US533845A - And george h - Google Patents

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US533845A
US533845A US533845DA US533845A US 533845 A US533845 A US 533845A US 533845D A US533845D A US 533845DA US 533845 A US533845 A US 533845A
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fender
car
section
frame
rods
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60RVEHICLES, VEHICLE FITTINGS, OR VEHICLE PARTS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B60R21/00Arrangements or fittings on vehicles for protecting or preventing injuries to occupants or pedestrians in case of accidents or other traffic risks
    • B60R21/34Protecting non-occupants of a vehicle, e.g. pedestrians

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  • TH Nonms Farias co, No1-ammo., wnsunsfcn. n. c.
  • a further object of the invention is to provlde a means whereby the sliding frame may be expeditiously and conveniently carried from the inner to an outer or working posi tion, the inner position being'assumed when the car, for. example, is in the car house.
  • Another object of the invention is to construct the fender. proper in two sections, the
  • Another object of the invention is to provide a guard for the wheels at thesides of the car, operating in conjunction with the fender, and likewise provide for the outward movement of the movable section of the fender proper simultaneously with a corresponding movement on the partl of the sliding frame.
  • the invention consistsv in the novel con- 4 struction and combination of the several parts, as will be hereinafter fully set forth,
  • FIG. 2 is a side elevation of the car fender applied to a car. thereof.
  • Fig. 4 is a side elevation of the fender and aportion of the car to which it is applied, the body portion proper of the fender being shown as constructed in sections, the lower or receiving section being in working position.
  • Fig. 5 is a view similarr to Fig. 4, in which both the sliding frame and the movable section of the body of the fender are carried inward beneath the car.
  • Fig. 6 is a bottom plan view of a modied form of the fender; and
  • Fig. 7 is a rear elevation of a portion of the body of the fender, illustrating the manner in which one section is held in Fig. 3 is a bottom plan View locking engagement with the other; and Fig.
  • FIG. 8 is a sectional detail View, illustrating the construction employed for automatically carrying one section of the fender beneath the car when required, the movable section of the fender in said ligure being shown locked'in its forward position.
  • arms A are attached to tne truck B, and the said arms are projected forwardly beneath the car and are curved upwardly one at each side of the center of the dashboard B of the car, eX- tending along the outer face of saidboard, as is best shown in Figs. 2 and 5.
  • the upper ends of the upright posts at the front ends of armsA maybe connected, or they may be atin one piece, that is to say, themember 10 ⁇ may be .continuous with the member 11, as
  • the lower member 11 of the body of the car fender in each event is provided with a series of'slots or openings 12, extending from a point near the front to and through a portion of its rear or inner end.
  • the preferred construction of the body of the fender is that shown in Figs. 4, 5, 6 and 7, or that in which adjustable sections are employed.
  • the upper member or section 10 which is stationarily attached to the arms A extends downward to a predetermined point below the platform of the car and isr provided with a recess in which the-upper end of the movable or lower member is made to enter, and this lower member or section is curved forwardly at its rear end and then carried upwardly to enter the said recess in the iixed member or section, and in order that these two sections may be held securely together one of the sections at their point of contact may be provided with pins and the other with apertures to receive the pins.
  • a locking plate 13 has sliding movement in a vertical direction, and the said locking plate is guided in its movement by studs 14 or their equivalents loosely entering slots l5 in the plate, as lshown in Fig. 7, and the plate is raised and lowered through the medium of an adjusting screw shaft 16, threaded at its lower end the threaded end being iitted in a correspondingly treated lng 17, formed upon the back of the locking plate 13, preferably at the center thereof, while the upper portion of the shaft may be journaled in bearings upon the inner face of the vertical section of the fender, and the said'shaft is preferably provided at its upper end with a hand wheel 18, or its equivalent.
  • the movable section 11 of the fender is guided in its rearward movement byforming apertures in the upper portion of its rear end, which receive hollow rods 19, projected from and securely attached to the lower portion of,
  • the fender When the two sections are in engagement and the locking plate is carried downward, it closes overthe upper portion of the lower section or member of the fender, as shown in Figs. 4 and 7, securely holding them in working position.
