US3556144A - Directional control valve and method of making - Google Patents

Directional control valve and method of making Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3556144A
US3556144A US3556144DA US3556144A US 3556144 A US3556144 A US 3556144A US 3556144D A US3556144D A US 3556144DA US 3556144 A US3556144 A US 3556144A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
valve
pilot
fluid
passages
poppet
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Anthony Bickers
Philip T Delmer
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Nordberg Manufacturing Co
Original Assignee
Nordberg Manufacturing Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Nordberg Manufacturing Co filed Critical Nordberg Manufacturing Co
Priority to US87539069A priority Critical
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3556144A publication Critical patent/US3556144A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F15FLUID-PRESSURE ACTUATORS; HYDRAULICS OR PNEUMATICS IN GENERAL
    • F15BSYSTEMS ACTING BY MEANS OF FLUIDS IN GENERAL; FLUID-PRESSURE ACTUATORS, e.g. SERVOMOTORS; DETAILS OF FLUID-PRESSURE SYSTEMS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F15B13/00Details of servomotor systems ; Valves for servomotor systems
    • F15B13/02Fluid distribution or supply devices characterised by their adaptation to the control of servomotors
    • F15B13/04Fluid distribution or supply devices characterised by their adaptation to the control of servomotors for use with a single servomotor
    • F15B13/0401Valve members; Fluid interconnections therefor
    • F15B13/0405Valve members; Fluid interconnections therefor for seat valves, i.e. poppet valves
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F15FLUID-PRESSURE ACTUATORS; HYDRAULICS OR PNEUMATICS IN GENERAL
    • F15BSYSTEMS ACTING BY MEANS OF FLUIDS IN GENERAL; FLUID-PRESSURE ACTUATORS, e.g. SERVOMOTORS; DETAILS OF FLUID-PRESSURE SYSTEMS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F15B13/00Details of servomotor systems ; Valves for servomotor systems
    • F15B13/02Fluid distribution or supply devices characterised by their adaptation to the control of servomotors
    • F15B13/04Fluid distribution or supply devices characterised by their adaptation to the control of servomotors for use with a single servomotor
    • F15B13/042Fluid distribution or supply devices characterised by their adaptation to the control of servomotors for use with a single servomotor operated by fluid pressure
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F15FLUID-PRESSURE ACTUATORS; HYDRAULICS OR PNEUMATICS IN GENERAL
    • F15BSYSTEMS ACTING BY MEANS OF FLUIDS IN GENERAL; FLUID-PRESSURE ACTUATORS, e.g. SERVOMOTORS; DETAILS OF FLUID-PRESSURE SYSTEMS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F15B13/00Details of servomotor systems ; Valves for servomotor systems
    • F15B2013/002Modular valves, i.e. consisting of an assembly of interchangeable components
    • F15B2013/006Modular components with multiple uses, e.g. kits for either normally-open or normally-closed valves, interchangeable or reprogrammable manifolds
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/8593Systems
    • Y10T137/87169Supply and exhaust
    • Y10T137/87193Pilot-actuated
    • Y10T137/87201Common to plural valve motor chambers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/8593Systems
    • Y10T137/877With flow control means for branched passages
    • Y10T137/87885Sectional block structure

Abstract

A directional control valve having double-acting differential poppets located in a valve body controlled by one or more pilot valves. The pilot valves control pilot fluid to and through a multiplicity of pilot fluid control passages. A porting pattern for the control passages is predetermined and coordinated to the pilot valve selected so that multiplicity of functions of the control valve may be acquired.

Description

United States Patent Inventors Anthony Bickers Hales Corners; Philip T. Delmer, Milwaukee, Wis. Appl. No. 875,390 Filed Nov. 10, 1969 Patented Jan. 19, 1971 Assignee Nordberg Manufacturing Company Milwaukee, Wis. a corporation of Wisconsin Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 777,314, Nov. 20, 1968, now abandoned.

DIRECTIONAL CONTROL VALVE AND METHOD OF MAKING 17 Claims, 23 Drawing Figs.

US. Cl 137/596.l5, 137/608 Int. Cl F16k 11/20 Field ofSearch 137/271,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,038,500 6/1962 Lansky et al.... 137/596. 15X

3,171,435 3/1965 Lansky et a1... 137/596.16

3,411,536 11/1968 Tennis 137/596.15 3,429,337 2/1969 Raymond 137/596X Primary Examiner-Henry T. Klinksiek Att0rney-Parkcr, Carter and Markey ABSTRACT: A directional control valve having double-acting differential poppets located in a valve body controlled by one or more pilot valves. The pilot valves control pilot fluid to and through a multiplicity of pilot fluid control passages. A porting pattern for the control passages is predetermined and coordinated to the pilot valve selected so that multiplicity of functions of the control valve may be acquired.

PATENTED JAN 1 9 I97! SHEET 2 OF 7 PATENT EB JAM 9 IHTI SHEET 1; UF 7 DIRECTIONAL CONTROL VALVE AND METHOD OF MAKING SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This is a continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 777,314, filed Nov. 20, I968 and now abandoned.

This invention relates to a directional control valve and more particularly to such a valve utilizing double-acting differential poppets controlled by one or more pilot valves.

An object of this invention is a directional control valve utilizing double-acting differential poppets in which the functions of the valve may be varied by rearranging the flow pattern through the pilot fluid passages in the top or cover plate, without changing the valve body containing the poppets, the subplate, the manifold or the top cover.

Another object is a directional control valveand a method of constructing and operating it using one or more pilot valves with one type of spool configuration with one or two actuators or two pilot valves with one actuator each coordinated to a preselected fluid, passage system to provide a multiplicity of functions thereby avoiding any changes in configuration of the poppets and valve body.

Another object is a directional control valve in which the pilot fluid passages may be located in a removable manifold interconnected between the pilot valveand the cover plate.

Another object is a directional control valve in which all of LI: pilot fluid passages extend through one wall of the valve Another object is a directional control valve in which a pair of poppets, one pressure and one exhaust, act in sequence, the pressure poppet first, and the exhaust poppet second, milliseconds apart. 7

Another object is a directional control valve in which the pilot fluid passages may be located in the cover plate.

Another object is a directional control valve that can be utilized to control the flow of fluids of low viscosity and poor lubricity under high operating pressures.

Another object isa poppet-type directional control valve in which the poppets have self replaceable seat-engaging discs.

Another object is a directional control valve having a pilot valve which may be operated by solenoids, hydraulic or pneumatic actuators, hand levers, or any other suitable mechanical means.

Another object is a directional control valve having plugs screwed into the poppets contoured to effectively vary the rate of flow through the,valve seat whenever the poppet is seated or unseated', thus minimizing system shocks.

Another object is a directional control valve in which the piping to the source and reservoir for hydraulic fluid and to the device to be actuated by the hydraulic fluid is connected to a subplate where it will not interfere with dismantling of the other parts of the valve.

Another object is a poppet-type directional control valve in which the rate of flow of operating fluid through the valve can .be controlled by selectively limiting the amount of opening of each poppet.

Another object is a poppet-type directional control valve in which the amount of opening of each poppet can be adjusted without dismantling the valve.

Another object is a poppet-type directional control valve in which the poppets can easily be replaced without dismantling the entire valve.

Another object is a directional control valve in which the poppet seats are held in position by the subplate.

