US3500480A - Urinal attachment for toilet bowl - Google Patents

Urinal attachment for toilet bowl Download PDF

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US3500480A
US3500480A US3500480DA US3500480A US 3500480 A US3500480 A US 3500480A US 3500480D A US3500480D A US 3500480DA US 3500480 A US3500480 A US 3500480A
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duct
urinal
bowl
toilet bowl
water
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John H Michal Jr
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John H Michal Jr
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E03WATER SUPPLY; SEWERAGE
    • E03DWATER-CLOSETS OR URINALS WITH FLUSHING DEVICES; FLUSHING VALVES THEREFOR
    • E03D11/00Other component parts of water-closets, e.g. noise-reducing means in the flushing system, flushing pipes mounted in the bowl, seals for the bowl outlet, devices preventing overflow of the bowl contents; devices forming a water seal in the bowl after flushing, devices eliminating obstructions in the bowl outlet or preventing backflow of water and excrements from the waterpipe
    • E03D11/02Water-closet bowls ; Bowls with a double odour seal optionally with provisions for a good siphonic action; siphons as part of the bowl
    • E03D11/025Combined with wash-basins, urinals, flushing devices for chamber-pots, bed-pans, or the like

Description

J. H. MICHAL, JR'

URINAL ATTACHMENT FOR TOILET BOWL Original Filed July 1, 1966 0 March 11; 1970 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 JOHN, H.M|CHAL JR.-

FIG.5

ATTORNEY March 17, 1970 J. H. MICHAL, JR 3,500,480

(mum. ATTACHMENT FOR TOILET BOWL Original Filed July 1. 1966 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 FlG.ll

JOHN H. MICHAL JR.

ATTORNEY URINAL ATTACHIIENT FOR TOILET BOWL Original Filed July 1. 1966 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVEJTOR JOHN H. MICHAL JR.

. 1 7 FIG..I6 FIG.I7 BY United States Patent 3,500,480 URINAL ATTACHMENT FOR TOILET BOWL John H. Michal, Jr., 2467 Auburn Road, York, Pa. 17402 Original application July 1, 1966, Ser. No. 562,349, now Patent No. 3,412,408, dated Nov. 26, 1968. Divided and this application July 30, 1968, Ser. No. 748,797

Int. Cl. E03d 13/00, 9/00; A47k 11/12 US. Cl. 4-102 5 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A disposable duct for a urinal attachment arranged to be mounted adjacent a toilet bowl and formed from flexible, inexpensive, waterproof sheet material and normally relatively flat for ready storage as well as insertion between the rim of a toilet bowl and a seat normally disposed in slightly spaced relationship to said rim, said duct being of a nature to kill the sound of splashing of liquid while passing between the urinal attachment and discharging from the lower end of the duct which normally is disposed within the interior of the toilet bowl and is anchored adjacent the rim of the bowl so as to prevent dislodgment during use, said duct readily being connectable to and removable from the urinal attachment and the toilet bowl when replacement is desired.

Cross-reference to related application The present application comprises a division of copending application Ser. No. 562,349, filed July 1, 1966, now Patent No. 3,412,408 and entitled Urinal Attachment for Toilet Bowl. The present application is directed specifically to a number of different embodiments of ducts which extend between said urinal attachment and a conventional toilet bowl into which said duct discharges. The parent application is directed to the construction of the urinal attachment and the combination of the same with supporting means and a flexible, disposable drain duct.

Background of the invention As is recited in detail in the aforementioned parent application, the use of a conventional toilet bowl by a male adult in standing position causes various unsatisfactory results. Among the more notorious and longstanding results are substantial splashing which, while often unnoticed, nevertheless is absorbed by the legs of trousers and such splashings also extend onto the floor and other surrounding articles. Objectionable cascading noise usually accompanies such operation and this can be annoying when exercised under family situations immediately adjacent sleeping quarters. Still further, from the economic standpoint, it is a known fact that approximately 5 gallons of water usually is required to flush a conventional toilet bowl, and the use of this much water to flush a toilet after a single urinary use frequently constitutes a waste of water, especially in times of water scarcity such as occurs in extended periods of dry weather.

Although, heretofore, certain attempts have been made to at least conserve the use of water such as by providing a dual type flushing arrangement usually provided in the flush tank, avoiding the other nuisance-type results under the conditions of use described above have not heretofore been solved to any degree. of satisfaction.

Summary of the invention It is the prinicipal purpose of the present invention to provide an effective, sanitary, inexpensive and easily operated urinal attachment for use in conjunction with conventional toilet bowls and which is capable of being 3,500,480 Patented Mar. 17, 1970 installed easily relative to existing toilet bowls and flush tanks so as to provide relatively noiseless use thereof, adequate flushing means, and particularly to provide sanitary, expendable and easily disposable inexpensive ducts extending downward from a small bowl arrangement comprising part of the urinal attachment and anchored adjacent the rim of a normal toilet bowl but being of a fiat nature so as to be readily positioned within the very low space normally occurring between a conventional toilet seat and the rim of a toilet bowl to which it is attached.

Another object of the invention is to provide a bowllike urinal arrangement of relatively small size and adjustably positionable with respect to the flush tank of a standard plumbing installation in a bathroom so as to be positionable suitably for different heights of individuals in order that the same might be used for urinary purposes without noisy results of any kind and also affording complete and effective. discharge of all liquid, including flushing liquid, whereby under normal conditions, the discharge end of the relatively flat, and collapsible type duct may extend into the toilet bowl in such manner that any discharge therefrom into the bowl likewise is accomplished quietly.

A further object of the invention is to provide several embodiments of inexpensive, disposable but highly effective drain ducts which, in initial conduction, maybe fiat so as to be compactly rolled or folded and thereby permit compact storage and packaging for appropriate merchandising, and several different embodiments of means for attaching the duct to the urinal attachment and a toilet bowl are provided in accordance with the principles of the invention.

Details of the invention and the foregoing objects thereof, as well as other objects thereof are set forth in the following specification and illustarted in the accompanying drawings comprising a part thereof.

Brief description of the drawings FIG. 1 is a perspective view showing an exemplary embodiment of urinal attachment incorporating the principles of the present invention and illustrated as being connected to a conventional toilet bowl and flush tank, shown in phantom, by one embodiment of bracket means utilizing the principles of the invention.

