US3586116A - Directional drilling equipment - Google Patents

Directional drilling equipment Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3586116A
US3586116A US3586116DA US3586116A US 3586116 A US3586116 A US 3586116A US 3586116D A US3586116D A US 3586116DA US 3586116 A US3586116 A US 3586116A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
motor
inflection point
tool
equipment
sleeve
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Wladimir Tiraspolsky
Roger Francois Rouviere
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
TURBOSERVICE
Original Assignee
TURBOSERVICE
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by TURBOSERVICE filed Critical TURBOSERVICE
Priority to US81205069A priority Critical
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3586116A publication Critical patent/US3586116A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B7/00Special methods or apparatus for drilling
    • E21B7/04Directional drilling
    • E21B7/06Deflecting the direction of boreholes
    • E21B7/067Deflecting the direction of boreholes with means for locking sections of a pipe or of a guide for a shaft in angular relation, e.g. adjustable bent sub

Abstract

Directional drilling equipment is disclosed that employs a downhole motor to rotate the bit, while the drill string provides the weight on the bit. The equipment has a sleeve between the bit and the motor that has a bend or inflection point such that the bit makes the desired angle with the axis of the drill string. Torque from the motor is transmitted through the inflection point to the bit by a shaft and a dual universal joint housed in the sleeve. None of the weight on the bit or the end thrust of the motor is transmitted to the shaft.

Description

United States Patent Inventors Appl. No.

Filed Patented Assignee DIRECTIONAL DRILLING EQUIPMENT 11 Claims, 10 Drawing Figs.

US. Cl 175/74, 175/256 Int. (I E211) 7/08 FleldotSeareh 175/73,74, 92,101, 256, 320

mm lglflll [56] References Cited UNlTED STATES PATENTS 1,850,403 3/1932 Lee 175/74 3,190,374 6/1965 Caperan et a1 175/256 X FOREIGN PATENTS 1,247,454 10/1960 France 175/73 Primary Examiner-David H. Brown Attorney-Hyer, Eickenroht & Thompson ABSTRACT: Directional drilling equipment is disclosed that employs a downhole motor to rotate the bit, while the drill string provides the weight on the bit. The equipment has a sleeve between the bit and the motor that has a bend or inflection point such that the bit makes the desired angle with the axis of the drill string. Torque from the motor is transmitted through the inflection point to the bit by a shaft and a dual universal joint housed in the sleeve. None of the weight on the bit or the end thrust of the motor is transmitted to the shaft.

PATENTEDJUNZZISYI 3.586116 sum 2 or 4 W/ad/m/r 77/aJpoZr/4y ATTOR/VFYJ PATENTEU JUN22 1971 SHEET 3 OF 4 DIRECTIONAL DRILLING EQUIPMENT The present invention relates generally to the art of drilling wells such as oil wells in directional or deviated fashion by means of underground rotating drilling motors.

For acquiring mastery in this art, it is important to be able to give the drilling tool (drilling bit, core drill or the like) an inclination which must not exceed a few sexagesimal degrees with respect to the axis of the drill string. The easiest solution consists in interposing a cranked union or joint between the tool-driving motor and the drill string. However, such a method only gives limited possibilities and it often happens than an inclination of the order of 30 may not be exceeded in this way because the weight of the motor then operates reversely of the sought effect. Moreover, the provision of a cranked union limits the permissible length and consequently the power of the motor.

In view of this, attempts were made to arrange the cranked joint under the motor between the latter and the tool.

Several types of joints or subs of this type have already been developed and tested. However, their duration is very limited and none of them seems to have reached the manufacturing stage. The chief defects of such constructions were that the principles of homokinetics were not respected and that a pushing stress was transmitted simultaneously with the torque. This seems to be detrimental to their behavior in service.

An object of the invention is to remedy the disadvantages of known constructions in this technical field and to provide an equipment for directed drilling wherein the driving force is fumished by an underground rotating motor capable of dissociating axial thrust stresses from torque-transmitting stresses while permitting the use of a homokinetically acting driving device owing to such a novel construction that such device does not transmit axial stresses of any importance.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new or improved equipment for directed drilling comprising in known fashion an inflection point or cranked portion, an underground rotary motor, a motor driven drilling tool, axial thrust bearings and characterized by the fact that the thrust bearing that takes the reaction of the tool and the bearing that supports the axial push of the motor or that part of the motor situated above the inflection point are dissociated or segregated and arranged on the opposite sides of said inflection point, at least one part of the motor being located above the inflection point, a distortable driving device (advantageously of homokinetic nature) being provided opposite the inflection point of the drilling string between the shafts extending through the straight upper and lower parts of the equipment.

