US709491A - Straightway valve. - Google Patents

Straightway valve. Download PDF

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US709491A
US709491A US8250101A US1901082501A US709491A US 709491 A US709491 A US 709491A US 8250101 A US8250101 A US 8250101A US 1901082501 A US1901082501 A US 1901082501A US 709491 A US709491 A US 709491A
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disks
valve
ring
bearing
screw
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US8250101A
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Daniel Kennedy
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16KVALVES; TAPS; COCKS; ACTUATING-FLOATS; DEVICES FOR VENTING OR AERATING
    • F16K3/00Gate valves or sliding valves, i.e. cut-off apparatus with closing members having a sliding movement along the seat for opening and closing
    • F16K3/02Gate valves or sliding valves, i.e. cut-off apparatus with closing members having a sliding movement along the seat for opening and closing with flat sealing faces; Packings therefor
    • F16K3/16Gate valves or sliding valves, i.e. cut-off apparatus with closing members having a sliding movement along the seat for opening and closing with flat sealing faces; Packings therefor with special arrangements for separating the sealing faces or for pressing them together
    • F16K3/18Gate valves or sliding valves, i.e. cut-off apparatus with closing members having a sliding movement along the seat for opening and closing with flat sealing faces; Packings therefor with special arrangements for separating the sealing faces or for pressing them together by movement of the closure members
    • F16K3/184Gate valves or sliding valves, i.e. cut-off apparatus with closing members having a sliding movement along the seat for opening and closing with flat sealing faces; Packings therefor with special arrangements for separating the sealing faces or for pressing them together by movement of the closure members by means of cams
    • F16K3/186Gate valves or sliding valves, i.e. cut-off apparatus with closing members having a sliding movement along the seat for opening and closing with flat sealing faces; Packings therefor with special arrangements for separating the sealing faces or for pressing them together by movement of the closure members by means of cams by means of cams of wedge from

