injury of the grinding-surface.
24. In a grinding machine, a rotatable grinding-surface, a work-holder, means to move it manually to place the work in operative relation with the grinding-surface, an intermittiugly-rotatable pattern to control the position of the work relatively to the grinding-surface during grinding, means operated by or through such manual movement of the work-holder to effect control thereof by the pattern and start the rotation of the latter, and independent means to automatically withdraw the work from the grinding-surface and effect stoppage of the pattern when the latter has made a predetermined movement.
25. In a grinding machine, a rotatable grinding-surface, a work-holder, means to move it to operatively position the work relatively to the grinding-surface, a follower movable with the work-holder, a pattern with which the follower cooperates during the grinding, means to actuate the pattern, and a starting device for said means, operated by or through movement of the work-holder, to operatively position the work, such movement also bringing the follower into cooperation with the pattern, the latter thereafter controlling the position of the work with relation to the grinding-surface.
26. In a grinding-machine, a grinding-surface, a work-holder, means to move the latter manually to operatively position the work, means, including a rotatable pattern, to automatically control the movement of the workholder during grinding, mechanism to rotate the pattern, comprising a ratchet rotatable therewith, a constantly-reciprocating pawlcarrier, and a pawl thereon, and a device to maintain the pawl inoperative, the man nallyactuated movement of the work-holder causing said device to release the pawl and permit its cooperation with the ratchet.
27. In a grinding-machine, a grinding-surface, a work-holder, means to move the lattermannally to operatively position the work, means, including a rotatable pattern, to automatically control the movement of the workholder during grinding, a pawl and ratchet to effect rotation of the pattern,a pawl-con troller to normally maintain it inoperative, and a dog movable with the work-holder, to retract the pawl-controller when the work is opera- ICO tively positioned, disengagement of the dog and pawl-controller upon completion of the grinding permitting the latter to disengage the pawl and ratchet.
28. In a grinding-machine, a turn-table, a work-holder mounted thereon, including a work-clamp, a spring to set the clamp, and a releasing device to act in opposition to said spring and effect the opening of the clamp, and means to automatically operate the releasing device when the work-holder is in position to receive or discharge the work.
29. In a grinding-machine, a turn-table, a work-holder mounted thereon, including a work-clamp, a spring to set the clamp, and a releasing device to act in opposition to said spring and effect the opening of the clamp, said device including a sliding plunger, and means to engage and move the plunger to effect the operation of the releasing device when the work-holder is moved into position to receive or discharge the work.
80. In a grinding-machine, a turn-table, a work-holder mounted thereon, including a work-clamp, a spring to set the clamp, and a releasing device to act in opposition to said spring and effect the opening of the clamp, said device including a sliding plunger, and means to engage and move the plunger to effeet the operation of the releasing device when the work-holder is moved into position to receive or discharge the work, said means including a spring-controlled, swinging actuator to cooperate with and move the plunger.
31. In a grinding-machine, a turn-table, a work-holder mounted thereon, including a work-clamp, a spring to set the clamp, and a releasing device to act in opposition to said spring and effect the opening of the clamp, said device including a sliding plunger, and means to engage and move the plunger to effect the operation of the releasing device when the work-holder is moved into position to receive or discharge the work, said means including a spring-controlled, swinging actuator to codperate with and move the plunger, and an adjustable stop to engage the ac tuator and limit the movement imparted thereby to the plunger. I
32. In a grinding-machine, a work-holder mounted to turn on a vertical pivot, and including rotatable front and rear chucks, a work-clamp in each, and means to automatically close the work-clamps when the workholder is moved into operative position, and to open said clamps when moved into position to receive or discharge the work.
33. In a grinding-machine, awork-holder mounted to'turn on a Vertical pivot, and including rotatable front and rear chucks, a work-clamp in each,means to move the chucks toward and from each other in accordance with the length of the work, springs to close the clamps, and means to automatically effeet the opening thereof by or through movement of the work-holder into position to receive or discharge the work.
