US3841322A - Applicator for pneumatic therapy - Google Patents

Applicator for pneumatic therapy Download PDF

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US3841322A
US3841322A US32012173A US3841322A US 3841322 A US3841322 A US 3841322A US 32012173 A US32012173 A US 32012173A US 3841322 A US3841322 A US 3841322A
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neck
applicators
method
facial
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P Spelio
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P Spelio
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61HPHYSICAL THERAPY APPARATUS, e.g. DEVICES FOR LOCATING OR STIMULATING REFLEX POINTS IN THE BODY; ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION; MASSAGE; BATHING DEVICES FOR SPECIAL THERAPEUTIC OR HYGIENIC PURPOSES OR SPECIFIC PARTS OF THE BODY
    • A61H9/00Pneumatic or hydraulic massage
    • A61H9/005Pneumatic massage
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61HPHYSICAL THERAPY APPARATUS, e.g. DEVICES FOR LOCATING OR STIMULATING REFLEX POINTS IN THE BODY; ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION; MASSAGE; BATHING DEVICES FOR SPECIAL THERAPEUTIC OR HYGIENIC PURPOSES OR SPECIFIC PARTS OF THE BODY
    • A61H9/00Pneumatic or hydraulic massage
    • A61H9/0007Pulsating

Abstract

A method for facial and neck tissue reestablishment includes application of cyclic suction-relaxation manipulative action to the tissue to improve lymphatic and venous circulation. Apparatus for practicing the method includes a variable pulsating vacuum device to transmit rhythmic suction-relaxation manipulative action through tubing to applicators in contact with the facial and neck tissue. Each applicator is a generally frusto-conical shell having a shallow conical end portion on its minor diameter end, an opening in the apex of the conical end portion, and a nipple extending outwardly from the periphery of the opening. Sleeve-type connector means telescopingly engages the nipple and includes a reduced diameter end remote from the nipple for connection to the tubing. The major diameter end of the shell is reversely flanged to form a rounded, smooth surface for contact with the facial and neck tissue.

Description

United States Patent [191 Spelio Oct. 15, 1974 APPLICATOR FOR PNEUMATIC THERAPY [57] ABSTRACT [76] Inventor: Peter N. Spelio, PO. Box 5857, A method for facial and neck tissue reestablishment Encino, Calif, 91413 includes application of cyclic suction-relaxation manipulative action to the tissue to improve lymphatic [22] 1973 and venous circulation. Apparatus for practicing the [21] Appl. No.: 320,121 method includes a variable pulsating vacuum device to transmit rhythmic suction-relaxation manipulative action through tubing to applicators in contact with the (SI. facial and neck tissue. Each applicator is a generally [58] Fieid "128/3840 frusto-conical shell having a shallow conical end porc 302 tion on its minor diameter end, an opening in the apex of the conical end portion, and a nipple extending outwardly from the periphery of the opening. Sleeve-type [56] References cued connector means telescopingly engages the nipple and UNITED STATES PATENTS includes a reduced diameter end remote from the nip- 1,312,619 8/1919 D'Orsay 128/40 ple for connection to the tubing. The major diameter 1,704,960 /1 Ackerman 128/38 end of the shell is reversely flanged to form a rounded, 1898652 2/1933 WHIamS-U 128/40 UX R smooth surface for contact with the facial and neck 2,646,038 7/l953 lwan 128/40 tissue 3,236,231 2/1966 Schneider et al. 128/40 Primary ExaminerLawrence W. Trapp 4.25m, q F rm-91am? t. QBfi m Harvey B. Jacobson 12 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures APPLICATOR FOR PNEUMATIC THERAPY BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a process and apparatus for applying rhythmic manipulative action to a patients skin and, more particularly, to a process and apparatus for reestablishing facial and neck tissue by improving lymphatic and venous circulation and thereby improving arterial blood flow and reestablishing capillary permeability.

