US3559361A - Method for construction - Google Patents

Method for construction Download PDF

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US3559361A
US3559361A US3559361DA US3559361A US 3559361 A US3559361 A US 3559361A US 3559361D A US3559361D A US 3559361DA US 3559361 A US3559361 A US 3559361A
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blocks
row
construction
rows
support
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George S Sarros
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SARROS CONSTRUCTION CO Inc
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SARROS CONSTRUCTION CO Inc
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B5/00Floors; Floor construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted therefor
    • E04B5/16Load-carrying floor structures wholly or partly cast or similarly formed in situ
    • E04B5/17Floor structures partly formed in situ
    • E04B5/18Floor structures partly formed in situ with stiffening ribs or other beam-like formations wholly cast between filling members
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B5/00Floors; Floor construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted therefor
    • E04B5/16Load-carrying floor structures wholly or partly cast or similarly formed in situ
    • E04B5/17Floor structures partly formed in situ
    • E04B5/23Floor structures partly formed in situ with stiffening ribs or other beam-like formations wholly or partly prefabricated
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04CSTRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; BUILDING MATERIALS
    • E04C3/00Structural elongated elements designed for load-supporting
    • E04C3/02Joists; Girders, trusses, or trusslike structures, e.g. prefabricated; Lintels; Transoms; Braces
    • E04C3/20Joists; Girders, trusses, or trusslike structures, e.g. prefabricated; Lintels; Transoms; Braces of concrete or other stone-like material, e.g. with reinforcements or tensioning members
    • E04C3/22Joists; Girders, trusses, or trusslike structures, e.g. prefabricated; Lintels; Transoms; Braces of concrete or other stone-like material, e.g. with reinforcements or tensioning members built-up by elements jointed in line

Abstract

A SYSTEM FOR PRODUCING FLOOR CONSTRUCTIONS EXTENDING ACROSS A SPAN BETWEEN UPRIGHT WALLS WHEREIN CONSTRUCTION BLOCKS ARE ALIGNED IN INDIVIDUAL ROWS IN SIDE-BY-SIDE RELATIONSHIP. A SUPPORTING STRUCTURE IS PROVIDED FOR HOLDING INDIVIDUAL BLOCKS AS THEY ARE PLACED IN POSITION TO FORM A ROW. ELONGATED TENSIONING MEMBERS ARE APPLIED TO EACH ROW WHILE STILL ON THE SUPPORT WHEREBY THE BLOCKS IN THE ROW ARE SUBJECTED TO COMPRESSIBLE FORCES MAKING THE ROW SELF-SUSTAINING. THE SUPPORT CAN BE MOVED AFTER APPLICATION OF TENSION AND REPEATEDLY USED FOR SUCCESSIVE ROWS. A GROUTING MATERIAL IS DISPOSED IN THE OPENINGS DEFINED BETWEEN ADJACENT ROWS OF BLOCKS WHEREBY THE TENSIONING MEMBERS WILL BE EMBEDDED IN THE GROUTING MATERIAL BETWEEN THE ADJACENT ROWS.

Description

Feb. 2,1971 e. s. SARROS METHOD FOR CONSTRUCTION 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 4. 1968 /NVEN7'0 1 Gears .5" Sarros M af ys Fgb. 2, 1971 s. s. SARROS 3,559,361

METHOD FOR CONSTRUCTION Filed June 4. 196a ZSheets-Sheet 2 United States Patent Oifice US. Cl. 52-743 4 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A system for producing floor constructions extending across a span between upright walls wherein construction blocks are aligned in individual rows in side-by-side relationship. A supporting structure is provided for holding individual blocks as they are placed in position to form a row. Elongated tensioning members are applied to each row while still on the support whereby the blocks in the row are subjected to compressible forces making the row self-sustaining. The support can be moved after application of tension and repeatedly used for successive rows. A grouting material is disposed in the openings defined between adjacent rows of blocks whereby the tensioning members will be embedded in the grouting material between the adjacent rows.

This application is a continuation-in-part of applicants copending application Ser. No. 418,953, filed Dec. 17, 1964, now abandoned.

This invention relates to a method for constructing floors or other spans by employing construction blocks. In addition, the invention is concerned with means to be utilized in undertaking the novel method of construction.