Owing to the segregation over and under the inflection point between the bearings and the absorbing means for the axial stresses due to the tool reaction and the pushing stresses due to the motor elements, there is thus created opposite said inflection point in the drive shafting a so-called quiet zone which does not transmit axial stresses, thereby permitting to provide at said point a driving device which substantially transmits angular stresses exclusively.

A further object of the invention is to provide an equipment as aforesaid comprising a particularly advantageous construction including a driving device made up of a dual universal joint performing a homokinetic driving action while eliminating axial stresses at this point, thereby making it possible to employ universal joints of conventional structure, for example of the type as commonly used on automotive vehicles.

Yet a further object of the invention is to provide an axially slidable angular driving device interposed in the line of shafting on either the one or the other side of the aforesaid distortable driving device, advantageously on the tool side so as practically to eliminate axial thrust transmission or axial vibrations from said distortable device, elastic means being advantageously provided for attenuating or absorbing angular impacts and vibrations.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an equipment as aforesaid comprising means for advantageously and continuously adjusting the angle defined at the inflection point between 0 and a maximum value without any need to dismantle entirely the equipment.

The underground motor may be arranged entirely over the inflection point or partly over and partly under said point.

With these and such other objects in view as will incidentally appear hereafter, the invention comprises the novel construction and combination of parts that will be now described hereafter with reference to the accompanying diagrammatic drawings exemplifying the same and forming a part of the present disclosure.

In the drawings:

FIG. I is a diagrammatic view of this improved grounddrilling equipment including an underground rotating motor connected with the tool by a cranked joint.

FIG. 2 is a view showing the relative positions of the three axes of the motor, deviating sleeve and tool.

FIG. 3 is a graph illustrating the variation law of the several angles defined by the three aforesaid axes.

FIG. 4 is a detailed view of that portion of the equipment capable of defining the varying angle of the cranked portion in the position occupied thereby for performing a straight drilling operation.

FIG. 5 is a partial view corresponding with FIG. 4 but with a position of maximum deviation.

FIG. 6 is a view showing a constructional form of the axially slidable angular coupling, half this figure being in axial section.

FIG. 7 is an under plan view corresponding with FIG. 6, half this figure being in transverse section.

FIG. 8 is a sectional view on the line VIII-VIII in FIG. 6.

FIG. 9 is a view representing a constructional modification of what is shown in FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 shows an embodiment of the equipment having a stationary cranked portion.

In the showing of FIG. I, the tool I which comprises a drilling bit is driven by a shaft 2 fitted in a body member 3 and abutted against it by means of an axial bearing 4 which takes and absorbs the tool reaction. The shaft 2 is angularly connected with a shaft 6 through an axially slidable angular coupling 5. The shaft 6 is driven by a device made up of a pair of universal joints 7, 7 interconnected by a shaft 8. This device is engaged by a shaft 9 accommodated in a body member 10 containing the underground rotary motor which may be of any conventional type. The axial bearing for this motor is shown at 11.

It will be seen from the drawings that the shafts 6 and 9 are mounted in radial bearings 12, 13 and that the axes of the body members 3, l0 define an angle so as to permit deviated drilling to take place. 14 designates in diagrammatic fashion a cranked union. It will be seen that said union is arranged substantially midway of the ends of the shaft 8. This union 14 may be stationary or may have a variable and adjustable angle as described more in detail hereafter.

It will be understood that, during the operation, the reaction of the tool I and the axial thrust stress exerted by the motor are respectively taken and absorbed by the thrust bearings 4, 11 whereby a zone relieved from axial stresses is provided opposite the union or cranked portion 14. In this zone merely prevails a transmission of angular forces for driving the tool from the motor. This permits a dual universal joint device of the illustrated type to be used for performing the driving action thereby ensuring a homokinetic transmission that cannot absorb axial stresses.

In the showing of FIG. 2 is illustrated at x-x' the axis of the drilling string or motor, at y-y' the axis of the tool and tool holder and at zz' the axis of a deviating sub of the type described hereafter and shown in FIG. 1 as the union or joint 14.