FIG. 2 illustrates, fragmentarily, portions of another embodiment of bracket means shown in association with fragmentarily illustrated portions of a conventional toilet bowl and flush tank of the type shown in FIG. 1.

FIGS. 3 and 4 respectively are perspective views, respectively illustrating the urinal attachment of the type shown in FIG. 1 extended to operative position and shown selectively as being supported adjacent either the left-hand or right-hand sides of a conventional toilet bowl and flush tank.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary view similar to FIG. 2 and illustrating still another embodiment of supporting means for the bracket assembly of the type shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is an exploded view showing, in phantom, portions of a conventional flush tank having water discharge means used for finishing the urinal attachment comprising the present invention connected thereto.

FIG. 7 is an enlarged side elevation of a spacing member of the type used in the arrangement shown in 'FIG. 6 for accommodating the water discharge mechanism to a conventional flush tank.

FIG. 8 is an exploded view of one embodiment of urinal attachment employing the principles of the present invention and illustrating the individual components thereof primarily in vertical sectional manner, the drain duct of this elevation being cut away to partially foreshorten the length thereof.

FIG. 9 is a vertical elevation showing a preferred arrangement of supporting bracket means capable of vertical adjustment relative to a fragmentarily illustrated vertical support member.

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary elevation of a conventional water supply means for a typical type of flush tank commercially available and showing means to connect thereto one embodiment of water supply means for a urinal attachment.

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of another embodiment of urinal bowl attachment employing the principles of the present invention and showing the water conduit fragmentarily.

FIG. 12 is a front elevation of an exemplary type of cabinet-like enclosure for the major portion of the urinal attachment embodying the present invention and illustrated in operative position with respect to a fragmentary portion of an exemplary flush tank shown in phantom.

FIGS. 13, 14 and 15 respectively are plan views of different embodiments of exemplary disposable flexible drain ducts all made in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

FIGS. 16 and 17 respectively are front and side views 4 of an exemplary type of attaching clamp for detachable engagement by any of the embodiments of flexible disposable drain ducts to secure the lower end thereof in operative position with respect to a conventional toilet bowl, the scale employed in FIGS. 16 and 17 being substantially greater than that in the preceding figures.

FIG. 18 is a side elevation showing exemplary means for connecting the urinal flushing conduit to a toilet bowl installation of the type using pressure water rather than a flush tank.

Though the present invention comprises a division of the overall combination described and claimed in said parent application Ser. No. 562,349, in order to understand the full significance, benefits and details of structures and operation thereof which comprise the subject matter of the instant application, it is necessary to provide a description of the details of the urinal attachment with which the various embodiments of flexible, disposable lining and duct arrangements are used, which arrangements comprise an essential part of the structures and combinations described and claimed in said parent application. Because of classification restrictions, however, division has been required between the overall urinal attachment arrangement and the duct embodiments per se, whereby the present application has been filed to protect these essential duct embodiments which are described and claimed herein as being a separate, merchandisable item embodying both novelty and extensive usefulness.

Primarily for purposes of readily distinguishing the essential parts of the present invention from conventional toilet facilities with which the urinal attachment of the present invention is associated, throughout the figures of the application, conventional equipment has, in general, been illustrated in phantom, whereas the details of the various embodiments of elements and assemblies of mechanism comprising the present invention are shown in full lines. Referring to FIGS. 1, 3 and 4, there is illustrated therein, in phantom a conventional toilet bowl 10. Connected to the rearward portion thereof in accordance with customary procedure and structure, and extending preferably upward therefrom is a conventional flush tank 12 upon which a removable cover 14 is mounted. Operation of the conventional flushing equipment within the tank 12 is effected by means of movable lever 16 shown in FIG. 1.

One embodiment of the present invention is illustrated in different positions in the perspective views shown in FIGS. 1, 3 and 4. These illustrations include one embodiment of relative simple and highly utilitarian bracket mechanism, details of which are described hereinafter. The urinal attachment illustrated in these figures primarily comprises a structure generally designated as a urinal bowl 18 which comprises a plurality of different elements which also are described in detail hereinafter. The embodiment of bracket means 20 shown in these figures permits movement of the urinal bowl 18 from the substantially retracted, inoperative position thereof shown in FIG. 1, respectively to several extended operative posi-- tions shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, these views also showing the versatility of the srtucture by the arrangement in FIG. 3 being shown mounted adjacent the left-hand side of the flush tank 12 while, in FIG. 4, the urinal bowl 1 8 is mounted adjacent the righthand side of the flush tank 12.

Extending from the lower, discharge end of the urinal bowl 18 is a preferably flexible, disposable drain duct 22, of which there are a plurality of different embodiments respectively illustrated in FIGS. 13-15. In FIGS. 1, 3 and 4, the duct 22 is of the type shown either in FIGS. 13 and 14, as desired.

For purposes of attaching the urinal bowl 18 to flush tank 12, regardless of which specific embodiment thereof is involved, a number of different embodiments of bracket means 20 are employed. Considering in particular the specific bracket arrangement shown in FIGS. 1, 3, and 4, it will be seen that a vertical hanger 24 has a hook 26 at the upper end thereof which extends over the upper edge of one side of the flush tank 12. The lower end 28 of hanger 24 extends horizontally beneath the bottom of flush tank 12 and has a clamping screw 30 threadably connected therewith for clamping engagement against the bottom of tank 12, thereby fixedly securing hanger 24 with respect to the tank.

As best shown in FIG. 4, a pair of horizontal parallel bracket arms 32 are pivotally connected at one end respectively to appropriate extensions on vertical hanger 24, the same being braced by vertical member 34 extending therebetween and connected at its opposite ends respectively thereto. Pivotally connected to the outer ends of bracket arms 32 is a U-shaped bracket 35, the bight portion thereof having suitable lateral extensions thereon which are directly pivotally connected to the outer ends of the arms 32. Extending between the outer ends of the U-shaped bracket 34 is a vertical rod 38 upon which a supporting block 40, see FIGS. 1 and 3, is slidably movable and positionable thereon at any desired vertical location by means of a one-way clutch 42, details of which are best shown in FIG. 9.

Fixedly connected to block 40 is an L-shaped bracket arm 44, the outer end of which extends laterally and is connected directly to a supporting ring 46 having a laterally projecting ear 48 thereon which directly abuts the outer end of bracket 44 for connection thereto by suitable rivets, screws or the like. The opposite side of supporting ring 46 has an appropriate manipulating handle 50 thereon by means of which the urinal bowl assembly 18 is manipulated for both projecting and retracting lateral movement toward and from flush tank 12.