The building of floors and arches by using concerete blocks is considered to be relatively economical. The blocks provide a completely satisfactory structure from the standpoint of strength, and they are adaptable for surfacing as by means of conventional flooring on roofing materials. The joining of the blocks for forming of the desired span can be undertaken relatively rapidly when compared with other methods of construction such as wood floors. In addition, a smaller outlay from the standpoint of material cost characterizes such constructions, and the net result is that economies can be achieved in certain applications.

One difficulty which characterizes the use of concrete blocks or the like in constructing spans involves labor costs. Thus, where such blocks are used, it is conventional practice to build supports, usually scaifolding, whereby the blocks can be laid out in the desired fashion over the supports. Before the supports can be removed, the mortar employed must set to provide the desired adherence between blocks and, in many cases, several days may be required before the supports can be removed. High labor costs are involved in building the necessary support structure and in dismantling the structure. In addition, it is necessary to provide large amounts of materials for building the supporting structures, and these materials are tied up during the entire time necessary for setting of the mortar used in assembling the blocks. These factors also add significantly to the costs of constructions of the type described.

It is an object of this invention to provide a novel method to be employed for the construction of configurations employing building blocks.

It is a further object of this invention to provide novel means for use in the construction of configurations with building blocks whereby the improved method of this in- 3,559,361 Patented Feb. 2., 1971 vention can be undertaken in an extremely efiicient manner.

It is a more particular object of this invention to provide a novel method and novel means for undertaking the method whereby configurations such as floors and roofs can be constructed from concrete blocks and the like and in a highly efficient and economical fashion.

These and other objects of this invention will appear hereinafter and for purposes of illustration but not of limitation, specific embodiments of this invention are shown in the accompanying drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view illustrating a row of blocks provided for forming a floor or similar span in accordance with the techniques of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the block row shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an end elevation illustrating a plurality of rows of blocks situated in side-by-side relationship to provide a floor surface or the like;

FIG. 4 is a schematic illustration demonstrating the application of the principles of this invention in the formation of an arch construction;

FIG. 5 is a detail fragmentary view illustrating a modified supporting means for use in combination with the techniques of this invention;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating an alternative form of a clamping means suitable for use in the practice of this invention;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view illustrating a modified form of the invention;

FIG. 8 is an end elevation illustrating a plurality of rows of blocks as they are situated in a modified form of the invention; and,

FIGS. 9, 10 and 11 illustrate alternative arrangements for the construction of individual rows in accordance with the principles of the invention.

The instant invention generally involves a method for construction wherein a plurality of construction blocks, such as conventional concrete blocks, are aligned to form a row. A plurality of rows of the aligned blocks are adapted to be situated in side-by-side relationship whereby the desired surface configuration can be provided. The instant invention is primarily concerned with the construction of floors or other surface configurations defining a generally fiat surface. As will be noted hereinafter, the principles of this invention are also applicable to the formation of arches such as are employed in root constructions.

In situating the construction blocks in the manner described, conventional methods are used to a certain extent. Specifically, supports are provided for the individual rows of blocks, and mortar may be applied between the opposed faces of the blocks primarily to fill in irregularities and to provide proper alignment. Alternatively, the opposed faces may be ground smooth to achieve the same result. In either case, the workers involved in building the construction can lay the individual blocks over the supports and achieve alignment in a conventional fashion.

The instant invention is distinguished from prior techniques for the reason that supports are not constructed to extend beneath the entire configuration to be built. To the contrary, individual supports are provided for each row, and these supports are moved after completion of a row whereby the supports can be utilized several times in the course of a building operation. Furthermore, a minimum number of supports is necessary, and the supports are of a type which can be readily placed in position and readily moved to a new position for the formation of a new row of blocks.

In accordance with the techniques of this invention, the support for a particular row can be moved after the row is completed. Accordingly, a floor construction can be 3 completed in an extremely short time since the building of complete support structures is eliminated and, in addition, the particular support structures are easily handled by a minimum number of workmen whereby time and labor expense can be saved.

The advantages referred to above can be achieved due to the fact that means are applied to each row of blocks in the construction which eliminate the necessity for employing supports. Specifically, the instant invention provides for the application of tensioning means to the row of blocks after a particular row is formed. These tensioning means are such that a row of blocks, even though extending over a considerable span, will be essentially selfsustaining so that the supports can be moved for use in the formation of a new row.

The accompanying drawing illustrates the manner in which the technique of the instant invention can be applied in the formation of floors and arches. In FIG. 1, there is illustrated a row formed of individual concrete blocks 12. It will be noted that the blocks 12 are of a conventional configuration; however, construction blocks of other configurations are obviously suitable for use in the application of the principles of this invention.