A particularly advantageous feature resides, as described hereafter, in the possibility of varying the deflection angle 0 (defined between the axes x-x and y-y) between zero and a maximum value:

0,,,,, ,=2a by turning y-y' around z-z'.

In the graph constituting FIG. 3 is illustrated the variation of the angle in terms of the angle a delineated between the plane defined by the axes of x-x and z-z' and the plane defined by the axes y-y' and z-z' in the case of a union whose (1 angle is equal to 1.5.

In said graph are also represented the linear variations of the B angle defined between the plane xx'zz' and the plane xxyy the knowledge of which is useful for relative reference of the several elements of an adjustable union.

In the constructional form shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, a turbodrill is used the body member of which is indicated by 15 while its shaft 16 terminates adjacent the tool in a lower shaft 17 arranged inside a stator union 18. This shaft 17 can resolve in a radial bearing 19 and is rigidly connected with a universal joint 20 housed in a sleeve 21. The universal joint 20 is connected via a shaft 22 with another universal joint 23 which drives a further shaft 24 revoluble in radial bearings 25 and connected through an axially slidable angular coupling 26 with the shaft 27 that imparts rotation to the tool.

It will be easily seen that the motion derived from the shaft 27 is homokinetic with respect to that of the shaft 16 no matter what their relative angular positions may be. The shaft 27 is radially guided by its own set of bearings and bushes 28 and its axial displacements are limited by a double-acting abutment 29 which absorbs the tool reaction Although this is not shown but as herebefore stated, the axial thrust exerted by the motor is absorbed by an independent thrust bearing.

The universal joint system is housed in the sleeve 21 and in a sleeve 30 connected via a bearing 31 and a union 32 with the body or housing 33 containing the axial bearing 29.

The sleeves 21, 30 are interconnected by a sleeve 34 having a shoulder 35 and a male-threaded portion 36 which can be screwed into a female-threaded portion of the sleeve 30. As is visible in FIG. 4, the axis of the female-threaded portion defines an 0: angle with the axis of the sleeve 30. This is also true for the axis of the sleeve 34. Moreover, the axis of the sleeve 21 slants by an angle equal to a which is preferably equal to the at angle with respect to the axis of the abutted faces of its lower end on the shoulder 35.

It will thus be seen that if the sleeve 30 is revolved about the sleeve 34, the angle 6 defined between the axes of the sleeves 21, 30 may be varied by 0-0: up to the value art-a which, where a=a, gives the following limit values:

Practically speaking, the maximum value used for 0 does not exceed 3 so that al305 In the graph constituting FIG. 3, the variation of 0 in terms of the angular motion of the sleeve 21 relatively to the sleeve 34 is clearly shown.

The showing of FIG. 4 corresponds with the aligned position, i.e., with 6=0.

In operation, the sleeve 21 should be axially and angularly rigid with the sleeve 30. In order to achieve this rigid interconnection, there is provided (as shown in FIG. 4) a spacing ring 37 interposed between the abutted faces of the sleeves 21, 30. Such ring is keyed or otherwise made angularly fast at 38 with the sleeve 34. Furthermore, the sleeve 21 is keyed in adjustable fashion by means of pegs 39 engaged into sequentially arranged holes 40 formed in the end face of the sleeve 21.

However, this angular interconnection might be also ob tained by providing the abutment face between the shoulder 35 and the base of the sleeve 21 with crowns of teeth or mutually interlocked ribs and flutes.

When it is desired to vary the relative inclination angle 0, it is only sufficient to unlatch the threaded portion 36 then to rotate the ring 37 with respect to the sleeve 21 by the required angle a and to reestablish the keying effect and to relatch the threaded portion. Advantageously, the connecting elements may be provided with reference marks and/or scale lines permitting the necessary a angle to be determined so as to obtain an angle 0 having the desired value.

In FIG. the above-described device is represented in its position of maximum deviation.

In the showing of FIGS. 6 to 8 is illustrated a possible constructional form of the slidable coupling which can be used to constitute the coupling 5 visible in FIG. 1. There is provided in the present case a female cap 40 rigid with a shaft 41 which may be the driving shaft and through which a driven shaft 42 is engaged. This shaft 42 has ribs 43 which are guided, when engaged into the female sleeve, by separating wedges 44 rigid with said female sleeve. Inside this sleeve, each rib 43 is arranged between a pair of cages formed in the sleeve 40 (FIG. 7) associated with balls 45 which roll along paths 46 abutted against elastic elements 47.

