US596010A - Construction of walls - Google Patents

Construction of walls Download PDF

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US596010A
US596010A US596010DA US596010A US 596010 A US596010 A US 596010A US 596010D A US596010D A US 596010DA US 596010 A US596010 A US 596010A
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cells
sections
walls
parts
wall
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B2/00Walls, e.g. partitions, for buildings; Wall construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted to walls
    • E04B2/72Non-load-bearing walls of elements of relatively thin form with respect to the thickness of the wall
    • E04B2/723Non-load-bearing walls of elements of relatively thin form with respect to the thickness of the wall constituted of gypsum elements

Description

(No Model.)
. E. F. BAUDE.
CONSTRUCTION OF WALLS, PARTITIONS, GEIL-INGS, 620., OF SHEET METAL.v
No. 596,010. Patented 1390.21, 1897.
UNITE STATES ATEN Ti FFIGE.
EMIL F. BAUDE, OF CINCINNATI, OHIO, ASSIGNOR TO AOOB F. WEITZEL, OF LUDLOW, KENTUCKY.
CONSTRUCTIONOF WALLS, PARTlTlONS, CEILINGS, &c., 0F SHEET METAL.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent N o. 596,010, dated December 21, 1897.
Application filed June 12, 1896. Serial No. 595,274:- (No model.)
To all whom it may concern.-
Be it known that I, EMIL F. BAUDE, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Cincinnati, Hamilton county, State of Ohio, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in the Construction of Walls,; Partitions, Girders, &c., of Sheet Metal; and
I do declare the following to be a clear, full, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same, attention being called to the accompanying drawings, with the reference-n umerals thereon, which form a part of this specification.
This invention relates to improvements in the construction of parts forming one of the structural elements of buildings of all descriptions.
The elements here in View are walls, partitions, girders, and similar parts.
The objects of my improvements are to make these elements and their'construction and connection stronger, stiffer, of increased resistance to collapse, and lighter, all with less material, less labor, and thereby as a consequence with less cost.
An important feature of my invention is to prepare these parts in a manner to permit the application of plaster to outer surfaces where desirable.
In the following specification, and particularly pointed out in the claims, is found a full description of the invention, its parts, and manner of construction, which latter is also illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 shows in a perspective View with parts broken away a wall or partition constructed after the plan of my invention. Fig. 2 is a horizontal section of such wall. Fig. 3 shows a portion of it in front elevation, the View being taken to embrace one of the horizontal joints, whereby one of the lower rows or tiers connects to the one next above it. Fig. 4 is a vertical section of a wall or partition passing Vertically from one floor to another. Figs. 5 and 6 are sectional detail Views showing capability of using my improvements for constructing floors and ceilings. Figs. 7 and 8 are also detail views showing part of my invention capable of being applied for constructing girders.
The body of these structural elements is composed of cells 11, alined in upright position. adjacent to each other, and formed of sheets of metal which are each shaped in a manner that parts of these cells form the continuous surfaces or faces of the walls. The cells are triangular, as best'shown in Fig. 2, the sheets being bent from one side to the other, forming at each side apart of the outer surface of the wall and traverse the thickness of it each time as they thus pass from one side to the other. Thus the sides 12 of the cells, being all in line, form the outside or faces of the wall, while the sides 18, passing alternately back and forth between them and from one face to the other, hold the face sides rigidly in position and form solid internal braces for the same, imparting great strength and stiffness to the Wall formed.
As many cells are formed in one sheet as the length of the latter permits, the whole constituting then a section of cells, of which there are as many as necessary,until the structure for which they are intended is made up. Standard sizes of these sections may be established for the convenience of builders and users to enable selection of sizes to meet certain conditions. At their ends where the different sections meet they may be interlocked by simply hooking them to each other, as best shown at 14 in Figs. 1 and 2. Fig. 1 shows my method for building walls and partitions.