Another object is a directional control valve in which the poppet seats are held pressure tight by static seals.

Another object is a poppet-type directional control valve in which the poppet seats can be replaced without the use of special tools. 7

Other objects may be found in the following specification, drawings and claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an elevational view of a directional control valve with parts in section and other portions broken away;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the valve body;

FIG. 3 is asection taken along line 33 of FIG. 2 with the poppets omitted;

FIG. 4 is a side view along line 4-4 of FIG. I with portions broken away;

FIG. 5 is a top view of the subplate;

FIG. 6 is a section taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a section taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 8 is a top plan view of the top plate;

FIG. 9 is a section taken along line 9-9 of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a side view taken along line 10-10 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 11 is a top view of the manifold;

FIG. 12 is an end view of the manifold;

FIG. 1-3 is a schematic of one form of the invention;

FIG. 14 is a schematic of another form;

FIG. 15 is a schematic of a third form;

FIG. 16 is a diagram;

FIG. 17 is a top view of an alternate channeling and porting system; and

, FIGS. 18 through 23 are sections along the respective section lines in FIG. 17.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In FIGS. 1 through 12 of the drawings is shown a valve body 23 having a top or cover plate 25, a subplate 27, a manifold 29 and a pilot valve 31. The top plate and subplate are attached respectively to the top and bottom of the valve body. The manifold may be mounted on one side of the valve body and the pilot valve may be mounted on the manifold.

In FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, the valve body 23 is provided with a number of bores 33 extending therethrough from top to bottom. Since the valve shown is a four-way valve, there are four bores. Each bore has a portion 35 of enlarged diameter at the upper end thereof, hereinafter sometimes referred to as the head portion of the bore, and another enlarged portion 36 adjacent the lower end of the bore. The designation of portions of the directional control valve in relation to the vertical in this specification is for ease of description. and should not be construed as a limitation on the manner of installing or orienting the valve.

Poppets 37 39, 41 and 43 are positioned one in each of the bores. Each poppet includes a plunger 45, a head 47 of enlarged diameter attached to the upper end of the plunger and a plug 49 screw threaded into a threaded bore 50 formed in the lower end of the plunger. The enlarged head 47 of each poppet is positioned in the head portion 35 of its bore. A rider ring 51 and a piston ring 53 are carried in grooves in the head portion of the poppet. Piston ring 55 and rider ring 57 are carried in grooves in the plunger portion of the poppet. The plug 49 holds an annular seating disc 59 in contact with the lower end of the plunger. The seating disc 59 has a beveled seating surface 61 which engages a similarly beveled surface of a seat. The disc is made of a soft composition material which will close tightly around foreign particles, scratches or scoring. The diameter of the disc 59 is less than the diameter of the plunger leaving annular surfaces 62 at the end of the plunger and surrounding the disc. These surfaces, which are both radial and beveled, constitute the only poppet area upon which operating fluid acts to open the poppet when the poppet disc is in contact with the seat.

A passage 63 extends into the valve body 23 from the bottom wall 64 of the valve body. A cross passage 66 extending from a threaded opening 67 in the valve sidewall 68 intersects and communicates with passage 63. The cross passage 66 extends through the enlarged portion 36 of the bores containing the poppets 39 and 41. The threaded opening 67 is shown closed by a removable pipe plug 69.

A passage 71 extends into the valve body from the bottom wall 64 thereof. A cross passage 72 extending from a threaded opening 73 in the valve body sidewall 74 intersects and communicates with the passage 71. The cross passage 72 extends through the enlarged portion 36 of the bore containing the poppet 37. A plug 75 is provided to close the opening 73.

in a similar manner, a passage 76 extends into the valve body-from the bottom wall 64. A cross passage 77 extending from a threaded opening 78 in the valve body sidewall intersects and communicates with the passage 76. The cross passage 77 extends through the enlarged portion 36 of the bore containing the poppet 43. A plug is installed in opening 78 but it is now shown.

Tubular seats 79 are positioned in the bores 33 between portions 36 and the bottom wall 64 of the valve body 23. The seats have passages 80 which function as outlets for the bores and are beveled or mitered at 81 which engages the beveled surfaces 61 of the discs 59 to close the passages 80. The tubular seats are held in place by the subplate 27. Suitable O-rings 83 and 85 are provided for the seats.

Drain passages extend from the head portions 35 of the bores through the sidewall 87 of the valve body. These passages are: Passage 910 (FIG. 2) extends from the head portion 35 of the bore containing poppet 43 into the head portion of the bore containing poppet 37. Drain passage 91b extends from the head portion of this bore to the sidewall 87 of the valve body. Drain passage 91c (FIGS. 2 and 4) extends from the bottom wall 64 of the valve body to intersect the drain passage 91b. Drain passage 91d (FIG. 2) extends from the head portion 35 of the bore containing poppet 41 into the head portion of the bore containing the poppet 39. Drain passage 91:: extends from this bore to the sidewall 87 of the valve body.

Passage 930 (FIG. 1) extends from the enlarged portion 36 of the bore containing the poppet 39 to the sidewall 87 of the valve body. Passage 95a (FIGS. 2 and 4) extends from the sidewall 87 and divides into passages 95b and 950 which extends to the top wall 96 of the valve body. A similar passage 970 extends from the sidewall 87 parallel to the passage 95a and has two branches 97b and 97c which also extend to the top wall 96. Passages 91, 93, 95 and 97 extend in part through the subplate, top cover, manifold and pilot valve or some of these component parts and continuations of these passages will bear the same number but will bear a different lower case letter for each in tracing the passages through the components of the valve.

The top plate 25 in FIGS. 1, 8 and 9 contains four sets of passages which connect the passages 95b, 95c, 97b, and 97c in the valve body with the head portions 35 of the bores. Each of these sets of passages includes two vertical passages connected by a passage extending across the top plate from openings formed in the sidewalls. The opening into each cross passage receives a plug for closing the opening. The plug may be of the expandable, wedged type, though other suitable types may be used. Vertical passages 95d connects to passage 95b in the valve body. The cross passage 95e and the vertical passage is 95f. Cross passage 95e extends through the sidewall 119 of the top plate to form opening 121 which is plugged.

Vertical passage 95g connects to passage 950 in the valve body. Cross passage 95h intersects passage 95g. Vertical passage 951' extending from cross passage 95h leads into the bore of poppet 43. Cross passage 95 h intersects sidewall 125 of the top plate forming an opening 127 which is plugged.

Vertical passage 97d connects with passage 97b in the valve body. Cross passage 97e connects to passage 97d. Vertical pasage 97f extends from passage 97e into the bore of poppet 37. Cross passage 97e extends from plugged opening 129 in the sidewall 125 of the top plate.

Vertical passage 97g connects to passage 97c in the valve body. Cross passage 97h connects to passage 97g and vertical passage 97i extends from the cross passage to the bore of poppet 41. Cross passage 97h extends from plugged opening 131 in the sidewall 119 of the top plate.

