US4250A - mussey - Google Patents

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US4250A
US4250A US4250DA US4250A US 4250 A US4250 A US 4250A US 4250D A US4250D A US 4250DA US 4250 A US4250 A US 4250A
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Prior art keywords
cart
tail
board
levers
axle
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01DHARVESTING; MOWING
    • A01D34/00Mowers; Mowing apparatus of harvesters
    • A01D34/01Mowers; Mowing apparatus of harvesters characterised by features relating to the type of cutting apparatus
    • A01D34/412Mowers; Mowing apparatus of harvesters characterised by features relating to the type of cutting apparatus having rotating cutters
    • A01D34/63Mowers; Mowing apparatus of harvesters characterised by features relating to the type of cutting apparatus having rotating cutters having cutters rotating about a vertical axis

Description

a sheets-sheet 1. T. MUSSEY.
Dumping-Wagon.
No; Patented Nov. 1, 1845.
l W v 3 Sheets-Sheet 3. T. M-USSEY.
r Dumping-Wagon.
N06 4,250, Patented Nov. 1,1845.
THOMAS MUSSEY, OF NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT.
MODE OE OPERATING CART BODIES:
Specification of Letters Patent No. 4,250, dated November 1, 1 845.
To all whom it may concern v Be it known that I, THOMAS MUssEv, of
New London, inthe county of New London and State of Connecticut, have invented certain improvements in the common cart to be used 1n cartmgcoahgravel, dirt, and any other material requiring ahead and tail board, which may be styled a laborsaving.
cart, and I do hereby declare that the following is a full, clear, and exact description,
of the construction and operation of the same, reference being had-to the annexed drawings, making. a part of this specification, in which Figure l is a perspective View of the cart, as it stands whether loaded or not; Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the front andside as in the act of discharging or dumping the load, and exhibiting the position of the tail board suspended by the levers which control it; Fig, 3 is a perspectiveview of the side and back of the cart with its tail board thrown up, for the purpose of loading.
It is well known tocarters and carmen, that a horse will draw up-hill a greater load when a part of it rests on his back, than when he has nothing but his own weight to give him foot hold. But when there is great weight on the forepartof the cart, it requires corresponding strength in the carter to tip up the load.
To obviate 'this difficulty, multiplied power is used on the principle of thewindlass, which is effected in this manner. A bar of iron at, about an inch indiameter is fitted, so as to have its bearings attached to the thills or shafts in front of the cart body, one end of thebar projecting from the shaft, on the near side, so as to receive a spurwheel 6 about 6 or. 8 inches in diameter. On the same bar, at a little distance from each of the shafts, are secured two smallsnailsor fixed pulleys c, c, of cast iron about 2 inches diameter, with holes cast in them, of the size of the bar a, and with flanges on the rims so as to admit straps f, f, of strong harness leather between them of two or more inches wide; one end of each of these straps is sewed to a pin or bolt which passes through the flanges, the other ends pass up over pulleys or rollers d, cl, pendant to a cross piece of wood 6, (which cross piece is supported by iron studs well braced, and lies close to the cross piece A at the top of the head-boards,) the straps then pass down from the pulleys under-the fore cross sill B and thence to the axle C where they are madefast. A smallpinion g about'3 inches diameter having cogs to match those of. the spur wheel 7) 'on the Windlass arbor a, is made towork in a plate attached-tothe side of the thill, thus fbringlng the pinion g in contact 1 with the spur wheel Z) so as to turn it around. To
the arbor of the pinion is fixed acrank 72 by which the power of tipping the cart bodyis increased by the strapsand windlass at the rate of 20 to 1. or more ifnecessary.
Carts may be made without these fixtures having all theadvantages of the self worle mg tail boards, or these: may beso attached to the cart by screws that they can be removed and the cart used without them.
Onegreat superiority in the use of the windlass consists in the power thus gained of adapting the cart to hilly. roads. In descending a hill it becomes easier forthe horse to carry the load when thrown as far as possible back :ofthe axle, which. can be accomplished simply by the use of either a iratchet wheel, or a ratchet 2', made to play into the spur wheel?) whereby the front of the cart body canbe raised to any desirable height, 'bymeansof the straps f, f, passing under the front sill B of the same, as before described, and by theuse of. sprung or bent thills, the cart can in like manner be let down in front, thus assisting the horse in ascending any elevation.
The tail board D is secured to the cart body by two balance levers (Fig. 2) E, E, to which it is made fast at the top, the bot tonr being secured by two braces 70 leading forward to the middle of the levers, when they are fastened to the rave of the cart F by bolts, which serve as fulcrums to support and move the tail-board up and down.
To theforwardends of the levers iron loops are fastened to receive check straps m, m,
which connect thelevers with the ends of the cross piece H, under the thills near the forward end of the cart (Fig. 2) so that when the body is tipped the hind end drops from the tail-board leaving it suspended by the levers which givesthe load a free. passage to the ground. These straps should be made of good strong harness leather with a buckle on one end so that they may be lengthened or shortened at pleasure in the manner of stirrup leathers.
It will be observed that the straps on the model hang loose allowing the cart to tip ing manner.