Heretofore, techniques for repairing, regenerating and maintaining healthy and youthful appearing facial and neck tissue have been relatively unsophisticated and largely ineffective. Often they have been dangerous, resorting to such radical procedures as surgery, the utilization of electrical impulses and the use of drugs.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a mechanical manipulative method for facial and neck tissue reestablishment which is effective and safe.

It is another object of this invention to provide a process for activating and improving lymphatic, venous and arterial circulation, thereby improving tissue nutrition and oxidation in the treated area.

It is still another object of the invention to provide apparatus useful in practicing the mechanical manipulative method of the present invention.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description and appended claims.

Briefly stated, in accordance with the aforesaid objects, the present invention provides a mechanical manipulative method for facial and neck tissue reestablishment comprising alternating suction and relaxation at successive intervals varying from 130 to 190 cycles per minute. The technique is practiced by contacting a patient with disposable applicator cups joined by tubing to a source of suction and relaxation to apply the cyclic mechanical manipulation to the appropriate areas of the face and neck. Each applicator includes a generally frusto-conical shell having an outwardly and upwardly turned peripheral flange on the major diameter end thereof and a shallow, conical end portion on the minor diameter end thereof. The conical end portion has an opening in its apex and a cylindrical nipple extending from the periphery of the opening. One end of a coupling member telescopingly engages the nipple and the other end is adapted for insertion into the tubing to provide a continuous path from the applicator to the source of the mechanical action.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The invention will be better understood from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1 illustrates bilateral placement of the applicators of the present invention on each side of the face.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of an applicator of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view of an applicator taken substantially along line 3-3 in FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is an exploded view of an applicator cup and a coupling therefor.

FIG. 5 is a schematic illustration of apparatus useful in practicing the process of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The present invention comprises a process and apparatus for applying rhythmic manipulation to facial and neck tissue to facilitate and improve venous, arterial and lymphatic circulation and thereby to assist in maintaining and regenerating such tissue. In fact, inasmuch as the lymph fluid that surrounds, bathes, and feeds the facial tissue is physically and biochemically different from blood, it is believed that lymph stasis may be more significant than arterial sluggishness or venous congestion in the deterioration and degeneration of facial and neck tissue. The present process is therefore particularly designed to activate and reestablish the normal flow rate in lymphatic circulation. Incidental thereto, venous and arterial circulation are improved. In addition, it has been observed that the present process relaxes tense nerves and has a generally soothing effect on the nervous system. This latter effect allows the vase-constrictor muscles of the sympathetic nervous system of the arteriols and capillaries to relax, resulting in the restoration of and increase in arterial blood flow to the tissues of the treated area. It has also been observed that the present process promotes epidermal cleansing by dislodging embedded grime and make-up, cleansing clogged pores and empty hair follicles, and removing accumulated sebum from dried-up sebaceous glands.

The process generally contemplates rhythmic mechanical manipulative action, i.e., application of cyclic contraction and relaxation to the facial and neck area. Preferably, the manipulative application technique is directed and controlled by a technician placing and moving disposable applicators over the facial and neck area to be treated. Prior to application of the rhythmic suction and relaxation, the skin should be thoroughly cleansed and dried and a layer of facial cream, such as a cream prepared from herbal and unsaturated fatty acids, applied in a thin coating over the entire facial and neck skin. A variable pulsating vacuum device which produces the rhythmic action is then activated and the desired suction and relaxation cyclic frequency is set in the range to cycles per minute, de-

pending upon the patient, condition under treatment and the results sought. The applicators are placed, bilaterally, one on each side of the median line of the face, as shown in FIG. 1. Subsequently, the applicators are moved and placed, bilaterally, one on each side of the underside of the chin, the front of the neck, the median line of the forehead above the eyebrows, on each side of the nose underneath the eyes and on each side of the spinous process of cervical region on back of the neck and upper dorsals of the spine.

