US3812850A - Corrective foot splint - Google Patents

Corrective foot splint Download PDF

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US3812850A
US3812850A US37447773A US3812850A US 3812850 A US3812850 A US 3812850A US 37447773 A US37447773 A US 37447773A US 3812850 A US3812850 A US 3812850A
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foot
heel
support
splint
supports
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R Reiman
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R Reiman
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F5/00Orthopaedic methods or devices for non-surgical treatment of bones or joints; Nursing devices; Anti-rape devices
    • A61F5/01Orthopaedic devices, e.g. splints, casts or braces
    • A61F5/0193Apparatus specially adapted for treating hip dislocation; Abduction splints

Abstract

The present invention is directed to a foot splint for the correction of toed-in or pigeon-toeing, sometimes known as clubfoot, by the use of a single fixed angle support for both feet simultaneously without the requirement for dynamic periodic readjustment.

Description

11mm Sttes "atet 11 1 1111 3,812,850 Reiman May 28, 1974 [54] CORRECTIVE FOOT SPLINT 3,505,994 4/1970 Smith, Jr .1 128/80 1,124,596 1/1915 D l ..128/80 [76] inventor? Reuben :Relman, 23 Beachway 2,920,620 1/1960 122;; 128 80 Washmglon, 11050 2,959,169 11/1960 Bless 128/80 22 Filed: un 28, 1973 1 J e Primary Examiner-Richard A. Gaudet PP N04 374,477 Assistant Examiner-J. Yasko Attorney, Agent, or FirmBauer & Amer [52] US. Cl. 128/80 A, 128/80 J 151 1111.01. A6113/00 [571 ABSTRACT [58] Field of Search 128/80, 83, 87 The pr en inven ion is directed to a foot splint for the correction of toed-in or pigeon-toeing, sometimes [56] References Cited known as clubfoot, by the use of a single fixed angle UNITED STATES PATENTS support for both feet simultaneously without the re- 2,545,510 3/1951 B08161 128/80 qmrement for dynamlc penodlc readjustment 3,068,862 12/ 1962 Fuzere 128/87 6 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a non-dynamic splint for the correction of foot deformations.

Turning in of the feet or clubfeet is a problem that commonly occurs in infants and young children. The deformity occurs as a result of metatarsus varsus, also known as metatarsus adductus, caused by the forefoot being in an adducted position in relation to the hindfoot. This is usually accompanied by internal tibial torsion or bowing of the Shinbone which adds to the toeing-in appearance. If this condition is not corrected in an early stage, the abnormal condition may result later in pigeon-toeing" or clubfoot and/or bow legs.

In the past, various forms of treatment have been employed. These have included the use of bars to which the feet were secured and bound by strips of adhesive tape to maintain the feet in a turned-out position. This required frequent, laborious and uncomfortable changing of the tape and numerous time-consuming and expensive visits with the doctor to achieve the gradual outward rotation of the feet. The treatment has been often poorly tolerated by the young patients who experience conditions of abrasion, erosion and/or ulceration of the skin to which the confining bindings are applied.

Attempts at modifying the aforementioned procedure and making it less onerous and less psychologically fearsome and impressionable upon the infant have consisted of the use of shoe-like enclosures or complex holding devices fixed to a bar with an adjustment required to gradually reposition the outward angle of the foot enclosure or the widening of the angle of the bar itself. Although these methods have been effective, they have the attendant disadvantage of requiring periodic adjustment of the angulation and the difficulty in daily forcing the turned-in feet into the rigidly outturned foot enclosure. The awkwardness and the weight of the device and the occasional blistering and- /or contusion of the skin at the instep and behind the heels of the foot, caused by the foot enclosures and the relatively great expense of the treatment, have militated against theirousage in many instances.

Examples of prior art disclosures requiring frequent adjustment and the use of foot enclosure devices may be found in the prior art patents of Dalpe U.S. Pat. No. 1,124,596, Bosler U.S. Pat. No. 2,545,410, Gessel U.S. Pat. No. 2,702,542 and Freeman U.S. Pat. No. 2,815,021.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the present invention to provide an unusually simple, inexpensive splint that may be used to correct the aforementioned foot condition.

Another object of the invention is to provide a corrective splint that may be used on the afflicted child by his parents or others without the requirement of medical technology and/or medical skills.

It has been found that prior art devices have utilized cumbersome boots and other enclosures that tend to frighten and leave an ugly everlasting psychological impression upon the mind of the child. Accordingly, another feature and object of the invention resides in the simple unitary details of openwork construction that is unencumbered by frightening shoe-type enclosures and that are thereby more psychologically acceptable and tolerated by the child without the resultant production of contusions, abrasions and irritations to the tender skin.