several inches before there is any opening at the tail-board, the object being to throw part of the weight back of the axle before the load begins to discharge, so that the center of gravity having passed that point the load tips much easier going all together. The same effect may be produced by ropes or chains instead of leather and the same for tipping the cart by the Windlass. Also rods or hoop iron may be used to connect the levers with the thills, but to give the load liberty to tip before the cart opens behind there must be slots or joints in them to permit them to vary their lengths, so that the object above stated may be attained. An-
other mode is to connect the thills and levers by simple rods or other fastenings as long only as will reach from one to the other in this case however the cart will begin to open behind as it begins to tip.
To raise and tip by the crank and windlass, studs may be used hanging down by the thills and wound up by the Windlass but they look clumsy and are rather in the Way.
To facilitate loading the tail-board may be thrown up and so secured in the follow- About half way between the axle and the front ends of the side sills K K are holes made in the sills through which spring bolts n n pass projecting out about of an inch, being within the sweep of the ends of the balance levers, these bolts are riveted into springs P, P, which are screwed to the inside of the sills so that they force the bolts out. The ends of the bolts which come in contact with the levers as the tailboard rises are sloped so as to admit the levers to pass by pushing them in, and
when they have passed, the springs force them out, so that they catch and hold the lever till by another process they are drawn in again and this is performed as follows. A wire or cord 1, is stretched across the underside of the cart connecting the springs and bolts and to this another cord s, is fastened near the middle and passes over the axle to the hind end of the cart, where it goes through a hole in the hind cross sill L, or through astaplethe cord having a knot tied in it to prevent its slipping out. The following is the plan for keeping the tailboard firmly down when the cart is travel ing over rough roads. A hole is made in the hind cross sill L, near the center through which a rod t about of an inch diameter passes steeled at the end to guard it from wearing as it works against a spring catch w. This rod extends forward till it abuts against an iron U, projecting up from the axle: at the hind end near the cross sill L a notch is made in the rod to fit it to a slit in the end of a spring '0 screwed on the sill L. This spring .forces the rod forward until the end is drawn within the hole, when the forward end of the body of the cart is raised a few inches, but when the cart body is brought down forward to .its proper place, the rod comes in contact with the iron U on the axle, which forces it back so that it becomes a catch to hold down the tail-board.
A spring to with a catch attached is screwed to the tail-board and this seizes the rod and fastens the tail board but it may be easily raised by pulling a knob on the spring so as to relieve the catch. The cart body is fastened down forward by a spring catch X bolted to the fore cross sill B, and a stud y projecting from the'cross bar N of the thills.
About 18' inches from the axle on the thills and at the same distance on the side sills K, K, check joints 2,2, are secured to their inner sides by bolts; they lie folded when the fore end of the body is down, but when it is raised for dumping, they open as shown in Fig. 2, and check it at the proper angle for discharging. R R are secured to the axle C by screw bolts a, a, with eyes back of the axle, into which the snipe bills of the cart body constructed as usual are inserted, they should be made pretty stout and long penetrating well into the ends of the thills; when so made and fitted they constitute the strongest, simplest and cheapest fastenings for that part of the cart that can be adopted.
All the apparatus here used may be applied equally as well to ox as to horse carts and the tail-board and levers being secured by bolts may be removed at pleasure.
Having thus fully described the construction and operation of my labor saving cart, what I claim therein asnew and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-
1. The combination of the shaft a, crank it, pinion g, spur wheel 6, ratchet z, pulleys 0, 0, and (Z, d, straps f, f, and elevated cross piece 6, arranged and operating substantially in the manner and for the purpose herein set forth.
2. I also claim the combination of the tail board D, balance levers E, E, straps m, m, and cross piece H; arranged and operating substantially in the manner and for the purpose herein set forth.
3. I also claim the combination of the bolt 6, spring 1;, spring catch 10, upon the tail board, and metallic plate u, upon the axle, arranged and operating substantially in the manner and for the purpose herein set forth.
THOMAS MUSSEY. Witnesses Z. G. RoBBINs, HENRY SIZER.
The thills
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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2589694A (en) * 1947-12-10 1952-03-18 Albert R Hines Dumping wheelbarrow
US2990212A (en) * 1957-08-30 1961-06-27 Esther F Nicastro Pivotally movable bumper for motor vehicles
US3003742A (en) * 1960-03-17 1961-10-10 Michael I Kearns Lift gate valve
US5135032A (en) * 1991-08-14 1992-08-04 Foster Valve Corporation Slurry gate valve

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2589694A (en) * 1947-12-10 1952-03-18 Albert R Hines Dumping wheelbarrow
US2990212A (en) * 1957-08-30 1961-06-27 Esther F Nicastro Pivotally movable bumper for motor vehicles
US3003742A (en) * 1960-03-17 1961-10-10 Michael I Kearns Lift gate valve
US5135032A (en) * 1991-08-14 1992-08-04 Foster Valve Corporation Slurry gate valve

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