In retracted position, the arms 32, for example, may be folded backwardly substantially quite close to the adjacent end of the flush tank 12 and the U-shaped bracket 36 similarly is folded, laterally, close to the arms 32, whereby it can be seen that very little space will be consumed by the folded arrangement..When so folded, the entire bracket means 20 and the urinal bowl 18 supported thereby may be housed within an appropriate enclosure such as cabinet 52, shown in FIG. 12.

Said cabinet preferably has readily operable front door 54 hinged thereto and an operating knob 56 facilitates the operation thereof to open and close the door. When the door is opened, handle 50 on supporting ring 46 is engaged by the operator, and the bracket means 20 may be manipulated to readily extend the urinal bowl 18 to any desired extended position permitted within the range of movement of the various elements of the bracket means. When retracted into the cabinet 52, however, the urinal bowl 18 and its supporting bracket means 20 ofiers no obstruction to normal use of the toilet bowl for customary purposes.

Several other embodiments of proposed supporting bracket means, in addition to those specifically illustrated in FIGS. 1, 3 and 4, respectively are shown in FIGS. 2 and 5. Referring to FIG. 2, a vertical post 58 preferably has a suction cup 60 or the like in engagement with the floor adjacent the toilet bowl 10, the post 58 having an appropriate bracket 62 adjacent the upper end thereof for clamping attachment to one edge of the rear portion of the toilet bowl 10 as clearly shown in FIG. 2. Extending laterally from post 58 is a bracket arm 64 to which, for example, the lower end of vertical hanger 24 of the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1, 3 and 4 may be connected suitably and thereby dispense with the clamping lower end 28 of vertical hanger 24.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 5, the bracket arrangement therein also contemplates a vertical post 66 having a suction cup 68, for example, on the lower end thereof for engagement with the floor adjacent the toilet bowl 10, the upper end of post 66 having an appropriate vertically movable abutting member engaging the lower surface of flush tank 12 frictionally, either by means of a coiled spring within the post 66 which, for example, may be hollow to accommodate the same, or otherwise. A lateral arm 70 is adjustably positionable upon post 66 for appropriate connection to the lower end of vertical hanger 24 of the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1-4, for example, said bracket being connected thereto by any suitable means.

Referring to FIG. 8, wherein an exploded illustration of a number of elements comprising one embodiment of urinal bowl 18 is shown, it will be seen that said embodiment comprises a circular or endless tube-like member 72, which may be molded from appropriate plastic material, cast from metal, or otherwise. The vertical dimension of the tube is relatively short compared with the diameter thereof, whereby the same primarily comprises a collar having an enlarged upper end which projects radially inward and is hollow to provide an annular cavity 74 therein. An inlet nozzle 76 communicates with the interior of cavity 74, and, preferably, a plurality of circular rows of inwardly and downwardly directed discharge ports are formed either by molding, drilling or otherwise.

Arranged in circumferentially spaced relationship on the inner surface of the lower portion of tube-like member 72 are a plurality of somewhat sloping projections 80 which comprise part of an interrupted ring which are engageable with similar sloping projecting members 82 formed on the exetrior of clamping ring 84 which is complementary to the inner surface of the lower portion of tube-like member 72 and is sufliciently long to project a short distance below the lower edge of member 72 when connected thereto so as to permit manual engagement thereof for connection and disconnection relative to member 72. The lower portion of clamping ring 84 also tapers gradually toward its lower edge so as to be received in complementary manner against a suitable inner surface 86 of supporting ring 46, such engagement preferably including reasonable frictional contact so as to releasably but suitably support the urinal bowl assembly 18, comprising the above-described elements, with respect to the bracket 44.

For purposes of affording transmission of liquids from the urinal bowl 18 to the toilet bowl 10, the present invention provides a number of embodiments of flexible, waterimpervious disposable drain ducts 22, one exemplary embodiment of which is shown in FIG. 8, including one preferred means for connecting the upper end thereof to the clamping ring 84 which supports the upper end of the duct or the additional embodiment of supporting band 108 shown in FIG. 10 and described in detail hereinafter. In addition to the exemplary embodiment of supporting duct 22 shown in FIG. 8, further specifically different embodiments thereof are shown respectively in FIGS.

12-14, which various embodiments each afford their own particular advantages over the other embodiments but all of the same incorporating the basic principles of the present invention.

Further to the present advantages of the use of the flexible, disposable ducts 22 in general, it has been set forth hereinabove that among the major advantages are the elimination of sound of splashing liquids at the point of contact thereof with the duct 22 which, in addition to actually serving in a conducting function for the liquid, also serves as a liner for the supporting means engaged by the duct at the upper end thereof, whereby said supporting means is protected against any corrosive action of the splashing liquid. Minimizing of splashing of liquids outside of the urinary attachment also is another major objective. In addition to the foregoing, however, the following highly desirable benefits result from the use of such type of duct.

The flat nature of the duct enables it to extend through the very low or short space normally provided between the upper rim of a conventional toilet bowl and seat mounted adjacent the same, whereby no rearrangement of the standard equipment is necessary. The duct 22 is readily capable of being formed from inexpensive synthetic resins and the like which are corrosion and chemical resistant, as well as being of a tough nature to resist accidental harsh treatment by children, for example. Further, the entire duct may be readily installed and removed very simply and under sanitary conditions.

In the preferred construction of the disposable drain ducts described in detail hereinafter and illustrated in FIGS. 8 and 11-14, they can be formed from reasonably thin and tough plastic material of sheet-like nature, preferably by being heat-sealed, especially if initially formed from sheet material folded upon itself and sealed, to form a tubelike construction. Such sheet material, being relatively thin, is capable of being disposed in very flat condition, substantially only paper-thin, whereby it may be folded or rolled into extremely compact condition. The upper ends of any of the embodiments of duct, when mounted operatively upon the urinal bowl 18, extend upwardly through the clamping ring 84 and a limited amount of said upper end, such as about 1" or more, is folded downwardly and outwardly over the upper edge of ring 84, as illustrated in exemplary manner in FIG. 9.

If preferred, interengageable snap-fasteners, not shown, may be used to effect such connection, either in conjunction with or in lieu of the means described in detail immediately above.