While various types of apparatus may be utilized to practice the present process, each apparatus must generally include the components shown in FIG. 5 wherein the numeral 10 designates the applicators used to transmit the cyclic suction-relaxation action to the patient. The applicators 10 are connected via relatively short sections of rubber or vinyl tubing (hose) 12 into two arms of a Y-shaped connector 14. The third arm of connector 14 is joined via a relatively longer section of rubber or vinyl tubing 16 to a variable pulsating vacuum pneumatic device 18, designed to produce the cyclic suction-relaxation action. While such pulsating vacuum pneumatic devices, per se, form no part of the present invention, it is noteworthy that they are preferably electrically powered to assure uniform, synchronized manipulative action. To allow ample maneuverability for usage of the applicators, tubing sections 12 and 16 are conveniently about 2 feet and 4 feet in length, respectively. As will be appreciated the tubing sections may be any length which is convenient for the user.

Applicators 10, which are preferably disposable, may be made in various sizes and formed of polyethylene or other suitable, relatively inexpensive, plastic material. The different sizes are necessary and convenient for application of the cyclic manipulative action to the various round and angular areas around the face. Referring to FIG. 4 it can be seen that each applicator 10, in a preferred embodiment of the invention, consists of an applicator cup 20 and a coupling 22. The major diameter end of the cup is the only portion of the applicator which contacts the patients skin.

Cup 20 is a generally frusto-conical shell 26 having a shallow conical end portion 28 on the minor diameter end thereof. An opening 30 in the apex of the conical end portion 28 communicates with the interior of shell 26 and a cylindrical upstanding nipple 32 extends from the periphery of opening 30. The major diameter end of shell 26 is open and includes an upwardly and outwardly curved peripheral flange 34 adapted to form a wide, firm and rounded smooth surface for contact with the facial and neck tissue. For convenience in grasping and handling, shell 26 includes a number of generally longitudinally disposed recesses or depressions 36 in the peripheral wall.

Coupling 22, which is preferably constructed of aluminum or rigid plastic, consists of a generally cylindrical sleeve 38 having an internal diameter of proper dimensions to permit it to snugly and telescopingly fit over nipple 32. The other end portion 40 of sleeve 38, i.e., the end remote from nipple 32, is of reduced external diameter to permit it to fit snugly within tubing section 12. Reduced diameter end portion 40 also includes at least one, and preferably two, spaced-apart circumferential, radially projecting, ring members 42, which, as can be seen in FIG. 3, engage the inner wall of tubing section 12 to assure a positive connection with the reduced diameter end portion 40. Shoulder 44, defined by sleeve 38 and end portion 40, limits the insertion of connector 22 into tubing section 12.

A particular advantage of the present process is that it is completely sanitary since the applicator cups 20 are disposable. The coupling 22 allows easy and rapid disposal and replacement of applicator cups thereby avoiding any possible chance of contamination or infection by contact. By virtue of their disposable characteristics, the applicator cups are replaced for use on each patient, thereby eliminating any need for washing and sterilizing the apparatus of the present invention.

In actual practice a patient is seated in a chair, preferably in front of a mirror, and a technician stands behind the patient. It is important for best results that the applicators simultaneously transmit the cyclic manipulative action bilaterally to thesame anatomical area of the patients face and neck. Thus, the mirror is useful as a visual aid to the technician in placing and replacing the applicators in proper locations and in assuring proper relative vertical orientation. The technician lightly places the reversely flanged open end of the applicators into contact with the skin bilaterally and simultaneously on any one of the indicated areas to be treated and rhythmically glides the applicators over the skin in synchronization with the relaxation portion of the suction-relaxation cycle. The applicators are maintained in contact with the skin at all times and are glided approximately one-sixth of an inch with each movement in the general direction set forth in the detailed description which follows. It is believed that application of cyclic mechanical manipulative action in this manner facilitates and improves venous and lymphatic circulation with a consequent invigoration of arterial blood flow.