It will be understood that such a coupling permits an easy relative axial displacement of the two shafts while ensuring adequate transmission of the torques and an absorption of angular vibrations. Consequently, the axial and angular vibrations from the tool are not transmitted to the universal joints.

In the showing of FIG. 9 is represented a constructional modification in which balls 48 are arranged between ribs 49 and rolling paths 50 disposed in stepped fashion so as to facilitate penetration of the male portion into the female portion when assembling is done.

In Fig 10 is shown a simplified constructional form of the arrangement visible in FIG. 4. In this form, elements identical with those visible in FIG. 4 are designated by the same reference numerals and will not be described again.

In the present construction there is provided between the unions l8 and 32 a one-piece cranked sleeve 51 in which is housed the head 52 of a dual universal joint protected against the influence of the ambient medium by a sheath 53 rigid with the shaft 17 and connected with a coupling 54 which may be of the type visible on FIGS. 6 to 8. Such an arrangement permits the overall lengths of the entire device to be rendered smaller.

In order to modify the deflection angle, the sleeve 51 is changed by replacing it by another one wherefor it is only sufficient to unscrew the screw-threaded portion between the union 52 and the cranked sleeve 51, then to separate the two parts of the coupling 54 and to substitute for said sleeve another sleeve having a different deflection angle. Fitting a straight sleeve permits, should this appear to be desirable, the drilling operation to be continued without a deviating device and may thus lead to a saving by sparing a change of turbine between two deviation jobs.

Minor constructional details may be varied without departing from the scope of the subjoined claims.

What we claim is:

1. An equipment for directional ground drilling particularly for drilling oil wells comprising an underground rotating motor, a drilling tool, an inflection point between said motor and tool, a first straight shaft extending between said inflection point and motor, a second straight shaft extending between said inflection point and tool, radial bearings for said shafts, a first axial thrust bearing for receiving the axial thrust stress of the motor and combined with said first shaft, a second axial thrust bearing for receiving the tool reaction and combined with said second shaft, and a homokinetic driving device at said inflection point.

2. An equipment for directional ground drilling according to claim 1 wherein the homokinetic driving device comprises a dual universal joint.

3. An equipment for directional ground drilling according to claim 1 wherein the inflection point comprises a one-piece cranked sleeve and the homokinetic driving device comprises a dual universal joint housed in said sleeve.

4. An equipment for directional ground drilling comprising an underground drilling motor made up of separate first and second sections, a drilling tool, an inflection point between both sections of said motor, a first straight shaft extending between the inflection point and said first section of the motor, a second straight shaft extending between said inflection point and tool through said second section, radial bearings for the shafts, a first axial thrust bearing for receiving the axial thrust stress of said first motor section and combined with said first shaft, a second axial thrust bearing for receiving the resultant force from the axial thrust stress of said second motor section and the tool reaction and combined with said second shaft, and a homokinetic driving device at said inflection point.

5. An equipment for directional ground drilling according to claim 4, wherein the homokinetic driving device comprises a dual universal joint.

6. An equipment for directed ground drilling according to claim 4, wherein the inflection point comprises a one-piece cranked sleeve and the homokinetic driving device comprises a dual universal joint housed in said sleeve.

7. An equipment for directional ground drilling comprising an underground rotating motor, a drilling tool, a homokinetic driving device providing an inflection point between said motor and tool, a first straight shaft extending between said driving device and motor, a second straight shaft extending between said driving device and tool, radial bearings for said shafts, a first axial thrust bearing for receiving the axial thrust stress of the motor and combined with said first shaft, a second axial thrust bearing for receiving the tool reaction and combined with said second shaft, and an axially slidable angular coupling interposed in one of said shafts.

8, An equipment for directional ground drilling according to claim 7 wherein elastic elements are associated with said coupling for absorbing vibrations and angular impacts.

9. An equipment for directional ground drilling according to claim 7 wherein said axially slidable coupling comprises a female joint, a shaft received in said joint, ribs and flutes respectively provided on said female joint and shaft for behaving as guides, and rolling member received in said guides.

10. An equipment for directional ground drilling comprising an underground rotating motor, a drilling tool, an inflection point between said motor and tool, a first straight shaft extending between said inflection point and motor, a second straight shaft extending between said inflection point and tool, radial bearings for said shafts, a first axial thrust bearing for receiving the axial thrust stress of the motor and combined with said first shaft, a second axial thrust bearing for receiving the tool reaction and combined with said second shaft, a homokinetic driving device as said inflection point, and means for adjusting the angle provided by the inflection point.

