US3577966A - Engine antidieseling device - Google Patents

Engine antidieseling device Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3577966A
US3577966A US3577966DA US3577966A US 3577966 A US3577966 A US 3577966A US 3577966D A US3577966D A US 3577966DA US 3577966 A US3577966 A US 3577966A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
engine
valve
chamber
conduit
container
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Wilford R Collingwood
William M Hutchison
Frank E Mangas
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Ford Motor Co
Original Assignee
Ford Motor Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Ford Motor Co filed Critical Ford Motor Co
Priority to US88444469A priority Critical
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3577966A publication Critical patent/US3577966A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M3/00Idling devices for carburettors
    • F02M3/02Preventing flow of idling fuel
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S123/00Internal-combustion engines
    • Y10S123/11Antidieseling

Abstract

A container stores a small quantity of air and pumps the air into the idling system of a carburetor when the engine ignition system is turned off. The air reduces the supply of idling fuel to the engine for a time period sufficient to stop engine dieseling. An electrical solenoid valve connected to the engine ignition system controls the injection of the air into the idling passage.

Description

United States Patent Inventors Wilford R. Collingwood Dearborn;

William M. l-lutchison, Allen Park; Frank E. Mangas, Southfield, Mich.

Dec. 12, 1969 May 11, 1971 Ford Motor Company Dearborn, Mich.

Appl. No. Filed Patented Assignee ENGINE ANTIDIESELING DEVICE 7 Claims, 2 Drawing Figs.

US. Cl 123/12411, 123/97B, 123/1 19D, 123/198DC Int. Cl F02m 7/06,

F02d 31/00, F02d 13/08 Field of Search 123/198,

198 (DA), 198 (DB), 198 (DC), 97 (B), 119, 124

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,817,325 12/1957 Meissner 123/198DC 2,943,615 7/1960 Kainz 123/198DC 3,158,144 ll/l964 Walker l23/198DC 3,354,877 ll/1967 Zub et a]... l23/198DA 3,374,777 3/1968 Walker l23/97B 3,398,731 8/1968 Johansson 123/198DC 3,482,557 12/1968 De Larue et al.. 123/97B 3,482,502 12/1969 Ranft l23/198DC 3,491,737 1/ 1970 Bumia 123/97B Primary Examiner-Wendell E. Burns Attorneys-John R. Faulkner and Glenn S. Arendsen ABSTRACT: A container stores a small quantity of air and pumps the air. into the idling system of a carburetor when the engine ignition system is turned off. The air reduces the supply of idling fuel to the engine for a time period sufficient to stop engine dieseling. An electrical solenoid valve connected to the engine ignition system controls the injection of the air into the idling passage.

ENGINE ANTIDIESELING DEVICE SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The large amount of emission control equipment required on modern day internal combustion engines has resulted in a condition known commonly as dieseling in which the engine continues to run after the ignition switch has been turned off.

Dieseling typically results from the ignition of the f uel-air mixing dieseling under most engine operating conditions, it is ineffective when the fast idle cam of the engine is being used to position the throttle blade during engine warmup. Dieseling in fact is probably most acute when the fast idle cam is in effect since just a few cycles of engine operation can heat small deposits in the engine combustion chamber to incandescence and the rich mixture supplied to the combustion chamber by the partially closed choke and the open throttle blade can be ignited readily by the deposits.

This invention provides a system for preventing positively engine dieseling under all conditions of engine operation. In an internal combustion engine having a source of electrical energy, an induction passage for supplying fuel and air to a combustion chamber, a movable throttle blade in the induction passage and an idling passage for supplying idling fuel to the induction passage downstream of the throttle blade, the system of this invention comprises a mechanism that includes a small container for storing a relatively small quantity of air. A conduit connects the container with the idling passage and a valve located in the conduit permits communication between the container and the idling passage when the ignition system is turned off. Air from the container then flows into the idling passage to reduce the supply of idling fuel and stop engine operation.