The above description, as well as further objects, features and advantages of the present invention, will be more fully appreciated by reference to the following detailed description of a presently preferred, but nonetheless illustrative, embodiment in accordance with the present invention, when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, wherein:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a perspective view taken at a angle of the front and top of a corrective foot splint constructed according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is a top view; and

FIG. 3 is a front view.

Referring now to the drawing, the corrective foot splint is generally identified by the numeral 10. It comprises a unitary base 12 defining two separate but integral foot supports 14 and 16. Intermediate the foot supports 14 and 16 is a heel support portion 18 that functions as a unitary connection between the two supports 14 and 16 to maintain the both foot supports immovably related to each other at a diverging included angle of approximately 60.

The heel support 18 is raised slightly higher than and above the foot supports 14 and 16, as may be seen more clearly in FIGS. 1 and 3, to provide two heel sup port surfaces 20 and 22, one for each of the respective foot supports 14 and 16. The heel support surfaces 20 and 22 are contoured smoothly to provide a raised and curved surface against which the heel of the foot, resting upon one of the respective foot supports 14 and 16, may be positioned and retained. The heel supports 20 and 22 are in alignment with their respective foot support surfaces 14 and 16 so that the deepest portion of such heel supports is centered along the central line of such respective foot support. Although not shown in the drawing, each contoured heel support surface 20 and 22 may be provided with a layer of soft material such as felt, foam rubber or the like to provide a warm, soft feeling to the foot when the heel is placed thereagainst.

Each foot support surface 14 and 16 is substantially planar and uninterrupted and, therefore, substantially free of any obstruction. This open appearance is important to prevent the occurrence of abrasions, contusions and other forms of irritation to the tender skin of the foot resting thereon. Once again, although it is not shown in the drawing, it is within the contemplation of the invention that the planar surfaces 14 and 16 may be coated or provided with layers of soft, absorbent materials such as foam rubber, felt and the like against which the foot may rest when supported on such surfaces.

Illustrated in the drawing for exemplary purposes only are releasable fastening means in the form of straps 24 which may be adapted to pass through appropriate slots 26 or other holding and positioning means in the base of each foot support surface 14 and 16. Each strap may be provided with a releasable fastening element such as a buckle, snaps, clips and the like. In the present disclosure, and for the convenience of understanding, the straps are provided with interengaging loops and books, more commonly known in the art by the trademark Velcro. The velcro fastening structures are placed at the opposite ends of the straps such as is illustrated at 28. In practice, it has been found that the Velcro fasteners permit adjustment of the straps without the need for cumbersome buckles and adjustment holes, although such buckles and hole combinations may be employed with equal facility in the present invention.

In operation, the feet of the child are placed against each of the respective foot support surfaces 14 and 16 with the heel of each respective foot positioned rearmost on their respective surfaces and in the deepest portion of the conformingly shaped heel support surfaces 20 and 22. Because of the raised height of the connection 18 and as a consequence of each of the conforming heel support surfaces 20 and 22, the heel of each foot is adequately supported at the connection and, thus, prevented from being lifted free by the child and removed therefrom after the foot is strapped or retained to the respective foot support surface 14 or 16.

Accordingly, after the foot is positioned against the heel of its respective foot supporting surface 14 or 16, the releasable securing strap means 24 is then positioned about the instep and adjacent portions of the upper surface of the foot, thereby encompassing the foot and retaining it substantially flat against the foot supporting surface 14 or 16. The width-wise extent of the releasable fastening means 24 may be varied. However, in practice, it has been found that by making the width of the releasable fastening means 24 of sufficient extent, the same will cover a substantial lengthwise portion of the instep of the foot to thereby prevent the foot from being removed from its foot support surface 14 or 16. The initial positioning of the heel of the foot in the deepest portion of the contoured heel support surface 20 and 22, the height of the conforming heel supports and the extent of encompassment of the strap 24 prevent the child from being able to lift his foot free of the splint without first releasing the strap.

A unique feature of the invention resides in the simplicity of structure of the splint in that both foot supports are formed as a single and unitary uninterrupted base 12, the details of which are incapable of relative movement with respect to each other. The connecting portion 18, although shown formed as a unitary part of the base 12 and its two non-movable foot supports 14 and 16, may be provided as a separate element but subsequently made integral with such base. The height of the heel support surfaces and 22 may be controlled to provide sufiicient support to the heel of the foot and when so controlled, will prevent the dislodgment and disengagement of the foot from the conforming heel support surface, even in the event the strap or releasable fastening means 24 is not tightly engaged about the instep of the foot.

It is to be recognized that the open appearance of the splint 10 avoids creating an everlasting frightening psychological impression upon the mind of the child to which the same is applied and, therefore, makes the same more readily usable and more palatable for use by the child. The unitary details of structure and the openness of such structure also avoid the possibility of damage to the tender skin and surfaces of the childs foot while enabling the same to be applied to the feet byany non-skilled individual without the requirementof prior medical knowledge and techniques.