The row 10 extends across the span defined between the walls 14 and 16. These walls may comprise foundation walls, for example as are provided in a conventional basement construction, or any other type of wall. The end blocks in the row 10 overlap these walls, and it will be appreciated that the aligning of a plurality of the rows 10' as shown in FIG. 3 will provide for the formation of a generally fiat surface configuration.

When forming the individual rows, mortar may be located between the engaging faces of the blocks 12 to fill any irregularities so that the faces of blocks in a row will be in substantially total engagement with adjacent faces. Alternatively, the faces of the blocks could be ground smooth so that when the faces are in abutting relationship, substantially total engagement will be provided. This arrangement is important since upon application of tension, the blocks will be in compression, and an irregular alignment could result in cracking and weaknesses in the final construction.

In forming a row of the blocks, there are first provided supports 18 which may comprise wooden beams. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2, a stirrup member 20 is suspended on the wall 16 by means of an upper flange portion 22, and a lower flange portion 24 of the stirrup holds the end of the support 18. It will be appreciated that the provision of a similar stirrup on the wall 14 will permit extending of the support 18 across the span. Mortar may be applied between the top of the wall and the bottom surfaces of the end blocks, on either side of the stirrups, where the stirrups are to be removed after use. This mortar will maintain the floor at the desired level after such removal.

As best shown in FIG. 3, the stirrups 20 are preferably arranged whereby the mid-point of the supports 18 will be located at the juncture of adjacent blocks 12. In laying a row of blocks, the side ends of the blocks will rest on adjacent supports and the supports are kept in place until the entire row is completed.

In FIG. 3, the supports 18 are illustrated as providing support for the row 10 comprising the right-hand row shown in solid lines. After this row has been completed and the tensioning provided in the manner to be described, the next row (shown in phantom lines) can be formed by removing the left-hand support 18 and moving the support to the first position shown in phantom lines. After the next row is completed, the next support is then moved to provide for formation of the next succeeding row.

As previously noted, the concepts of this invention provide for tensioning of means associated with the row of blocks after completion of a particular row. Specifically, after completion of the row, the unit itself is not selfsustaining and, therefore, removal of the supports would cause the row to collapse. It has been found, however, that the application of tensioning means in the system serves to compress the blocks with respect to each other and to impart self-sustaining characteristics whereby the supports can be removed after completion of the row.

FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 illustrate the use of a band 26 suitable for achieving the desired function. The band is adapted to be located in the recessed portion 28 defined at each end of the blocks 12. Conventional means may be provided for applying tension to the band so that it will be strapped tightly around the block row and apply compressive forces thereto. Such means are employed for strapping bundles of steel and similar articles.

As an alternative to the use of a strap, it is contemplated that conventional steel cable could be employed. One end of the cable can be clamped to the end block and the cable then wrapped around the row in the manner of the strap. Jack means can then be utilized to pull the cable taut and to introduce the desired compression into the row. After the cable has been pulled by the jack to the desired extent, the free end of the cable can be clamped in place to provide a permanent part of the construction.

FIG. 6 illustrates an additional alternative embodiment wherein a plate 30 is applied in abutting relationship with the end block 12. A rod 32 extends through the blocks and in this instance, the passage 34 defined by the blocks may be utilized. The end 36 of the rod 32 is threaded and a nut 38 is associated therewith. By providing a similar plate arrangement at the other end of the row of blocks, tension can be exerted on the rod whereby compression will be applied to the row of blocks and a selfsustaining combination will result.

FIG. 3 illustrates, at the left-hand side thereof, a further alternative for introducing the desired compression. In this arrangement, a rod or cable 44 is introduced into the recessed portion 28 and the member 44 is adapted to be placed in tension by employing a plate 46, the application of the tension being similar to the arrangement shown in FIG. 6.

The use of a rod 44 is particularly desirable since the rod serves a useful purpose in the final assembly. Specifically, the elongated space defined by the opposed recessed portions 28 is conventionally filled with a grout material 52, usually after all of the rows have been completed. The rod 44 lends rigidity to the system after the grout has set. It will be noted that a pair of the members 44 is provided so that one such member will be located along each side of each row. This arrangement is necessary since the member 44 doubles as the means for imparting completion of the support while also acting as the means for imparting rigidity to the construction after setting of the grout.