Whereas four sets of cross passages top plate 25 with single vertical passages have been shown in the leading respectively from each cross passage into the bores and vertical passages extending into the valve body to connect with cross passages, it should be understood that additional passages may be provided in both the top plate and the valve body to pc rmit the flow pattern of the pilot fluid between the various bores and the pilot valve to be changed. For example, additional vertical and cross passages could be provided in the top plate so that each bore would be provided with two pilot fluid outlets, any one of which could be blocked at any particular time by a suitable plug to provide a variety of operatin'g characteristics for each poppet valve. Also, the cross and vertical passages in the top plate could be arranged so that adjacent bores could be connected to the same or additional cross passages in the valve body. The passages could be arranged sothat the bores containing poppets 39 and 41 could be connected to the same cross passage in the valve body. Additionally, it may be desirable to provide cross passages in the top plate which directly connect bores which are positioned diagonally of each other. A passage could be provided leading from the bore containing poppet 39 to the bore containing poppet 43. Again, it may be desirable to provide a passage in the top plate directly connecting bores which are adjacent each other such as the bores containing poppets 37 and 39. Again, passages may be arranged so that one of the bores, for example, the bore containing poppet 43, may be connected to a passage in the valve body to which no'other bore is connected. Other possible combinations may also be arranged depending upon the operating characteristics desired of the valve.

The top plate 25 also contains threaded openings 101 with each opening aligned with the center of one of the bores 33.

An adjustment screw 103 threads through each of the openings 101 and extends into the head portion 35 of each bore to engage and thereby limit the movement of a poppet toward the top plate. The adjustment screws are formed with unthreaded end portions in the head portions 47 of the poppets. The movement of an end portion into a well is resisted by hydraulic fluid trapped in the well thereby dampening the shock occasioned by contact of an adjustment screw and a poppet. The leading edges of the end portions 105 are beveled at 111 to assist the dampening function. A slot 113 facilitates rotation thereof. A jam nut 115 holds the screw in a selected position. A cover nut 117 is also provided. Copper or aluminum washers are provided to prevent leakage. A threaded lifting hole 1 19 is provided for inserting and removing the poppets. Cap screws 133 attach the top plate to the valve body. O-rings 135 seal the valve body and the top plate.

The subplate 27 in FIGS. 1, 5, 6 and 7 contains passages which connect the inlets and outlets of the bores 33 in the valve body 23 with piping leading to a source of operating fluid, a device to be operated and a drain or reservoir. A vertical threaded inlet passage 137 in the subplate connects the valve body to the fluid source. are drilled into the subplate through sidewall 142 with their openings 143 and 145 in the sidewall threaded to receive plugs. Vertical passages 147 and 149 extend from the topsurface 151 of the subplate and intersect the passage 139. .Vertical passage 147 aligns with passage 71 in the valve body which is the inlet passage for the bore containing poppet 37. Vertical passage 149 aligns with the outlet of the bore containing poppet 39. A vertical passage 152 extends from the bottom wall of the subplate in alignment with the passage 147 and intersects the passage 139. This passage is threaded at its outlet for connection to a pipe leading to a device to be actuated by the hydraulic operating fluid.

The arrangement of vertical passages intersecting passage 141 is similar to that described for passage 139. Vertical passages 153 and 155 extend from the top surface 151 of the subplate and intersect the passage 141. Vertical passage 153 aligns with passage 76 in the valve body which is the inlet passage for the bore containing poppet 43. Vertical passage 155 aligns with the outlet of the bore containing poppet 41. A vertical passage 157 extends from the bottom wall of the sub- 105 which fit into wells 107 formed A pair of passages 139 and 141 v plate in alignment with the passage 153. Thispassage is I threaded at its outlet 158 for connection to a pipe leading to a device to be actuated by the hydraulic operating field.

A passage 159 extends partially across the subplate from a plugged opening 161 formed in the sidewall 163 thereof. Vertical passages I65 and I67 extend from the top wall 151 to intersect the passage 159. Vertical passage'165 aligns with the outlet of thebore in the valve body containing poppet 37 and passage167 aligns with the outlet of poppet 43; A vertical passage 169'extends from the bottom wall of the subplate to intersect the passage 159. The opening 171 into this passage is threaded for connection to a pipe leading'to the drain or a reservoir for the hydraulic operatingfluid. a

A verticallyextending passage 91] aligns vwith the passage 91c in the valve body. The passage 91] intersects and joins a cross passage 91g in the subplate fromthe sidewall 172 thereof. The passage 91g connects with the passage 159 in the subplate. The outlet through the sidewall-for passage 913 is shown plugged. Passages 91f and 9lg.connect the reservoir drain passages 159.and 169 in the subplate with the drain passages in the valve body. v

The subplate is attached to the bottom of the valve body by bolts .(notshown) which pass through bolt holes 173."l'hus, the valve body may be removed from the subplate without disturbing the piping to the source of operating fluid, the

reservoir and the device to be actuated which piping is connectedtothe subplate. 1 I

The manifold 29 may contain a series of passages which extend through the sidewall 175.of th'e manifold which is in contact with the wall 87 of the valve body with these passages cylinder, a hydraulic cylinder or anysuitable actuator could be used in place of a solenoid. The spool has lands 207 and 209 spaced apart to span three annular passages in the bore. These annular passages join with the various inlet and outlet passages. The directional control valve is shown connected to a hydraulic cylinder 210 having a piston 211. The drain outlet 91m connects to the drain passages in the top plate, valve body and subplate, which passages are generally designated as 91.

.Pilot fluid is supplied from the source through a series of passages generally designated as 93 to the inlet 93e of the pilot valve.It then flows through the bore of the pilot valve and through the outlets 95m and 97m. The passages 95 and 97 carry the pilot fluid into the bores against the heads of the ing fluid to and from cylinder 210.

Extensions of the passages 91 and 93 in the top plate are provided for use with a second pilot valve as in the manner shown in FIG. 14.

By moving the spool 205 tovthe left so that the land 209 is I positioned between theoutlets 93e and 95m and the land 207 is positioned to the left of outlet 91m, the pilot fluid is permitted to escape from the bores containing poppets 39 and 43 to open these poppets. Pilot fluid is maintained in poppets 37 and 41 keeping these poppets closedsThis arrangement of .poppets will direct hydraulic operating fluid to enter the cylinder 210 to act against the left side of the piston 211 and operating fluid reservoir.

respectively aligning with passages 9lb'and91e in the valve .body. A cross passage .91] lengthwise through the manifold intersects passages 91!: and 91L The opposite ends of this passage are shown plugged. A vertical passage 91k extends through the top wall 177 of the manifold to the pilot valve 31. The passage 91k aligns with an outlet 91m "of the pilot valve in 1 16.13.

Passage 93b extending from the sidewall 175 of the manifold inalignment with the passage 93a in the valve body is intersected by a longitudinallyflexte'ndingcross passage 930 which extends from end wall 179 of the manifold. The opening through this endwall is closed by a'suit'able plug. A vertical passage 93d extends from the. top wall 177 of the manifold to intersect the passage 93c. The passage 93d aligns with an outlet 93 ofthepilotvalvein FIG. 13. J j I Passage 95j extending from the sidewall 175of the manifold aligns with the passage 95:; 'in the valve body. A vertical passage 95k extending from the top wall 177 of the manifold intersects the passage 95j. Passage 95k aligns with outlet 95m of the pilot valve in FIG. 13. I

Passage 97j extends from the sidewall 175 of the manifold in alignment with the passage 97a in the valve housing. A vertical passage 97!: extending from'the top wall 177 of the manifold intersects the passage 97j. The passage 97k aligns with the outlet 97m of the pilot valve shown schematically in FIG. 13.