  • the fender is made with its two members or sections in one part, or integral, it is more or less decidedly curved at its rear portiomor at the junction of the two members, as shown in Figs.
  • a shield D is employed in connection with the fender body C, as a guard for the wheels at the Sides of the car.
  • the shields D are made preferably in three sections 22, 23 and 24.
  • the sections 24, are the forward sections, and they are pivotally connected with the movable section or member of the body fen der at the sides of its rear end, and the said forward section of the shield has sliding connection with the intermediate section 23, the latter section being provided with longitudinal slots 25, receiving pins carried by the forward section 24; and the rear section 22 of each shield, is attached to the truck B of the car, and is provided with a slot 26, receiving a pin carried by the r intermediate section.
  • the sections of the shields may in a measure telescope, or slide one upon the other, when the lower section of the body fender is carried inward, this position being shown clearly in Fig. 5.
  • the shields D are in one piece, having pivotal engagement at one end with the truck of the car and pivotal engagement at the opposite end with the lower portion of the fender.
  • a sliding frame E is employed, and this frame is adapted to contact first with whatever object may be within the path of the car; and the said frame consists of a front bar 27, parallel with the front edge of the body of the fender, and a series of rods 28, which rods extend rearwardly from the front bar through the slots 12 in the lower portion of the body fender and beneath the body of IIC the car.
  • These rods are ordinarily graduated in length, the center ones being the longer ones, and the central rod is provided with teeth upon one of its faces forming a rack 29.
  • the central rods 28 have guided movement in an apertured bar 30a, or its equivalent, extending from one supporting arm A to the other as shown in Figs. 2 and 6, and bracket supports 31a are likewise usually provided for the extreme inner ends of the longer rods.
  • the forward bar 27 of the sliding frame E is cushioned ordinarily upon its forward face, in order that the person or object struck will not be injured to any appreciable extent.
  • the sliding frame is operated through the medium of a pinion 30, which is secured upon a shaft 31, said shaft being usually journaled in bearings upon the inner surface of the vertical fender section, and is provided with a hand wheel 33 at its upper end.
  • the shaft 3l is capable of being raised to a degree, carrying the pinions 30 out of engagement with the rack 39, and this shaft will be practically in aligment with the shaft 16 operating the lower section of the sectional fender.
  • the shaft 16 onlyvappears, but in Fig. 6 both shafts are visible.
  • sundry of the Arods 28 of the sliding frame are provided with upwardly-extending hooks 34, adapted for engagement with the rear end of the movable section of the fender; and with downwardlyextending hooks 35, adapted for engagement with the forward edge of the front bar of the fender, such downwardly projected hooks be ing also used with the one piece fender.
  • the sliding frame When the fender is in operative position; the sliding frame will have been projected outward a sufficient distance to extend over and beyond the front portion of the fender, this bein glaccomplished through the medium of the rack and pinion 29 and 30. When the frame is in this position the pinion 30 is disengaged from the rack 29. Consequently, whenever an object is struck by the frame E the frame will move backward breaking the force of the blow, and the frame being free to slide in a rearwardly direction will be carried by its momentum to the position shown in Fig. 2, leaving the horizontal member or section of the fender exposed to receive the object struck.
  • the sliding frame may be readily carried out again by manipulating the shaft 3l, the rack and pinion 29 and 30 being in engagement.
  • the fender when the frame is carried yrearward the fender will drop close to the surface of the ground and thereby prevent any object from passing beneath it, while the shields D will likewise be carried close to the rails.
  • thesaid section may be carried outward to the working position by thek motor man standing upon the platform, as in manipulating the rack 2 9 of the sliding frame as the said frame moves outward, the hooks 34E willl engage with the back of the said sliding section of the fender and will carry the said section forward to its working position, whereupon the locking plate 13 is brought into action and the car is ready to proceed.
  • a car fender constructed in two sections, an upper vertical fixed section adapted for attachment to a car, and a lower or horizontal section having sliding and guided movement to and from the vertical section, the horizontal section when extended engaging with its rear end the lower end of the vertical section, a lookin g device whereby the two sections are connected or disconnected, and means, substantially as shown and described, for manipulating the sliding section, asand for'the purpose specified.