When so arranged, the clamping ring 84 then may be moved upwardly into the lower portion of member 72 until the projections and 82 are interdigitated and then moved relative to each other circumferentially a short distance sufliciently to lock the clamping ring 84 de tachably with respect to member 72. This simultaneously clamps the upper end of the disposable drain duct 22 operatively with respect to the urinal bowl 18. The lower part of member 72 preferably is sufficiently long to obscure the folded edges of ducts 22. When said arrangement is secured, it may be lowered into the supporting ring 46 on bracket 44, for support thereby. The provision of the ring 46 additionally affords comfort in changing the drain ducts by making it unnecessary to stoop or bend while doing so. The height of ring 46 permits a person to stand erectly while exchanging the ducts.

The lower, discharge end of ,drain duct 22, which normally may be in relatively flat condition, thereby actually comprising a flattened tube, is disposed an appropriate distance into the interior of toilet bowl 10 as shown, for example, in FIGS. 3 and 4, whereby the same discharges directly into toilet bowl 10. Due to the relatively flexible nature and light weight of the drain duct 22, it necessarily must be secured against accidental dislodgement of the discharge end 90 thereof from Within the toilet bowl 10. To accomplish this, an appropriate auxiliary clamp 92, somewhat resembling a bicycle pants clamp, and made preferably of appropriate erosion-resistant metal, plastic material or the like, is suitably shaped so as to be engageable at a desired location upon the rim of a toilet bowl 10, as shown in exemplary manner in FIGS. 3 and 4.

The clamp 92 has an appropriate headed securing member 94 thereon. Along one edge of the flattened drain duct 22 is an attaching tab 96 which may be formed from the same material as the drain duct but preferably of slightly thicker gauge sheet material. The tab 96 is attached such as by heat-sealing or cement to said edge of duct 22 and the outer end of the tab is provided with an appropriate slot 98 which is extended over the securing member 94 in a manner similar to extending a button through a button hole so as to detachably secure the discharge end 90 of the duct 22 in desirable position within the toilet bowl 10.

Further, in accordance with the principles of the invention and by reference to FIGS. 13 and 14, wherein slightly different embodiments of the ducts 22 are shown and respectively identified as duct 22 and 22', it will be seen that a series of slots 98 are formed in longitudinally spaced relationship along one edge of said ducts respectively upwardly from the discharge ends 90 and 90' thereof. If preferred, suitable grommets, not shown, may be used in lieu of slots 98 or suitable snap-fastening means may be used on the ducts and clamp 92, such as the type widely used on garments. By such an arrangement, after the preferred vertical position of the urinal bowl 18 has been established with respect to the vertical rod 38 of the bracket means 20, for example, the discharge end of the duct is established in operative relationship with respect to the toilet bowl so as preferably not to have any sag in the duct of such nature that any portion thereof, especially during use, is below the level of the upper edge of toilet bowl Toefiect such desired adjustment in longitudinal position of the duct 22 or 22' with respect to the bracket 92 and its securing member 94, a desired slot 98 of either of the embodiments of drain duct which are employed is selected for attachment to the securing member 94. Under such circumstances, if there is an undue length of the discharge end of the duct extending into the toilet bowl [0, such excessive amount readily may be removed by scissors or a knife.

1 Due to the fact that the urinal bowl 18 preferably should be of the order of within the range of between 5 and 6 inches in diameter for convenient use, it is obvious that the upper, entrance end of the ducts 22 and 22 must be of complementary circumference. Particularly to facilitate the manufacturing thereof, the two embodiments shown respectively in FIGS. 13 and 14 embody only a limited taper of the duct between the inlet ends thereof and the opposite discharge ends 90 and 90 thereof. As mentioned in the foregoing, the cut edges of the folded sheet material may be connected by heat-sealing cement, or the like and, similarly, any extra strip which is to contain the slots 98 also may be attached thereto by the aame means. However, as shown in FIG. 14, a relatively wide band 100 may extend along one edge of the duct 22', the same being formed by heat-sealing the two adiacent edges of the opposite sides of the duct together for a reasonable width, thereby forming a double thickness area within which the slots 98 readily may be formed.

Ducts of the type shown in FIGS. 13 and 14, which .ncidentally are also shown in FIGS. 1, 3 and 4, might :onceivably be too wide for convenient discharge from he urinal bowl to the toilet bowl in that excess width of ;aid ducts might cause at least a certain amount of ac- :umulation of residue thereinwhich could contribute to objectionable odors, even after the ducts have been flushed. Accordingly, a further embodiment of duct 22" is ;hown in FI G. 15 wherein the entrance end 102 is substantially as wide as the entrance end of the embodiment shown in FIGS. 13 and 14, but said entrance end then substantially tapers inwardly a short distance beyond the upper, wide terminal end to a narrow width which continues to the discharge end An attaching strip 106 for engagement with member 94 is formed with a plurality of slots 98 engageable with the headed securing member 94 of the bracket 92.

Another embodiment of means for attaching the entrance end of the drain duct 22 to the urinal bowl is illustrated in FIG. 11. In said figure, the bowl comprises a preferaby slightly tapered sheet-like band 108 which is circular in cross-section and, in function as well as in shape, somewhat resembles the clamping ring 84 of the embodiment of urinal bowl shown in FIG. 8. Actually, the tapered band 108 resembles a short tube having a vertical dimension substantially less than the diameter. An attaching ear 110 extends radially therefrom, for example, for connection to the bracket 44 as in the embodiment shown in FIG. 1.

The upper end of the duct 22 is complementary circumfereutially to the inner surface of the band 108 which actually comprises the urinalbowl and extends upwardly therethrough a limited distance to permit the terminal upper end of the duct 22 to extend downwardly, externally, over the upper end of the band 108. A suitable securing means such as a wide rubber band 112 may be employed at least initially to position the duct with respect to band 108.

Further to clamp the upper end of duct 22 relative to band 108, a dual purpose annular tube 114 is provided which has an endless passage therein to receive water from inlet tube or pipe 116. If desired, a suitable notch, not shown, may be formed in the upper edge of band 108 to accommodate tube 116 if desired to have it extend radially outward from tube 114. Annular tube 114 has a series of water spray ports 118 formed therein, directed preferably inwardly and downwardly as illustrated in FIG. 11 to flush the inner surface of the urinal bowl which actually comprises the tapered band 108 which is lined with the upper end of the drain duct 22. Circular tube 114 also is closely complementary to the inner diameter of the upper end of the band 108 so that it can wedgingly and frictionally engage the inner surface of the duct 22 adjacent the upper end of band 108 and thereby serve in a second capacity to complete the clamping of the duct with respect to the urinal bowl while simultaneously serving to flush the inner surface thereof.