The manifold 29 is connected to the valve body 23 by bolts (not shown) through bolt holes 183.1The pilot valve 31 is connected to the manifold by bolts (not shown) in bolt holes 185.

One form of this invention is shown diagrammatically in FIG. 13 arranged for four-way three position operation with a blocked center in neutral. The multiplicity of pilot fluid passages is shown in the top plate, and a manifold is not shown. This means that both sides of the piston are shut off from the source of operating fluid and from the fluid reservoir in the center position of the valve." A modified top plate 198 has two sets of passages for connection to two pilot valves. Because only one pilot valve is used; these passages are either not connected to the passages in the valve body or they are blocked, at 91n-91r and 93f. The pilot valve 199 is of the spool type actuated by a pair of solenoids 201 and 203, one of which is connected to each end ofa spool 205. An air to escape from the right side of the piston 211 to flow to the The other operating position of this valve is obtained by moving the spool 205 to the right so that the land 207 is positioned between the outlets 93c and 97m and the land 209 is positioned to the right of the bypass passage. With the lands so positioned, pilot fluid will be permitted to exhaust from the bores containing poppets 37 and 41 thereby allowing these poppets to open, but will be retained in the bores containing the poppets 31 and 43 to hold these poppets closed. This arrangement of poppets will permit the: hydraulic operating fluid against the'right'side of the piston 211 while operating fluid from the left 'sideof the piston 21]. will escape through the poppet 37 to the reservoir. 1

In FIG. 14 a control valve-assembly is shown with two pilot valves 213 and the cover plate 193 arranged for four-way, three position operation with both sides of the piston 212 connected to the source of hydraulic fluid under pressure and with the drain blocked in the neutral position. Each pilot valve has a single solenoid 215 connected to one end of a spool 217. Each spool has two lands 219and' .221, each of which spans two annular passages connected respectively to inlet, outlet or bypass passages in the spool housing. This form is arranged so that in its center position'both sides of the piston 212 are acted on by hydraulic operating fluid and the outlets to the operating fluid reservoir are blocked. Each of the pilot valves 213 controls the flow of pilot fluid to only two of the poppets. The passages between the pilot valves and the poppets are so arranged that the poppets controlling the source of fluid act in unison as do the poppets controlling the passages leading to the reservoir. This occurs only in the neutral or deenergized position. In the operating positions, poppets 37 and 41 and poppets 39 and 43 act in unison.

Lands 219 and 221 of the pilot valve on the left-hand side of the drawings are located so as to connect passage 93 from the a source of operating pressure to the passage 97 leading to pop- Branch passages 95 and 97 leading respectively from poppets 43 and 41 to the left-hand pilot valve 213 are blocked by plugs 95p and 97p respectively so that both of these poppets are controlled only by the right-hand pilot valve 213.

FIG. shows a control valve assembly arranged for fourway, three position operation with the opposite sides of the piston 212 connected to the drain or reservoir and the source of fluid blocked in the neutral position of the valve. In this form, there is one spool valve 231 with a single solenoid 235 connected to one end of a spool 237. The spool has lands 239 and 241. Otherwise, FIG. 15 may be the same as FIG. 13 as to the blocking of the passages, etc.

The use, operation and function of this invention are as follows:

The invention is concerned with a method of operating or constructing a directional control valve and with the valve or valves resulting therefrom so that a maximum number of functions may be obtained with maximum interchangeability of basic components without changing the configuration of the poppets and valve body itself. This has been done by providing or selecting pilot valves with a single spool function. Then a multiplicity of pilot fluid control passages are provided in accordance with a predetermined desirability of functions of the main valve. The porting of the pilot fluidpassages is arranged in a predetermined pattern. And that pattern is deliberately coordinated with the pilot valves selected so that a multiplicity of functions of the resulting valve assembly may be acquired without changing the configuration of the poppets and valve body. For example in FIG. '13 one double actuated pilot valve is used and the nonused passages have their ports blocked. In FIG. 14 two pilot valves are used, each with a single actuator and different ports are blocked. In FIG. 15 one pilot valve is used with a single actuator and the nonused passages have their ports blocked. v

Thus it is the selection of the number and type of pilot valve that is used and the coordination or interplay between that selection and the patterning of the pilot fluid passages with the porting thereof being arranged so that certain passages are used and the nonused ports are blocked or plugged.

The pilot valves have been shown as mounted on the exterior of the valve body, but they might be merged into the valve body itself. A manifold has been referred to in connection with the FIG. 1 form and a portion of the pilot fluid passages have been described therein. But it should be understood that the multiplicity of pilot fluid passages could be all in the top or cover plate and the manifold might be dispensedwith. In fact, the passage multiplicity might be entirely in the valve body itself and the porting coordinated to the selected pilot valves.

Or a portion of the pilot fluid passages might be in the cover plate. The point is it is not critical where, how much, and to what extent the multiplicity of pilot fluid control passages are located in one part or another. The important point is that a suitable patterning of the ports thereof is provided so that they may be properly coordinated with the pilot valves so that a maximum number of functions of the overall control valve assembly may be acquired without changing the configuration of the valve body and the poppets themselves.

The control valve assembly may be used in a hydraulic system in which a source of pressure, such as a pump or the like, with or without accumulators, fluid holding reservoirs or tanks, etc. may be used to operate cylinders or devices to be actuated. The fluid for the pilot functi onmay come from the same source as the primary-system or it may be separate.

The invention is set forth in chart form in FIG. 16 as coordinated with a cover plate shown in FIGS. l723. A multiplicity of pilot fluid control passages is shown in the cover plate 25a in FIG. 17 with the ports thereof being designated by letters. As an example, FIG. 18 shows the porting for one group of channels with the porting designated MA, NA," RA," and SA." The same is true of-FIGS. 19 through 23 with different letter designations.

In the FIG. 16 chart, the first column Arrangement of Plugs has the letters of the ports thereunder. The desired valve function is in the second column Valve Function," and the pilot valve or valves used are indicated in the third column Pilot Valve Arrangement. Thus, any one of the valve functions in the middle column may be acquired by selecting the pilot valve or valves indicated in the right column and plugging the ports listed on the left column. In this particular example the pilot fluid passages or channels are in the cover plate. But this could as well be done either partially or totally in a manifold, if a manifold-is used, or in the main valve body itself, ifdesired.

The details of one valve body and porting arrangement with various components have been laid out in FIGS. 1 through 12. Another form is shown in FIGS. 13 through 15. And still another in FIGS. 16 through 23. It should be understood that the channels and'ports of any one do not necessarily match or line up with one of the others. For example, in FIGS. 15 through 17, a manifold is not present, whereas in the form of FIGS. 1 through 14, the manifold is shown and described in detail. The form of FIGS. 16 through 23 might be usable with an assembly having a rn'anifold but not necessarily the one in FIGS. 1 through 14.

A positive seating poppet-type valve of the type depicted herein has advantages not found in directional control valves of the spool type essentially when the fluids handled are of the water or water soluble low viscosity type or contain harmful foreign particles. Such fluids are characterized by low viscosity and poor lubricity. A directional control valve of the packless spool type will not function satisfactorily with fluids of this nature. Low viscosity causes high leakage. past the lands of the spool. Poor lubricity prevents proper sliding of the spool and may bring about seizure. Also, hamtful foreign particles in the fluid will damage the spool valve. A directional control valve of the packed spool type will work satisfactorily with fluids of low viscosity and poor lubricity but will be destroyed if the fluids contain harmful foreign particles.