In placing, replacing and gliding the applicators over the facial and neck areas in accordance with the present process, the following anatomical areas appear to be the most significant in terms of response to treatment.

1. The applicators are placed bilaterally on each side of the face in general horizontal alignment with the lips. The direction of gliding (glide path) is generally upward and backward defining a glide line from the lower front end of the face to the upper front end of the neck. To cover this anatomical area completely, it will be necessary to repeat the glide path a number of times, each time paralleling the initial and subsequent glide lines.

2. The applicators are placed bilaterally on each side of the face underneath the chin on the inner side of the jaw bone. The direction of gliding (glide path) is generally rearwardly defining a glide line to the middle, front part of the neck. To cover this anatomical area completely, it will be necessary to repeat the glide path a number of times, each time paralleling the initial and subsequent glide lines.

3. The applicators are placed bilaterally on the forehead, one on each side of the facial median line above the eyebrows. The direction of gliding (glide path) is generally sidewardly away from the median line defining a glide line ending at the side of the face at about the temporal bone. To cover this anatomical area completely, it will be necessary to repeat the glide path a number of times, each time paralleling the initial and subsequent glide lines.

4. The applicators are placed bilaterally on each side of the neck above the clavicle bone. The direction of gliding (glide path) is sideward and rearward defining a glide line ending at the cervical lateral spinous process at the side of the neck. To cover the entire length of the neck it will be necessary to repeat the glide path a number of times, each time paralleling the initial and subsequent slide lines.

5. The applicators are placed bilaterally one on each side of the nose underneath the eyes. The direction of gliding (glide path) is away from the nose toward the outer side of the face defining a glide line ending at the cheek bone. To cover the entire area above the upper lip and below the eyes, it will be necessary to repeat the glide path a number of times, each time paralleling the initial and subsequent glide lines.

6. The applicators are placed bilaterally one on each side of the spinous process of the cervical region on the back of the neck and upper dorsals of the spine, including the upper part of the trapezious muscle connecting the upper part of the shoulders with the neck. The direction of gliding (glide path) is along a glide line from below the occiput to the first dorsal vertebra. From the upper extended area of the trapezious muscle the glide path is toward the center along a glide line ending on each side of the spinous process of the cervical and upper dorsal region of the spine. To cover this anatomical area completely it will be necessary to repeat the glide paths a number of times, each time paralleling the initial and subsequent glide lines.

The present process was evaluated on about 58 patients ranging in age from 25 to 74 years. Treatment schedules varied from once to twice weekly for each patient. Following treatment it was generally observed that circulation improved as evidenced by the uniformity of vivid and healthy pink complexion on the facial and neck epidermal tissue. Almost all patients experienced an exuberant feeling of relaxation, relief from tension and relaxation of muscle spasm. Muscle tone and skin elasticity were restored as manifested by loose and wrinkled skin and flabby muscle becoming smoother and firmer. Many patients who were subject to frequent headaches reported great relief and comfort.

While the present invention has been described with reference to particular embodiments thereof, it will be understood that numerous modifications can be made by those skilled in the art without actually departing from the scope of the invention. Accordingly, all equivalents and modifications may be restored to which fall within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A device for applying cyclic suction-relaxation manipulative action to the skin comprising a generally frusto-conical shell having major and minor diameter open ends; a plurality of recesses in said shell extending between said ends; a conical end portion on the minor diameter end of said shell, an opening in the apex of said conical end portion; a nipple extending outwardly from the periphery of said opening and connector means on said nipple for connecting tubing to said shell; said connector means comprising a sleeve having one end thereof telescopingly housing and snugly engaging said nipple and a reduced external diameter other end for insertion within said tubing; and an outwardly and reversely curved peripheral flange on the major diameter end of said shell to form a rounded surface for contact with the skin.