Referring to FIG. 6, wherein a conventional flush tank 12 is shown in phantom, the conventional water supplying means therefor also is shown therein in phantom. The normal water level 120 is illustrated in exemplary manner in FIG. 6. Water is introduced to the tank 12 by pipe 122 which extends through the bottom of the tank and is connected to a suitable source of supply under pressure. Flow control valve 124 is connected to the top of pipe 122, said valve being controlled in actuation by a conventional float lever 126 having the usual float on the other end thereof as illustrated in FIG. 6.

Following a normal flushing operation of toilet bowl 10, the entire water content of tank 112 is drained for discharge into said bowl 10. After this occurs, the outlet valve -for tank 12, not shown, is closed and at that time valve 124 is open due to the float on the end thereof being depressed into tank 12. While the tank is filling approximately to the level 120, a limited amount of water flows through an auxiliary pipe 128, such as shown in FIG. 10. Said pipe 128 is of limited diameter and the discharge enters pipe 130 which communicates with the conventional gooseneck passage, not shown, in the lower part of toilet bowl 10 for purposes of establishing a conventional water seal therein. This arrangement is required due to the fact that the discharge from the toilet bowl frequently occurs with such force and efficiency that water normally remaining in the gooseneck trap is drawn therefrom into the sewer. In order to re-establish the water seal, the aforementioned discharge of water through pipe 120 into the seal is provided. This arrangement is used to advantage in connection with providing flush means for the urinal bowl 18, several embodiments of the flush means being illustrated in the drawings and described as follows.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 6, the conventional auxiliary pipe 128, such as shown in FIG. 10, is replaced by a short tube or pipe 130 and is connected to valve 124 in place of said conventional pipe 128. The pipe 130 extends to a T 132, the stem of which has a short tube 134 extending therefrom intopipe 130, while the other branch of T 132 communicates with a flexible tube 136 of appropriate length to permit the outer end thereof to be connected to the inlet nozzle 76 on member 72 of the embodiment of urinal bowl assembly shown in FIG. 8. Any suitable form of control valve may be included in tube 136 to control the flow of water therethrough, such as either a simple pinchcock 138 or a more sophisticated type of valve, not shown, but preferably manually operable.

In order that the tube 136 may be installed in conventional type flush tanks 12, particularly so as to extend over the upper edge of the tank and not be pinched by the cover 14, it is contemplated that the present invention employ a plurality of small button-like projections 140, an enlarged view of one of which is shown in FIG. 7 and several of which are shown in FIG. 6 attached to the upper edge of flush tank 12, such as adjacent the corners thereof, so as to elevate the cover 14 sufficiently to permit passage of the tube 136 over the upper edge of one side of tank 12, for example. By such an arrangement, after the normal flushing of the toilet bowl 10 has been completed, for example, and also after the tank 12 has been refilled to its normal level 120, the supplementary discharge of water from valve 124 for purposes of insuring the filling of the gooseneck water trap in the bottom part of toilet bowl 10 also is used partially to flush the urinal bowl. This is accomplished by part of the water, which normally would be discharged into pipe 130, being diverted to tube 136 for discharge into the annular cavity 74 to flush the interior of the urinal bowl assembly through the discharge ports 78 in member 72.

Such flushing of the urinal bowl flushes down the inner surface of the bowl which actually comprises the inner surface of the upper end of drain duct 22, for example. The interior of the drain duct likewise will be flushed and all of the flushed material will be discharged into toilet bowl 10, thereby aiding in re-establishing the water seal in the lower part of toilet bowl 10. In effect, therefore, such arrangements merely divides the water intended for the water seal in the gooseneck of the toilet bowl and forms the same actually from opposite ends of the water seal. Obviously, during the flushing of the urinal bowl 18, the valve 138 must be open. Further, under most conditions of operations, excepting for those mentioned hereinafter, the valve 138 may be in open condition at all times, for practical purposes except, for example, when replacing the duct 22 within the urinal bowl.

Referring to FIG. 18, it will be seen that the urinal flushing arrangements of the invention also may be connected to flushing systems of the pressure type now commonly used in hotels, motels and oifice buildings. In the pressure-type of flush system, water at city pressure is supplied to valve 141 which delivers water under pressure through conduit 141a to toilet bowl 10. Simply by drilling and tapping conduit 141a and inserting a threaded nipple therein, shown in FIG. 18, the inlet end of tube 116 or 136 may be connected to said nipple to receive flushing water therethrough. Thus, at least whenever the toilet bowl is flushed, the urinal bowl also will be flushed. Obviously, the urinal bowl also may be flushed, at will, by operating valve 141, this also flushing toilet bowl 10 as well.

A dual purpose cap or cover 142, which is cup-shaped, is illustrated in cross-section in FIG. 8 and also is shown in operative, covering position in FIG. 1. The cover 142 also preferably has a handle 144 thereon to aid in manipulating the same and especially in moving it from bowlcovering position as shown in FIG. 1, to inverted position, removed from the urinal bowl 18, as shown in FIG. 4. The cover may be formed, for example, by molding from plastic material. When the cover is in covering relationship to the urinal bowl 18, it serves several functions such as preventing the emanation of any odor from the urinal bowl. It also insures against any splashing from the bowl during flushing thereof. A still further function of the cover is to serve as a container for a sufiicient amount of water, obtained from a wash basin, for example, which usually is adjacent the normal toilet facility. In the absence of any automatic flushing arrangement such as illustrated in FIG. 6, for example, or in addition thereto, the cover 142, when used as a cup, may be used to perform a satisfactory manual flushing of the urinal bowl and main duct 22.

Still another arrangement of automatic flushing arrangement is illustrated in FIG. 10 wherein the inlet tube 116 is connected to the end Of the normal auxiliary pipe 128 conventionally carried by control valve 124 on the upper end of water delivery pipe 122 within the flush tank 12. The pipe 122 is shown in exemplary manner in FIG. 10 as being unconnected to tank 12 but it will be understood that the operation thereof is in conjunction with the flush tank 12 under normal conditions. Float lever 126 operates in the usual manner and, upon the completion of the filing of the flush tank 12 to its exemplary normal level 120 shown in FIG. 6, a supplementary amount of water will be discharged through the conventional auxiliary pipe 120.

