US568934A - Automatic sight-feed crude-oil burner - Google Patents

Automatic sight-feed crude-oil burner Download PDF

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US568934A
US568934A US568934DA US568934A US 568934 A US568934 A US 568934A US 568934D A US568934D A US 568934DA US 568934 A US568934 A US 568934A
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oil
water
tube
pipe
steam
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23NREGULATING OR CONTROLLING COMBUSTION
    • F23N5/00Systems for controlling combustion
    • F23N5/24Preventing development of abnormal or undesired conditions, i.e. safety arrangements
    • F23N5/242Preventing development of abnormal or undesired conditions, i.e. safety arrangements using electronic means
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21KNON-ELECTRIC LIGHT SOURCES USING LUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING ELECTROCHEMILUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING CHARGES OF COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL; LIGHT SOURCES USING SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES AS LIGHT-GENERATING ELEMENTS; LIGHT SOURCES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21K5/00Light sources using charges of combustible material, e.g. illuminating flash devices
    • F21K5/02Light sources using charges of combustible material, e.g. illuminating flash devices ignited in a non-disrupting container, e.g. photo-flash bulb

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  • My invention relates to an improved device for burning crude oil which may be used in various ways, either for creating power, heating ranges for hotels and restaurants, or for general domestic purposes; and my invention consists in certain features of novelty hereinafter described, and pointed out in the claims.
  • Figure I represents my device in perspective as attached to a range or cooking-stove.
  • Fig. II represents a section of the stove, taken on line II II, Fig. I, looking outward, but showing various parts of the device in full lines as well as in sections.
  • Fig. III is in part a section taken on line III III, Fig. II, looking inward, showing the sight-feed and diaphragm for controlling the supply of oil.
  • Fig. IV is a horizontal section taken on line IV IV, Fig. III.
  • Fig. V is a perspective view of the heat retaining and distributing box.
  • 1 represents an ordinary cooking-stove to which my device is shown attached, but which, as before stated, may be used in connection with various heat ing and cooking furnaces, ranges, &c.
  • the oil-supply pipe 2 connects with a vertical cylinder 3 by means of a port 4.
  • the oil passes into a lower chamber 5 in said cylinder, thence up through apertures 6 in a partition 3 to an upper chamber 7 in said cylinder, thence through a pipe 8 to a channel 9 oil passes from the port 11 down through a contracted orifice 13, into the upper end of which the point of the valve 12 enters when the valve is closed.
  • ll represents a glass tube through which the oil drops, thus forminga sight-feed for the same.
  • the oil passes through a chamber 15 in a lower head 16, and from thence itis discharged into the stove or furnace through a pipe 17, the upper end of said pipe being connected at 18 to the head 16, and being supported near its lower end by being connected at 19 with the outside of the steam-discharge pipe.
  • 20 represents the water-sup ply pipe through which water is introduced to the stove or furnace in order to create steam to mix with the. oil at the point of discharge.
  • Vhere convenient to a system of water supply I connect said supply-pipe thereto, in order to have a constant supply and at the same time take advantage of the water-pressure; but be it understood the successful operation of my device does not depend on such a connection or pressure, as a tank suitably located would perform the same functions.
  • I also preferably place a reservoir 21 in connection with the supply-pipe at some suitable point between the check-valve 22 and the burner, the object of said reservoir being to always maintain a supply of water and pressure in case the main supply is for any reason out 01f or is being used for other purposes, said pressure being caused by the compressed air within the same.
  • the water-supply pipe 20 connects with the 8 5 upper head 10 at 23, at the opposite end of the upperhead to the port 11, in rear of the channel 9, and discharges into a chamber 24 in said head. Thence the water passes down through a contracted orifice 25, the amount 0 allowed to pass through said orifice being governed by a needle-valve 26.
  • the water passes out through an orifice 31, through a pipe 32, and discharges into the heating-pipe 33, surrounding the fire-chamber.
  • a partition 32, having a Z-shaped orifice 34, (see Fig. 11,) which serves as a trap toprevent a back pressure of steam from escaping, into the transparent tube and condensing on the glass, as well as to retain water in the diaphragm or piston.
  • the heating-pipe is properly arranged around the fire-box of the stove or furnace in one or more coils, in order that steam may be quickly generated.