2. A method for facial and neck tissue reestablishment by improving lymphatic and venous circulation comprising the step of applying bilateral cyclic suctionrelaxation manipulative action having a cyclic frequency in the range 130 to 190 cycles per minute, to

a. each side of the face;

b. each side of the face underneath said chin on the inner side of the jaw bones;

c. the forehead on each side of the facial median line above the eyebrows;

d. each side of the neck above the clavicle bone;

e. each side of the nose underneath the eyes; and

f. each side of the spinous process of the cervical region on the back of the neck and upper dorsals of the spine, including the upper part of the trapezious muscle connecting the upper part of the shoulders with the neck.

3. A method, as claimed in claim 2, wherein the manipulative action is applied by placing applicators in contact with the facial and neck tissue in the areas set forth in each of (a) through (f) and moving said applicators to apply the manipulation to the entire of said areas.

4. A method, as claimed in claim 3, wherein said applicators move about one sixth of an inch along said areas with each movement.

5. A method, as claimed in claim 3, wherein said manipulative action is applied to each side of the face by moving said applicators along a path generally upward and backward from the lower front end of the face to the upper front end of the neck.

6. A method, as claimed in claim 3, wherein said manipulative action is applied to each side of the face underneath the chin on the inner side of the jawbones by moving said applicators along a path from the inner sides of the jawbones generally rearwardly to the front part of the neck.

7. A method, as claimed in claim 3, wherein said manipulative action is applied to said forehead by moving said applicators along a path from the facial median line above the eyebrows sidewardly away from the median line to the side of the face at the temporal bone.

8. A method, as claimed in claim 3, wherein said manipulative action is applied to each side of the neck above the clavicle bone by moving said applicators along a path from the side of the neck sideward and rearward to the cervicle lateral spinous process at the side of the neck.

9. A method, as claimed in claim 3, wherein said manipulative action is applied to each side of the face underneath the eyes by moving said applicators along a path from the nose toward the outer side of the face to the cheek bone.

10. A method, as claimed in claim 3, wherein said manipulative action is applied to each side of the spinous process of the cervical region on the back of the neck and upper dorsals of the spine by moving said applicators along a path from below the occiput to the first dorsal vertebra.

11. A method, as claimed in claim 3, wherein said manipulative action is applied to the upper part of the trapezious muscle connecting the upper part of the shoulders with the neck by moving said applicators along a path from the upper extended area of the trapezious muscle toward the center to the spinous process of the cervical and upper dorsal region of the spine.

12. A method, as claimed in claim 3 including the steps of cleansing and drying the facial and neck areas to be treated and applying a layer of a facial cream thereto prior to applying the manipulative action to said areas.

Claims (12)