Normally the water discharging from pipe 120 would be introduced into the pipe 130 shown in FIG. 6 for filling the water trap in the gooseneck in the lower part of toilet bowl 10. In the arrangement shown in FIG. 11, tube 116, which is illustrated in broken manner therein, to foreshorten the same, is directly connected to the outlet end of auxiliary pipe 128, whereby all of such auxiliary discharge passes into the annular flushing tube 114 to flush the embodiment of urinal bowl illustrated in FIG. 11 but the flushing water in any event discharges to the toilet bowl 10 and thereby flows into the sump therein comprising the water seal in the gooseneck portion of the toilet bowl. The final rising movement of the float lever 126, during normal operation of a conventional water tank mechanism, discontinues the discharge of supplementary water through the auxiliary pipe 128 after a predetermined amount has flowed therethrough. While the flushing of the embodiment of urinal bowl shown in FIG. 11 occurs, the cover 142 of the embodiment shown in FIG. 8, for example, may be placed over the upper end of the urinal bowl, especially to minimize any tendency toward splashing.

Notwithstanding the fact that flushing of the urinal bowl and especially the inner surface thereof, which is primarily composed of the upper end of the disposable drain ducts 122 or variations thereof, it is recognized that flushing alone by water is not suflicient to ultimately prevent the occurrence of objectionable odor. The time interval required to reach this condition varies normally in accordance with individual use of the urinal bowl and the care exercisedin conjunction with flushing the same. Likewise, care in regard to using the urinal bowl has an effect upon how soon the bowl and drain duct will discharge odor to the extent that it becomes objectionable.

The present invention, therefore, contemplates ready means for replacing the readily disposable drain duct 22 and its variations such as those shown in detail in FIGS. 13-15. Such replacement and especially the removal of a contaminated duct is accomplished with a minimum of effort and under generally sanitary conditions. For example, in regard to the embodiment shown in FIG. 8, it is only necessary to detach the clamping ring 84 from 11 member 72 and while holding the exterior part of the lower portion of ring 84, the upper end of duct 22, which is folded over ring 84, is raised upwardly and over the upper edge of said clamping ring. While still holding the ring 84 by the outer surface thereof in one hand, the operator engages the outer surface of the upper end portion of duct 82 with the other hand and pulls it through ring 84. Then, by using a paper napkin, paper towel or otherwise, if necessary, the slot 98 in attaching tab 96 which has been engaging the headed securing member 94 on clamp 92 secured to toilet bowl is disengaged therefrom and the lower discharge end 90 of the drain duct 22 is pulled from the toilet bowl 10 and the entire duct is disposed within a suitable piece of discardable paper such as newspaper, paper towel or the like with a minimum amount of unsantiary contact of the used duct by the hand of the operator. Following such removal of the used duct, a new duct is mounted in place relative to both the urinal bowl and toilet bowl by the procedure outlined above. a

In the embodiment of urinal bowl shown in FIG. 11, it is merely necessary to unclamp the upper end of the used duct 22 bypulling the annular tube 114 therefrom-removing rubber band 112, and while still engaging the outer surface ofthe upper end portion of the used duct 22, pull the same from the band 108 comprising the main portion of that embodiment of urinal and after the lower end portion of the used drain duct is removed from the securingmember 94, the entire used duct may be removed and discarded in the manner described above with respect to the embodiment shown in FIG. 8.

I claim:

1. A flexible plastic disposable duct connectable to a urinal bowl attachme'nt a'rranged to be mounted adjacent a toilet bowl at a level above the upper rim of said toilet how], one end of said duct comprising an inlet end shaped to extend continuously around the urinal, bowl and be clamped thereto in water-tight relationship for support thereby, the opposite end of said duct comprising a relatively flat discharge end and said duct also being suificiently long to extend downward from said urinal attachment to the interior of a toilet bowl with which it is associated toconduct liquid from the urinal bowl to said toilet bowl for discharge into the latter from said dis. charge end of said duct, and positioning means extending longitudinally along said duct adjacent said discharge end thereof and including a series of engaging means complementary and attachable to securing means on a toilet bowl to prevent accidental removal of the discharge end of said duct from within said toilet bowl.

2. The disposable duct according to claim 1 in which said engaging means comprises a series of similar short 'slots.

3. The disposable duct according to claim 2 further including an elongated strip attached to said one side edge of said duct adjacent said discharge end thereof and said strip having said slots formed therein.

4. The disposable d-uct according to claim 2 in which 1 said duct further includes an attaching band extending along one side edge of said duct and comprising an area which is tlr'cker than the walls of said duct and in which area said row of slots are formed.

5. The disposable duct according to claim 1 in which said duct is sufiiciently wide at the entrance end thereof to extend around the urinal bowl to which it is attachable and intermediately of;the ends of said duct the width is substantially reduced and said reduced width continues substantially uniformly to the discharge end of said duct, such portion of said duct of reduced Width having an attaching strip of limited length attached thereto along one edge and said strip having a series of engaging openings therein comprising said positioning means attachable to securing means on a toilet bowl.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS SAMUEL RQTHBERG, Primary Examiner HENRY K. ARTIS, Assistant Examiner Us. 01. X.-R.