  • the return end of the heating-pipe connects with a vertical pipe 35 at 36, said vertical pipe having at its upper end a safety-valve 37, controlled by a coilspring 38. It is not thought that a safetyvalve is necessary in a device automatically controlled, as this device is, but the-same has been shown as a double precaution.
  • the steam passes down through the pipe 35 and connects with the injector-tube 39 at 40, said pipe serving to support the burner, which is mainly formed of the pipe or tube 39 and the end of the oil-pipe 17.
  • the steam in said pipe serves to heat the oil before it is discharged.
  • the tube 39 is provided with a conical inner end 41 and has a centralcontracted dischargeopening 42.
  • the discharge end of the oilpipe 17 is bent or curved, as shown at 43, in order that the point of discharge of the oil may be on a horizontal plane with the discharge-openin g 42 of the tube 39, with the result that the steam strikes the end of the oiltube and is scattered, carrying with it the oil as it is discharged and vaporizes it ready to be consumed.
  • Thecurved tube conveys the oil in the same general direction as the steam drives it after it is discharged from the tube, the steam thus having a greater purchase upon the oil than if it were discharged at right angles, the curved tube also admitting of a slower discharge, thus giving the steam more time to act, and as the oil travels slowly down the curved tube time is given for the steam to heat the oil before it is dis charged, thus aiding combustion. to that extent. I have found that this curved tube gives much better results than other forms.
  • strainer-tube 44 represents a strainer-tube placed in the injector-tube 39 and being connected with a threaded plug 45, screwed into the outer end of said injector-tube and having a handwheel 46 thereon, by which means said strainer-tube may be removed when found necessary.
  • object of said rod being to clean out the open ing at the inner end of the injector-tube when necessary while the burner is in use, the rod being then drawn back out of the way without removing it from the injector-tube. (See Fig. 11.)
  • the supply of oil is automatically controlled or turned 011 or. off bythe action of the steampressure on the water, the water passing through a curved pipe 51 (which provides a watertrap) into a diaphragm-cup 52, supported on the pipe..
  • Vashers 58 are placed at the ends of the glass tubes 14 29 in slight recesses 59 in the heads 10 16 and the heads forced into close I thus form a steam-tight contion and distribution of the heat atoms to use a heat retaining and distributing device.
  • Said distributing-box is preferably triangular or V shape, having a chamber 62.0f the samecontour, the Wide portion of the chamber facing the burner and located at a proper distance therefrom to receive the heat-blast.
  • the box 61 represents a series of openings in the end, sides, and top of the box 61, through which the heat is properly distributed.
  • the box 61 is preferably made of fire-clay, in order to resist the heat, and at the same time it serves to retain a sufficient amount of heat to ignite the oil if for any reason the supply should be shut ofi for a brief space of time and again turned on before the box has time to cool off.
  • I prefer to construct the steam-heating pipes as shown on I, so that coal or other fuel may be used without removing the same or the pipes in any way interfering with the use of said fuel.
  • An oil-burner comprising an oil supply, a burner, means for generating steam, a water supply, a head, connected with the water supply, having an outlet-port, and a coil of wire situated at the outlet-port of the head in a vertical position and of such a diameter as to cause the water to be separated into drops by passing through it; substantially as described.
  • An oil-burner comprising an oil supply, a burner, means for generating steam, a water supply, tubes through which the water and oil supplies pass, and a wire coil located in one of the tubes and situated at the outlet-port of the head in a vertical position and of such a diameter as to cause the water to be separated into drops by passing through it; substantially as described.
  • An apparatus for burning oil comprising a water-supply pipe an upper head having a chamber with which the water-supply pipe is connected and a contracted orifice beneath the chamber, a valve for controlling the orifice, a pendent coil of wire surrounding the lower end of the orifice for arresting the flow and producing large drops of water,
  • the lower head having a chamber and a tube around the coil and'connecting the chambers in the upper and lower heads; substantially as described.
  • An apparatus for burning oil comprising a water-supply pipe, the upper head having a chamber with which the water-supply pipe is connected and a contracted orifice beneath the chamber, a valve for controlling the orifice, the lower head having a chamber and a pipe leading from the chamber formed with a partition having a Z-shaped recess forming a trap and a tube connecting the chambers in the upper and lower heads; substantially as described.