In an advanced embodiment of this invention, the container includes a diaphragm that has one side exposed to the intake manifold vacuum of the engine and the other side communicating with the valve and via the valve with the conduit. The valve is made up of a valve rod movable onto a lower seat formed at the entrance to the conduit and an upper seat that communicates with the atmosphere. A spring normally urges the valve rod onto its upper seat but an electrical solenoid actuated with the engine ignition system overcomes the force of the spring to move the valve rod onto the lower seat.

When the ignition system is turned on and the engine has been started, manifold vacuum applied to the bottom of the diaphragm in the container urges the diaphragm to a lowered position. Actuation of the ignition system moves the valve rod to its lower position so the downward movement of the diaphragm draws air past the upper valve seat and into the chamber. The components stay in this position throughout normal engine operation; since the valve rod is closing the conduit, the system does not interfere with engine operation. When the ignition switch is turned off to shut down the engine, deactivation of the solenoid permits movement of the valve rod to its upper seat, thereby connecting the container with the engine idling passage. At the same time the rising manifold pressure permits a spring to move the diaphragm of the container to an upward position, thereby forcing air through the conduit and into the carburetor idling passage where the air cuts off fuel flow to stop any engine dieseling.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. I is a schematic view of an installation of the system of this invention showing the relationship of the container to the engine ignition system and the carburetor during normal engine operation.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of the container and the valve assembly showing the relationship of the components when the engine is shutoff.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring to the drawing, a carburetor for an internal combustion engine has an induction passage 12 for supplying fuel and air to a combustion chamber of the engine. A throttle blade I4 is mounted pivotally in induction passage 12 tocontrol the flow of fuel and air through the induction passage. Upstream of throttle blade 14 is a venturi section I6 that produces an appropriate main fuel metering signal. Downstream of throttle blade 14, induction passage I2 communicates with the engine intake manifold passage I8 that communicates with the engine combustion chamber.

A fuel reservoir is located in carburetor I0 alongside induction passage I2. Reservoir 20 communicates with a fuel well 22 that supplies fuel to an idling passage 24 through a metering jet 26. Idling passage 24 communicates through a port 28 with induction passage I2 downstream of throttle blade 14.

Mounted near carburetor '10 is a small air container 30 that has a movable diaphragm 32 mounted therein to divide the container into an upper chamber 34 and a lower chamber 36. A compression spring 37 is located in lower chamber 36 where it urges diaphragm 32 toward an upper position shown in FIG. 2. The bottom of the container includes a ferrule 38 and a hose 39 mounted on the ferrule connects lower chamber 36 with induction passage 12 at all times at a point downstream of throttle blade 14. A guide rod 40 attached to the diaphragm slides in ferrule 38 to maintain proper alignment of the diaphragm.

A cap 41 mounted on top of container 30 has a small space 42 defined partially by a lower plate 43 that fits on top of chamber 34. Space 42 communicates with chamber 34 through a short passage 44 in plate 43. Plate 43 also contains a valve seat 46 at the opening into space 42 of a passage 48. Another valve seat 50 is located in the upper part of cap 41 in alignment with valve seat 46. Valve seat 50 is the opening into space 42 of a passage 52 that communicates with a port 58 at the upper part of induction passage 12. A movable valve rod 54 is positioned to seat on either of the upper and lower valve seats. Rod 54 is urged onto seat 50 by a spring 56. The valve rod is made of a material that is movable by a magnetic'field. Passage 48 communicates with a passage 60 formed in the carburetor that in turn communicates with idling passage 24.

Positioned around the outside of the upper part of cap 41 is a solenoid coil 62. Coil 62 is connected electrically to the vehicle ignition system indicated by numeral 64 which is connected to an ignition switch 66 and the vehicle battery 68. Switch 66 is actuated manually by the vehicle driver and is closed when the engine is operating. Solenoid coil 62 thus is energized when the engine is operating; when energized the coil applies a magnetic field to valve rod 54 that moves the valve rod onto lower seat 46. When the valve rod is in this lowered position, upper chamber 34 communicates with the atmosphere via passage 44, space 42, valve seat 50, passage 52 and port 58.