In the building of a floor or of an arched roof of particularly large size, it is desirable to limit the extent of the span over which the construction blocks extend. In. FIG. 1, there is illustrated an I-beam 40 which serves to divide the row 10 into two sections. The I-beam may be of a conventional type employed in building constructions for supporting floors and the like. Alternatively, temporary supports at intermediate points may be provided and these supports will remain in place until the grout has set sulficiently to make the completed construction selfsupporting over the entire span.

FIG. 5 illustrates the manner in which a support 18 can be associated with an I-beam 40. It will be noted that the flange 42 of the I-beam provides a natural means for holding one end of the support 18.

In a typical operation utilizing the principles of this invention, three of the beams 18 will be utilized. By using three beams, more time will be available for the worker applying the tensioning means. Thus, the laying of the blocks can be undertaken very rapidly and the mason should not be delayed due to the fact that applying of the tensioning means may often take longer than laying of a row of blocks. When three supports are employed, the mason can stay two rows ahead .ofthe iron worker and thereby compensate forthe differences in time necessaryfor-ziehieving the respectivejoperations. v

FIG. 4 illu s tra tes the application of the instant inventionto an arched configuration. In this instance, the blocks 12 are disposed over supports 48 and as in the caseofafloor construction, theblocks are arranged in side-by-side fashion in each row with several rows being located adjacent each other to form the desired configuration. The supports 48, comprising beams or the like, may

be located on. scaffolding 50, and it will be apparent that with this arrangement, the beams can be moved after completion of a row in the same manner as described with reference to the building of a floor. It will be ap-' preciated that the beams should preferablyhave a configuration conforming to the shape of the arch. Tensioning means need not be associated with this arrangement since the individual blocks will settle, under the influence of gravity, into a self-sustaining relationship when the beam supports are removed. It will be apparent, however, that the technique of moving supports immediately after formation of a row clearly provides advantages when building an arch construction of the type shown in FIG. 4.

FIG. 7 illustrates alternative forms of the invention. The row 110' of blocks 112 can be formed between walls 131 through ,the use of supports in the manner previously described. An I-bearn 132 may be provided if the span between the walls 131 is sufficiently great.

Plates 125 are provided for securing tensioning cables 126. In this instance, however, a rod 121 is driven into a block at the center of the row, and the cable 126 is placed in engagement with this rod. As best shown in FIG. I10, the rod is located adjacent the bottom edge of the block so that the cable 126 will be disposed angularly relative to the row of blocks. With this arrangement, there will be a tendency for the cable to force the row to bulge upwardly at the center, and this tendency will offset the tendency of the row to sag. This arrangement can be important particularly after the floor has been in place for an extended period.

The row 130 shown in FIG. 7 and in FIG. 9 is constructed of blocks in the manner previously described. In this instance, however, the support for the blocks is curved to provide a rise in the center so that a camber will appear in the row. When the cable 126 is tensioned between plates 125, the force which results will tend to maintain the camber. This will offset the tendency to sag. In constructing the row 130, the faces of the blocks 112 may be ground to provide a suitable inclination so that each face will be in substantially total engagement with an adjacent face. Alternatively, the blocks could be slightly stepped relative to each other to provide the convex configuration. In this connection, it will be appreciated that the camber shown in FIG. 9 is exaggerated insofar as a floor construction is concerned. The specific arrangement shown or a more severe angle may, however, be suitable where an arch is desired.

FIG. 11 illustrates an additional modification wherein the floor as initially produced actually sags to a degree. In this case, the cable 126 engaging pin 121 will serve to strengthen the floor and offset any tendency toward a depression in the floor beyond that initially designed.

FIG. 8 illustrates an arrangement of the invention wherein the rows 110 are spaced apart so that the adjacent rows do not abut each other. It has been found that this spacing permissible without a loss in structural strength of the floor, and the spacing does provide a more economical arrangement.

The passages between adjacent rows are filled with grouting material as shown at 140. A top facing 142 may be provided where desired.

In order to facilitate introduction of the grouting material, a metal span or similar blocking means 127 may be provided to fill the gap at the bottom of the passages between the rows. Alternatively, the blocks could be designed with large bottom flanges 144 to achieve this same result.

As previously noted, the reference to blocks in the appended claims is intended to cover conventional concrete blocksv as well as other construction materials. In addition, the reference to mortar is to be understood to cover all types of cement and concrete as well as any other plastic material suitable for adhering construction blocks into a unitary construction.