  • An oil-burner comprising the steam-im jector tubehavin g a conical inner end formed with a contracted discharge-opening, the' strainer-tube located in the injector-tube, the threaded plug with which the strainer-tube is connected, having a hand-wheel, the stuffing-box connected with the plug, and the sliding rod extending through the stufiing-box, through the plug, and through the strainertube, for cleaning the discharge-opening of the injector-tube; substantially as described.

Description

(No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet. 1.
' D. G. WILGUS. 7 AUTOMATIC SIGHT FEED CRUDE OIL BURNER Patented Oct. 6, 1896'.
WITNESSES INVENTOR .Z7.0.W2JZ 50,5;
BY XYMA (N /v MW A TTORNEYS Tm: minus mans w. Pno mmco. msnmomu. n c;
. 6- .j' pm 55 3 9' x 59-11 v 5 z; 1
(No Model,-) 2 sneetssneet 2.
D. G. 'WILGUS.
AUTOMATIC SIGHT FEED CRUDE 01L BURNER. No. 568,924. Patented 00b6, 1896.
I /j l WITNESSES INVENTOR A T TORNEY'S m: nouns min: no. mum wnswksmmo. c.
UNITED STAT -s.
PATENT OFFICE.
DANIEL c. WILGUS, or LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA."
AUTOMATIC SIGHT-FEED CRUDE-OIL BURNER.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 568,93f1, dated October 6, 1896.
Application filed February 7 1895. Serial No. 537,646. (No model.)
To aZZ whom it may concern.-
Be it known that I, DANIEL C. IVILGUS, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of the city of Los Augeles, in the county of Los An geles and State of Oalifornia,have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Automatic Sight-Feed Crude-Oil Burners, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, which form a part of this specification.
My invention relates to an improved device for burning crude oil which may be used in various ways, either for creating power, heating ranges for hotels and restaurants, or for general domestic purposes; and my invention consists in certain features of novelty hereinafter described, and pointed out in the claims.
Figure I represents my device in perspective as attached to a range or cooking-stove. Fig. II represents a section of the stove, taken on line II II, Fig. I, looking outward, but showing various parts of the device in full lines as well as in sections. Fig. III is in part a section taken on line III III, Fig. II, looking inward, showing the sight-feed and diaphragm for controlling the supply of oil. Fig. IV is a horizontal section taken on line IV IV, Fig. III. Fig. V is a perspective view of the heat retaining and distributing box.
Referring to the drawings, 1 represents an ordinary cooking-stove to which my device is shown attached, but which, as before stated, may be used in connection with various heat ing and cooking furnaces, ranges, &c.
2 represents the oil-supply pipe, which connects with a reservoir conveniently located (not shown) at some point higher than the burner in order to create a gravity-feed, the oil not requiring any further pressure than that of the atmosphere.
The oil-supply pipe 2 connects with a vertical cylinder 3 by means of a port 4. The oil passes into a lower chamber 5 in said cylinder, thence up through apertures 6 in a partition 3 to an upper chamber 7 in said cylinder, thence through a pipe 8 to a channel 9 oil passes from the port 11 down through a contracted orifice 13, into the upper end of which the point of the valve 12 enters when the valve is closed.
ll represents a glass tube through which the oil drops, thus forminga sight-feed for the same. The oil thence passes through a chamber 15 in a lower head 16, and from thence itis discharged into the stove or furnace through a pipe 17, the upper end of said pipe being connected at 18 to the head 16, and being supported near its lower end by being connected at 19 with the outside of the steam-discharge pipe.
20 represents the water-sup ply pipe through which water is introduced to the stove or furnace in order to create steam to mix with the. oil at the point of discharge. Vhere convenient to a system of water supply, I connect said supply-pipe thereto, in order to have a constant supply and at the same time take advantage of the water-pressure; but be it understood the successful operation of my device does not depend on such a connection or pressure, as a tank suitably located would perform the same functions. I also preferably place a reservoir 21 in connection with the supply-pipe at some suitable point between the check-valve 22 and the burner, the object of said reservoir being to always maintain a supply of water and pressure in case the main supply is for any reason out 01f or is being used for other purposes, said pressure being caused by the compressed air within the same.