The system of this invention .operates in the following manner. When the vehicle operator starts the engine, the solenoid moves valve rod 54 as described above to connect upper chamber 34 with the atmosphere. The reduced intake manifold pressure in the intake manifold passage I8 draws diaphragm 32 into a lowered position as shown in FIG. 1, thereby filling the upper chamber 34 with a small quantity of air. During continued engine operation, variations in manifold pressure can move diaphragm 32 slightly, but this movement has no effect on engine operation since the air simply moves back and forth through port 58.

When the operator opens switch 66 to shut down the engine, solenoid 62 is deactivated and spring 56 pushes valve rod onto upper seat 50 (See FIG. 2). Opening switch I66 also deactivates the engine ignition system 64, which produces an increase in the manifold pressure in intake manifold 18. The increase in pressure permits spring 37 to move diaphragm 32 upward into chamber 34 and the air in chamber 34 is forced through passage 48 into the idling passage 24 of the carburetor where it reduces fuel flow through jet 26 and thereby reduces the composition of the fuel air mixture reaching the engine combustion chambers to the point where the mixture no longer is combustible. The engine thus ceases operation without dieseling,

The amount of air necessary to prevent dieseling varies somewhat with engine size and carburetor characteristics and must be determined empirically. A minimum of about I cubic inch of air is needed to prevent dieseling under most anticipated conditions. If desired, a check valve can be included in passage 52 and valve rod 54 then moves onto only one seat controlling airflow into the idling passage.

Thus this invention provides a positively acting system for preventing engine dieseling regardless of the positions of the carburetor choke plate or throttle blade. The system can be incorporated in vehicle production or added to vehicles out in the field by relatively simple operations.

We claim:

1. In an internal combustion engine having a source ofelcctrical energy, an induction passage for supplying fuel and air to a combustion chamber, an ignition system connected to said source of electrical energy for supplying an ignition spark to said combustion chamber, a movable throttle blade mounted in said induction passage, and an idling passage for supplying idling fuel to said induction passage downstream of said throttle blade, a mechanism for preventing engine dieseling comprising:

container means for storing a quantity of air,

a conduit connecting said container means with said idling passage, and

means for transmitting air from said container means via said conduit to said idling passage when said ignition system is turned off. said air reducing the supply of idling fuel via said idling passage to said combustion chamber to stop engine operation.

2. The engine of claim 1 in which the transmitting means comprises a valve located in said conduit for controlling airflow through said conduit, said valve comprising an electric solenoid connected electrically to said ignition system and a valve rod movable by the magnetic field produced by energization of said solenoid. said solenoid closing said valve to prevent airflow through said conduit when the ignition system in turned on and opening said valve when the ignition system is turned off.

3. The engine of claim 2 in which the container means comprises a movable diaphragm dividing said container into first and second chambers, said first chamber communicating with said conduit through said valve, and a spring urging said diaphragm into said first chamber.

4. The engine of claim 3 in which the second chamber communicates with the intake manifold of the engine so the intake manifold vacuum draws said diaphragm out of said first chamber.

5. The engine of claim 4 comprising a valve seat for each end of said valve rod, the first valve seat connecting said first chamber to said conduit and the second valve seat connecting said first chamber to the atmosphere, and a spring urging the valve rod to said second seat, said solenoid moving the valve rod to the first seat when energized.

6. The engine of claim 1 in which the container means comprises a movable diaphragm dividing said container into first and second chambers, said first chamber communicating with said conduit through said valve, and a spring urging said diaphragm into said first chamber.