In practicing the techniques of the instant invention, it will be appreciated that various conventional building procedures can be employed in combination therewith. In some instances, it may be desirable to form a crown in a row of blocks to accommodate some settling after re moval of a crowned support. A form used for the support which is capable of assuming a crowned configuration is best suited for this purpose. It will be apparent that various other shapes can be provided for drainage purposes or the like while utilizing the novel features of this invention.

It will be understood that various changes and modifications may be made in the methods and means described which provide the characteristics of this invention without departing from the spirit thereof particularly as defined in the following claims.

That which is claimed is:

.1. A method for the in-place formation of constructions comprising floors and roofs extending across a span defined between opposed, previously constructed, and permanent supporting walls wherein a plurality of construction blocks are aligned to form individual rows and a plurality of said rows are situated in side-by-side relationship for thereby providing a substantial portion of the body of the construction, said method comprising the steps of providing an elongated, portable supporting beam, temporarily connecting said supporting beam to the top edges of said walls and suspending the beam between the walls whereby support for the beam is provided by the walls, placing said blocks one at a time on said supporting beam with the side faces of the blocks being in abutting relationship and with the ends of the blocks being exposed and forming the sides of a row, locating an elongated tensioning member along the length of a row after the row is formed on said support, connecting the opposite ends of the tensioning member at the ends of the rows at a relatively high point on the end blocks, said tensioning member extending downwardly to a low point adjacent the center of the row, providing means for holding the tensioning means in position at the low point in the row, applying tension in said member whereby the blocks in the row are subjected to compressive forces, moving the supporting beam subsequent to said application of tension whereby the entire support for the row intermediate its ends is provided by means of said compressive forces, said tension being maintained during the life of the construction, relocating said support and forming an adjacent row of blocks, the side faces of said adjacent row being located in completely separate, spaced-apart relationship relative to the previously formed row, repeatedly employing said portable support for the formation of adjacent, spaced-apart rows in the construction, repeating said tension applying step with respect to each row formed to thereby provide support for each row prior to movement of said portable support, the spacing between the rows providing continuous passages between each adjacent row of blocks along the length of the rows, said tensioning members being positioned within said passages, locating blocking means between said rows after completion of a plurality of rows, said blocking means being positioned adjacent the bottom of said passages for blocking said passages, and thereafter filling said passages with grouting material to thereby embed said tensioning members in position between adjacent rows.

2. A method in accordance with claim 1 including the step of applying mortar between opposed faces of the blocks in a row, said mortar being applied as the blocks are placed on said portable structure.

3. A method in accordance with claim 1 including the step of grinding the end faces of the blocks to provide a smooth surface whereby the faces of the blocks in a given row will be in substantially total engagement with each other.

4. A method in accordance with claim 1 including the step of forming a camber in said construction by placing each block in a given row at a progressively different level relative to the horizontal during construction of a row.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 600,334 3/1898 Mesch 52229 1,214,442 1/1917 Edlin 52227 1,959,653 5/ 1934 Barzaghi 52229 2,102,447 12/1937 Whitacre 52293 2,184,137 12/1939 Brewer 52229 8 2,696,729 12/1954 Vander Heyden 52229 3,172,932 3/1965 Vander Heyden 52227 3,173,226 3/1965 Solnick 5289 3,256,653 6/1966 Huff 52--127 3,283,457 11/ 1966 Hart 52744 3,407,554 10/ 1968 Young 52226 1,306,962 6/1919' Jagdmann 52227 2,776,471 1/1957 Dobell 52228 FOREIGN PATENTS 601,038 4/1948 Britain 52227 889,314 9/ 1943 France 52227 835,798 4/ 1952 Germany 52227 5 FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner J. L. RIDGILL, JR., Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 52227, 747