4 1;13s 12s, 177, 17s

US3500480D 1966-07-01 1968-07-30 Urinal attachment for toilet bowl Expired - Lifetime US3500480A (en)

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US74879768A true 1968-07-30 1968-07-30

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Cited By (47)

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US3822419A (en) * 1972-10-16 1974-07-09 C Wilson Urine conveyer
US4137579A (en) * 1977-12-20 1979-02-06 Soler Peter S Urine drain
US4180875A (en) * 1978-05-16 1980-01-01 Wilson Porter C Urine disposal bypass unit
US4282611A (en) * 1980-07-11 1981-08-11 O Day Gerald L Sanitary urinal
US4490863A (en) * 1981-12-04 1985-01-01 Pate Grover C Portable hand-held urine disposal system for residential structures
US4524500A (en) * 1982-03-24 1985-06-25 Societe Anonyme Des Produits Ceramiques De Touraine Process for converting a ceramic toilet commode intended to be supplied with an independent water supply pipe into a toilet commode adapted to be supplied with water by an associated tank
US4549321A (en) * 1985-03-18 1985-10-29 Roger Douillard Urinal
US4683598A (en) * 1986-07-07 1987-08-04 Jones Kathleen K Urinal for use by females
US4763694A (en) * 1987-08-28 1988-08-16 Henderson Lillie M Particle retainer cup for riser pipes
US4932083A (en) * 1989-06-12 1990-06-12 Arozena Andrew A Insert urinal compartment for toilet bowls
US4982455A (en) * 1988-05-12 1991-01-08 Carter Marjorie H Automatically concealed urinal
US4985940A (en) * 1989-11-17 1991-01-22 Jones Kathie K Urinal for use by female individuals
US5050248A (en) * 1990-08-21 1991-09-24 Carlo Olivero Combination toilet and urinal
US5153947A (en) * 1991-08-13 1992-10-13 Markles Elmer C Urinal for attachment to a toilet
US5276925A (en) * 1992-12-17 1994-01-11 Frank Blaha Retractable urinal for toilet seat
US5299328A (en) * 1992-03-25 1994-04-05 Wayne Walega Water closet with retractable urinal
US5345619A (en) * 1993-09-09 1994-09-13 Richard Harrington Combination toilet and swivel urinal
US5390374A (en) * 1993-06-21 1995-02-21 Hubrig; Sylvan E. Water-conserving urinal
DE4343789A1 (en) * 1993-11-22 1995-05-24 Heinz Roempke Tubular guide for urine spray prevention
DE4411824A1 (en) * 1994-03-07 1995-09-14 Klara Jahn Urinating aid for women
WO1995027105A1 (en) * 1992-03-25 1995-10-12 Wayne Walega Water closet with retractable urinal
US5465431A (en) * 1994-09-01 1995-11-14 Wertz; Carl F. Boy's urinal trainer for a toilet
WO1996004872A1 (en) * 1994-08-16 1996-02-22 Butler & Hanby, Inc. Ostomy bag cleaning apparatus
US5575020A (en) * 1995-02-17 1996-11-19 Sybrig, Inc. Water-conserving urinal
US5655230A (en) * 1996-01-22 1997-08-12 Corbin; John H. Auxiliary urinal retrofit for a commode
FR2744746A1 (en) * 1996-02-12 1997-08-14 Larroque Max Temporary or permanent urinal for all sizes of toilet or bathroom
DE19608998A1 (en) * 1996-03-08 1997-09-11 Manfred Ess Male urinating aid for toilets
US5737779A (en) * 1995-09-19 1998-04-14 Haddock; Robert H. Hand held movable urinal assembly
US5819331A (en) * 1997-04-14 1998-10-13 Miuccio; Edward Urinal attachment for a toilet
US6154891A (en) * 1999-12-10 2000-12-05 Wilson; Evelyn E Urine tube
US20040172780A1 (en) * 2003-03-07 2004-09-09 Benton Robin E. Cleaning brush for child's drinking cup sports bottles long straws adult containers and manufacturing method thereof
US20050172386A1 (en) * 2004-02-09 2005-08-11 Mcaleenan Patrick M.Jr. Portable fluid collection device for toilet bowl with splash guards
US20060096016A1 (en) * 2004-11-09 2006-05-11 Nancy Krowl Ostomy bag emptying accessory for use with a toilet
US20100037379A1 (en) * 2008-08-14 2010-02-18 Richard Brian Hanson Interchangeable toilet tank with urinal
US20100223720A1 (en) * 2009-03-03 2010-09-09 Mahendra Nagindas Mehta Power operated urinal apparatus for a commode.
US20100275358A1 (en) * 2009-05-01 2010-11-04 Burch Michael L Pivotal Floor Mounted Low Flow Urinal Design Such as Incorporated into Water Inlet and Drain Lines of an Existing Toilet and Including Stanchion Support
US20110072569A1 (en) * 2009-09-30 2011-03-31 Kishor Chandra Desai Toilet for handicapped and normal people
CN103120568A (en) * 2011-11-17 2013-05-29 李国健 Male urinal attached to water closet
US8484770B2 (en) 2009-09-30 2013-07-16 Kishor C. Desai Toilet for the disabled
US20130265720A1 (en) * 2012-04-09 2013-10-10 Tyco Electronics Raychem Bvba Heat dissipation device for telecommunications equipment
DE202013009952U1 (en) 2013-10-28 2013-11-20 Hakan Gülay Woman underpants with which a woman can urinate while standing
US9194115B1 (en) * 2002-07-18 2015-11-24 Frank P. Green Mountable urine reservoir
US9605420B1 (en) * 2016-02-04 2017-03-28 Jason Gabriel Berger Universal, attachable urinal
US9637906B1 (en) * 2015-07-14 2017-05-02 Donald Charles Urine attachment for toilets
USD807992S1 (en) 2016-09-09 2018-01-16 Walor, Inc. Urinal
US10179988B2 (en) 2015-09-12 2019-01-15 Walor, Inc. Systems, methods, and devices relating to a urinal
US10865555B2 (en) * 2019-04-16 2020-12-15 Karl Abrahams Emesis funnel assembly