7. The engine of claim 2 comprising a valve seat for each end of said valve rod, the first valve seat connecting said first chamber to said conduit and the second valve seat connecting said first chamber to the atmosphere, and a spring urging the valve rod to said second seat, said solenoid moving the valve rod to the first seat when energized. 4

Claims (7)

1. In an internal combustion engine having a source of electrical energy, an induction passage for supplying fuel and air to a combustion chamber, an ignition system connected to said source of electrical energy for supplying an ignition spark to said combustion chamber, a movable throttle blade mounted in said induction passage, and an idling passage for supplying idling fuel to said induction passage downstream of said throttle blade, a mechanism for preventing engine dieseling comprising: container means for storing a quantity of air, a conduit connecting said container means with said idling passage, and means for transmitting air from said container means via said conduit to said idling passage when said ignition system is turned off, said air reducing the supply of idling fuel via said idling passage to said combustion chamber to stop engine operation.
2. The engine of claim 1 in which the transmitting means comprises a valve located in said conduit for controlling airflow through said conduit, said valve comprising an electric solenoid connected electrically to said ignition system and a valve rod movable by the magnetic field produced by energization of said solenoid, said solenoid closing said valve to prevent airflow through said conduit when the ignition system in tuRned on and opening said valve when the ignition system is turned off.
3. The engine of claim 2 in which the container means comprises a movable diaphragm dividing said container into first and second chambers, said first chamber communicating with said conduit through said valve, and a spring urging said diaphragm into said first chamber.
4. The engine of claim 3 in which the second chamber communicates with the intake manifold of the engine so the intake manifold vacuum draws said diaphragm out of said first chamber.
5. The engine of claim 4 comprising a valve seat for each end of said valve rod, the first valve seat connecting said first chamber to said conduit and the second valve seat connecting said first chamber to the atmosphere, and a spring urging the valve rod to said second seat, said solenoid moving the valve rod to the first seat when energized.
6. The engine of claim 1 in which the container means comprises a movable diaphragm dividing said container into first and second chambers, said first chamber communicating with said conduit through said valve, and a spring urging said diaphragm into said first chamber.
7. The engine of claim 2 comprising a valve seat for each end of said valve rod, the first valve seat connecting said first chamber to said conduit and the second valve seat connecting said first chamber to the atmosphere, and a spring urging the valve rod to said second seat, said solenoid moving the valve rod to the first seat when energized.
US3577966D 1969-12-12 1969-12-12 Engine antidieseling device Expired - Lifetime US3577966A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US88444469A true 1969-12-12 1969-12-12

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3577966A true US3577966A (en) 1971-05-11

Family

ID=25384640

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3577966D Expired - Lifetime US3577966A (en) 1969-12-12 1969-12-12 Engine antidieseling device

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (1) US3577966A (en)
CA (1) CA920898A (en)
DE (1) DE2058153B2 (en)
GB (1) GB1293835A (en)

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3635203A (en) * 1970-07-27 1972-01-18 Sylvania Electric Prod Antidieseling device for internal combustion engines
US3751916A (en) * 1970-12-29 1973-08-14 Toyo Kogyo Co Exhaust gas purifying system for use in internal combustion engine
US3795237A (en) * 1971-12-03 1974-03-05 Ford Motor Co Carburetor anti-dieseling and deceleration control
US3802403A (en) * 1971-05-20 1974-04-09 British Leyland Austin Morris Run-on prevention means for spark-ignition internal combustion engines including evaporative loss canisters
US4043310A (en) * 1975-02-18 1977-08-23 Toyota Jidosha Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Auxiliary apparatus for hot-starting internal combustion engine
US6478015B2 (en) * 1999-12-20 2002-11-12 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Vaporized fuel treatment apparatus of internal combustion engine
US10343692B2 (en) * 2016-09-09 2019-07-09 Hyundai Motor Company Method and apparatus for preventing dieseling of engine for mild hybrid electric vehicle

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2817325A (en) * 1957-12-24 Control device for internal combustion engines
US2943615A (en) * 1955-03-23 1960-07-05 Daimler Benz Ag Air inlet control mechanism for an internal combustion engine
US3158144A (en) * 1964-11-24 Walker
US3354877A (en) * 1966-03-25 1967-11-28 Acf Ind Inc Means for preventing auto ignition at engine shut down
US3374777A (en) * 1964-11-06 1968-03-26 Walker Brooks Vehicle carburetor
US3398731A (en) * 1966-06-22 1968-08-27 Gylling & Co Ab Device for automatic control of the fuel supply to diesel engines
US3482557A (en) * 1967-01-26 1969-12-09 Renault Feed control devices for carburetor engines
US3482502A (en) * 1965-06-18 1969-12-09 Balke & Co Developer for automatically operated photographic device
US3491737A (en) * 1968-03-22 1970-01-27 Ford Motor Co Throttle blade control mechanism for preventing engine dieseling