,A floor-rail 15, provided with horizontal and vertical flanges 16 and 17, is laid down first and by flanges l6 nailed or otherwise secured to the floor. The sections with the cells in vertical position are then set up between the vertical flanges 17, the space between which they closely fit. Next I throw mortar or concrete from above into the open ends of the cells, filling only their lower parts, however, as shown at 18, Fig. 4. This filling is tamped down, so as to be forced closely into the cor- 5 ners. When dry, it serves to hold the cells to their shape and adds stiffness to the structure. WVhen one tier of cell-sections is set up across the length of the wall, another rail 19 in shape of a double channel-iron or I-beam is laid across them. The upper end of the lower tier is received between the downwardly-extending flanges 21 of the rail and the next higher tier is set up between the upturned flanges 22. This next tier is built precisely as the lower one, and mortar or concrete is thrown in again before the next rail is laid on, upon which is set up the next tier. These latter are thus built up until the proper height of the wall is attained. On top another rail 23, similar to rail 15 at the bottom, is laid on, but in reverse position and with its laterallyextending flanges 24: nailed or otherwise secured to the ceiling or to the joists thereof. The tiers and sections thereof, especially in larger walls, are bound together by an interlacing of wire 25, as shown in Figs. 2 and 3, the wire passing first through the wall below rail 19, then over and through the next cell of tiers above rail 19, then down again and back through the next cell in the lower tier, and so on from one side of the wall to the other and up and down on either side of rail 19 across the whole wall. A second row of lacing crossing the first row may be applied. here it is desirable to plaster the wall, sides 12'of the cells forming the surface of the walls are perforated to form metallic lath, as shown in Fig. 1, so that no extra lath is required for walls thus built, and they are at once ready to receive the plastering. The internal sides 13, connecting sides 12, are left imperforate, so as not to impair the strength and self-sustaining capacity of the wall. For such purpose these perforations are applied after the sheets are shaped to prevent any of them 00- curring at the corners of the cells, which would lessen the stiffness thereat.
At ends of partitions or at doors and windows the cells next adjoining may be solidly filled with mortar or concrete to form a firm The same may be done at places Where and resting on them and in which case the cells immediately below may be filled com- 1 pletely from floor to ceiling to form a firm support at such points. walls and partitions thus constructed are at once apparent. Unlike most of partitions they are self-sustaining, and being of great stiffness and lateral resistance serve to brace a building internally. They are of less weight than most any other kind of partition, which of itself is a great advantage as lessening the load on joists, girders, and other parts forming supports. Being of great strength, they maybe of less thickness, whereby floorspace is gained. The sections being of considerable size, the walls are quickly set up, and when finished are at once ready for plasterin For roofs and ceilings their application readily suggests itself wherever it should be found desirable to use them for such purpose. here girders or I-beams are used, they may The advantages of be supported directly on them, as shown in Fig. 5, or on theflanges thereof, as shown in dotted lines in same figure, the eell-sections passing from beam to beam and filling the space between.
The internal filling of concrete may also be dispensed with; but such concrete may be applied from the top, where it is desirable to deaden the sound and to form a foundation for the flooring. When used for floor con struction and where wooden floors are to be laid on it, wooden strips 26 may be inserted in some of the cells, as shown in Fig. 6, to which the flooring is nailed. However, and where a floor of great compactness is desired, channel-rails 19 may be used at the ends between the fioor'sections, the whole compactly connected by being embedded in cement. (See Fig. 5.) These cell-sections may also be used to form girders, as shown in Figs. 7 and 8, where a number of sections are set in between two rails 27 27, preferably channelrails, forming a continuous web from end to end of these latter and held together by tierods 28. By reason of the vertical stress acting endwise on the sheet-metal cells the resistance and carrying capacity of a girder thus constructed is enormous as compared with the limited amount of metal used. For the same reason and being very light a smaller percentage of the capacity of the girder is absorbed for the purpose of supporting its own weight.
The outer faces of the cells making up the web 6 of girders so constructed may be perforated the same as shown in Fig. l to form lath, which permits application of plaster and inclosure of the girder thereby.