While there have been shown and described and pointed out the fundamental novel features of the invention as applied to a preferred embodiment thereof, it will be understood that various omissions and substitutions and changes in the form and details of the device illustrated and in its operation may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the invention. It is the intention, therefore, to be limited only as indicated by the scope of the claims appended thereto.

What is claimed is:

l. A corrective foot splint comprising a single unitary, open unincumbered base,

said base having a heel support thereon intermediate the ends thereof,

said heel support having two heel support surfaces at field angles relative to each other,

said base having foot supports being substantially planar surfaces open and free of limiting operative structures and with one of said supports for each of said heel support surfaces and extending in lice with each of their respective heel support surfaces to support a foot, the heel of which is adapted to be positioned against the respective one of said heel support surfaces,

and releasable means on said base to retain a foot on each of said foot supports and to prevent the removal of the heel of the foot from its respective heel support.

2. A corrective foot splint as in claim 1,

each one of said respective foot and heel supports diverging from and relative to the other at an angle of approximately 3. A corrective splint comprising a pair of open, substantially unobstructed, foot supporting surfaces diverging at fixed angles relative to each other,

each of said foot supporting surfaces being connected to each other at their heels in spaced relationships to form a unitary structure incapable of relative movement,

a heel shaped support defined at the heel of each of said foot supporting surfaces,

and releasable means on each of said open foot supporting surfaces.

4. A corrective splint as in claim 3, said diverging angle being approximately 60.

5. A corrective splint as in claim 3,

each of said foot supporting surfaces being substantially planr,

said heel shaped supports each being connected together and being raised above said substantially planar foot supporting surfaces.

6. A corrective splint as in claim 3,

said heel shaped supports being defined in the connection of said foot supporting surfaces and being unitary therewith.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE CGRREQTION Patent No. 3,312,850 Dated May 23, 1974 InventOr( REUBEN H. REIMAN It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

IN THE CLAIMS:

Claim 1, line 6, change "field" to -fixed Claim 1, line 10, change "liee" to line Claim 5, line 3, change "planr" to -planar-- Signed and sealed this 8th day of October 1974.

(SEAL) Attest:

MCCOY M. GIBSONJR. C, MARSHALL DANN Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents FORM F'O-105O (10-69)

Claims (6)

1. A corrective foot splint comprising a single unitary, open unincumbered base, said base having a heel support thereon intermediate the ends thereof, said heel support having two heel support surfaces at field angles relative to each other, said base having foot supports being substantially planar surfaces open and free of limiting operative structures and with one of said supports for each of said heel support surfaces and extending in liee with each of their respective heel support surfaces to support a foot, the heel of which is adapted to be positioned against the respective one of said heel support surfaces, and releasable means on said base to retain a foot on each of said foot supports and to prevent the removal of the heel of the foot from its respective heel support.
2. A corrective foot splint as in claim 1, each one of said respective foot and heel supports diverging from and relative to the other at an angle of approximately 60*.
3. A corrective splint comprising a pair of open, substantially unobstructed, foot supporting surfaces diverging at fixed angles relative to each other, each of said foot supporting surfaces being connected to each other at their heels in spaced relationships to form a unitary structure incapable of relative movement, a heel shaped support defined at the heel of each of said foot supporting surfaces, and releasable means on each of said open foot supporting surfaces.
4. A corrective splint as in claim 3, said diverging angle being approximately 60*.
5. A corrective splint as in claim 3, each of said foot supporting surfaces being substantially planr, said heel shaped supports each being connected together and being raised above said substantially planar foot supporting surfaces.
6. A corrective splint as in claim 3, said heel shaped supports being defined in the connection of said foot supporting surfaces and being unitary therewith.
US37447773 1973-06-28 1973-06-28 Corrective foot splint Expired - Lifetime US3812850A (en)