Although this directional control valve may utilize a spool valve as'a pilot valve, it is not subject to the disadvantages which occur when a spool valve is used as a directional control valve. Leakage in the spool-type pilot valve will not adversely affect the operation of the hydraulic device being actuated because of the small volume of fluid that passes through the pilot valve. In the event of damage to or malfunction of the pilot valve by poor lubricity or foreign particles in the fluid, replacement or repair of the pilot valve is relatively simple and inexpensive because of its detachability and small size.

In the form of FIGS. 1 through 12, the top plate or cover 25 and the pilot valve 31 are easily removable from the valve body 23 and one another to facilitate varying the functions of the valve. The subplate 27 is also removably attached to the valve body 23 but normally it will not be disturbed. The piping to a source of hydraulic operating fluid, a reservoir for the hydraulic operating fluid (neither shown) and the device to be operated is connected to the subplate. With the piping connected to the subplate, the top cover and valve body may be removed formaintenance without disturbing piping connections. I

The removable top plate 25 permits access to the bores 33 for inspection and removal of the poppets, aided by the threaded lifting holes 119 in the head of each poppet. Removal of the soft-seating discs 59 of the poppets for replacement can be accomplished when the poppets are out of their bores by unlocking the plug 49 and then unthreading the plug from the end of the poppet. The tubular seats 79 in the bore outlets can be removed by removing the valve body from the subplate. The tubular seats 79 can then be easily slipped out of the bore outlets since they are held in position by the subplate and sealed by the O-rings. Replacement of the poppet discs59 and the tubular seats 79 may be accomplished easily and without the use of special tools due to their loose fit in the bore outlets and in the use of O-rings as fluid seals.

In this directional control valve, the flow of operating fluid and pilot fluid through the component parts of the valve is as follows:

Operating fluid from the source enters the control valve 21 through opening 138 in the subplate 27, through the passage 137 in the subplate and into the passage 63, then to the enlarged portions 36 of the bores containing the poppets 39 and 41. Since in the condition of the valve shown in F IG. 1 poppet 39 is closed and poppet 41 open, fluid will pass through seat 79 of poppet 41, through passage 80 i in the seat and into passage 155 in the subplate. Fluid then flows from passage 155, through passage 141, through the outlet 158, to cylinder 210. i t

Operating fluid in the enlarged portion 36 of the bore 33 and in the passage 80 in the tubular seat 79 will act against poppet 4] and the end of the plug 49 to hold this poppet in its open position. This poppet will be held'open onlyso long as the pilot fluid is exhausted from the head portion 35 of its bore acting against the head 47 of the poppet.

The operating fluid in the enlarged portion 36 of the bore of poppet 39 acts only against the annular and beveled surfaces 62 at the end of the poppet adjacent the disc 59. Because the area of these surfaces is small in relation to, the area of the top surface of the head 47 of the poppet against which the pilot fluid is acting, the pilot fluid being at the same pressure as the operating fluid, the poppet will remain seated against the force of operating fluid when pilot fluid is acting on the poppet head. In operation in FlG. '15 operating fluid entering passageway 137 acts on poppets 39 and 41. If the pilot pressure is exhaustedfrom the enlarged bore of poppet 41 and 37, pressure will enter the rod end of cylinder2l0 causing sufficient compression of fluid in the head end of the cylinder 210 to overcome the weight and friction of plunger 37, which enlarged bore has been exhausted and will lift poppet 37. Therefore, these poppets acting in unison will respond in this sequence to pressure followed by exhaust, and that this is in verse to normal practice. It is normally preferable to open the exhaust first to avoid high transient pressure rise due to momentary blockage of the exhaust port. in this concept, transient pressure rise can be no more than the force required to overcome poppet weight and friction. Also, any pressure surges in the operating fluid will be unlikely to unseat the poppet 39 because of the large ratio of the pilot fluid area to the operating fluid area of the poppet.

This directional control valve is not affected by variations in the actuating-to-return ratio of the hydraulic device being actuated by the operating fluid. in this valve, the seating and unseating of the poppets is controlled by the application to or release of pilot fluid from the poppet heads.

The design of the poppet plug 49 and the miter surface 81 of the tubular seat 79 permits smooth and progressive opening and closing of the poppets. Upon unseating of a poppet, the flow is controlled by the annular area between the tapered portion of the plug 49 and the tubular seat 79. As the poppet rises, due to the configuration of the plug, the area increases thus allowing progressive increases of flow. This annular area is the controlling influence on the flow and has been arranged to ensure that maximum velocities occur within this area and not between the poppet disc 59 and the miter portion of the tubular seat 79. High velocity of water is a principal cause of erosion which in turn can lead tovalve failure. The valve as designed will not prevent high velocity of fluid, but it restricts this velocity to an area that will not aflect the functioning or sealing of the valve. Upon seating of the poppet, the plug functions in the opposite manner to gradually decrease the amount of flow area and therefore the poppet closes with a minimum of fluid hammer.

Because the tubular seat 79 and the poppet disc 59 each has contacting surfaces extending at an angle of approximately 45 to the vertical, the seat is essentially self-cleaning. This aspect of the valve is improved because the flow through each poppet of the valve is normally but not necessarily in the direction from above the seat and down through the seat. In this way, foreign objects which come between the disc surface 61 and the miter surface 81 are flushed out upon opening of the poppet.

The amount of opening of each poppet relative to its seating surface 81 can be controlled through the adjustment screws 103. When a poppet opens, as the end portion of the screw enters the hole 107 in the head, trapped pilot fluid will slowly escape cushioning the shock when the end portion 105 contacts the base of the hole 111.

The drain passages 91a, 91b, 91d and. 9le in the valve body 23 function to maintain the differential between the head end and the plunger end of the poppet. Any pilot fluid that leaks past the piston ring 53 of the head and any operating fluid that leaks past the piston ring 56 of the plunger will be diverted to the operating fluid reservoir before it can unbalance the differential between the head 47 and the plunger ends of the poppet. Drain passages 91c in the valve body and 91f and 91g in the subplate connect to the drain passage 159 in the subplate to connect the drain passages 91a, 91b and 91a to the operating fluid reservoir.

The invention may also be applied to a valve body having only two poppets for use as a three-way valve. Also, although several arrangements have been described, there are many other arrangements that can be made utilizing the basic principles of this invention. Therefore, the scope of the invention should not be limited to the particular embodiments shown and described in this specification.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows.

We claim:

1. A method of constructing a directional control valve having a valve body with at least two poppet valves therein with pilot fluid control passages providing pilot fluid to the heads of the poppets and pilot valves for selectively directing pilot fluid between a source and the heads of the poppets, including the steps of selecting pilot valves with a certain spool function, constructing a multiplicity of pilot fluid control passages, porting the pilot fluid passages in a predetermined pattern, coordinating the pilot valves selected with the porting pattern of the pilot fluid passages so that a multiplicity of functions of the control valve may be acquired without changing the configuration of the poppets and valve body, connecting certain of the ports with at least one pilot valve and blocking any unused orts. p 2. The method of claim 1 further characterized in that the control valve has a manifold removably connected to the valve body and further including the step of constructing the multiplicity of pilot fluid control passages :at least in part in the manifold.