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  • the invention applies to that class of valves in which the control ofthe fluid is effected by two disks mounted wedgewise back to back and moved by the mechanism into position between corresponding wedgewise surfaces which form, in effect, the adjacent ends of the fixed pipes. It is common to provide for a small amount of rocking of these disks to compensate for inequalities in the Obliquity or for the engagement of a chip or other solid matter which may require either of the disks to tilt on its bearing. I can employ any ordinary or suitable means to move the pair of disks thus united out from their central position in the line of the pipes and back again, as required to open and close the valve.
  • the improvement relates to the disks and adjacent bearing and rubbing surfaces. It has long been common to provide separatelyformed facing-rings for each disk, which may be of a different metal, as brass, while the main body of the valve is iron. It has been proposed to engage them by causing the rings to lock by spreading in undercut grooves. I have discovered an improved,V form which greatly improves the effect by inducing the spreading effect at the bottom only of the groove. This with little labor or skill preserves the integrity ofthe metal both of the ring and the grooved iron and holds these facing-rings with unusual tightness and ⁇ irmness.
  • I' also provide for receiving the pressure received through these rings through the Wedging action impelled by the strong screw force, in shutting and also for receiving the force, sometimes very great, exerted by the fluid on a large valve.
  • I will refer to the fluid as water; but it will be understood that the invention may apply with steam, air, or any other liquid or gas requiring to be tightly stopped and to be easily freed, partly or en tirely, at will.
  • Figure l is a central vertical section in the plane of the axis of the pipes.
  • Fig. 2 is in fthe right half a corresponding section in a plane at right angles to that of Fig. l.
  • the left half shows the outer or front face of the other disk in elevation.
  • Fig. 3 is a plan view with a horizontal section of the interior parts 0n the line 3 3 in Fig. 2.
  • Figs. tand 5 show a section through the facing-ring and the adjacent portion of a valve on a larger scale. They are in a plane corresponding to Fig. l and show different stages of the construction, as follows:
  • Fig. a is a section as these parts are constructed and presented to each other in the act of joining, and Fig.
  • Fig. lL is a side elevation of the rolling-ring detached in the position shown in Fig. l.
  • Eig. 2at is a side elevation of the rolling-ring detached in the position shown in Fig. 2.
  • the left side of Fig. 3a is a plan View of half of the rollingring detached in the position shown in Fig. 3, and the right side is a horizontal section of the other half.
  • Fig. (5 is a horizontal section corresponding to Eig. 3, but showing a modi fication.
  • A is the main body of the casing, and A A' are removable annular pieces set inclined in opposite directions and finished to serve as valve-seats.
  • the operating-screw is the operating-screw, having a collar B, carried in a suitable top piece, which forms an enlargement of the chamber, into which the valve may be drawn and retained when desired.
  • the operating-screw is equipped with a stuffing-box and hand-wheel.
  • each disk is recessed to strongly but loosely take hold of the flange O/ of a nut C, engaged with the screw B, and by the turning of which screw the disks are moved to open and close the passage.
  • the working side of each disk is faced with a ring E, of soft brass, cast with ICO two annular ridges E E2, each of V-shaped section. When this ring is cast, these ridges have their outer sides parallel, the obliquity being all on their inner sides, as indicated in Fig. 4.
  • Each disk D is formed with an annular groove only sufficiently wide at the surface to receive the two ridges E E2 while in sented and forced into position, preferably by hammering with an air-hammer.
  • the beveled inner faces of the ridges E E2 striking the rounded bottom d2 are spread apart, and the force being continued drives the metal home, engaging it smoothly with the undercut edges d cl2 of the groove, so that it is strongly locked at the bottom of the V-shaped groove, while by reason of the rounding of the ridge at the center, with the cross-section of the softer ring not so rounded, the metal of the ring is but slightly, if at all, compressed, and the stronger iron receives the locking spread of the annular ridges at the base of the grooves alone, where it is able to withstand it without danger of cracking or weakening.
  • Plane extensions D2, which I will term guide-lugs, on the edges of each disk D travel within guide-anges A2, cast on the interior of the casing A
  • I provide for receiving the pressure of the disks D D on large surfaces., with adequate provision for rocking in any direction to the greatest extent ever required.
  • the central portion of the back of each disk is recessed, as indicated by d, (see Figs. l and 3;) but this recess does not receive the load. It is simply to provide Vfor loosely receiving the ring to be presently described.
  • the pressure very great with large valves, is received with liberty to rock on lenticular-shaped bearing parts G' G', of hard brass or other suitable material, each thicker at its inner than at its outer edge and received between correspondingly inclined and concaved faces on the ends of posts D', which extend from the back of each disk.
  • the bearings G' l are held firmly apart by means o f a thin but sufficiently stout connecting-ring G, cast integral therewith.
  • the bearing and rolling surfaces are each portions of a large sphere. I have succeeded well by making these surfaces each a portion of a sphere having a radius exactly coinciding with that of the disks, but this may be varied.
  • the construction allows that the bearings shall be, respectively, portions of large spheres, and yet requires the disks to be held only a small distance apart,
  • Modications may be made without departing from the principle or sacrificing the advantages of the invention.
  • the areas, as well as the sphericity, of the lenticular bearing partsG and of the corresponding receivingsurfaces on the posts D may be less or even somewhat greater than shown.
  • the beveling or undercutting of the edges d d2 of the groove may be considerably less than shown.
  • the great force applied to the parts in working is always in the direction pressing the ring home, never rending it.
  • the whole construction is economical and durable and greatly reduces the liability of the metal on either the outer or inner faces of the disk to become crushed or abraded.
  • a valve having inclined seats disks with inclined outer faces and an operatingscrew which is received between the disks, and posts D' D' in the backs having concave bearing-faces arranged on each side respectively of the operating-screw, the combination therewith of two lenticular bearingpieces G G matching in the concave seats on such posts, all adapted to serve substantially as herein specified.
  • disks with inclined outer faces an operating-screw which is received between the disks, and posts oper- IOO IIO
  • a stop-valve provided with a ring ar- Witnesses ranged between the disks and having two leul J.

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  • General Engineering & Computer Science (AREA)
  • Mechanical Engineering (AREA)
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Description