  • Ya fender constructed in two sections, an upper fixed section and a lower sliding section, the sliding section being adapted to pass beneath the car, locking devices for connecting or disconnecting the two sections, a guide upon which the movable section has movement, and a tension device connected with the movable section and operating to draw said section in direction of the inner end of its specified.
  • shields connected at one end to the fender and connected at the other end to thetruck over the receiving portion of the fender and provided with projections adapted for engagement with the fender upon the outward movement of the frame, as and for the purpose specified.
  • a car fender comprising an upper section and alower or horizontal section, and a locking device for connecting and disconnecting the sections, of a support projected forwardly from the truck of the car and connected with the upper or stationary section of the fender, guides upon which thelower section of the fender travels, and sectional shields connected with the movable section of the fender and with the truck of the car, the said sections having telescopic action, as and for the purpose specified.
  • an immovable safety guard comprising upright posts connected to and extending upwardlg from said rods near the front end of the car,a connection between said posts and an extensible fender adapted to slide back and forth on said rods, substantially as described.

Description

(No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet 1, J. H. FAULSTICH.
GAB. FENDER. N0. 533,845. Patented Feb. 5, 1895.
- y' I m m q f 0 l @y .y j [Fi-F lll III d afg a l. i @jg lli II ,ZD v.
ATTORNEYS.
a wsu 2 shetsfsheet 2.
I (N0 Model.)
J. H. FAULSTICH.
CAR FEIIDBB..v
A Patenzed Feb. 5
WTNESSES:
ATTORNEYS.
TH: Nonms Farias co, No1-ammo., wnsunsfcn. n. c.
Unirse 'rares VFries.
ATWT
JOHN H. FAULSTIOH, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., ASSIGNOR OF FIVE-SIXTHS TO GEORGE KRAUS AND FREDERICK HAUSMAN, OF SAMEPLAOE, AND CHARLES W. STRINGHAM AND JOHN A. WILLIAMS, OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, AND GEORGE H. THOMPSON, OF EAST ORANGE, NEW
. JERSEY.
CAR-FEN DEAR.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 533,845, dated February 5, 1 8.95.l Application led March 14, 1894- Serial No. 503,578. (No model.)
7 car fenders, and it has for its object to provide a device adapted for attachment to a car, in which in addition to a fender proper a sliding frame will be employed to contact with whatever object may be in the path of the car, the sliding frame yielding freely when engaged by said object, thereby somewhat breaking the forceof the fall, and in the rearward movement of the frame the b- -ject struck will be received upon the fender proper. o
A further object of the invention is to provlde a means whereby the sliding frame may be expeditiously and conveniently carried from the inner to an outer or working posi tion, the inner position being'assumed when the car, for. example, is in the car house.
Another object of the invention is to construct the fender. proper in two sections, the
' lower or horizontal section being capable of movement practically beneath the platform of the car, its normal position being in advance of the platform, thus permitting the car to occupy no` more room in a car house than it would were the fender not applied thereto.
Another object of the invention is to provide a guard for the wheels at thesides of the car, operating in conjunction with the fender, and likewise provide for the outward movement of the movable section of the fender proper simultaneously with a corresponding movement on the partl of the sliding frame.
The invention consistsv in the novel con- 4 struction and combination of the several parts, as will be hereinafter fully set forth,
and pointed out in the claims.
. Reference is to be had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification, in which similar figures and letters of reference indicate corresponding parts in all the views. s
` Figure lis a longitudinal vertical section through the car fender, the said section being taken practically on the line l-l of Fig. 3. Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the car fender applied to a car. thereof. Fig. 4 is a side elevation of the fender and aportion of the car to which it is applied, the body portion proper of the fender being shown as constructed in sections, the lower or receiving section being in working position. Fig. 5 is a view similarr to Fig. 4, in which both the sliding frame and the movable section of the body of the fender are carried inward beneath the car. Fig. 6 is a bottom plan view of a modied form of the fender; and Fig. 7 is a rear elevation of a portion of the body of the fender, illustrating the manner in which one section is held in Fig. 3 is a bottom plan View locking engagement with the other; and Fig.