Having described my invention, I claim as new-- 1. A wall, or similar structure forming one of the component parts of a building, built up of sections arranged in rows or tiers and consisting of rows of adjoining vertical triangular cells 11 formed of a continuous sheet of metal which is correspondingly shaped and in a manner that the upright sides 12 which are substantially in line form the outer sides or faces of such wall, which sides or faces are connected by the sides 13 of the triangle which sides pass between the outer faces and traverse the thickness of the structure and wire lacing whereby adj oining tiers are connected with each other substantially as shown.
2. A wall or partition built up in rows of sections of equal height and each of which consists of a series of adjoining vertical triangular cells 11, the upright sides 12 of which are substantially in line and form the faces of said walls, the sections being formed of a continuous sheet of metal, flanged rails at top and bottom of such wall or partition'and between the adjoining ends of the rows or tiers thereof, to hold such tiers and sections forming them in position and a layer or partial filling of mortar or concrete applied to the ICO IIO
lower part of the cells of each tier as shown at 18 and tamped down before the next higher tier is set up.
3. A sheet of metalhaving part-s perforated and prepared to form lath, the perforated and imperforate parts which are of equal width respectively, forming alternate rectangular fields parallel with the edges of the sheet.
4; An elementary component to be used in the formation of metal structures as here in View, consisting of a section of cells 11 of triangular shape placed side by side, the sections being constructed of a sheet of which parts are perforated, the perforated and imperforate parts which are of equal width respectively, forming alternate rectangular fields parallel with the edges of the sheet, the latter being bent between the fields to form the cells as shown and in a manner to bring the perforated parts of the sheet to the outside and in line to form the outer faces 12 of the sections which, being perforated, form metallic lath and become adapted to receive plaster while the imperforate parts 13 serve to connect them and strengthen the structure.
5. A girder, the Vertical part of which consists of adjoining cells of equal height and all connecting and formed of sheets of metal correspondingly shaped, forming a continuous web from end to end of the girder channelrails to hold the cells in alinement and tierods to hold the whole structure together.
6. A girder, the web of which is formed of sections of cells of triangular shape, placed side by side, the sections being constructed of a sheet of which parts are perforated, the perforated and imperforate parts which are of equal width respectively, forming alternate rectangular fields parallelwith the edges of the sheet, the latter being bent between the fields as to form the cells as shown and in a manner to bring the perforated parts of the sheet to the outside and, in line to form the outside of the girder and being perforated permits the latter to be inclosed by plaster, channel-rails 27 above and below the cells to hold them in alinement and tie-rods to hold the whole structure together.
7. An elementary component to be used in the formation of metal structures as here in View, consisting of a row of cells 11 of triangular shape placed side by side, the sides 12 of the cells being substantially in line forming the outer faces of the parts, which faces are connected by the sides 13 passing between them, the adjoining edges of sides 12 forming also the corners of the cells, being in actual contact or at least so close to each other as to form substantially an unbroken and closed surface.
In testimony whereof I hereunto affix my signature in presence of two witnesses.
EMIL F. BAUDE.
Witnesses:
JACOB F. WEITZEL, O. SPENGEL.
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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2455455A (en) * 1946-12-12 1948-12-07 Paul B West Prefabricated concrete form
US2536759A (en) * 1946-12-13 1951-01-02 United Steel Fabricators Inc Arch construction
US2909917A (en) * 1954-11-01 1959-10-27 Roedter Henry Edward Wall structure
US3857215A (en) * 1972-12-08 1974-12-31 A Moore Can-containing construction member
US3932973A (en) * 1974-11-18 1976-01-20 Moore Alvin E Insubars

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2455455A (en) * 1946-12-12 1948-12-07 Paul B West Prefabricated concrete form
US2536759A (en) * 1946-12-13 1951-01-02 United Steel Fabricators Inc Arch construction
US2909917A (en) * 1954-11-01 1959-10-27 Roedter Henry Edward Wall structure
US3857215A (en) * 1972-12-08 1974-12-31 A Moore Can-containing construction member
US3932973A (en) * 1974-11-18 1976-01-20 Moore Alvin E Insubars

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