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Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4001988A (en) * 1975-01-09 1977-01-11 Monte Riefler Concrete block panel
US4035966A (en) * 1973-10-18 1977-07-19 Leon Eugenie Daniel Dompas Structure having vertical bearer walls and horizontal ceilings
US4505088A (en) * 1982-06-24 1985-03-19 Lippe Lloyd K Method of constructing arcuate structures
US4587684A (en) * 1983-10-14 1986-05-13 Roman Arch And Culvert Corporation Of America Precast concrete bridge
US4727696A (en) * 1984-11-29 1988-03-01 Henriques Da Trindade Americo Stable structure consisting of tubular components and posttensioned cables or other tensory elements
US4802318A (en) * 1985-07-10 1989-02-07 Jacov Snitovski Insulating block unit, a method for its manufacture, and a method of erecting a wall by means of such blocks
US5628582A (en) * 1995-04-24 1997-05-13 Schuylkill Products, Inc. Concrete barrier erection and alignment system
FR2848580A1 (en) * 2002-12-11 2004-06-18 Luc Charles Pierre Tamborero Arch structure forming device for use during building construction, has strap for forming adjuster unit, which is stretched between two ridges, and subjected to tension by system to press ridges against structural units
US20050016093A1 (en) * 2003-07-22 2005-01-27 Buarque De Macedo Pedro M. Prestressed, strong foam glass tiles
US6877283B2 (en) 2000-03-28 2005-04-12 Susumu Yoshiwara Manufacture and use of earthquake resistant construction blocks
US20060156673A1 (en) * 2003-07-24 2006-07-20 Mituo Nakamura Block for constructions, panel for construction using the block, and method of forming panel for construction
US20070234490A1 (en) * 2006-03-23 2007-10-11 Mordehay Carmel Mobile compression and tension bridge and shelter structure
US20090094904A1 (en) * 2007-10-09 2009-04-16 Hntb Holdings Ltd Method for building over an opening via incremental launching
ES2590536R1 (en) * 2015-05-01 2017-03-09 Elastic Potential, S.L. Construction system and assembling procedure of this

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4035966A (en) * 1973-10-18 1977-07-19 Leon Eugenie Daniel Dompas Structure having vertical bearer walls and horizontal ceilings
US4001988A (en) * 1975-01-09 1977-01-11 Monte Riefler Concrete block panel
US4505088A (en) * 1982-06-24 1985-03-19 Lippe Lloyd K Method of constructing arcuate structures
US4587684A (en) * 1983-10-14 1986-05-13 Roman Arch And Culvert Corporation Of America Precast concrete bridge
US4727696A (en) * 1984-11-29 1988-03-01 Henriques Da Trindade Americo Stable structure consisting of tubular components and posttensioned cables or other tensory elements
US4802318A (en) * 1985-07-10 1989-02-07 Jacov Snitovski Insulating block unit, a method for its manufacture, and a method of erecting a wall by means of such blocks
US5628582A (en) * 1995-04-24 1997-05-13 Schuylkill Products, Inc. Concrete barrier erection and alignment system
US6877283B2 (en) 2000-03-28 2005-04-12 Susumu Yoshiwara Manufacture and use of earthquake resistant construction blocks
FR2848580A1 (en) * 2002-12-11 2004-06-18 Luc Charles Pierre Tamborero Arch structure forming device for use during building construction, has strap for forming adjuster unit, which is stretched between two ridges, and subjected to tension by system to press ridges against structural units
US8453400B2 (en) 2003-07-22 2013-06-04 Pedro M. Buarque de Macedo Prestressed, strong foam glass tiles
US20050016093A1 (en) * 2003-07-22 2005-01-27 Buarque De Macedo Pedro M. Prestressed, strong foam glass tiles
US8453401B2 (en) * 2003-07-22 2013-06-04 Pedro M. Buarque de Macedo Prestressed, strong foam glass tiles
US20070261328A1 (en) * 2003-07-22 2007-11-15 Buarque De Macedo Pedro M Prestressed, strong foam glass tiles
US20060156673A1 (en) * 2003-07-24 2006-07-20 Mituo Nakamura Block for constructions, panel for construction using the block, and method of forming panel for construction
US7546654B2 (en) * 2006-03-23 2009-06-16 Mordehay Carmel Mobile compression and tension bridge and shelter structure
US20070234490A1 (en) * 2006-03-23 2007-10-11 Mordehay Carmel Mobile compression and tension bridge and shelter structure
US7814724B2 (en) * 2007-10-09 2010-10-19 Hntb Holdings Ltd. Method for building over an opening via incremental launching
US20110030155A1 (en) * 2007-10-09 2011-02-10 Hntb Holdings Ltd Method for building over an opening via incremental launching
US8359810B2 (en) * 2007-10-09 2013-01-29 Hntb Holdings Ltd Method for building over an opening via incremental launching
US20090094904A1 (en) * 2007-10-09 2009-04-16 Hntb Holdings Ltd Method for building over an opening via incremental launching
ES2590536R1 (en) * 2015-05-01 2017-03-09 Elastic Potential, S.L. Construction system and assembling procedure of this

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