1. A device for applying cyclic suction-relaxation manipulative action to the skin comprising a generally frusto-conical shell having major and minor diameter open ends; a plurality of recesses in said shell extending between said ends; a conical end portion on the minor diameter end of said shell, an opening in the apex of said conical end portion; a nipple extending outwardly from the periphery of said opening and connector means on said nipple for connecting tubing to said shell; said connector means comprising a sleeve having one end thereof telescopingly housing and snugly engaging said nipple and a reduced external diameter other end for insertion within said tubing; and an outwardly and reversely curved peripheral flange on the major diameter end of said shell to form a rounded surface for contact with the skin.
2. A method for facial and neck tissue reestablishment by improving lymphatic and venous circulation comprising the step of applying bilateral cyclic suction-relaxation manipulative action having a cyclic frequency in the range 130 to 190 cycles per minute, to a. each side of the face; b. each side of the face underneath said chin on the inner side of the jaw bones; c. the forehead on each side of the facial median line above the eyebrows; d. each side of the neck above the clavicle bone; e. each side of the nose underneath the eyes; and f. each side of the spinous process of the cervical region on the back of the neck and upper dorsals of the spine, including the upper part of the trapezious muscle connecting the upper part of the shoulders with the neck.
3. A method, as claimed in claim 2, wherein the manipulative action is applied by placing applicators in contact with the facial and neck tissue in the areas set forth in each of (a) through (f) and moving said applicators to apply the manipulation to the entire of said areas.
4. A method, as claimed in claim 3, wherein said applicators move about one sixth of an inch along said areas with each movement.
5. A method, as claimed in claim 3, wherein said manipulative action is applied to each side of the face by moving said applicators along a path generally upward and backward from the lower front end of the face to the upper front end of the neck.
6. A method, as claimed in claim 3, wherein said manipulative action is applied to each side of the face underneath the chin on the inner side of the jawbones by moving said applicators along a path from the inner sides of the jawbones generally rearwardly to the front part of the neck.
7. A method, as claimed in claim 3, wherein said manipulative action is applied to said forehead by moving said applicators along a path from the facial median line above the eyebrows sidewardly away from the median line to the side of the face at the temporal bone.
8. A method, as claimed in claim 3, wherein said manipulative action is applied to each side of the neck above the clavicle bone by moving said applicators along a path from the side of the neck sideward and rearward to the cervicle lateral spinous process at the side of the neck.
9. A method, as claimed in claim 3, wherein said manipulative action is applied to each side of the face underneath the eyes by moving said applicators along a path from the nose toward the outer side of the face to the cheek bone.
10. A method, as claimed in claim 3, wherein said manipulative action is applied to each side of the spinous process of the cervical region on tHe back of the neck and upper dorsals of the spine by moving said applicators along a path from below the occiput to the first dorsal vertebra.
11. A method, as claimed in claim 3, wherein said manipulative action is applied to the upper part of the trapezious muscle connecting the upper part of the shoulders with the neck by moving said applicators along a path from the upper extended area of the trapezious muscle toward the center to the spinous process of the cervical and upper dorsal region of the spine.
12. A method, as claimed in claim 3 including the steps of cleansing and drying the facial and neck areas to be treated and applying a layer of a facial cream thereto prior to applying the manipulative action to said areas.
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US4748973A (en) * 1987-02-02 1988-06-07 Cho Robert J Pneumatic massage device
EP0583855A1 (en) * 1992-06-23 1994-02-23 Nikolaos Liaskos Apparatus for the promotion of blood circulation in human skin, especially for the promotion of head hair growth in men
US5897512A (en) * 1996-04-09 1999-04-27 Zagame; Andre Massage appliance for moving over a predetermined zone of the human body
US6196982B1 (en) 1995-10-30 2001-03-06 Terry A. Ball Vacuum massager
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US6464653B1 (en) 1998-11-18 2002-10-15 Urometrics, Inc. Clitoral treatment devices and methods
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US20140296751A1 (en) * 2011-11-14 2014-10-02 Diamond Medical Aesthetics Pty Ltd Apparatus and method of body contouring and skin conditioning
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US20160136041A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2016-05-19 Trudell Medical International Oral mouthpiece and method for the use thereof
US9833261B2 (en) 2008-08-22 2017-12-05 Envy Medical, Inc. Microdermabrasion system upgrade kit
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Cited By (34)

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US4836192A (en) * 1982-09-20 1989-06-06 Mariarosa Abbate Vacuum generator for stimulating the scalp
DE3622808A1 (en) * 1985-07-17 1987-01-22 Mariarosa Abbate Apparatus for the treatment of scalp trichologic under variable pressure, according to regulation and supervision, and electronic diesbezueglicher treatment process
US4748973A (en) * 1987-02-02 1988-06-07 Cho Robert J Pneumatic massage device
EP0583855A1 (en) * 1992-06-23 1994-02-23 Nikolaos Liaskos Apparatus for the promotion of blood circulation in human skin, especially for the promotion of head hair growth in men
US6196982B1 (en) 1995-10-30 2001-03-06 Terry A. Ball Vacuum massager
US5897512A (en) * 1996-04-09 1999-04-27 Zagame; Andre Massage appliance for moving over a predetermined zone of the human body
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Publication number Publication date
FR2283666A1 (en) 1976-04-02
FR2283666B1 (en) 1978-09-15

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