11. An equipment for directional ground drilling according to claim 10, wherein said adjusting means comprise a first sleeve, a second sleeve screwed upon the first sleeve and having an axis inclined with respect to the first sleeve axis, a revoluble ring between said first and second sleeves, and means for angularly keying said ring in a plurality of positions with respect to said first and second sleeves.

Claims (10)

1. An equipment for directional ground drilling particularly for drilling oil wells comprising an underground rotating motor, a drilling tool, an inflection point between said motor and tool, a first straight shaft extending between said inflection point and motor, a second straight shaft extending between said inflection point and tool, radial bearings for said shafts, a first axial thrust bearing for receiving the axial thrust stress of the motor and combined with said first shaft, a second axial thrust bearing for receiving the tool reaction and combined with said second shaft, and a homokinetic driving device at said inflection point.
2. An equipment for directional ground drilling according to claim 1 wherein the homokinetic driving device comprises a dual universal joint.
3. An equipment for directional ground drilling according to claim 1 wherein the inflection point comprises a one-piece cranked sleeve and the homokinetic driving device comprises a dual universal joint housed in said sleeve.
4. An equipment for directional ground drilling comprising an underground drilling motor made up of separate first and second sections, a drilling tool, an inflection point between both sections of said motor, a first straight shaft extending between the inflection point and said first section of the motor, a second straight shaft extending between said inflection point and tool through said second section, radial bearings for the shafts, a first axial thrust bearing for receiving the axial thrust stress of said first motor section and combined with said first shaft, a second axial thrust bearing for receiving the resultant force from the axial thrust stress of said second motor section and the tool reaction and combined with said second shaft, and a homokinetic driving device at said inflection point.
5. An equipment for directional ground drilling according to claim 4, wherein the homokinetic driving device comprises a dual universal joint.
6. An equipment for directed ground drilling according to claim 4, wherein the inflection point comprises a one-piece cranked sleeve and the homokinetic driving device comprises a dual universal joint housed in said sleeve.
7. An equipment for directional ground drilling comprising an underground rotating motor, a drilling tool, a homokinetic driving device providing an inflection point between said motor and tool, a first straight shaft extending between said driving device and motor, a second straight shaft extending between said driving device and tool, radial bearings for said shafts, a first axial thrust bearing for receiving the axial thrust stress of the motor and combined with said first shaft, a second axial thrust bearing for receiving the tool reaction and combined with said second shaft, and an axially slidable angular coupling interposed in one of said shafts. 8, An equipment for directional ground drilling according to claim 7 wherein elastic elements are associated with said coupling for absorbing vibrations and angular impacts.
9. An equipment for directional ground drilling according to claim 7 wherein said axially slidable coupling comprises a female joint, a shaft received in said joint, ribs and flutes respectively provided on said female joint and shaft for behaving as guides, and rolling member received in said guides.
10. An equipment for directional ground drilling comprising an underground rotating motor, a drilling tool, an inflection point between said motor and tool, a first straight shaft exTending between said inflection point and motor, a second straight shaft extending between said inflection point and tool, radial bearings for said shafts, a first axial thrust bearing for receiving the axial thrust stress of the motor and combined with said first shaft, a second axial thrust bearing for receiving the tool reaction and combined with said second shaft, a homokinetic driving device as said inflection point, and means for adjusting the angle provided by the inflection point.
11. An equipment for directional ground drilling according to claim 10, wherein said adjusting means comprise a first sleeve, a second sleeve screwed upon the first sleeve and having an axis inclined with respect to the first sleeve axis, a revoluble ring between said first and second sleeves, and means for angularly keying said ring in a plurality of positions with respect to said first and second sleeves.
US3586116D 1969-04-01 1969-04-01 Directional drilling equipment Expired - Lifetime US3586116A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US81205069A true 1969-04-01 1969-04-01

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3586116A true US3586116A (en) 1971-06-22

Family

ID=25208342

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3586116D Expired - Lifetime US3586116A (en) 1969-04-01 1969-04-01 Directional drilling equipment

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3586116A (en)