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2817325A (en) * 1957-12-24 Control device for internal combustion engines
US3158144A (en) * 1964-11-24 Walker
US2943615A (en) * 1955-03-23 1960-07-05 Daimler Benz Ag Air inlet control mechanism for an internal combustion engine
US3374777A (en) * 1964-11-06 1968-03-26 Walker Brooks Vehicle carburetor
US3482502A (en) * 1965-06-18 1969-12-09 Balke & Co Developer for automatically operated photographic device
US3354877A (en) * 1966-03-25 1967-11-28 Acf Ind Inc Means for preventing auto ignition at engine shut down
US3398731A (en) * 1966-06-22 1968-08-27 Gylling & Co Ab Device for automatic control of the fuel supply to diesel engines
US3482557A (en) * 1967-01-26 1969-12-09 Renault Feed control devices for carburetor engines
US3491737A (en) * 1968-03-22 1970-01-27 Ford Motor Co Throttle blade control mechanism for preventing engine dieseling

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3635203A (en) * 1970-07-27 1972-01-18 Sylvania Electric Prod Antidieseling device for internal combustion engines
US3751916A (en) * 1970-12-29 1973-08-14 Toyo Kogyo Co Exhaust gas purifying system for use in internal combustion engine
US3802403A (en) * 1971-05-20 1974-04-09 British Leyland Austin Morris Run-on prevention means for spark-ignition internal combustion engines including evaporative loss canisters
US3795237A (en) * 1971-12-03 1974-03-05 Ford Motor Co Carburetor anti-dieseling and deceleration control
US4043310A (en) * 1975-02-18 1977-08-23 Toyota Jidosha Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Auxiliary apparatus for hot-starting internal combustion engine
US6478015B2 (en) * 1999-12-20 2002-11-12 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Vaporized fuel treatment apparatus of internal combustion engine
US10343692B2 (en) * 2016-09-09 2019-07-09 Hyundai Motor Company Method and apparatus for preventing dieseling of engine for mild hybrid electric vehicle

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
DE2058153B2 (en) 1980-08-28
GB1293835A (en) 1972-10-25
CA920898A (en) 1973-02-13
DE2058153A1 (en) 1971-06-16
CA920898A1 (en)

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3738334A (en) Emission reduction system
US3322408A (en) Carburetor
DE3519292C2 (en)
US6698727B1 (en) Electronic control diaphragm carburetor
US3941105A (en) Exhaust gas recirculation for three-valve engine
US4020803A (en) Combined fuel injection and intake valve for electronic fuel injection engine systems
US3455260A (en) Carburettors for internal combustion engines
SU545269A4 (en) Fuel injection device for internal combustion engine
US3875922A (en) Vapor injection system
US3706444A (en) Carburettor for motor vehicle
US3795237A (en) Carburetor anti-dieseling and deceleration control
US4011847A (en) Fuel supply system
US4373493A (en) Method and apparatus for utilizing gaseous and liquid fuels in an internal combustion engine
US3800768A (en) Apparatus and method for fueling an internal combustion engine
US3158144A (en) Walker
US3789819A (en) Fuel rail vapor bleed
CA1082058A (en) Fuel injection system and method for internal combustion engine
BE897463A (en) Fuel supply system for an internal combustion engine
US2621911A (en) Carburetor
US3845745A (en) Water injection system for an internal combustion engine
US3760785A (en) Carburetor throttle valve positioner
US5605133A (en) Fuel rail pressure control
US2386340A (en) Decelerator
EP0112918A1 (en) Control valve for a gas fuel supply to an internal combustion engine and method for using the control valve.
US3432152A (en) Fuel injection system