3. The method of claim 1 further characterized in that the control valve includes a cover plate removably connected to the valve body and further including the step of constructing the multiplicity of pilot fluid control passages at least in part in the cover plate.

4. The method of claim 1 further including the step of mounting each pilot valve on the exterior of the valve body.

5. A directional control valve including a valve body, at least two bores formed in the valve body, each of the bores having an inlet passage and an outlet passage for pressurized operating fluid, a seat located in one of the passages of each bore, a poppet mounted in each bore for movement toward and away from its seat and having means to engage the seat in fluid-sealing relationship, each of the poppets having a head portion, a cover plate removably connected to the valve body to ,provide access to the poppets, a multiplicity of pilot fluid control passages to provide a choice of flow directions to the poppets, at least one pilot valve with a certain spool function for selectively directing the flow of pilot fluid between a source and the head portion of the poppets, and a porting pattern for the multiplicity of passages selected and coordinated to the spool function of the pilot valve so that a multiplicity of functions of the control valve may be acquired by the use of at least one pilot valve fluid to certain of the ports which are unblocked and the blocking of certain of the other ports in the pattern.

6. The structure of claim further characterized by and including a manifold removably connected to the valve body, at least a portion of the pilot fluid control passages being in the manifold.

7. The structure of claim 5 further characterized in that at least a portion of the pilot fluid control passages is in the cover plate.

8. The structure of claim 5 further characterized in that each pilot valve is removably connected to the valve body.

9. The structure of claim 5 further characterized in that a subplate is removably connected to the valve body, the inlet and outlet passages for pressurized operating fluid having connections in the subplate.

10, The structure of claim 5 further characterized in that the porting pattern for the multiplicity of passages is in one wall of the valve body.

11. The structure of claim 5 further characterized by and including means for selectively limiting the amount of opening of each poppet.

12.. The structure of claim 5 further characterized by and including a subplate connected to the valve body and containing passages for pressurized operating fluid, each of the seats being tubular in shape and located in the outlet passage of each bore, each seat having one end surface facing the poppet and engageable thereby and the opposite end in contact with the subplate and held in position thereby.

13. The structure of claim 5 further characterized in that each poppet has a replaceable annular disc carried thereby to engage its seat, the disc being removably held in the poppet by a removable plug which extends beyond the annular disc so that, when the poppet is seated, the plug extends into the tubular seat, the extreme portion of the plug being tapered so as to gradually change the rate of flow of operating fluid through the valve as the poppet is opened and closed.

14. A directional control valve including a valve body, at least two bores formed in the valve body, each of the bores having an inlet passage and outlet passage formed in the valve body to carry pressurized operating fluid, a seat located in one of the passages of each bore, a poppet mounted in each bore for movement toward and away from its seat and having means to engage the seat in a fluid-sealing relationship, each of the poppets having a head portion, a cover plate removably connected to the valve body to provide access to the poppets, a multiplicity of pilot fluid control passages to supply pilot fluid to the poppets, at least one pilot valve for selectively directing the flow of pilot fluid to and from the poppets, a sub plate removably connected to the valve body, inlet and outlet passages in the subplate to carry pressurized operating fluid to and from the poppet, the valve body with the poppets, cover plate, pilot fluid control passages and pilot valve being mounted on and removable from the subplate so that connections to and from the source and deviceto be actuated will not interfere with dismantling of the other parts of the control valve.

15. A directional control valve including a. valve body having a plurality of poppets adapted to control the flow of pressurized operating fluid between a source of pressurized operating fluid, a device to be operated by the pressurized operating fluid and a reservoir for the operating fluid with the poppets being closed by pressurized pilot fluid and opened upon the release of said pilot fluid by the operating fluid, a pilot valve for controlling the flow of pressurized pilot fluid between a source of pressurized pilot fluid, a reservoir for the pilot fluid and the valve body poppets, a manifold removably connected to said valve body and said pilot valve and having passages formed therein which are adapted to carry pressurized pilot fluid, and a cover plate removably connected to said valve body and having passages formed therein which are adapted to carry pressurized pilot fluid during at least part of its travel from the manifold and to the valve body poppets.

16. In a directional control valve including a valve body, a bore formed in the valve body, inlet and outlet passages formed in the valve body to carry pressurized operating fluid to the bore, a seat in one of the passages, a poppet mounted in the bore for movement toward and away from the seat, an annular disc of a material having resilient characteristics on the lower end of the poppet adapted to engage the seat, and a nose portion on the poppet within the disc and projecting beyond it and contoured to progressively restrict the flow so that as the poppet moves toward and away from engagement with the seat, the nose portion causes maximum fluid velocity between the nose portion and the passage rather than between the disc and the seat so as to minimize the corrosive effect of the high velocity fluid on the disc.

17. In a directional control valve including a valve body, a bore formed in the valve body, inlet and outlet passages formed in the valve body to carry pressurized operating fluid to the bore, a seat in one of the passages, a poppet mounted in the bore for movement toward and away from the seat with a head portion at one end, a plunger projecting into the bore and engageable with the head portion of the poppet, when it rises, and means for externally adjusting the plunger so that the maximum amount of lift of the poppet off of its seat may be adjusted thereby controlling the rate of flow between the poppet and its seat.

Claims (17)