Cited By (36)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4027734A (en) * 1975-12-11 1977-06-07 Hebert & Co., Inc. Gurtler Deviated conductor driving system
US4220214A (en) * 1977-08-18 1980-09-02 Benoit Lloyd F Directional drilling sub
WO1980002582A1 (en) * 1979-05-21 1980-11-27 L Benoit Variable angle directional drilling sub
NL8103119A (en) * 1980-07-12 1982-02-01 Preussag Ag Drilling tool for the production of curved running portions of deep drilling.
US4438821A (en) * 1981-05-11 1984-03-27 Henry Jolly Mining machinery
FR2542366A1 (en) * 1983-03-08 1984-09-14 Baker Oil Tools Inc Apparatus for direct drilling of underground wells
DE3417743C1 (en) * 1984-05-12 1985-03-28 Christensen Inc Norton Apparatus for alternative straight or directional drilling in underground rock formations
US4508182A (en) * 1983-07-20 1985-04-02 Dailey Petroleum Services Corp. Method and apparatus for controlling azimuthal drift of a drill bit
DE3423465C1 (en) * 1984-06-26 1985-05-02 Christensen Inc Norton Devices for alternative straight or directional drilling in underground rock formations
GB2190411A (en) * 1986-05-16 1987-11-18 Shell Int Research Directional drilling
US4739842A (en) * 1984-05-12 1988-04-26 Eastman Christensen Company Apparatus for optional straight or directional drilling underground formations
US4884643A (en) * 1989-01-17 1989-12-05 392534 Alberta Ltd. Downhole adjustable bent sub
US5022471A (en) * 1990-01-08 1991-06-11 Maurer Engineering, Inc. Deviated wellbore drilling system and apparatus
US5048621A (en) * 1990-08-10 1991-09-17 Masx Energy Services Group, Inc. Adjustable bent housing for controlled directional drilling
US5050692A (en) * 1987-08-07 1991-09-24 Baker Hughes Incorporated Method for directional drilling of subterranean wells
US5052501A (en) * 1990-08-01 1991-10-01 Douglas Wenzel Adjustable bent housing
USRE33751E (en) * 1985-10-11 1991-11-26 Smith International, Inc. System and method for controlled directional drilling
US5094305A (en) * 1990-01-23 1992-03-10 Kenneth H. Wenzel Oilfied Consulting Inc. Orientatable adjustable bent sub
US5117927A (en) * 1991-02-01 1992-06-02 Anadrill Downhole adjustable bent assemblies
FR2671130A1 (en) * 1990-12-28 1992-07-03 Inst Francais Du Petrole Device comprising two articulated elements in a plane applies to drilling equipment.
US5139094A (en) * 1991-02-01 1992-08-18 Anadrill, Inc. Directional drilling methods and apparatus
US5343967A (en) * 1984-05-12 1994-09-06 Baker Hughes Incorporated Apparatus for optional straight or directional drilling underground formations
US5343966A (en) * 1991-06-19 1994-09-06 Vector Oil Tool Ltd. Adjustable bent housing
EP0775802A3 (en) * 1995-11-22 1998-04-01 Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd. Method and apparatus for directional drilling
US6216802B1 (en) 1999-10-18 2001-04-17 Donald M. Sawyer Gravity oriented directional drilling apparatus and method
US20020166701A1 (en) * 2001-05-14 2002-11-14 Comeau Laurier E. Apparatus and method for directional drilling with coiled tubing
US20040131342A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2004-07-08 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Digital adaptive sensorless commutational drive controller for a brushless DC motor
EP1559864A1 (en) * 2004-01-27 2005-08-03 Schlumberger Holdings Limited Downhole drilling of a lateral hole
US20060254824A1 (en) * 2005-05-13 2006-11-16 Horst Clemens L Flow operated orienter
US7287607B1 (en) * 2006-08-04 2007-10-30 Falgout Sr Thomas E Directional drilling apparatus
US20090183921A1 (en) * 2008-01-17 2009-07-23 Rishi Gurjar Flow operated orienter
US20100065143A1 (en) * 2008-09-15 2010-03-18 Johnson Orren S Adjustable bent housing with rotational stop
US9127510B2 (en) 2012-10-12 2015-09-08 Vermeer Manufacturing Company Dual drive directional drilling system
CN105458321A (en) * 2015-12-05 2016-04-06 重庆市成吉思机械制造有限公司 Drilling machine with variable-angle drill bit
US20160281431A1 (en) * 2015-03-24 2016-09-29 Baker Hughes Incorporated Self-Adjusting Directional Drilling Apparatus and Methods for Drilling Directional Wells
US10184298B2 (en) * 2013-03-05 2019-01-22 National Oilwell Varco, L.P. Adjustable bend assembly for a downhole motor