The water-supply pipe 20 connects with the 8 5 upper head 10 at 23, at the opposite end of the upperhead to the port 11, in rear of the channel 9, and discharges into a chamber 24 in said head. Thence the water passes down through a contracted orifice 25, the amount 0 allowed to pass through said orifice being governed by a needle-valve 26.
27 represents-a pendentcoil of wire sur rounding the lower end of the orifice 25 and extending some distance below the same, the 5 object of said coil being to retard the water a sufficient length of time in order that it be discharged in distinct drops, as seen at 28 in Fig. III, thus only admitting at regular intervals a suificient quantity of water into the 1 0o tube offers a frictional resistance to the wa-- as a tube, but the convolutions of the wire serve to arrest the passage of the water until a large drop is formed, and the passage of the water is still further retarded by the water passing between the separate convolutions or coils of the wire and running down on the outside as well as 011 the inside of the coil to the lower end of the same, where it forms into drops, as stated. The drops of water pass from the orifice 25, down through a glass tube 29, into a chamber in the lower head 16, said glass tube admitting a constant inspection of the amount of water being discharged into the heating-pipe. The water passes out through an orifice 31, through a pipe 32, and discharges into the heating-pipe 33, surrounding the fire-chamber. Between the pipes 32 is a partition. 32, having a Z-shaped orifice 34, (see Fig. 11,) which serves as a trap toprevent a back pressure of steam from escaping, into the transparent tube and condensing on the glass, as well as to retain water in the diaphragm or piston.
The heating-pipe is properly arranged around the fire-box of the stove or furnace in one or more coils, in order that steam may be quickly generated. The return end of the heating-pipe connects with a vertical pipe 35 at 36, said vertical pipe having at its upper end a safety-valve 37, controlled by a coilspring 38. It is not thought that a safetyvalve is necessary in a device automatically controlled, as this device is, but the-same has been shown as a double precaution. The steam passes down through the pipe 35 and connects with the injector-tube 39 at 40, said pipe serving to support the burner, which is mainly formed of the pipe or tube 39 and the end of the oil-pipe 17. As the steam-pipe 35 is in close proximity to the oil-pipe 17 near its discharge-point, the steam in said pipe serves to heat the oil before it is discharged.
The tube 39 is provided with a conical inner end 41 and has a centralcontracted dischargeopening 42. The discharge end of the oilpipe 17 is bent or curved, as shown at 43, in order that the point of discharge of the oil may be on a horizontal plane with the discharge-openin g 42 of the tube 39, with the result that the steam strikes the end of the oiltube and is scattered, carrying with it the oil as it is discharged and vaporizes it ready to be consumed. Thecurved tube conveys the oil in the same general direction as the steam drives it after it is discharged from the tube, the steam thus having a greater purchase upon the oil than if it were discharged at right angles, the curved tube also admitting of a slower discharge, thus giving the steam more time to act, and as the oil travels slowly down the curved tube time is given for the steam to heat the oil before it is dis charged, thus aiding combustion. to that extent. I have found that this curved tube gives much better results than other forms.
The oil and steam discharges being entirely separate, the oil will not in any way clog or close up the opening through which the steam is discharged.
44 represents a strainer-tube placed in the injector-tube 39 and being connected with a threaded plug 45, screwed into the outer end of said injector-tube and having a handwheel 46 thereon, by which means said strainer-tube may be removed when found necessary.
47 represents a rod located in the center of the injector-tube 39 and passing through a stuffing-box 48 in the outer end of the tube, having a knob 49 on its outer end foroperating the same, and having a shoulder 50 surrounding the rod located inside of the injec tor-tube to limit its outward movement, the.
object of said rod. being to clean out the open ing at the inner end of the injector-tube when necessary while the burner is in use, the rod being then drawn back out of the way without removing it from the injector-tube. (See Fig. 11.)
The supply of oil is automatically controlled or turned 011 or. off bythe action of the steampressure on the water, the water passing through a curved pipe 51 (which provides a watertrap) into a diaphragm-cup 52, supported on the pipe..
53 represents a diaphragmsuit-ably secured in the cup 52 and having a piston 54 resting thereon, the rod 55 of the piston connecting with a rod 56, which extends up into theupper chamber 7 of the cylinder 3, Where it comes in contact with a valve 56, which seats on the partition 3 and closes the oilsupply orifices 6, the result being that as the steam is generated the diaphragm and piston are raised by the steam-pressure on the water and a supply of oil is permitted to pass to the burner. If any accident should shut 0E the supply of water and no steam be generated and the pressure on the diaphragm be removed, then the valve will be closed by action of a spring 57 and the supply of oil shut off until steam is again generated.