1. A method of constructing a directional control valve having a valve body with at least two poppet valves therein with pilot fluid control passages providing pilot fluid to the heads of the poppets and pilot valves for selectively directing pilot fluid between a source and the heads of the poppets, including the steps of selecting pilot valves with a certain spool function, constructing a multiplicity of pilot fluid control passages, porting the pilot fluid passages in a predetermined pattern, coordinating the pilot valves selected with the porting pattern of the pilot fluid passages so that a multiplicity of functions of the control valve may be acquired without changing the configuration of the poppets and valve body, connecting certain of the ports with at least one pilot valve and blocking any unused ports.
2. The method of claim 1 further characterized in that the control valve has a manifold removably connected to the valve body and further including the step of constructing the multiplicity of pilot fluid control passages at least in part in the manifold.
3. The method of claim 1 further characterized in that the control valve includes a cover plate removably connected to the valve body and further including the step of constructing the multiplicity of pilot fluid control passages at least in part in the cover plate.
4. The method of claim 1 further including the step of mounting each pilot valve on the exterior of the valve body.
5. A directional control valve including a valve body, at least two bores formed in the valve body, each of the bores having an inlet passage and an outlet passage for pressurized operating fluid, a seat located in one of the passages of each bore, a poppet mounted in each bore for movement toward and away from its seat and having means to engage the seat in fluid-sealing relationship, each of the poppets having a head portion, a cover plate removably connected to the valve body to provide access to the poppets, a multiplicity of pilot fluid control passages to provide a choice of flow directions to the poppets, at least one pilot valve with a certain spool function for selectively directing the flow of pilot fluid between a source and the head portion of the poppets, and a porting pattern for the multiplicity of passages selected and coordinated to the spool function of the pilot valve so that a multiplicity of functions of the control valve may be acquired by the use of at least one pilot valve fluid to certain of the ports which are unblocked and the blocking of certain of the other ports in the pattern.
6. The structure of claim 5 further characterized by and including a manifold removably connected to the valve body, at least a portion of the pilot fluid control passages being in the manifold.
7. The structure of claim 5 further characterized in that at least a portion of the pilot fluid control passages is in the cover plate.
8. The structure of claim 5 further characterized in that each pilot valve is removably connected to the valve body.
9. The structure of claim 5 further charactErized in that a subplate is removably connected to the valve body, the inlet and outlet passages for pressurized operating fluid having connections in the subplate.
10. The structure of claim 5 further characterized in that the porting pattern for the multiplicity of passages is in one wall of the valve body.
11. The structure of claim 5 further characterized by and including means for selectively limiting the amount of opening of each poppet.
12. The structure of claim 5 further characterized by and including a subplate connected to the valve body and containing passages for pressurized operating fluid, each of the seats being tubular in shape and located in the outlet passage of each bore, each seat having one end surface facing the poppet and engageable thereby and the opposite end in contact with the subplate and held in position thereby.
13. The structure of claim 5 further characterized in that each poppet has a replaceable annular disc carried thereby to engage its seat, the disc being removably held in the poppet by a removable plug which extends beyond the annular disc so that, when the poppet is seated, the plug extends into the tubular seat, the extreme portion of the plug being tapered so as to gradually change the rate of flow of operating fluid through the valve as the poppet is opened and closed.
14. A directional control valve including a valve body, at least two bores formed in the valve body, each of the bores having an inlet passage and outlet passage formed in the valve body to carry pressurized operating fluid, a seat located in one of the passages of each bore, a poppet mounted in each bore for movement toward and away from its seat and having means to engage the seat in a fluid-sealing relationship, each of the poppets having a head portion, a cover plate removably connected to the valve body to provide access to the poppets, a multiplicity of pilot fluid control passages to supply pilot fluid to the poppets, at least one pilot valve for selectively directing the flow of pilot fluid to and from the poppets, a subplate removably connected to the valve body, inlet and outlet passages in the subplate to carry pressurized operating fluid to and from the poppet, the valve body with the poppets, cover plate, pilot fluid control passages and pilot valve being mounted on and removable from the subplate so that connections to and from the source and device to be actuated will not interfere with dismantling of the other parts of the control valve.
15. A directional control valve including a valve body having a plurality of poppets adapted to control the flow of pressurized operating fluid between a source of pressurized operating fluid, a device to be operated by the pressurized operating fluid and a reservoir for the operating fluid with the poppets being closed by pressurized pilot fluid and opened upon the release of said pilot fluid by the operating fluid, a pilot valve for controlling the flow of pressurized pilot fluid between a source of pressurized pilot fluid, a reservoir for the pilot fluid and the valve body poppets, a manifold removably connected to said valve body and said pilot valve and having passages formed therein which are adapted to carry pressurized pilot fluid, and a cover plate removably connected to said valve body and having passages formed therein which are adapted to carry pressurized pilot fluid during at least part of its travel from the manifold and to the valve body poppets.
16. In a directional control valve including a valve body, a bore formed in the valve body, inlet and outlet passages formed in the valve body to carry pressurized operating fluid to the bore, a seat in one of the passages, a poppet mounted in the bore for movement toward and away from the seat, an annular disc of a material having resilient characteristics on the lower end of the poppet adapted to engage the seat, and a nose portion on the poppet within the disc and projecting beyond it and contoured to progressively restrict the flow so That as the poppet moves toward and away from engagement with the seat, the nose portion causes maximum fluid velocity between the nose portion and the passage rather than between the disc and the seat so as to minimize the corrosive effect of the high velocity fluid on the disc.
17. In a directional control valve including a valve body, a bore formed in the valve body, inlet and outlet passages formed in the valve body to carry pressurized operating fluid to the bore, a seat in one of the passages, a poppet mounted in the bore for movement toward and away from the seat with a head portion at one end, a plunger projecting into the bore and engageable with the head portion of the poppet, when it rises, and means for externally adjusting the plunger so that the maximum amount of lift of the poppet off of its seat may be adjusted thereby controlling the rate of flow between the poppet and its seat.
US3556144D 1969-11-10 1969-11-10 Directional control valve and method of making Expired - Lifetime US3556144A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US87539069A true 1969-11-10 1969-11-10

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3556144A true US3556144A (en) 1971-01-19

Family

ID=25365717

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3556144D Expired - Lifetime US3556144A (en) 1969-11-10 1969-11-10 Directional control valve and method of making

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3556144A (en)

Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3680589A (en) * 1969-06-19 1972-08-01 Newmark Ltd Louis Mounting block for fluid control valve
US3756274A (en) * 1971-04-21 1973-09-04 Bosch Gmbh Robert Connection element for construction of a base plate for hydraulic devices
US3766943A (en) * 1971-07-29 1973-10-23 H Murata Integrated multiple valve unit
US3838710A (en) * 1972-11-03 1974-10-01 Vapor Corp Hydraulic valve
US3840047A (en) * 1971-10-28 1974-10-08 Dowty Mining Equipment Ltd Hydraulic apparatus
USB490623I5 (en) * 1972-09-15 1976-03-02
USRE29481E (en) * 1971-02-01 1977-11-29 Fluid Devices, Ltd. Multi-way directional fluid flow control valve arrangement
FR2399561A1 (en) * 1977-08-01 1979-03-02 Ross Operating Valve Co Device has four circular valve has multiple functions
US4586531A (en) * 1983-09-22 1986-05-06 Toolex Alpha Ab Valve arrangement
US4711267A (en) * 1985-02-13 1987-12-08 Hydrolux S.A.R.L. Hydraulic control block
US4733696A (en) * 1987-07-27 1988-03-29 Daniel Baun Pilot operated coolant control valves
US4794951A (en) * 1986-07-24 1989-01-03 Paul Pleiger Maschinenfabric Gmbh & Co. Kg Built-in two-way directional control valve
US5040565A (en) * 1988-02-29 1991-08-20 Kabushiki Kaisha/Komatsu Seisakusho Pilot operated control valve system
US5046400A (en) * 1988-02-29 1991-09-10 Kabushiki Kaisha/Komatsu Seisakusho Control valve system
US5071072A (en) * 1990-12-04 1991-12-10 Daniel Baun Pilot controlled liquid actuated coolant control valves
US5081903A (en) * 1990-01-09 1992-01-21 Woodward Governor Company Multiplexed hydraulic control system with multi-bit binary selector signal control
US5125232A (en) * 1990-05-29 1992-06-30 Kubota Corporation Control change system for a hydraulic working vehicle
US5178191A (en) * 1990-09-05 1993-01-12 Newmatic Controls Inc. Modular pneumatic control systems
WO1994010457A1 (en) * 1992-10-30 1994-05-11 Bw/Ip International, Inc. Pressure control valve for a hydraulic actuator
US5311850A (en) * 1989-01-11 1994-05-17 Martin Tiby M High pressure electronic common-rail fuel injection system for diesel engines
US5361679A (en) * 1993-04-28 1994-11-08 Foster Raymond K Directional control valve with pilot operated poppet valves
US5996369A (en) * 1997-08-05 1999-12-07 Tgk Co., Ltd. Air conditioner with sub-condenser
EP1013941A1 (en) * 1998-12-23 2000-06-28 Bürkert Werke GmbH & Co. Assembly for controlling positioning members
WO2004027268A1 (en) * 2002-09-13 2004-04-01 Imi Norgren-Herion Fluidtronic Gmbh & Co. Kg Multiple-way valve
WO2015086908A1 (en) * 2013-12-11 2015-06-18 Hydraulic Piippo Hydraulic valve body and hydraulic valve
WO2016198094A1 (en) * 2015-06-09 2016-12-15 Festo Ag & Co. Kg Valve arrangement
US10788057B2 (en) 2015-06-11 2020-09-29 Hydraulic Piippo Hydraulic valve body and hydraulic valve mechanism comprising the body