8 is a sectional detail View, illustrating the construction employed for automatically carrying one section of the fender beneath the car when required, the movable section of the fender in said ligure being shown locked'in its forward position.
. In carrying outthe invention, arms A are attached to tne truck B, and the said arms are projected forwardly beneath the car and are curved upwardly one at each side of the center of the dashboard B of the car, eX- tending along the outer face of saidboard, as is best shown in Figs. 2 and 5. The upper ends of the upright posts at the front ends of armsA maybe connected, or they may be atin one piece, that is to say, themember 10` may be .continuous with the member 11, as
Ssv
`in -which the lower member 11 is capable of being carried beneath the car body, but the upper member is permanent, being secured to the arms A. The lower member 11 of the body of the car fender in each event is provided with a series of'slots or openings 12, extending from a point near the front to and through a portion of its rear or inner end.
The preferred construction of the body of the fender is that shown in Figs. 4, 5, 6 and 7, or that in which adjustable sections are employed. When the adjustable sections or members are used the upper member or section 10, which is stationarily attached to the arms A extends downward to a predetermined point below the platform of the car and isr provided with a recess in which the-upper end of the movable or lower member is made to enter, and this lower member or section is curved forwardly at its rear end and then carried upwardly to enter the said recess in the iixed member or section, and in order that these two sections may be held securely together one of the sections at their point of contact may be provided with pins and the other with apertures to receive the pins.
4Upon the back of the stationary member or section ,10 of the body of the fender a locking plate 13 has sliding movement in a vertical direction, and the said locking plate is guided in its movement by studs 14 or their equivalents loosely entering slots l5 in the plate, as lshown in Fig. 7, and the plate is raised and lowered through the medium of an adjusting screw shaft 16, threaded at its lower end the threaded end being iitted in a correspondingly treated lng 17, formed upon the back of the locking plate 13, preferably at the center thereof, while the upper portion of the shaft may be journaled in bearings upon the inner face of the vertical section of the fender, and the said'shaft is preferably provided at its upper end with a hand wheel 18, or its equivalent.
The movable section 11 of the fender is guided in its rearward movement byforming apertures in the upper portion of its rear end, which receive hollow rods 19, projected from and securely attached to the lower portion of,
the station section or memberof the fender,the said rods being provided with stops 20 at their inner ends, closing the sante and preventing the lower section of the fender from leaving them; and when the locking plate is drawn out of engagement with the lower member or section of the fender, said section may be carried inward beneath the body of the car to the position shown in Fig. 5, thereby leaving the car of the same length practically as though no fender were applied. This is accomplished as shown in Fig. 8, in which lugs 19' are shown as projected downward from the movable section of the fender, entering longitudinal slots 19", produced in the upper portion of' the hollow rods 19, and the said lugs are connected with the heads of the said hollow rods through the medium of springs 19, the tendency ofthe said springs being to draw the movable section or member of the fender in direction of the heads of the guide rods 10. Therefore, when the locking plate 13, is released from the movable section or member of the fender the springs 19, immediately act to draw the said fender beneath the car.
When the two sections are in engagement and the locking plate is carried downward, it closes overthe upper portion of the lower section or member of the fender, as shown in Figs. 4 and 7, securely holding them in working position. When, however, the fender is made with its two members or sections in one part, or integral, it is more or less decidedly curved at its rear portiomor at the junction of the two members, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, and in either event the outer end of the lower section or member of the fender is solid, and if in practice it is found desirable, may be covered by a cushion of any description; and this end of the fender may likewise be provided with small wheels 2l, said wheels being adapted to engage either with the rails of the track, or with the surface between the said rails.