Vashers 58 are placed at the ends of the glass tubes 14 29 in slight recesses 59 in the heads 10 16 and the heads forced into close I thus form a steam-tight contion and distribution of the heat atoms to use a heat retaining and distributing device. I have invented for this purpose a box 61 tobe placed in the fire-box of a stove or furnace. Said distributing-box is preferably triangular or V shape, having a chamber 62.0f the samecontour, the Wide portion of the chamber facing the burner and located at a proper distance therefrom to receive the heat-blast.
63 represents a series of openings in the end, sides, and top of the box 61, through which the heat is properly distributed. The box 61 is preferably made of fire-clay, in order to resist the heat, and at the same time it serves to retain a sufficient amount of heat to ignite the oil if for any reason the supply should be shut ofi for a brief space of time and again turned on before the box has time to cool off.
64 represents wire or its equivalent placed in the fire-clay box 61 before it is burned, said -wire forming a binding element to prevent breakage of the clay.
I prefer to construct the steam-heating pipes as shown on I, so that coal or other fuel may be used without removing the same or the pipes in any way interfering with the use of said fuel.
In countries where the temperature falls to a low point I prefer to use distilled oil when necessary and form gas to mix with the crude oil at the point of discharge, and thus avoid danger of the burner not operating on account of the water freezing.
I claim as my invention 1. An oil-burner comprising an oil supply, a burner, means for generating steam, a water supply, a head, connected with the water supply, having an outlet-port, and a coil of wire situated at the outlet-port of the head in a vertical position and of such a diameter as to cause the water to be separated into drops by passing through it; substantially as described.
2. An oil-burner comprising an oil supply, a burner, means for generating steam, a water supply, tubes through which the water and oil supplies pass, and a wire coil located in one of the tubes and situated at the outlet-port of the head in a vertical position and of such a diameter as to cause the water to be separated into drops by passing through it; substantially as described.
3. An apparatus for burning oil comprising a water-supply pipe an upper head having a chamber with which the water-supply pipe is connected and a contracted orifice beneath the chamber, a valve for controlling the orifice, a pendent coil of wire surrounding the lower end of the orifice for arresting the flow and producing large drops of water,
the lower head having a chamber and a tube around the coil and'connecting the chambers in the upper and lower heads; substantially as described.
l. An apparatus for burning oil comprising a water-supply pipe, the upper head having a chamber with which the water-supply pipe is connected and a contracted orifice beneath the chamber, a valve for controlling the orifice, the lower head having a chamber and a pipe leading from the chamber formed with a partition having a Z-shaped recess forming a trap and a tube connecting the chambers in the upper and lower heads; substantially as described.
5. An oil-burner comprising the steam-im jector tubehavin g a conical inner end formed with a contracted discharge-opening, the' strainer-tube located in the injector-tube, the threaded plug with which the strainer-tube is connected, having a hand-wheel, the stuffing-box connected with the plug, and the sliding rod extending through the stufiing-box, through the plug, and through the strainertube, for cleaning the discharge-opening of the injector-tube; substantially as described.
6. The combination with aburner for steam and oil, sources of water and oil, water and oil ducts having sight-tu hes therein and leading from the said sources of water and oil to the burner, heads for the sight-tubes having ports forming portions of the ducts aforesaid, and a steam-generator in the water-duct interposed between the sight tube for water and the burner; substantially as described.
DANIEL O. WILGUS.
Witnesses: JAS. E. KNIGHT, HENRY E. BRETT.
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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2427530A (en) * 1939-03-21 1947-09-16 Monmouth Products Company Humidifying system water feed device
US2465297A (en) * 1943-12-30 1949-03-22 Linde Air Prod Co Process and apparatus for disposing of metal desurfacing products

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2427530A (en) * 1939-03-21 1947-09-16 Monmouth Products Company Humidifying system water feed device
US2465297A (en) * 1943-12-30 1949-03-22 Linde Air Prod Co Process and apparatus for disposing of metal desurfacing products

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