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3038500A (en) * 1958-03-10 1962-06-12 Parker Hannifin Corp Pilot-master valves with pressure accumulators
US3171435A (en) * 1961-12-05 1965-03-02 Parker Hannifin Corp Solenoid operated valve assembly
US3411536A (en) * 1966-07-06 1968-11-19 Koehring Co Pilot operated control valve mechanism
US3429337A (en) * 1966-12-29 1969-02-25 Int Basic Economy Corp Pressure control apparatus

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3038500A (en) * 1958-03-10 1962-06-12 Parker Hannifin Corp Pilot-master valves with pressure accumulators
US3171435A (en) * 1961-12-05 1965-03-02 Parker Hannifin Corp Solenoid operated valve assembly
US3411536A (en) * 1966-07-06 1968-11-19 Koehring Co Pilot operated control valve mechanism
US3429337A (en) * 1966-12-29 1969-02-25 Int Basic Economy Corp Pressure control apparatus

Cited By (34)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3680589A (en) * 1969-06-19 1972-08-01 Newmark Ltd Louis Mounting block for fluid control valve
USRE29481E (en) * 1971-02-01 1977-11-29 Fluid Devices, Ltd. Multi-way directional fluid flow control valve arrangement
US3756274A (en) * 1971-04-21 1973-09-04 Bosch Gmbh Robert Connection element for construction of a base plate for hydraulic devices
US3766943A (en) * 1971-07-29 1973-10-23 H Murata Integrated multiple valve unit
US3840047A (en) * 1971-10-28 1974-10-08 Dowty Mining Equipment Ltd Hydraulic apparatus
USB490623I5 (en) * 1972-09-15 1976-03-02
US3996964A (en) * 1972-09-15 1976-12-14 The Bendix Corporation Control apparatus particularly for a plurality of compressor bleed valves of a gas turbine engine
US3838710A (en) * 1972-11-03 1974-10-01 Vapor Corp Hydraulic valve
FR2399561A1 (en) * 1977-08-01 1979-03-02 Ross Operating Valve Co Device has four circular valve has multiple functions
US4586531A (en) * 1983-09-22 1986-05-06 Toolex Alpha Ab Valve arrangement
US4711267A (en) * 1985-02-13 1987-12-08 Hydrolux S.A.R.L. Hydraulic control block
US4794951A (en) * 1986-07-24 1989-01-03 Paul Pleiger Maschinenfabric Gmbh & Co. Kg Built-in two-way directional control valve
US4733696A (en) * 1987-07-27 1988-03-29 Daniel Baun Pilot operated coolant control valves
US5040565A (en) * 1988-02-29 1991-08-20 Kabushiki Kaisha/Komatsu Seisakusho Pilot operated control valve system
US5046400A (en) * 1988-02-29 1991-09-10 Kabushiki Kaisha/Komatsu Seisakusho Control valve system
US5311850A (en) * 1989-01-11 1994-05-17 Martin Tiby M High pressure electronic common-rail fuel injection system for diesel engines
US5081903A (en) * 1990-01-09 1992-01-21 Woodward Governor Company Multiplexed hydraulic control system with multi-bit binary selector signal control
US5125232A (en) * 1990-05-29 1992-06-30 Kubota Corporation Control change system for a hydraulic working vehicle
US5178191A (en) * 1990-09-05 1993-01-12 Newmatic Controls Inc. Modular pneumatic control systems
US5071072A (en) * 1990-12-04 1991-12-10 Daniel Baun Pilot controlled liquid actuated coolant control valves
WO1994010457A1 (en) * 1992-10-30 1994-05-11 Bw/Ip International, Inc. Pressure control valve for a hydraulic actuator
US5522301A (en) * 1992-10-30 1996-06-04 E-Systems, Inc. Pressure control valve for a hydraulic actuator
US5361679A (en) * 1993-04-28 1994-11-08 Foster Raymond K Directional control valve with pilot operated poppet valves
US5996369A (en) * 1997-08-05 1999-12-07 Tgk Co., Ltd. Air conditioner with sub-condenser
EP1013941A1 (en) * 1998-12-23 2000-06-28 Bürkert Werke GmbH & Co. Assembly for controlling positioning members
US6286547B1 (en) 1998-12-23 2001-09-11 Burkert Werke Gmbh & Co. Module for driving actuators
WO2004027268A1 (en) * 2002-09-13 2004-04-01 Imi Norgren-Herion Fluidtronic Gmbh & Co. Kg Multiple-way valve
WO2015086908A1 (en) * 2013-12-11 2015-06-18 Hydraulic Piippo Hydraulic valve body and hydraulic valve
WO2016198094A1 (en) * 2015-06-09 2016-12-15 Festo Ag & Co. Kg Valve arrangement
CN107208665A (en) * 2015-06-09 2017-09-26 费斯托股份有限两合公司 Valve module
US20170328383A1 (en) * 2015-06-09 2017-11-16 Festo Ag & Co. Kg Valve Arrangement
CN107208665B (en) * 2015-06-09 2020-02-14 费斯托股份有限两合公司 Valve assembly
US10605274B2 (en) 2015-06-09 2020-03-31 Festo Ag & Co. Kg Valve arrangement
US10788057B2 (en) 2015-06-11 2020-09-29 Hydraulic Piippo Hydraulic valve body and hydraulic valve mechanism comprising the body

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4662601A (en) Hydraulic valve means
EP0900962B1 (en) Pilot solenoid control valve and hydraulic control system using same
US3654960A (en) Modular hydraulic system
US2542390A (en) Reciprocating piston-type valve
US4477051A (en) Flow control valve
JP3457386B2 (en) Cartridge type 2 port seat valve
US7021332B2 (en) Hydraulic valve section with reduced bore distortion
CA1297379C (en) Valve manifold stacking base
US2165096A (en) Serial multiway valve
CA1244744A (en) Slide valve
US4485846A (en) Four-way valve with integral flow controls, common exhaust, and cartridge type pilot valve
US7243591B2 (en) Hydraulic valve arrangement
US5944051A (en) Sprinkler drain and test valve
JP2008298292A (en) Hydraulic system for work machine
CA2105120C (en) High differential pressure control valve
US10378671B2 (en) Double action direction fluid flow valve
EP1306596B1 (en) Dual pilot manifold assembly for a safety relief valve
US3749357A (en) Valve structure having fluid pressure actuated seats
DE10322585B4 (en) Valve Modular systems
US4727792A (en) Hydraulic holding valve
EP0432873B1 (en) Pressure balanced cartridge choke valve
KR19980042674A (en) Speed controller with pilot check valve
US2986367A (en) Valve
LU87794A1 (en) Proportional-wegeventil in sitzbauweise
CH656441A5 (en) Servo valve.