Patented Sept. 23, |902.
.L V .n `Y DV EY M ...w KH .G DM B l s ma.. 4, 9 7 n.. N
(Application sued Nev. 16. 1901.)
(No Mo'del.)
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ATTORNEY WITNESSES:
y UNTTED STATES PATENT OEETCE,
DANIEL KENNEDY, OE BROOKLYN, NEV YORK.
STRAIG HTWAY VALVE.
SPECIFICATION formingpart of Letters Patent No. 709,491, dated September 23, 1902.
Application led November 16, 1901. Serial No. 82,501. (No model.)
To 1f/ZL whom t may concern:
Beit known thatLDANIEL KENNEDY, a citizen of the United States, residing in the borough of Brooklyn, in the cityand State of New York, have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Straightway Valves, of which the following is a specification.
The invention applies to that class of valves in which the control ofthe fluid is effected by two disks mounted wedgewise back to back and moved by the mechanism into position between corresponding wedgewise surfaces which form, in effect, the adjacent ends of the fixed pipes. It is common to provide for a small amount of rocking of these disks to compensate for inequalities in the Obliquity or for the engagement of a chip or other solid matter which may require either of the disks to tilt on its bearing. I can employ any ordinary or suitable means to move the pair of disks thus united out from their central position in the line of the pipes and back again, as required to open and close the valve.
The improvement relates to the disks and adjacent bearing and rubbing surfaces. It has long been common to provide separatelyformed facing-rings for each disk, which may be of a different metal, as brass, while the main body of the valve is iron. It has been proposed to engage them by causing the rings to lock by spreading in undercut grooves. I have discovered an improved,V form which greatly improves the effect by inducing the spreading effect at the bottom only of the groove. This with little labor or skill preserves the integrity ofthe metal both of the ring and the grooved iron and holds these facing-rings with unusual tightness and {irmness. I'also provide for receiving the pressure received through these rings through the Wedging action impelled by the strong screw force, in shutting and also for receiving the force, sometimes very great, exerted by the fluid on a large valve. I will refer to the fluid as water; but it will be understood that the invention may apply with steam, air, or any other liquid or gas requiring to be tightly stopped and to be easily freed, partly or en tirely, at will.
The following is a description of what I consider the best means of carrying out the invention.
The accompanying drawings form a part of this specification.
Figure l is a central vertical section in the plane of the axis of the pipes. Fig. 2 is in fthe right half a corresponding section in a plane at right angles to that of Fig. l. The left half shows the outer or front face of the other disk in elevation. Fig. 3 is a plan view with a horizontal section of the interior parts 0n the line 3 3 in Fig. 2. Figs. tand 5 show a section through the facing-ring and the adjacent portion of a valve on a larger scale. They are in a plane corresponding to Fig. l and show different stages of the construction, as follows: Fig. a is a section as these parts are constructed and presented to each other in the act of joining, and Fig. 5 shows the same parts after they have been united by forcibly compressing together. Fig. lL is a side elevation of the rolling-ring detached in the position shown in Fig. l. Eig. 2at is a side elevation of the rolling-ring detached in the position shown in Fig. 2. The left side of Fig. 3a is a plan View of half of the rollingring detached in the position shown in Fig. 3, and the right side is a horizontal section of the other half. Fig. (5 is a horizontal section corresponding to Eig. 3, but showing a modi fication.
Similar letters of reference indicate correspending parts in all the figures where they appear. Y
A is the main body of the casing, and A A' are removable annular pieces set inclined in opposite directions and finished to serve as valve-seats.
B is the operating-screw, having a collar B, carried in a suitable top piece, which forms an enlargement of the chamber, into which the valve may be drawn and retained when desired. The operating-screw is equipped with a stuffing-box and hand-wheel.
So far as yet described all may be of an ordinary and long-approved construction.
D and D are disks separately formed and capable of tilting to a small extent, Each is recessed to strongly but loosely take hold of the flange O/ of a nut C, engaged with the screw B, and by the turning of which screw the disks are moved to open and close the passage. The working side of each disk is faced with a ring E, of soft brass, cast with ICO two annular ridges E E2, each of V-shaped section. When this ring is cast, these ridges have their outer sides parallel, the obliquity being all on their inner sides, as indicated in Fig. 4. Each disk D is formed with an annular groove only sufficiently wide at the surface to receive the two ridges E E2 while in sented and forced into position, preferably by hammering with an air-hammer. The beveled inner faces of the ridges E E2 striking the rounded bottom d2 are spread apart, and the force being continued drives the metal home, engaging it smoothly with the undercut edges d cl2 of the groove, so that it is strongly locked at the bottom of the V-shaped groove, while by reason of the rounding of the ridge at the center, with the cross-section of the softer ring not so rounded, the metal of the ring is but slightly, if at all, compressed, and the stronger iron receives the locking spread of the annular ridges at the base of the grooves alone, where it is able to withstand it without danger of cracking or weakening. Plane extensions D2, which I will term guide-lugs, on the edges of each disk D travel within guide-anges A2, cast on the interior of the casing A, which insure against the disks becoming much separated and against the plane of travel of the disks becoming changed.
I provide for receiving the pressure of the disks D D on large surfaces., with adequate provision for rocking in any direction to the greatest extent ever required. The central portion of the back of each disk is recessed, as indicated by d, (see Figs. l and 3;) but this recess does not receive the load. It is simply to provide Vfor loosely receiving the ring to be presently described. The pressure, very great with large valves, is received with liberty to rock on lenticular-shaped bearing parts G' G', of hard brass or other suitable material, each thicker at its inner than at its outer edge and received between correspondingly inclined and concaved faces on the ends of posts D', which extend from the back of each disk. The bearings G' l are held firmly apart by means o f a thin but sufficiently stout connecting-ring G, cast integral therewith. The bearing and rolling surfaces are each portions of a large sphere. I have succeeded well by making these surfaces each a portion of a sphere having a radius exactly coinciding with that of the disks, but this may be varied. The construction allows that the bearings shall be, respectively, portions of large spheres, and yet requires the disks to be held only a small distance apart,
little more than sufficient to allow the ating-screw to be received.
It is common to provide separately-formed facing-rings; but the means for securing each to its respective disk have been expensive and imperfect. My form of locking carried out with as uficiently yielding metal, as soft brass, attaches such facing reliably, tightly, and cheaply and without overstraining the metal. It has long been practiced to hold such disks apart with liberty to rock by mechanism between the backs. The provisions for this heretofore employed have been defective, some in encumbering the central portion ot' the space, so that the choice of operating means is limited, because the operatingscrew cannot be allowed to pass the center. None can present so large a surface as mine to receive the pressure. My invention provides for rocking freely in all directions and for leaving a clear space for an operatingscrew to be received through the center between the disks. My experiments indicate that the surfaces will remain in good condition for an indefinite period.
Modications may be made Without departing from the principle or sacrificing the advantages of the invention. The areas, as well as the sphericity, of the lenticular bearing partsG and of the corresponding receivingsurfaces on the posts D may be less or even somewhat greater than shown. The beveling or undercutting of the edges d d2 of the groove may be considerably less than shown. The great force applied to the parts in working is always in the direction pressing the ring home, never rending it. The whole construction is economical and durable and greatly reduces the liability of the metal on either the outer or inner faces of the disk to become crushed or abraded.
A modification which is important on some accounts is indicated in the horizontal section in Fig. 6. In this the bearing-surfaces provided by the lenticular bearing portions are concave rather than convex, and the posts which are cast on the backs of the disks are correspondingly convex. This form, though widely different in appearance, will allow the disks to rock, While insuring their being carried up and down by the screw in the same manner as the other and preferred form.
I claim as my inventionl. In a valve having inclined seats, disks with inclined outer faces and an operatingscrew which is received between the disks, and posts D' D' in the backs having concave bearing-faces arranged on each side respectively of the operating-screw, the combination therewith of two lenticular bearingpieces G G matching in the concave seats on such posts, all adapted to serve substantially as herein specified.
2. In a valve having inclined seats, disks with inclined outer faces an operating-screw which is received between the disks, and posts oper- IOO IIO
DANIEL KENNEDY.
faces arranged on each side respectively of the operating-screw, the combination therewith of two lenticular bearing-pieces matching in the concave seats on such posts, and a ring G connectingr such bearing-pieces adapted to hold such bearing-pieces apart, all arranged to serve substantially as herein speci- D D' in the backs having concave bearingl l l i iied.
8. A stop-valve provided with a ring ar- Witnesses: ranged between the disks and having two leul J. B. CLAUTICE, ticular bearing-pieces integral therewith and 1 M. F. BOYLE.
US8250101A 1901-11-16 1901-11-16 Straightway valve. Expired - Lifetime US709491A (en)