Cited By (52)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4027734A (en) * 1975-12-11 1977-06-07 Hebert & Co., Inc. Gurtler Deviated conductor driving system
USRE29929E (en) * 1975-12-11 1979-03-13 Gurtler, Hebert & Co., Inc. Deviated conductor driving system
US4220214A (en) * 1977-08-18 1980-09-02 Benoit Lloyd F Directional drilling sub
US4303135A (en) * 1977-08-18 1981-12-01 Benoit Lloyd F Directional drilling sub
WO1980002582A1 (en) * 1979-05-21 1980-11-27 L Benoit Variable angle directional drilling sub
NL8103119A (en) * 1980-07-12 1982-02-01 Preussag Ag Drilling tool for the production of curved running portions of deep drilling.
US4438821A (en) * 1981-05-11 1984-03-27 Henry Jolly Mining machinery
FR2542366A1 (en) * 1983-03-08 1984-09-14 Baker Oil Tools Inc Apparatus for direct drilling of underground wells
US4522272A (en) * 1983-03-08 1985-06-11 Baker Oil Tools, Inc. Apparatus for directional drilling of subterranean wells
US4508182A (en) * 1983-07-20 1985-04-02 Dailey Petroleum Services Corp. Method and apparatus for controlling azimuthal drift of a drill bit
DE3417743C1 (en) * 1984-05-12 1985-03-28 Christensen Inc Norton Apparatus for alternative straight or directional drilling in underground rock formations
US5343967A (en) * 1984-05-12 1994-09-06 Baker Hughes Incorporated Apparatus for optional straight or directional drilling underground formations
US5065826A (en) * 1984-05-12 1991-11-19 Baker Hughes Incorporated Apparatus for optional straight or directional drilling underground formations
US4739842A (en) * 1984-05-12 1988-04-26 Eastman Christensen Company Apparatus for optional straight or directional drilling underground formations
DE3423465C1 (en) * 1984-06-26 1985-05-02 Christensen Inc Norton Devices for alternative straight or directional drilling in underground rock formations
USRE33751E (en) * 1985-10-11 1991-11-26 Smith International, Inc. System and method for controlled directional drilling
US4836301A (en) * 1986-05-16 1989-06-06 Shell Oil Company Method and apparatus for directional drilling
GB2190411A (en) * 1986-05-16 1987-11-18 Shell Int Research Directional drilling
GB2190411B (en) * 1986-05-16 1990-02-21 Shell Int Research Apparatus for directional drilling.
US5050692A (en) * 1987-08-07 1991-09-24 Baker Hughes Incorporated Method for directional drilling of subterranean wells
US4884643A (en) * 1989-01-17 1989-12-05 392534 Alberta Ltd. Downhole adjustable bent sub
US5022471A (en) * 1990-01-08 1991-06-11 Maurer Engineering, Inc. Deviated wellbore drilling system and apparatus
US5094305A (en) * 1990-01-23 1992-03-10 Kenneth H. Wenzel Oilfied Consulting Inc. Orientatable adjustable bent sub
US5052501A (en) * 1990-08-01 1991-10-01 Douglas Wenzel Adjustable bent housing
US5048621A (en) * 1990-08-10 1991-09-17 Masx Energy Services Group, Inc. Adjustable bent housing for controlled directional drilling
FR2671130A1 (en) * 1990-12-28 1992-07-03 Inst Francais Du Petrole Device comprising two articulated elements in a plane applies to drilling equipment.
WO1992012324A1 (en) * 1990-12-28 1992-07-23 Institut Français Du Petrole Device comprising two elements hinged in a plane, used in drilling equipment
US5139094A (en) * 1991-02-01 1992-08-18 Anadrill, Inc. Directional drilling methods and apparatus
US5117927A (en) * 1991-02-01 1992-06-02 Anadrill Downhole adjustable bent assemblies
US5343966A (en) * 1991-06-19 1994-09-06 Vector Oil Tool Ltd. Adjustable bent housing
EP0775802A3 (en) * 1995-11-22 1998-04-01 Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd. Method and apparatus for directional drilling
US6216802B1 (en) 1999-10-18 2001-04-17 Donald M. Sawyer Gravity oriented directional drilling apparatus and method
US20020166701A1 (en) * 2001-05-14 2002-11-14 Comeau Laurier E. Apparatus and method for directional drilling with coiled tubing
US6571888B2 (en) * 2001-05-14 2003-06-03 Precision Drilling Technology Services Group, Inc. Apparatus and method for directional drilling with coiled tubing
US20040131342A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2004-07-08 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Digital adaptive sensorless commutational drive controller for a brushless DC motor
US7239098B2 (en) * 2002-06-13 2007-07-03 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Digital adaptive sensorless commutational drive controller for a brushless DC motor
EP1559864A1 (en) * 2004-01-27 2005-08-03 Schlumberger Holdings Limited Downhole drilling of a lateral hole
WO2005071208A1 (en) * 2004-01-27 2005-08-04 Services Petroliers Schlumberger Downhole drilling of a lateral hole
US20080277166A1 (en) * 2004-01-27 2008-11-13 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Downhole Drilling of a Lateral Hole
JP2007519839A (en) * 2004-01-27 2007-07-19 シュランベルジェ、ホールディング、リミテッドSchlumberger Holdings Limited Horizontal hole downhole drilling
US7946360B2 (en) 2004-01-27 2011-05-24 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Downhole drilling of a lateral hole
US20060254824A1 (en) * 2005-05-13 2006-11-16 Horst Clemens L Flow operated orienter
US7481282B2 (en) 2005-05-13 2009-01-27 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Flow operated orienter
US7287607B1 (en) * 2006-08-04 2007-10-30 Falgout Sr Thomas E Directional drilling apparatus
US20090183921A1 (en) * 2008-01-17 2009-07-23 Rishi Gurjar Flow operated orienter
US7946361B2 (en) 2008-01-17 2011-05-24 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Flow operated orienter and method of directional drilling using the flow operated orienter
US20100065143A1 (en) * 2008-09-15 2010-03-18 Johnson Orren S Adjustable bent housing with rotational stop
US8360109B2 (en) 2008-09-15 2013-01-29 Johnson Orren S Adjustable bent housing with rotational stop
US9127510B2 (en) 2012-10-12 2015-09-08 Vermeer Manufacturing Company Dual drive directional drilling system
US10184298B2 (en) * 2013-03-05 2019-01-22 National Oilwell Varco, L.P. Adjustable bend assembly for a downhole motor
US20160281431A1 (en) * 2015-03-24 2016-09-29 Baker Hughes Incorporated Self-Adjusting Directional Drilling Apparatus and Methods for Drilling Directional Wells
CN105458321A (en) * 2015-12-05 2016-04-06 重庆市成吉思机械制造有限公司 Drilling machine with variable-angle drill bit