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DE658993C (en) * 1936-06-20 1938-04-21 Ed Stopp & Co metal sponge
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US2914926A (en) * 1957-04-12 1959-12-01 William E Meagher Ice fishing gear
US2960924A (en) * 1957-11-14 1960-11-22 Frank S Grott Air distributing conduit system for portable air conditioners
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Cited By (56)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3822419A (en) * 1972-10-16 1974-07-09 C Wilson Urine conveyer
US4137579A (en) * 1977-12-20 1979-02-06 Soler Peter S Urine drain
US4180875A (en) * 1978-05-16 1980-01-01 Wilson Porter C Urine disposal bypass unit
US4282611A (en) * 1980-07-11 1981-08-11 O Day Gerald L Sanitary urinal
US4490863A (en) * 1981-12-04 1985-01-01 Pate Grover C Portable hand-held urine disposal system for residential structures
US4524500A (en) * 1982-03-24 1985-06-25 Societe Anonyme Des Produits Ceramiques De Touraine Process for converting a ceramic toilet commode intended to be supplied with an independent water supply pipe into a toilet commode adapted to be supplied with water by an associated tank
US4549321A (en) * 1985-03-18 1985-10-29 Roger Douillard Urinal
US4683598A (en) * 1986-07-07 1987-08-04 Jones Kathleen K Urinal for use by females
US4763694A (en) * 1987-08-28 1988-08-16 Henderson Lillie M Particle retainer cup for riser pipes
US4982455A (en) * 1988-05-12 1991-01-08 Carter Marjorie H Automatically concealed urinal
US4932083A (en) * 1989-06-12 1990-06-12 Arozena Andrew A Insert urinal compartment for toilet bowls
US4985940A (en) * 1989-11-17 1991-01-22 Jones Kathie K Urinal for use by female individuals
WO1991007552A1 (en) * 1989-11-17 1991-05-30 Kathie Kidder Jones Urinal for use by female individuals
US5050248A (en) * 1990-08-21 1991-09-24 Carlo Olivero Combination toilet and urinal
US5153947A (en) * 1991-08-13 1992-10-13 Markles Elmer C Urinal for attachment to a toilet
WO1995027105A1 (en) * 1992-03-25 1995-10-12 Wayne Walega Water closet with retractable urinal
US5299328A (en) * 1992-03-25 1994-04-05 Wayne Walega Water closet with retractable urinal
US5276925A (en) * 1992-12-17 1994-01-11 Frank Blaha Retractable urinal for toilet seat
US5390374A (en) * 1993-06-21 1995-02-21 Hubrig; Sylvan E. Water-conserving urinal
US5345619A (en) * 1993-09-09 1994-09-13 Richard Harrington Combination toilet and swivel urinal
DE4343789A1 (en) * 1993-11-22 1995-05-24 Heinz Roempke Tubular guide for urine spray prevention
DE4411824A1 (en) * 1994-03-07 1995-09-14 Klara Jahn Urinating aid for women
US5503633A (en) * 1994-08-16 1996-04-02 Butler & Hanby, Inc. Ostomy bag cleaning apparatus
WO1996004872A1 (en) * 1994-08-16 1996-02-22 Butler & Hanby, Inc. Ostomy bag cleaning apparatus
US5465431A (en) * 1994-09-01 1995-11-14 Wertz; Carl F. Boy's urinal trainer for a toilet
US5575020A (en) * 1995-02-17 1996-11-19 Sybrig, Inc. Water-conserving urinal
US5737779A (en) * 1995-09-19 1998-04-14 Haddock; Robert H. Hand held movable urinal assembly
US5655230A (en) * 1996-01-22 1997-08-12 Corbin; John H. Auxiliary urinal retrofit for a commode
FR2744746A1 (en) * 1996-02-12 1997-08-14 Larroque Max Temporary or permanent urinal for all sizes of toilet or bathroom
DE19608998A1 (en) * 1996-03-08 1997-09-11 Manfred Ess Male urinating aid for toilets
US5819331A (en) * 1997-04-14 1998-10-13 Miuccio; Edward Urinal attachment for a toilet
US6154891A (en) * 1999-12-10 2000-12-05 Wilson; Evelyn E Urine tube
US9194115B1 (en) * 2002-07-18 2015-11-24 Frank P. Green Mountable urine reservoir
US20040172780A1 (en) * 2003-03-07 2004-09-09 Benton Robin E. Cleaning brush for child's drinking cup sports bottles long straws adult containers and manufacturing method thereof
US20050172386A1 (en) * 2004-02-09 2005-08-11 Mcaleenan Patrick M.Jr. Portable fluid collection device for toilet bowl with splash guards
US7043773B2 (en) 2004-02-09 2006-05-16 Mcaleenan Jr Patrick M Portable fluid collection device for toilet bowl with splash guards
US20060096016A1 (en) * 2004-11-09 2006-05-11 Nancy Krowl Ostomy bag emptying accessory for use with a toilet
US20100037379A1 (en) * 2008-08-14 2010-02-18 Richard Brian Hanson Interchangeable toilet tank with urinal
AU2010221703B2 (en) * 2009-03-03 2013-06-20 Mahendra Nagindas Mehta Power operated urinal apparatus for a commode
WO2010101678A1 (en) 2009-03-03 2010-09-10 Mahendra Nagindas Mehta Power operated urinal apparatus for a commode
US20100223720A1 (en) * 2009-03-03 2010-09-09 Mahendra Nagindas Mehta Power operated urinal apparatus for a commode.
EP2404000A4 (en) * 2009-03-03 2015-02-25 Mahendra Nagindas Mehta Power operated urinal apparatus for a commode
US8166579B2 (en) * 2009-03-03 2012-05-01 Mahendra Nagindas Mehta Power operated urinal apparatus for a commode
EP2404000A1 (en) * 2009-03-03 2012-01-11 Mahendra Nagindas Mehta Power operated urinal apparatus for a commode
US20100275358A1 (en) * 2009-05-01 2010-11-04 Burch Michael L Pivotal Floor Mounted Low Flow Urinal Design Such as Incorporated into Water Inlet and Drain Lines of an Existing Toilet and Including Stanchion Support
US8181283B2 (en) * 2009-05-01 2012-05-22 Burch Michael L Pivotal floor mounted low flow urinal
US8484770B2 (en) 2009-09-30 2013-07-16 Kishor C. Desai Toilet for the disabled
US20110072569A1 (en) * 2009-09-30 2011-03-31 Kishor Chandra Desai Toilet for handicapped and normal people
CN103120568A (en) * 2011-11-17 2013-05-29 李国健 Male urinal attached to water closet
US20130265720A1 (en) * 2012-04-09 2013-10-10 Tyco Electronics Raychem Bvba Heat dissipation device for telecommunications equipment
DE202013009952U1 (en) 2013-10-28 2013-11-20 Hakan Gülay Woman underpants with which a woman can urinate while standing
US9637906B1 (en) * 2015-07-14 2017-05-02 Donald Charles Urine attachment for toilets
US10179988B2 (en) 2015-09-12 2019-01-15 Walor, Inc. Systems, methods, and devices relating to a urinal
US9605420B1 (en) * 2016-02-04 2017-03-28 Jason Gabriel Berger Universal, attachable urinal
USD807992S1 (en) 2016-09-09 2018-01-16 Walor, Inc. Urinal
US10865555B2 (en) * 2019-04-16 2020-12-15 Karl Abrahams Emesis funnel assembly

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