34.. In a grinding-machine, a work-holder mounted to turn on a vertical pivot, and including rotatable front and rear chucks, a work-clamp in each, means to automatically close the work-clamps when the work-holder is moved into operative position, clamp-opening means to automatically effect the opening of the clamps when the work-holder is in position to receive or discharge the work, and a device to stop the work-holder in such position.
35. In a grinding-machine, two rotatable, oppositely-facing grinding-surfaces having their axes of rotation in parallelism and nonalined, a work-holder mounted between the grinding-surfaces and adapted to turn bodily on a vertical pivot, means to turn said workholder to present the opposite ends of the work to the respective grinding-surfaces, and automatic means to thereupon assume control of and govern the movement of the workholder thereafter during the grinding.
36. In a grinding-machine, two rotatable, oppositely-facing grinding-surfaces having their axes of rotation in parallelism and nonalined, means to bodily reciprocate the grinding-surfaces with their acting faces in parallelism, a work-holder mounted between the grinding-surfaces and adapted to turn bodily on a vertical pivot, means to turn said workholder to present the opposite ends of the work to the respective grinding-surfaces, and automatic means to thereupon assume control of and govern the movementof the workholder thereafter during the grinding.
37. In a grinding-machine, two rotatable, oppositely-facing grinding-surfaces having their axes of rotation in parallelism and nonalined, means to bodily reciprocate the grinding-surfaces with their acting faces in parallelism, a rotatable work-holder mounted between the grinding-surfaces and adapted to turn bodily on a vertical pivot, manuallyoperated means to swing the work-holder to present opposite ends of the work to the respective grindingsurfaces, and means to thereupon automatically assume control of and govern the swinging movement of the work-holder during the grinding.
38. In a grinding-machine, two rotatable, oppositely-facing grinding-surfaces having their axes of rotation in parallelism and nonalined, a work-holder mounted between the grinding-surfaces and adapted to turn bodily on a vertical pivot, means to turn said workholder to present the opposite ends of the work to the respective grinding-surfaces, means to thereupon automatically assume control of and govern the swinging movement of the work-holder during the grinding, and an adjustable, fixedly-mounted size-gage to prevent swinging movement of the workholder if the work is overlength.
39. In a grinding-machine, two rotatable, oppositely-facing grinding-surfaces having their axes of rotation in parallelism and nonalined, means to adjust the grinding-surfaces toward and from each other, for work of different lengths, a work-holder mounted between the grinding-surfaces and adapted to turn bodily on a vertical pivot, means to turn said work-holder to present the opposite ends of the work to the respective grinding-surfaces, and automatic means to thereupon assume control of and govern the movement of the Work-holder thereafter during the grinding.
40. In a grinding-machine, two rotatable, oppositely-facing grinding-surfaces having their axes of rotation in parallelism and nonalined, a work-holder mounted between the grinding-surfaces and adapted to turn bodily on a vertical pivot, means to turn said work holder to present the opposite ends of the Work to the respective grinding-surfaces, automatic means to thereupon assume control of and govern the movement of the workholder thereafter during grinding, a rotatable controlling-shaft, connections between it and the grinding-surfaces, to reciprocate them with their acting faces in parallelism, and mechanism driven by said shaft to operate said automatic means.
mounted between the grinders to swing on a vertical pivot, means to manually swing the work-holder to present the opposite ends of the work to the respective grinders, a spring to return the work-holder to inoperative position, intermittingly-operating means to automatically govern the swinging movement of the work-holder during grinding, actuating mechanism for said means, and a device to automatically effect the actuation of the governingmeans bysaid mechanism byorthrough the operative positioning of the work.
In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.
CHARLES F. ROPER.
Witnesses:
GEORGE OTIS DRAPER, ERNEST W. WOOD.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2713755A (en) * 1951-03-29 1955-07-26 Joos Heintz Drill grinding machine

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2713755A (en) * 1951-03-29 1955-07-26 Joos Heintz Drill grinding machine

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