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
EP2964866B1 (en) Adjustable bend assembly for a downhole motor
US5013194A (en) Chuck assembly for tool bits
US5181576A (en) Downhole adjustable stabilizer
US5113953A (en) Directional drilling apparatus and method
CA1172241A (en) Flexible drill pipe
US8627901B1 (en) Laser bottom hole assembly
CA2510081C (en) Drilling with casing
CA2185205C (en) Steerable drilling tool and system
AU2004254383B2 (en) Coupling for dual member pipe
CA1157005A (en) Tool for drilling curved sections of well holes
US4117895A (en) Apparatus and method for enlarging underground arcuate bore holes
CN1965143B (en) Rotary vector gear for use in rotary steerable tools
CA2825027C (en) Oil-sealed mud motor bearing assembly with mud-lubricated off-bottom thrust bearing
DE60224596T2 (en) Sonic drill head
US8851204B2 (en) Mud motor with integrated percussion tool and drill bit
US4842081A (en) Simultaneous drilling and casing device
US4410054A (en) Well drilling tool with diamond radial/thrust bearings
CN102209832B (en) Locking clutch for downhole motor
CA2387881C (en) Method and apparatus for operations in underground subsea oil and gas wells
US7549487B2 (en) Mandrel and bearing assembly for downhole drilling motor
US8900062B2 (en) Driveshaft assembly for a downhole motor
EP1251268A2 (en) Shaft coupling device for a windturbine
CA1327790C (en) Rotor adapter
US20050236187A1 (en) Drilling with casing
US4811798A (en) Drilling motor deviation tool