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2502363A (en) * 1945-10-31 1950-03-28 Babson Bros Co Gasket for milkers
US2560841A (en) * 1946-01-24 1951-07-17 Fairey Aviat Co Ltd Hydraulic valve
US2601967A (en) * 1949-03-22 1952-07-01 Saval Division Of The William Fluid valve
US2630293A (en) * 1948-06-23 1953-03-03 Walter G E Smith Gate valve
US2677876A (en) * 1949-09-26 1954-05-11 Bardco Mfg & Sales Company Method of fabricating a valve member having a body and seat of different metals
US2868495A (en) * 1953-12-15 1959-01-13 Joseph E Lucas Fabricated gate valve and method of making the same

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2502363A (en) * 1945-10-31 1950-03-28 Babson Bros Co Gasket for milkers
US2560841A (en) * 1946-01-24 1951-07-17 Fairey Aviat Co Ltd Hydraulic valve
US2630293A (en) * 1948-06-23 1953-03-03 Walter G E Smith Gate valve
US2601967A (en) * 1949-03-22 1952-07-01 Saval Division Of The William Fluid valve
US2677876A (en) * 1949-09-26 1954-05-11 Bardco Mfg & Sales Company Method of fabricating a valve member having a body and seat of different metals
US2868495A (en) * 1953-12-15 1959-01-13 Joseph E Lucas Fabricated gate valve and method of making the same

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