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Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3973559A (en) * 1974-08-14 1976-08-10 Reiman Reuben H Children's corrective foot splint
US4606334A (en) * 1984-09-11 1986-08-19 Gmi Engineering & Management Institute Orthopedic foot splint and method for using same
US8926537B2 (en) 2009-02-26 2015-01-06 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device for treatment of the back
US9220625B2 (en) 2009-11-04 2015-12-29 Ossur Hf Thoracic lumbar sacral orthosis
US9314363B2 (en) 2013-01-24 2016-04-19 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device for treating complications of the hip
US9370440B2 (en) 2012-01-13 2016-06-21 Ossur Hf Spinal orthosis
US9439800B2 (en) 2009-01-14 2016-09-13 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device, use of orthopedic device and method for producing same
US9468554B2 (en) 2013-01-24 2016-10-18 Ossur Iceland Ehf Orthopedic device for treating complications of the hip
US9554935B2 (en) 2013-01-24 2017-01-31 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device for treating complications of the hip
US9572705B2 (en) 2012-01-13 2017-02-21 Ossur Hf Spinal orthosis
US9795500B2 (en) 2013-01-24 2017-10-24 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device for treating complications of the hip
US9872794B2 (en) 2012-09-19 2018-01-23 Ossur Hf Panel attachment and circumference adjustment systems for an orthopedic device
US10159592B2 (en) 2015-02-27 2018-12-25 Ossur Iceland Ehf Spinal orthosis, kit and method for using the same
US10561520B2 (en) 2015-02-27 2020-02-18 Ossur Iceland Ehf Spinal orthosis, kit and method for using the same
US10828186B2 (en) 2016-07-19 2020-11-10 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device for treatment of the back

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1124596A (en) * 1914-05-01 1915-01-12 William Henry Dalpe Orthopedic stocks for the treatment of club-feet in children.
US2545510A (en) * 1949-03-29 1951-03-20 Merritt W Bosler Footrest
US2920620A (en) * 1958-10-15 1960-01-12 Robert W Rogers Orthopedic device
US2959169A (en) * 1958-09-17 1960-11-08 Bless William Immobilization attachment for an orthopedic traction shoe or boot
US3068862A (en) * 1959-01-07 1962-12-18 Robert J Fuzere Abduction splint
US3505994A (en) * 1967-07-12 1970-04-14 Edward A Smith Jr Device for preventing the orthopedic distortion of infant's legs

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1124596A (en) * 1914-05-01 1915-01-12 William Henry Dalpe Orthopedic stocks for the treatment of club-feet in children.
US2545510A (en) * 1949-03-29 1951-03-20 Merritt W Bosler Footrest
US2959169A (en) * 1958-09-17 1960-11-08 Bless William Immobilization attachment for an orthopedic traction shoe or boot
US2920620A (en) * 1958-10-15 1960-01-12 Robert W Rogers Orthopedic device
US3068862A (en) * 1959-01-07 1962-12-18 Robert J Fuzere Abduction splint
US3505994A (en) * 1967-07-12 1970-04-14 Edward A Smith Jr Device for preventing the orthopedic distortion of infant's legs

Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3973559A (en) * 1974-08-14 1976-08-10 Reiman Reuben H Children's corrective foot splint
US4606334A (en) * 1984-09-11 1986-08-19 Gmi Engineering & Management Institute Orthopedic foot splint and method for using same
US9439800B2 (en) 2009-01-14 2016-09-13 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device, use of orthopedic device and method for producing same
US8926537B2 (en) 2009-02-26 2015-01-06 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device for treatment of the back
US9414953B2 (en) 2009-02-26 2016-08-16 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device for treatment of the back
US8945034B2 (en) 2009-02-26 2015-02-03 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device for treatment of the back
US9220625B2 (en) 2009-11-04 2015-12-29 Ossur Hf Thoracic lumbar sacral orthosis
US9597219B2 (en) 2009-11-04 2017-03-21 Ossur Hf Thoracic lumbar sacral orthosis
US10617552B2 (en) 2009-11-04 2020-04-14 Ossur Hf Thoracic lumbar sacral orthosis
US9572705B2 (en) 2012-01-13 2017-02-21 Ossur Hf Spinal orthosis
US9370440B2 (en) 2012-01-13 2016-06-21 Ossur Hf Spinal orthosis
US9872794B2 (en) 2012-09-19 2018-01-23 Ossur Hf Panel attachment and circumference adjustment systems for an orthopedic device
US9554935B2 (en) 2013-01-24 2017-01-31 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device for treating complications of the hip
US9468554B2 (en) 2013-01-24 2016-10-18 Ossur Iceland Ehf Orthopedic device for treating complications of the hip
US9795500B2 (en) 2013-01-24 2017-10-24 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device for treating complications of the hip
US9393144B2 (en) 2013-01-24 2016-07-19 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device for treating complications of the hip
US9987158B2 (en) 2013-01-24 2018-06-05 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device for treating complications of the hip
US9314363B2 (en) 2013-01-24 2016-04-19 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device for treating complications of the hip
US10357391B2 (en) 2013-01-24 2019-07-23 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device for treating complications of the hip
US10561520B2 (en) 2015-02-27 2020-02-18 Ossur Iceland Ehf Spinal orthosis, kit and method for using the same
US10159592B2 (en) 2015-02-27 2018-12-25 Ossur Iceland Ehf Spinal orthosis, kit and method for using the same
US10828186B2 (en) 2016-07-19 2020-11-10 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device for treatment of the back

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