A shield D, is employed in connection with the fender body C, as a guard for the wheels at the Sides of the car. When the adjustable body fender is employed, the shields D, are made preferably in three sections 22, 23 and 24. The sections 24, are the forward sections, and they are pivotally connected with the movable section or member of the body fen der at the sides of its rear end, and the said forward section of the shield has sliding connection with the intermediate section 23, the latter section being provided with longitudinal slots 25, receiving pins carried by the forward section 24; and the rear section 22 of each shield, is attached to the truck B of the car, and is provided with a slot 26, receiving a pin carried by the r intermediate section. Thus the sections of the shields may in a measure telescope, or slide one upon the other, when the lower section of the body fender is carried inward, this position being shown clearly in Fig. 5.
When the one piece body fender is employed, as shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the shields D are in one piece, having pivotal engagement at one end with the truck of the car and pivotal engagement at the opposite end with the lower portion of the fender.
In connection with both forms of the fender a sliding frame E is employed, and this frame is adapted to contact first with whatever object may be within the path of the car; and the said frame consists of a front bar 27, parallel with the front edge of the body of the fender, and a series of rods 28, which rods extend rearwardly from the front bar through the slots 12 in the lower portion of the body fender and beneath the body of IIC the car. These rods are ordinarily graduated in length, the center ones being the longer ones, and the central rod is provided with teeth upon one of its faces forming a rack 29. The central rods 28 have guided movement in an apertured bar 30a, or its equivalent, extending from one supporting arm A to the other as shown in Figs. 2 and 6, and bracket supports 31a are likewise usually provided for the extreme inner ends of the longer rods.
The forward bar 27 of the sliding frame E is cushioned ordinarily upon its forward face, in order that the person or object struck will not be injured to any appreciable extent.' The sliding frame is operated through the medium of a pinion 30, which is secured upon a shaft 31, said shaft being usually journaled in bearings upon the inner surface of the vertical fender section, and is provided with a hand wheel 33 at its upper end. The shaft 3l, is capable of being raised to a degree, carrying the pinions 30 out of engagement with the rack 39, and this shaft will be practically in aligment with the shaft 16 operating the lower section of the sectional fender. In the views shown in Figs. 4 and 5 the shaft 16 onlyvappears, but in Fig. 6 both shafts are visible.
With the sectional fender, sundry of the Arods 28 of the sliding frame are provided with upwardly-extending hooks 34, adapted for engagement with the rear end of the movable section of the fender; and with downwardlyextending hooks 35, adapted for engagement with the forward edge of the front bar of the fender, such downwardly projected hooks be ing also used with the one piece fender.
When the fender is in operative position; the sliding frame will have been projected outward a sufficient distance to extend over and beyond the front portion of the fender, this bein glaccomplished through the medium of the rack and pinion 29 and 30. When the frame is in this position the pinion 30 is disengaged from the rack 29. Consequently, whenever an object is struck by the frame E the frame will move backward breaking the force of the blow, and the frame being free to slide in a rearwardly direction will be carried by its momentum to the position shown in Fig. 2, leaving the horizontal member or section of the fender exposed to receive the object struck. The sliding frame may be readily carried out again by manipulating the shaft 3l, the rack and pinion 29 and 30 being in engagement.
When the one-piece fender is used and the rack is carried outward, the hooks 35 will ele-l vate the forward end of the fender, as shown in Fig. 1, and consequently will raise upward to a certain degree, the side shields D; but
whenthe frame is carried yrearward the fender will drop close to the surface of the ground and thereby prevent any object from passing beneath it, while the shields D will likewise be carried close to the rails.
When the sectional fender is used and the movable lower section is carried rearward beneath the car body, thesaid section may be carried outward to the working position by thek motor man standing upon the platform, as in manipulating the rack 2 9 of the sliding frame as the said frame moves outward, the hooks 34E willl engage with the back of the said sliding section of the fender and will carry the said section forward to its working position, whereupon the locking plate 13 is brought into action and the car is ready to proceed.
Having thus described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent- 1.Y In a car fender, a fender constructed in two sections, an upper vertical fixed section adapted to be supported in front of the dash board, and a lower horizontal sliding section, the sliding section being adapted to pass beneath the car, and a locking device for connecting or disconnecting the rear end `of the sliding section and the vertical section, as and for the purpose specified.
2. A car fender, the same being constructed in two sections, an upper vertical fixed section adapted for attachment to a car, and a lower or horizontal section having sliding and guided movement to and from the vertical section, the horizontal section when extended engaging with its rear end the lower end of the vertical section, a lookin g device whereby the two sections are connected or disconnected, and means, substantially as shown and described, for manipulating the sliding section, asand for'the purpose specified.
3. In a car fender, Ya fender constructed in two sections, an upper fixed section and a lower sliding section, the sliding section being adapted to pass beneath the car, locking devices for connecting or disconnecting the two sections, a guide upon which the movable section has movement, and a tension device connected with the movable section and operating to draw said section in direction of the inner end of its specified. v j
4t. In a car fender, supporting arms attached to the truck of a car and extending forwardly beneath the car and upwardly in front of the dashboard, a fender having an upright portion attached to the said arms,
and a sliding frame mounted to slide over the IIO guides, as and for the purpose receiving portion of the fender and having guided movement beneath the car, as and for the purpose specified.
5. In a car fender, the combination with a fender, and means for connecting it to the car,
of shields connected at one end to the fender and connected at the other end to thetruck over the receiving portion of the fender and provided with projections adapted for engagement with the fender upon the outward movement of the frame, as and for the purpose specified.
6. The combination, Wi th a car fender, comprising an upper section and alower or horizontal section, and a locking device for connecting and disconnecting the sections, of a support projected forwardly from the truck of the car and connected with the upper or stationary section of the fender, guides upon which thelower section of the fender travels, and sectional shields connected with the movable section of the fender and with the truck of the car, the said sections having telescopic action, as and for the purpose specified.
7. In a car fender, the combination with the fender of a frame mounted to slide over the receiving portion of the fender, the forward end of said sliding frame when in the inward position being at the rearward portion of the receiving part of the fender when the latter is in forward or receiving position and when in the-,outward position projecting beyond the front end of said receiving part of the fender, and an operating device connected with the said frame whereby itis moved outward, the said device being adapted to be disconnected from the said sliding frame whereby said frame may have free inward movement to expose the receiving portion of the fender, substantially as shown and described.
8. The combination, with a car fender, thc receiving or horizontal member whereof is provided with slots or openings, of a sliding frame having guided movement beneath the car and adapted to extend through the openings in thereceiving member of the fender and over saidmember, the frame being provided with a racked surface, anda shaft provided with a pinion engaging with the said rack, the shaft being capable of vertical movement, whereby the pinion may be disengaged from the rack, as and for the purpose set forth.
9. The combination, with a fender, of a sliding frame having aoushioned forward end held to slide over and beyond the horizontal or receiving member of the fender, said frame being provided with projections adapted for engagement with the receiving member of the fender upon the outward movement of the frame, and means, as described, for manipulating said frame as specified.
10. In a railway car or other like vehicle, the combination of the truck frame, the rods, a safety guard connected to and extending upwardly from said rods and an extensible fender adapted to slide back and forth on said rods substantially as described.
11. In a railway car or other like vehicle, the combination of the truck frame, the rods, an immovable safety guaid connected to and extending upwardly from said rods and an extensible fender adapted to slide back and forth on said rods, substantially as described.
12. In a railway car or other like vehicle, the combination of the truck frame, the rods, an immovable safety guard connected to and extending upwardly from said rods near the front end of the car and an extensible fender adapted to slide back and forth on said rods, substantially as described.
13. In a railway car or other like vehicle, the combination of the truck frame, the rods, an immovable safety guard comprising upright posts connected to and extending upwardlg from said rods near the front end of the car,a connection between said posts and an extensible fender adapted to slide back and forth on said rods, substantially as described.
JOI-IN H. FAULSTIGII.
Witnesses:
JOHN F. ACKER, C. SEDGWICK.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN103507721A (en) * 2013-10-29 2014-01-15 长城汽车股份有限公司 Vehicle sundry box

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN103507721A (en) * 2013-10-29 2014-01-15 长城汽车股份有限公司 Vehicle sundry box

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